Woman Enters Left
A woman sets out on a cross-country road trip, unknowingly tracing in reverse the path her mother traveled thirty years before.In the 1950s, movie star Louise Wilde is caught between an unfulfilling acting career and a shaky marriage when she receives an out-of-the-blue phone call: She has inherited the estate of Florence “Florrie” Daniels, a Hollywood screenwriter she barely recalls meeting. Among Florrie’s possessions are several unproduced screenplays, personal journals, and—inexplicably—old photographs of Louise’s mother, Ethel. On an impulse, Louise leaves a film shoot in Las Vegas and sets off for her father’s house on the East Coast, hoping for answers about the curious inheritance and, perhaps, about her own troubled marriage.Nearly thirty years earlier, Florrie takes off on an adventure of her own, driving her Model T westward from New Jersey in pursuit of broader horizons. She has the promise of a Hollywood job and, in the passenger seat, Ethel, her best friend since childhood. Florrie will do anything for Ethel, who is desperate to reach Nevada in time to reconcile with her husband and reunite with her daughter. Ethel fears the loss of her marriage; Florrie, with long-held secrets confided only in her journal, fears its survival.In parallel tales, the three women—Louise, Florrie, Ethel—discover that not all journeys follow a map. As they rediscover their carefree selves on the road, they learn that sometimes the paths we follow are shaped more by our traveling companions than by our destinations.

Woman Enters Left Details

TitleWoman Enters Left
Author
FormatPaperback
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 8th, 2017
PublisherBallantine Books
ISBN0399178511
ISBN-139780399178511
Number of pages352 pages
Rating
GenreHistorical, Fiction, Novels

Woman Enters Left Review

  • Dorie
    July 3, 2017
    Sadly I keep getting lost in the back and forth and journal entries with this one. It's a DNF for now any way :(
  • Tara Chevrestt
    April 22, 2017
    I've enjoyed this author's work in the past and was excited about this novel. It fell a little short for me, however. First of all, the alternating POVs was very jarring. The modern-day heroine switching to the past was fine, but the switching journals between the two women in the past...not easy. You have to pay close attention to whether the journal starts with a date or a day and remember who is which. Only until one woman mentions the other did I figure it out half the time and even then I w I've enjoyed this author's work in the past and was excited about this novel. It fell a little short for me, however. First of all, the alternating POVs was very jarring. The modern-day heroine switching to the past was fine, but the switching journals between the two women in the past...not easy. You have to pay close attention to whether the journal starts with a date or a day and remember who is which. Only until one woman mentions the other did I figure it out half the time and even then I was going, "Wait a min... F or E..which one was who?"The modern heroine...what was the point? I saw the point of the past. The radium, the struggle folks with same-sex attraction had with each other. The modern story was about...well, an actress wanting to be taken seriously, a husband in a wheelchair, and something about some committee that was always in the background hovering and threatening those with communist leanings. Honestly, there wasn't enough of the latter sides to make me understand or see the point of it. Give me enough to form a conclusion or learn something or don't put it in the tale at all.In the end, I'm just on the fence with this one.
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  • Debbie
    April 7, 2017
    I won this book in a Goodreads giveaway. I loved it!! I really liked this author's other book, "Letters from Skye", and found myself just as engrossed in this book. I loved the characters and the story line and was never bored. It's nice to read a novel from these time periods that is based in America, and the story line itself is timeless and optimistic.
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  • Sandra
    June 9, 2017
    Louise Wild has decided to drive out to her next job acting in a movie on a set in Vegas. Little does she know, she is following the same route, although in reverse, that the mother, whom she doesn’t remember, followed with her own best friend 26 years before. Just before she leaves Hollywood, Louise discovers that she has inherited everything that Florence Daniels, a screenwriter she hardly even knows, owned. As Louise drives east, she discovers some truths about the mother who died when she wa Louise Wild has decided to drive out to her next job acting in a movie on a set in Vegas. Little does she know, she is following the same route, although in reverse, that the mother, whom she doesn’t remember, followed with her own best friend 26 years before. Just before she leaves Hollywood, Louise discovers that she has inherited everything that Florence Daniels, a screenwriter she hardly even knows, owned. As Louise drives east, she discovers some truths about the mother who died when she was only six.This amazing historical fiction is filled with interesting historical details about the ‘radium girls’, Hollywood in the 50’s, the HUAC, and some interesting facts about the 1920’s. Just as a historical fiction, it is fascinating.As a story, it is wonderful. I have read Jessica Brockmole’s others books, and I savored each one. So I was expecting a lot, here. And this book did not fail to deliver. Rich character development and a tender, realistic story line kept me reading and made me cry when it was over. This is another amazing Brockmole tale!I was given a free copy of tis book in exchange for an unbiased review.
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  • Cynthia
    May 11, 2017
    Woman Enters Left is a charming book. Louise Wilde is an actress in Hollywood circa 1950's. Her story is interspersed with her mother's 1920's journey from her home in New Jersey to the west. She's traveling with her formerly estranged best friend who's heading to California with dreams of making a name for herself as a screen writer. Louise is troubled about her marriage and her career and the further east she drive the more she contemplates her parents' marriage which brings up lots of memorie Woman Enters Left is a charming book. Louise Wilde is an actress in Hollywood circa 1950's. Her story is interspersed with her mother's 1920's journey from her home in New Jersey to the west. She's traveling with her formerly estranged best friend who's heading to California with dreams of making a name for herself as a screen writer. Louise is troubled about her marriage and her career and the further east she drive the more she contemplates her parents' marriage which brings up lots of memories both good and sad.Brockmole's style seems light and breezy even when dealing with tragedy that it's hard to put the book down. The chapters alternate between the mother and he daughter and it's hard not to read just one more chapter. Thank you to the publisher for providing an advance readers copy.
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  • Darcysmom
    July 26, 2017
    I received an ARC of this book from Netgalley for free in exchange for an honest review. Woman Enters Left is my kind of book! The glitz of old Hollywood, road trips on Route 66, the mystery of friendships you don't understand as a child, and the thrill of discovery that comes with a travel journal. Woman Enters Left is the story of two parallel journies, separated by time. The story in the present is Louise's journey of self-discovery and healing. The story in the past is her mother's road trip I received an ARC of this book from Netgalley for free in exchange for an honest review. Woman Enters Left is my kind of book! The glitz of old Hollywood, road trips on Route 66, the mystery of friendships you don't understand as a child, and the thrill of discovery that comes with a travel journal. Woman Enters Left is the story of two parallel journies, separated by time. The story in the present is Louise's journey of self-discovery and healing. The story in the past is her mother's road trip with her best friend, Florrie. Louise tells her own story. Her mother's story is told through journal entries and Florrie's script, King of the Road.I enjoyed both stories. Louise was a sympathetic character who I found myself rooting for - I felt invested in her figuring out her parents' secrets and finding her way in her own life. It was very satisfying to learn more about Ethel (Louise's mom), Florrie, and Carl's (Louise's dad) friendship and why the road trip was so important. Woman Enters Left is an entertaining story that is worth reading.
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  • Danielle Urban
    July 18, 2017
    Woman Enters Left by Jessica Brockmole is an interesting adventure. A young woman suddenly learns that she inherits quite a lot from a woman she barely knows. This only intrigues her curiosity. As the plot unfolds, she finds more clues. Turning to her father she learns about her past. Then, there's the situation with her husband. Not exactly on best terms, but then she learns things about her husband. Understanding sets in and maybe forgiveness too. It was a heartfelt story that holds a lot of d Woman Enters Left by Jessica Brockmole is an interesting adventure. A young woman suddenly learns that she inherits quite a lot from a woman she barely knows. This only intrigues her curiosity. As the plot unfolds, she finds more clues. Turning to her father she learns about her past. Then, there's the situation with her husband. Not exactly on best terms, but then she learns things about her husband. Understanding sets in and maybe forgiveness too. It was a heartfelt story that holds a lot of details in the beginning...making the plot feel a bit like it's dragging but then, it picks up speed. I enjoyed following the main protagonist, Louise. Her marriage and history is fascinating to follow. Overall, I recommend this tale to readers everywhere.
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  • Kristen McDermott
    May 24, 2017
    I will be reviewing this book for Historical Novels Review 81 (August 2017).
  • Ellen
    April 26, 2017
    A novel about love and loss, chapters alternate not just in time, but between characters. In 1956, Louise is an actress struggling to reestablish her connection with her husband just back from the Korean War. In 1926, the story alternates between Florence's journal and Louise's mother, Ethel, who wrote notes telling her story of her road trip with Florence. A bit complicated to follow, the stories deal with multiple issues such as the Blacklist for suspected Communists, radium poisoning, homosex A novel about love and loss, chapters alternate not just in time, but between characters. In 1956, Louise is an actress struggling to reestablish her connection with her husband just back from the Korean War. In 1926, the story alternates between Florence's journal and Louise's mother, Ethel, who wrote notes telling her story of her road trip with Florence. A bit complicated to follow, the stories deal with multiple issues such as the Blacklist for suspected Communists, radium poisoning, homosexuality and more, in an interesting fictional approach. I liked it, and like this author's creative style.
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  • Erin
    April 14, 2017
    When Louise Wilde, a 1950s starlet, finds out she’s inherited the estate of Florrie Daniels, a well-known screenwriter, she’s confused—she barely knew the woman. Her confusion grows as she discovers a cache of photos of Florrie and her mother. She sets off on a cross country road trip, hoping to clear up questions about her past- and looking for inspiration on how handle with both her unsatisfying career and her troubled marriage. The novel cuts between her journey and a similar trip Florrie an When Louise Wilde, a 1950s starlet, finds out she’s inherited the estate of Florrie Daniels, a well-known screenwriter, she’s confused—she barely knew the woman. Her confusion grows as she discovers a cache of photos of Florrie and her mother. She sets off on a cross country road trip, hoping to clear up questions about her past- and looking for inspiration on how handle with both her unsatisfying career and her troubled marriage. The novel cuts between her journey and a similar trip Florrie and Ethel Wild took decades earlier. Through a collection of journal entries, shopping lists and a screenplay, their journey from the East coast to California unfolds. Like Louise, they are both struggling with questions about who they are, and the lives they want to be leading.I really enjoyed this book, didn’t really want to put it down till I had finished it. The mix of journal entries, letters, screenplay and traditional storytelling really drew me in. I think the cover is a bit misleading- I was expecting a fluffy little read, and while there are elements of that, it also touches on important issues: figuring out who you are, standing up for yourself at work, sexuality, PTSD, even the HUAC. In a lot of ways, the book is about being true to who you are when it would be so much easier to give in to society’s expectations. I won a free copy of this book from a Goodreads giveaway.
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  • Danielle Lima
    March 31, 2017
    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.I found myself unable to put this book down. I was entirely addicted to the main characters in this novel and enjoyed riding along with the extraordinary women in this story.
  • Janilyn Kocher
    July 29, 2017
    An excellent book. The story flowed effortlessly, the characters were intriguing and the backdrops were described thoroughly. I had to keep reading to see how things ended. Thanks to NetGalley for the copy.
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