The Red Threads of Fortune (Tensorate #2)
The Red Threads of Fortune is one of a pair of unique, standalone introductions to JY Yang's Tensorate Series, which Kate Elliott calls "effortlessly fascinating." For more of the story you can read its twin novella The Black Tides of Heaven, available now.Fallen prophet, master of the elements, and daughter of the supreme Protector, Sanao Mokoya has abandoned the life that once bound her. Once her visions shaped the lives of citizens across the land, but no matter what tragedy Mokoya foresaw, she could never reshape the future. Broken by the loss of her young daughter, she now hunts deadly, sky-obscuring naga in the harsh outer reaches of the kingdom with packs of dinosaurs at her side, far from everything she used to love.On the trail of a massive naga that threatens the rebellious mining city of Bataanar, Mokoya meets the mysterious and alluring Rider. But all is not as it seems: the beast they both hunt harbors a secret that could ignite war throughout the Protectorate. As she is drawn into a conspiracy of magic and betrayal, Mokoya must come to terms with her extraordinary and dangerous gifts, or risk losing the little she has left to hold dear.

The Red Threads of Fortune (Tensorate #2) Details

TitleThe Red Threads of Fortune (Tensorate #2)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 26th, 2017
PublisherTor.com
ISBN-139780765395399
Rating
GenreFantasy, Fiction, Novella, GLBT, Queer, LGBT

The Red Threads of Fortune (Tensorate #2) Review

  • Bradley
    January 1, 1970
    Following the events after the first Tensorate novella, we deal with healing and grief from a different PoV. The other twin.Point of fact, I got into this one a bit more than the previous one because more time was spent inside the skin. Internal dialogue and a very limited time-frame, as well as a more direct plotting, drove this particular novel away from the experimental and into the normal realm of modern storytelling. You might say it's more Aristotelian. That being said, I really enjoyed no Following the events after the first Tensorate novella, we deal with healing and grief from a different PoV. The other twin.Point of fact, I got into this one a bit more than the previous one because more time was spent inside the skin. Internal dialogue and a very limited time-frame, as well as a more direct plotting, drove this particular novel away from the experimental and into the normal realm of modern storytelling. You might say it's more Aristotelian. That being said, I really enjoyed not only the monster hunting bits *naga!* but the nice aside into the subconscious and what drives (or doesn't drive) the power to prophesy.Above all, since it is told from a female PoV but with some heavy reservations about BEING female, for various reasons, it gives extra flavor... but perhaps not quite as much as the first novella. Still, well worth the read.
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  • Shaun Hutchinson
    January 1, 1970
    Even better than the first. This is really a wonderful story of dealing with grief and learning that we're capable of changing even things that seem set in stone.
  • Kaitlin
    January 1, 1970
    This one is the second in the series, and it's more of a monster-hunt than the first book which is a coming of age and resistance story. I think for me personally the monster-hunt element wasn't my favourite, but the themes of the story are still super interesting and there's some great sections which deal with leniency, judgement, and trust. I really enjoy that this is an LGBTQ+ storyline, and I look forward to seeing more of the world in the future novellas too :) 3.5*s for this one from me.
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  • Mary ~Ravager of Tomes~
    January 1, 1970
    Actual Rating: 3.5 StarsHm. Tough one to rate because in a handful of ways I liked this better than the first installment! But something about the connection between the two feels disjointed? It’s somewhat hard to explain. Anyhow, this is still a creative & enjoyable series so far!
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  • K.J. Charles
    January 1, 1970
    I read this in a sitting with its companion novella. They're very different: book 1 covers the best part of 40 years, 2 focuses in on Mokoya after she's lost her child, left her husband, and gone hunting naga (dragons ish) in the desert. All the joys of the first book: set in alt Asia, nonbinary characters, loads of strong women, positive queer and nontraditional relationships abounding, just none of the routine assumptions of so much fantasy, plus a great tale of treachery and monsters and bere I read this in a sitting with its companion novella. They're very different: book 1 covers the best part of 40 years, 2 focuses in on Mokoya after she's lost her child, left her husband, and gone hunting naga (dragons ish) in the desert. All the joys of the first book: set in alt Asia, nonbinary characters, loads of strong women, positive queer and nontraditional relationships abounding, just none of the routine assumptions of so much fantasy, plus a great tale of treachery and monsters and bereavement and healing. I love a book with as much heart as brain. Also the covers, my god. Triumphant. I am completely sold on this series, can't wait for more.
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  • Acqua
    January 1, 1970
    I loved it even more than the first one.The Red Threads of Fortune is set after The Black Tides of Heaven, and it follows Mokoya's PoV. She has left her husband Thennjay in the monastery, and now she's chasing a giant Naga trough the desert with the help of a pack of raptors.Yes, that's not what I expected (giant raptors?), but it works.I loved how this book focused more on the magical creatures. There were some in Black Tides too, but they were never really developed and they definitely weren't I loved it even more than the first one.The Red Threads of Fortune is set after The Black Tides of Heaven, and it follows Mokoya's PoV. She has left her husband Thennjay in the monastery, and now she's chasing a giant Naga trough the desert with the help of a pack of raptors.Yes, that's not what I expected (giant raptors?), but it works.I loved how this book focused more on the magical creatures. There were some in Black Tides too, but they were never really developed and they definitely weren't the focus of the story. This time, we saw a lot of magical, terrifying beasts.This is not only a fast-paced adventure, however. It's also a story about grief. Mokoya wants to stop running away, but at the same time she can't - she lost her daughter a few years ago, and living won't ever be as easy as it was before. As it turns out, she's not the only one grieving, and grief is a monster in his own right.It's a story that also shows how life doesn't end there, even if it may seem that way. Nothing will be the same, but life it's worth it. (Mokoya considers suicide, so trigger warning for that.)I loved Rider. When Mokoya meets them for the first time, they're on the back of a Naga. The two get close really quickly, but it felt natural. The romantic relationships in the first book felt rushed, and I was never really invested in them. This time? I liked Mokoya and Rider as a couple after a chapter of their interactions.I wasn't expecting to love Mokoya so much. I liked her in the first book, but reading in her PoV was a totally different experience. This time there were no time jumps to disconnect me from her or the story. And she changes so much in a short span of time, but it never felt forced.In Red Threads, the magic system is slightly more explored and explained, and now that I understand it more, I love it.Know the ways of the five natures, and you will know the way of the world. For the lines and knots of the Slack are the lines and knots of the world, and all that is shaped is shaped through the twining of the red threads of fortune.I want to see more of this world. While I think that the novella format is right for the story, sometimes I wish there was more of everything - the magic, the creatures, the characters. Because I loved everything I saw, and I can't wait for the next two books.Edit 08/14/18: not much to add, I loved this just as much, but this reread really made me realize how much I love Akeha.
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  • Matthew Quann
    January 1, 1970
    After I finished off the first book in the series, I took the opportunity to read what some other popular review sites had to say about the Tensorate saga. Just about every review had positive things to say about the novellas' unique structure, compelling world building, and exploration of sexual identity and orientation. So, I guess this series just isn't for me?Certainly, The Red Threads of Fortune is my preferred of the two books. Instead of compressing 35 years and two POVs into 160 pages, t After I finished off the first book in the series, I took the opportunity to read what some other popular review sites had to say about the Tensorate saga. Just about every review had positive things to say about the novellas' unique structure, compelling world building, and exploration of sexual identity and orientation. So, I guess this series just isn't for me?Certainly, The Red Threads of Fortune is my preferred of the two books. Instead of compressing 35 years and two POVs into 160 pages, this novella focuses its scope and limits the story to Mokoya's rebellious grief in the wake of The Black Tides of Heaven's conclusion. J. Y. Yang's story benefits from this focus as it makes the world-building feel more manageable than the rapid-fire pace of the first book.Surprisingly, this book's primary effort seemed to be to guide Mokoya through her grief. It is all too often in fantasy and sci-fi that characters will experience extreme trauma only to move on to their ultimate goal, but Yang has the interesting distinction of flipping that trope on its head. Indeed, Mokoya's decision to hunt dragons on giant velociraptors often seems Sisyphean, and one reading of the novella would be that her actions are entirely motivated by her unspoken grief.I think, for me, there's a disconnect between the serious interpersonal subject matter that the characters encounter and giant velociraptors. The juxtaposition between the real and fantastical often works in the genre because the reader is able to buy the world. Again, it's really unfortunate that these books didn't do much for me, but I wouldn't let that deter you from your own reading. I'm almost positive that a lot of you will be head over heels for Yang's world and story. Sadly, these first two novellas just aren't my cup of tea!
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  • Gabrielle
    January 1, 1970
    Treachery, monsters and magic. Oh my!This installment of the Tensorate saga is paced very differently from the first one: “The Black Tides of Heaven” (https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...) covered almost forty years in less than two-hundred pages and “The Red Threads of Fortune” takes place over a few days, which makes it feel a lot more focused (if a bit rushed: I wished both books had been longer). While the first book was more Akeha’s story, we now see the world through the eyes of his tw Treachery, monsters and magic. Oh my!This installment of the Tensorate saga is paced very differently from the first one: “The Black Tides of Heaven” (https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...) covered almost forty years in less than two-hundred pages and “The Red Threads of Fortune” takes place over a few days, which makes it feel a lot more focused (if a bit rushed: I wished both books had been longer). While the first book was more Akeha’s story, we now see the world through the eyes of his twin. And Mokoya’s world is not a happy place at the opening of this story: her gift of foresight has deserted her, her daughter is dead, she has left the confined of the monastery (and her husband) behind to go hunt nagas (big dragon-like creatures). On such a hunt, she meets the enigmatic Rider, who will help her and her fellow hunters to unravel a murderous plot.This story is truly about grief, about the monster that such a thing can be, and about the human need to carry on even when it doesn’t feel like it makes sense. I enjoy the parallels between the Slack and Zen sutras, I feel like Yang approached the idea of undefined gender within their world-building with great skill, and I find said world beautiful and fascinating. But as mentioned, I wish both story-line and world-building had been fleshed out more: two hundred pages just doesn't seem like enough room to discuss Mokoya and Wanbeng's bereavement, the developing relationship with Rider and the struggle of the Machinists against the Tensorate. But the prose is so pretty, and the ideas so fresh that I am more than happy to gloss over that.A great series of beautifully written silkpunk, set in a fantastic universe: I am very excited about the next two books!
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    This book resolved almost all of my issues with the first book in the series!One thing I want to address--this and The Black Tides of Heaven are described as stand-alone novellas. I would STRONGLY recommend reading Black Tides first, even though I think it's a bit weaker than this volume.Now, just what I liked so much about this. Unlike the first book in the Tensorate series, this is a bit more static in its timeline. Where the first book jumped decades, this book is centered around one time and This book resolved almost all of my issues with the first book in the series!One thing I want to address--this and The Black Tides of Heaven are described as stand-alone novellas. I would STRONGLY recommend reading Black Tides first, even though I think it's a bit weaker than this volume.Now, just what I liked so much about this. Unlike the first book in the Tensorate series, this is a bit more static in its timeline. Where the first book jumped decades, this book is centered around one time and place. Since these are novellas, that works in the book's favor. It doesn't feel like you're zooming forward in time. You spend more time with the characters at this one particular point in time, which made them (in my opinion) much more compelling. You get the chance to really spend some time with them, and connect with them in more significant ways than the first book.Additionally, I felt less overwhelmed by the world. This is set primarily in one city (and the surrounding desert), so the book has a more distinct and coherent sense of place.It also felt more thematically consistent. This book explores grief, and because that theme is really the tentpole of this novella, Yang is able to dig in with more nuance. It creates an emotional centerpiece for the novella which works incredibly well.Overall, I REALLY enjoyed this, and I'm excited to continue this series!
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  • James Chatham
    January 1, 1970
    This, along with The Black Tides of Heaven, is an absolutely phenomenal story. From the way Yang combines various influences into a compelling world and society to the way gender and sexuality is treated, you can feel how much care they put into their writing. This novella is more of a monster-hunting story but there's still room for emotional scenes between the characters that pull on your heart-strings and fascinating exposition about how the magic system of this universe works. The Tensorate This, along with The Black Tides of Heaven, is an absolutely phenomenal story. From the way Yang combines various influences into a compelling world and society to the way gender and sexuality is treated, you can feel how much care they put into their writing. This novella is more of a monster-hunting story but there's still room for emotional scenes between the characters that pull on your heart-strings and fascinating exposition about how the magic system of this universe works. The Tensorate series is stellar, and I cannot wait to spend more time in this world!
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  • Manisha
    January 1, 1970
    I feel like I could easily repeat my review for The Black Tides of Heaven and that would be sufficient. To summarise: • I enjoyed the world but thought it was undeveloped. I had hopes that with the second novella the world will be fleshed out more. However, I am still confused as to the magic system of the world.• The question of gender was such a new and exciting way to read. However, following the story of multiple characters who prefer non-binary genderless pronouns made it difficult to follo I feel like I could easily repeat my review for The Black Tides of Heaven and that would be sufficient. To summarise: • I enjoyed the world but thought it was undeveloped. I had hopes that with the second novella the world will be fleshed out more. However, I am still confused as to the magic system of the world.• The question of gender was such a new and exciting way to read. However, following the story of multiple characters who prefer non-binary genderless pronouns made it difficult to follow the story without re-reading paragraphs to figure out who said what. The name of the character written often could have solved this issue easily.• The story was action-packed and faster moving than the first novella, however, for a story focused completely on Mokoya, I feel like I never learnt anything more about that character. Characterisation was lacking, which could be due to the length of pages. In conclusion, the concept is a brilliant one but the execution falls short. I cannot help but repeat myself by saying that this series could have benefitted greatly from being expanded to a full-fledged novel.
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  • Mel
    January 1, 1970
    For the links and better readability, I suggest going to Just Love.I’ll organise this review by first writing about what concerns both books, like the fantasy world, writing style, and the concept of gender and transgender in this series, and then I will have a short look at both books individually. I’ll try to keep it manageable in length, promise.When I saw the covers in a tweet, I couldn’t but find out more about the books behind them. I read an interview with the author and was even more int For the links and better readability, I suggest going to Just Love.I’ll organise this review by first writing about what concerns both books, like the fantasy world, writing style, and the concept of gender and transgender in this series, and then I will have a short look at both books individually. I’ll try to keep it manageable in length, promise.When I saw the covers in a tweet, I couldn’t but find out more about the books behind them. I read an interview with the author and was even more intrigued when they said that the twin novellas could be read in any order. From then on, I counted the days until their release. I started with The Black Tides of Heaven and having read both books after another, I believe that this is the better starting point, but you can begin with the other one as well – I saw the author mention that they actually wrote the latter first.The world building and setting give the impression of complexity without feeling overladen. It’s inventive regarding the magical system, society, and gender. The world seems subtly Asian without falling back on stereotypes and the writing style is elegant and easy-going despite the richness of setting, plot and characters. The romantic relationships in the stories appear intimate and dense, although they are just minor parts of the story. All this are huge plus points for me and they build the background for even more interesting and touching aspects of the books.One is the concept of gender in the society, about which I have written more in this post, but, to make it short, children are born gender neutral and can decide their gender at any point or not at all. The language, the clothes, and the appearance are influenced by this as well, and the body only starts to develop once a person has chosen their gender, if they so want and take the necessary measures. This idea seems so right to me, I wish we had it in our world as well.Another prominent theme is the contradiction of fate and free will and I think there is a great balance in these books and an interesting take on it. Since Mokoya is a prophet and sees the future, this issue comes up again and again, and I like how it is handled and developed.What I especially liked in The Black Tides of Heaven is that the story is told through different phases of the twins’ lives. We accompany and grow to love them when they are still children, young adults, and later on as adults. I loved to see them develop and change and when they take their lives into their own hands and make decisions for themselves it was both painful and satisfying.There’s an interesting twist here on the problem of parental acceptance with regards to (gender/sexual) identity that I appreciated a lot. It managed to not fall into the same-old, same-old but still had the friction and struggle for the character.I have actually more to say and admire about The Red Treads of Fortune, although I enjoyed it a little less. Weird how this is sometimes. The 4.5 stars are due to the beginning of the book that was a bit too slow for my liking.What impressed me the most about this book is the awesome character development of Mokoya. Stricken with grief, because she lost her daughter in a fire a few years ago and because of recurring prophesies that she feels helpless about, she drew back into herself, ran away from her husband and barely handles herself. She’s reckless and hopeless in the beginning but slowly takes her life back into her own hands in this story. That was so very rewarding to read about. Empowering and hopeful, without it becoming unbelievable. Wow, I really appreciated this.There is a small romance arc between Mokoya and Rider, who is non-binary. Although it is only a minor part of the whole book, their scenes were authentic and passionate, and their fights and problems were real and understandable.The finale of this book was stunning. Till the end, it was unclear what was gonna happen, who was gonna survive. I am looking at you, beginning of that one chatper—jeeez. It was very suspenseful and fun.In this book we see a lot less of Akeya, but what we do witness of him is adorable because he is so lovingly grumpy and a nice counterpoint to Mokoya.After having finished these novellas, I found out that there will be two more out in 2018. Guess what! I cannot wait :) Who will they be about and when will they take place and what about that damn mother of theirs?I highly recommend that you check out these books because they are awesome. I want to mention that the author has some short stories out online which are free to read, if you feel like checking them out first.e.__________________________________Genre: High FantasyTags: Bi/Pan Character, Trans Characters, Prophecy, Magic, RomanceContent Warnings: Violence, Grief, Loss of a Child (past, off-page)Rating: 4.5 starsBlog: Review for Just LoveDisclosure: ARC for Reviewflagcomment · see review
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  • Dawn C
    January 1, 1970
    A wonderful second part of the Tensorate story, this one focuses on Mokoya after the events of the first book. After a slowish start I found myself gripped and immersed in the emotional life of the characters once again. There is such tenderness in Yang’s writing that moves me a lot. The plot is weaved nicely together with a few goosebump inducing revelations. While a lot could be fleshed out and explored in this universe I quite enjoy the micro focus on the characters’ lives. All in all a beaut A wonderful second part of the Tensorate story, this one focuses on Mokoya after the events of the first book. After a slowish start I found myself gripped and immersed in the emotional life of the characters once again. There is such tenderness in Yang’s writing that moves me a lot. The plot is weaved nicely together with a few goosebump inducing revelations. While a lot could be fleshed out and explored in this universe I quite enjoy the micro focus on the characters’ lives. All in all a beautiful piece of work that I really cherish having discovered.
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  • Roy
    January 1, 1970
    More or less the same concepts and ideas. Just not the coming of age building blocks plot. Has a Naga (a dragon or monster) hunt adventure as the plot of the story. The world building developed a fraction as compared to the 1st novel, but still limited to the novell size which is a pity. Probably wont continue with this series as I dont believe the author has finished it as of yet.
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  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    Please read this book after you read The Black Tides of Heaven. While the novellas are marketed as companion novels (aka twins aka the main characters), I have to say that reading this book first and Black Tides second will leave you confused for no good reason. Having that said, let's start the short review.I ADORE BLACK TIDES AND AKEHA. I gave that novella 5 stars for the characters, the plot, development and the world. This novella is the ugly runt. Mokoya wasn't likeable as she was in Black Please read this book after you read The Black Tides of Heaven. While the novellas are marketed as companion novels (aka twins aka the main characters), I have to say that reading this book first and Black Tides second will leave you confused for no good reason. Having that said, let's start the short review.I ADORE BLACK TIDES AND AKEHA. I gave that novella 5 stars for the characters, the plot, development and the world. This novella is the ugly runt. Mokoya wasn't likeable as she was in Black Tides, her persona, development and situation were flat compared her in Black Tides. The novella doesn't have the magic and excitement that its twin has. Maybe that's because Akeha (Black Tides main character) and Mokoya are twins who differ personality-wise. In that case: well done, but it definitely help my enjoyment of the story. I will continue reading this series because the world and its characters are interesting and I'm excited to find out who will be the main characters of the next set of novellas!
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  • Beth Cato
    January 1, 1970
    I received this ebook through the publisher via Netgalley.Yang has created an evocative Asian-inspired world in her Tensorate series. The setting is so immersive that I was slightly disoriented to start, but I soon found myself hooked. Mokoya is a former prophet, embittered by the loss of her child. She busies herself with hunting naga, and is looked after by a friends who love and accept her, abrasive as she is. Rumors of a massive and aggressive naga drive her deep into danger--and into a new I received this ebook through the publisher via Netgalley.Yang has created an evocative Asian-inspired world in her Tensorate series. The setting is so immersive that I was slightly disoriented to start, but I soon found myself hooked. Mokoya is a former prophet, embittered by the loss of her child. She busies herself with hunting naga, and is looked after by a friends who love and accept her, abrasive as she is. Rumors of a massive and aggressive naga drive her deep into danger--and into a new relationship that brings other new perils.Red Threads is high on action, but the core is all about love and healing. Mokoya's pain feels profound and real, and her journey to begin the healing process is beautiful to witness. The book features a nonbinary romantic lead, which was a refreshing surprise.
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  • Melanie
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided by Tor in exchange for an honest review.
  • Paul
    January 1, 1970
    You can see my thoughts on this novella here: https://youtu.be/TupkYNHUwMI
  • Denise
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars. Better plotted than the first book.
  • Aneta
    January 1, 1970
    The thing is, before reading these novellas I was, for some reason, sure I would enjoy this one more. Well...I didn't like the relationships in this. Didn't like the instalove, and the rest of the characters were pretty much props in this one. If not for reading Black Tides first which gave me some background, this could have been 1 star? It just felt really flat in comparison.There were good moments, though, as well. This novella deals with grief and anger, and isolation and I thought it was a The thing is, before reading these novellas I was, for some reason, sure I would enjoy this one more. Well...I didn't like the relationships in this. Didn't like the instalove, and the rest of the characters were pretty much props in this one. If not for reading Black Tides first which gave me some background, this could have been 1 star? It just felt really flat in comparison.There were good moments, though, as well. This novella deals with grief and anger, and isolation and I thought it was a good portrayal of these issues, frustrating as it may have been to read (people are messy). But the instalove really threw me? (Not that there weren't cases of it in Black Tides, but here it felt a lot more forced to me.) Last point, the worldbuilding. The world is really interesting and I like the concepts presented, but they are never explained. Even things as seemingly simple as the day and night cycles. I was really confused about it until I saw somewhere on goodreads or the official page that the sun sets and rises 6 times during one day. Why was this not even ONCE mentioned in the text?On top of which, (view spoiler)[we never even find out what happened with their mother? Like, Akeha decided to spare her and then they just continue their rebellion and she's never mentioned again. She seemed important enough, in Black Tides at least? (hide spoiler)] But what do I know.Ultimately, I think these were just too short, and this one in particular. Not enough space to develop anything. And the potential was SO there! It felt like the author was showing only the top of the iceberg, throughout the whole thing. Nothing more. It's a bit strange because in their novellette Waiting on a Bright Moon, in much less space, the relationship rang much more true for me.Or maybe novellas are just not my thing.A point about Rider which had me confused. (view spoiler)[So in this world every child chooses their gender willingly or can just not choose it at all. Swallow chose to be confirmed and identify as female and then... what changed their mind? At one point Mokoya is annoyed with Tan Khimyan for using the wrong pronouns for Rider, quote: "You can't even use the right pronouns for them. You don't even know their real name." But Tan Khimyan obviously knew Rider/Swallow better than her, since they had been lovers for a long time. Was Rider forced to be confirmed as female?Since the entire concept of gender is so different in this world and transphobia does not exist, why would Tan Khimyan use wrong pronouns on purpose? The later revelations about the nature of their relationship aside, this had me confused, and I feel like there was an important piece missing that would clear things up, and it was never brought up. Admittedly, I know very little about the matter at hand, being nonbinary, etc. so this comes from a genuine place of not understanding and confusion. (hide spoiler)]
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  • Timóteo
    January 1, 1970
    +-3.5/4Apesar de não ter gostado tanto desse volume quanto gostei do primeiro, ele certamente tem seus méritos. Gostei muito principalmente ele ter explorado bastante a Slackcraft e ter possibilitado entender melhor como funciona esse sistema. Tinha uma certa preocupação de que Mokoya não fosse um personagem tão bom de se acompanhar quanto Akeha foi no primeiro livro, e, apesar de ainda ter gostado mais do PoV de Akeha, Mokoya se mostrou uma personagem bastante desgraçada da cabeça, o que sempre +-3.5/4Apesar de não ter gostado tanto desse volume quanto gostei do primeiro, ele certamente tem seus méritos. Gostei muito principalmente ele ter explorado bastante a Slackcraft e ter possibilitado entender melhor como funciona esse sistema. Tinha uma certa preocupação de que Mokoya não fosse um personagem tão bom de se acompanhar quanto Akeha foi no primeiro livro, e, apesar de ainda ter gostado mais do PoV de Akeha, Mokoya se mostrou uma personagem bastante desgraçada da cabeça, o que sempre é bom. Esse livro também tem bastante açã. Bem mais que o anterior, inclusive com seus momentos a la Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. O "problema" é que com ao meu ver, com isso se sacrificou um pouco do ar "diferentão" que o Black Tides tem e se aproximou um pouco mais das fantasias tradicionais. Por outro lado, isso mostra a habilidade que a autora tem de escrever histórias com focos diferentes. Com certeza continuarei lendo essa série, e indicando pra que todo mundo que tiver condições dê uma chance.
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  • Nikki
    January 1, 1970
    I might not like Mokoya as much as I came to like Akeha, but I did really enjoy getting to spend more time in this world and especially the character of Rider, who didn’t appear in the previous book. This is set after The Black Tides of Heaven, and deals with some of the fallout from what happens there. Mokoya’s grief and anger and failure to deal with everything is well done, though sometimes her husband seemed a little too good to be true. Who’s that understanding? Well, somebody I’d like to k I might not like Mokoya as much as I came to like Akeha, but I did really enjoy getting to spend more time in this world and especially the character of Rider, who didn’t appear in the previous book. This is set after The Black Tides of Heaven, and deals with some of the fallout from what happens there. Mokoya’s grief and anger and failure to deal with everything is well done, though sometimes her husband seemed a little too good to be true. Who’s that understanding? Well, somebody I’d like to know — it just about worked.There’s also a lot more of the magic, which is pretty fascinating, and I’d love to know more about where Rider came from and what that place is like. There’s so much hinted at and left to explore — I hope the next novella takes us somewhere new again!Reviewed for The Bibliophibian.
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  • Corey White
    January 1, 1970
    Brilliant and inventive story in a unique fantasy setting.I read RED THREADS OF FORTUNE before BLACK TIDES OF HEAVEN, and I sort of prefer it that way. Red Threads is definitely a contained adventure story, whereas Black Tides is more the slowly unfolding backstory of the twin characters in these twin novellas.So make of that what you will - if you want to jump right in with a tightly plotted and emotionally moving adventure and get your backstory later, start with Red Threads. If you want to kn Brilliant and inventive story in a unique fantasy setting.I read RED THREADS OF FORTUNE before BLACK TIDES OF HEAVEN, and I sort of prefer it that way. Red Threads is definitely a contained adventure story, whereas Black Tides is more the slowly unfolding backstory of the twin characters in these twin novellas.So make of that what you will - if you want to jump right in with a tightly plotted and emotionally moving adventure and get your backstory later, start with Red Threads. If you want to know everything that's happening first, then start with Black Tides.Either way, they're both amazing books.
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  • Olga
    January 1, 1970
    Yang has great ideas and I'm very intrigued by the world and magic, but I just don't care for these characters. I think it's me and not the book, Yang's writing is really good so I'm interested in reading more of their works but this series is not for me. 🙁
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  • Kristen
    January 1, 1970
    Full review is here on my blog. It's a review of both novellas.I took this one a bit slower, as it didn’t capture me quite as easily as the first did. This volume takes place about 40 years after the first (hence why I recommend reading The Black Tides of Heaven first) and follows Mokoya’s story starting about 4 years after the first novella.Mokoya has fled from the capital, her husband, and everything else in her life following the loss of her daughter. Her gift for prophecy is gone as well, s Full review is here on my blog. It's a review of both novellas.I took this one a bit slower, as it didn’t capture me quite as easily as the first did. This volume takes place about 40 years after the first (hence why I recommend reading The Black Tides of Heaven first) and follows Mokoya’s story starting about 4 years after the first novella.Mokoya has fled from the capital, her husband, and everything else in her life following the loss of her daughter. Her gift for prophecy is gone as well, so instead of seeing the future, she sees the past instead, and the past usually haunts her on some level. She’s kind of a wreck. Reckless, moody, and rather less than her normal self. These days, she’s out in the rebel mining city of Bataanar hunting naga with a crew of misfits and her trusty mount Phoenix the raptor (she. rides. dinosaurs.), who is herself… more than the sum of her parts.On a hunt one day, she meets a very interesting individual named Rider, who rides a tame naga and can use the world’s Tensor magic to fold space and more or less teleport. Rider is, as the blurb suggests, quite alluring, and Mokoya finds herself enamored with them and subsequently begins a romance with them (which is fine with her husband, because polyamory seems to be pretty normal, perhaps even encouraged in this world). I thought it was rather sweet, how they come to spend the night together the first time. Their relationship had plenty of ups and downs and my heartstrings were suitably jostled at times.The Protectorate has been doing some experimentation on nagas, hoping to recreate something that Mokoya herself did, and instead of recreating Mokoya’s results, they have created a monster. Well, I mean nagas are already kind of monsters, but this particular one is both huge, angry, and threatening to attack Bataanar, which is the secret homebase of the Machinists.There’s a bit of a mystery behind this naga, Rider’s role in the whole situation, and the grieving next of kin of the recently deceased local authority. This is a mystery that Mokoya is going to get to the bottom of!This novella takes place over a much smaller timeframe than the previous, but it still tells a deep story. This is a story about Mokoya’s struggle with coping with her grief, and heals from it. I can say that while I didn’t come to like this volume as much as I did the first, I thought it was a fantastically told story with some pretty amazing worldbuilding. It was a wonderful couple of hours!All told, I liked it a lot. I liked both of them quite a lot. I’m excited to see where this story goes next year!
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  • Sienna
    January 1, 1970
    JY Yang has done it again! In such a short, tight morsel of prose, they've woven a watertight tapestry of immersive setting and engaging plot that I tumbled delightedly into. In general, the Tensorate series has some of the coolest worldbuilding I've seen to date. I loved the introduction of the Quarterlands as a location, and that its fascinating physical/geographical characteristics unfolded into Important Plot Things. The political conflict between the Machinists and the Tensorate is always i JY Yang has done it again! In such a short, tight morsel of prose, they've woven a watertight tapestry of immersive setting and engaging plot that I tumbled delightedly into. In general, the Tensorate series has some of the coolest worldbuilding I've seen to date. I loved the introduction of the Quarterlands as a location, and that its fascinating physical/geographical characteristics unfolded into Important Plot Things. The political conflict between the Machinists and the Tensorate is always interesting, too, specifically because it's always in the background, inescapable and yet taking a backseat to the emotional journeys of the protagonists. These are character studies in the midst of politically-intriguing times, not political intrigues with fleshed-out characters.Speaking of characters, Sanao Mokoya resonated HARD with me. It might be that I was reading it around the time some Difficult Things happened in my personal life, but it was cathartic to see someone processing their trauma and sort of flailing and failing at it, but continuing to work on it nonetheless. The new character of Rider was also a strangely comforting presence--I really appreciate JY Yang's ability to spin such lively, multi-dimensional people out of such a short narrative. It was a relief to watch Mokoya and Thennjay's relationship change over time, and, of course, any screentime that Mokoya and Akeha share is funny and poignant and precious.One thing: I highly disagree with people who say you can read this and Black Tides of Heaven in whatever order. 100% read Black Tides first, or a lot of the emotional notes won't land properly. Go get them now, and then grab The Descent of Monsters for good measure--I'm eyeing it on the shelf as we speak!
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  • Karyl
    January 1, 1970
    I read The Black Tides of Heaven first, and absolutely adored it. What's not to love? We've got non-binary characters and lots of magic, plus it's set in a non-Western type world, which feels so *right* for these novellas. We meet Mokoya and Akeha as children who have yet to choose their genders in the first novella, which is more of a coming-of-age story. This novella is more of an adventure story, but follows along with the same storyline. Now Mokoya is a grown woman, running away from the pai I read The Black Tides of Heaven first, and absolutely adored it. What's not to love? We've got non-binary characters and lots of magic, plus it's set in a non-Western type world, which feels so *right* for these novellas. We meet Mokoya and Akeha as children who have yet to choose their genders in the first novella, which is more of a coming-of-age story. This novella is more of an adventure story, but follows along with the same storyline. Now Mokoya is a grown woman, running away from the pain of losing her daughter and her arm in an accident, but amid fighting against mythical creatures who want to destroy a city, she finds love again in a most unlikely person.I'm not upset that Yang doesn't spell out for us exactly how tensing and the five natures work. I have a sense of it, and I feel that Yang wanted us to have just that, not an exact rendering, because knowing exactly how tensing works won't add to the story at all. Yang seems to have wanted to write a tight little novella, and explaining all about the magic of this world would have lengthened the story quite a bit.I have to admit I didn't love this one quite as much as I loved the first. I am more of a fan of epic sweeps in my storytelling, so the years-long timeline of the first suited me better. But this novella is great for those eager for swashbuckling adventure and action.Many kudos to Yang for creating such amazing characters, and featuring non-binary people and polyamory and a non-Western sensibility. These novellas are just wonderful.
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  • kari
    January 1, 1970
    That was the first of the Tensorate novellas I've picked, and did I love the worldbuilding. I loved the fact that its protagonist is a broken woman trying to find herself anew, and her relationship with Rider was fascinating. The language, though, felt somewhat clunky - I really think these novellas could use some more imaginative neologisms, I can't treat "Slack" seriously - and there were some metaphors that made me go, "wait, what, what did I just read". Still, a powerful debut.
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  • Cameron Van Sant
    January 1, 1970
    This is my 200th read book on goodreads. Very exciting!This book has a rich fantasy world and friendly dinosaurs and twists and a They-pronouned non-binary person and polyamory and snake-dragons attacking shit. What more could you want?
  • Bart
    January 1, 1970
    Actual rating: 3.50
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