Solo
Solo, a YA novel in poetic verse, tells the story of seventeen-year-old Blade Morrison, whose life is bombarded with scathing tabloids and a father struggling with just about every addiction under the sun—including a desperate desire to make a comeback. Haunted by memories of his mother and his family’s ruin, Blade’s only hope is in the forbidden love of his girlfriend. But when he discovers a deeply protected family secret, Blade sets out on a journey across the globe that will change everything he thought to be true.

Solo Details

TitleSolo
Author
FormatKindle Edition
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 25th, 2017
PublisherBlink
Number of pages320 pages
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Poetry, Realistic Fiction, Teen, Contemporary, Family, Music

Solo Review

  • Bridget
    March 28, 2017
    Kwame Alexander has a thing, poem (or in this case lyric) packed books with particular appeal to teenage boys. That is such a wonderful thing! The boys at my school lap up his books, he writes sport so beautifully and he has such great things to say to his audience, thing like, you can be great even if you are not the greatest at this one thing, it is ok to show weakness, you don't have to be That Guy all the time - you can be you and it will be fine. This particular book is the story of a young Kwame Alexander has a thing, poem (or in this case lyric) packed books with particular appeal to teenage boys. That is such a wonderful thing! The boys at my school lap up his books, he writes sport so beautifully and he has such great things to say to his audience, thing like, you can be great even if you are not the greatest at this one thing, it is ok to show weakness, you don't have to be That Guy all the time - you can be you and it will be fine. This particular book is the story of a young man who has it all, he has money, he is loved, has talent and who is the son of one of the world's most famous rockstars. He is about to graduate high school and it should be the beginning of fabulous new and exciting times at college, unfortunately the challenges in his life have become more than just annoying, his dad is living the rock and roll lifestyle to it's extreme and has used every rehab available, his sister has made the most cringeworthy record and there is plenty more to deal with, but that is ok, life is still ok, isn't it? Then love makes a fool of him and his poor hurt heart needs to heal. The next bombshell hits and he realises that there is healing to do that he can only do by himself. What he decides to do is brave and wild and will change his life forever.It is a really good book, I liked it slightly less than The Crossover, but that was always going to be a hard act to follow. Kwame is awesome. Thank goodness for Kwame and for his making reading cool for some of the most non-readerly boys. Thanks to Netgalley for giving me access to this great book.
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  • Tara
    March 24, 2017
    I just love Kwame Alexander's style. In his next novel in verse, out this summer, Blade is a teenager living in the shadow of his rock star dad and coping with the recent death of his mom. He has to learn how to get along with his dad, deal with family secrets, and find his place in the world. [Read via NetGalley]
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  • Beth Parmer
    May 14, 2017
    This YA novel-in-verse will undoubtedly go platinum. I was pulled in by the poetry and swept off my feet by the inclusion of music. To feel the mood the main character, Blade, was experiencing I played the songs referenced. The different styles capture the complexity and range of human emotions as Blade wades through the circumstances surrounding him. The poetry, the rock song references, and Blade's own songs have the ability to make this book a multi-sensory experience. Grab your earbuds, grab This YA novel-in-verse will undoubtedly go platinum. I was pulled in by the poetry and swept off my feet by the inclusion of music. To feel the mood the main character, Blade, was experiencing I played the songs referenced. The different styles capture the complexity and range of human emotions as Blade wades through the circumstances surrounding him. The poetry, the rock song references, and Blade's own songs have the ability to make this book a multi-sensory experience. Grab your earbuds, grab your tissues, settle into your favorite reading chair and be ready to fall in love with this hit.
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  • Lorie Barber
    July 3, 2017
    My 5th grade students are HUGE Kwame Alexander fans, having DEVOURED middle-grade novels-in-verse The Crossover and Booked, and his nonfiction/poetry hybrid, The Playbook. Solo, a collaboration with Mary Rand Hess, is a YA novel-in-verse that tells the story of Blade, the son of washed up rockstar/addict Rutherford Morrison. When Blade's already crazy life takes a surprising turn, he embarks - solo - on a journey of self-discovery. I tore through his book in a day, sinking in to the beautiful rh My 5th grade students are HUGE Kwame Alexander fans, having DEVOURED middle-grade novels-in-verse The Crossover and Booked, and his nonfiction/poetry hybrid, The Playbook. Solo, a collaboration with Mary Rand Hess, is a YA novel-in-verse that tells the story of Blade, the son of washed up rockstar/addict Rutherford Morrison. When Blade's already crazy life takes a surprising turn, he embarks - solo - on a journey of self-discovery. I tore through his book in a day, sinking in to the beautiful rhythm Alexander always creates. The songs and artists, some casually mentioned, others so originally & deeply woven into the story were done with intention, and I found myself making a playlist as I read. The characters were well-developed, perfect for the YA audience who will connect with the angst and chaos of teenage life. This is one I will definitely recommend to those students who come back a few years after I've had them in 5th grade and ask me what to read!
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  • Sarah
    June 27, 2017
    Where even to begin? Solo was nothing that I expected and I am so glad. Kwame Alexander does it again. I keep trying to type how I felt about the characters and the setting and growth and the sadness and the resolutions and the MUSIC! What a beautiful compilation of poetry and music. As I read, I played each of the songs that were mentioned or hinted at throughout the book and it made for such a unique experience.As I sit with my advanced reader copy, I cannot wait for everyone to be able to exp Where even to begin? Solo was nothing that I expected and I am so glad. Kwame Alexander does it again. I keep trying to type how I felt about the characters and the setting and growth and the sadness and the resolutions and the MUSIC! What a beautiful compilation of poetry and music. As I read, I played each of the songs that were mentioned or hinted at throughout the book and it made for such a unique experience.As I sit with my advanced reader copy, I cannot wait for everyone to be able to experience Blade's journey! Also, as a lover of The Crossover, I loved the nods to it with the use of "pulchritude" and the question conversations. :) I recommend this book to fans of Kwame, rock and roll, novels in verse, and stories that let you experience life right along with the characters. 🙌🏼
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  • Beth
    March 24, 2017
    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for a copy of the ebook!I really love Kwame's books. They are so easy to relate to for kids and adults, especially reluctant readers. I live in a rural community, so the kids don't check them out as much in my public library, but they are checked out a lot in the school one. His recent books have all been middle grade, but this newest is young adult for sure! I really, really hate to say this, but this book was just okay for me. I feel like it needed to b Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for a copy of the ebook!I really love Kwame's books. They are so easy to relate to for kids and adults, especially reluctant readers. I live in a rural community, so the kids don't check them out as much in my public library, but they are checked out a lot in the school one. His recent books have all been middle grade, but this newest is young adult for sure! I really, really hate to say this, but this book was just okay for me. I feel like it needed to be more focused on one specific thing instead of about three to four different things. Seriously, he had me at music, especially since it is the type of music I really enjoy, and I am fascinated by rockers who have lavish lifestyles...BUT...I am concerned that the teens are not going to relate to the music. If the teen is a music buff, it will be okay, but the others will be put off by it. This book is also more far-fetched than his others. If it had just focused on the relationship with the dad, I would have really enjoyed it. Even if it had focused on his girlfriend, or going to college, I would have liked it...BUT...(I'm not giving anything away.) the other part of the story a world away was too much for me. It was just too much going on for me to really like it. All of that being said, I think it will be very popular. It might be more popular with a specific group of teens, but I'm sure it will be read by a lot of people. *Note to librarians...in my opinion, because of the subject matter, this book is for teens. It's not graphic, but it talks about more mature subjects.*
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  • Jeimy
    June 29, 2017
    Very different from The Crossover and Booked. Blade, this book's protagonist, seems to have it all: son of rock 'n roll royalty, money, a bright future ahead. When the book begins we see him struggling to understand his father's alcoholism, his mother's death, his sister's coping mechanisms, and his relationship with Chapel, his girlfriend and the love of his life. Blade soon realized that his life's foundation is really a house of cards and he decides to embark on a journey of discovery to see Very different from The Crossover and Booked. Blade, this book's protagonist, seems to have it all: son of rock 'n roll royalty, money, a bright future ahead. When the book begins we see him struggling to understand his father's alcoholism, his mother's death, his sister's coping mechanisms, and his relationship with Chapel, his girlfriend and the love of his life. Blade soon realized that his life's foundation is really a house of cards and he decides to embark on a journey of discovery to see who he really is without the people that have surrounded him his whole life.
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  • Kori
    April 23, 2017
    Thank you, Kwame, for a fantastic verse novel! Verse novels seem to be the trend in middle-grade and YA lately, even though the verse isn't necessary or great. Kids love them because they're a quick read, but I get annoyed when it seems to be in verse "just because ". It was so refreshing to read this ARC and experience a true verse novel. So beautifully written.
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  • Zacarias Rivera, Jr.
    July 2, 2017
    This is a wonderful YA novel. I loved following the teenage protagonist's growth as he experiences conflict with his father (a former rock star bent on making a comeback), betrayal, dealing with loss, and confronting his nightmares.
  • Christina Hanson
    June 29, 2017
    Loved everything about this book: characters, storyline, and music. Kwame is a poetic genius. Pre-order now; cancel all plans for August 1; and read it in one sitting. It's. That. Good. 🎶🎸🎶
  • Jenn Lopez
    May 22, 2017
    Another wonderful story by Kwame Alexander. This time about Rock 'n Roll. He weaves such a powerful story into a book, I look forward to reading everything he publishes. The inclusion of rock songs, his father's tumultuous career that he survived, the secret the family kept were all built into a beautiful story about family, forgiveness and faith.
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  • Margie's Must Reads
    July 2, 2017
    Kwame Alexander is a writer you want to have on your library shelves. His work is relative and brilliant. He is a much needed voice in YA.
  • Amy Rhilinger
    June 30, 2017
    Filled with opportunities to simply close the book and let the words soak in. Looking forward to sharing!
  • Dan
    June 24, 2017
    If you like YA & Van Halen, "catch a magic moment," & preorder Solo by Kwame Alexander & Mary Rand Hess, "right here and now!" 🎸🇺🇸🇬🇭🤘 8/1/17!A more detailed review to come next week.
  • Kim
    March 25, 2017
    I absolutely loved this book. I loved that it was written in free verse and the music references. I enjoyed going on Blade's journey. In true Kwame fashion, he leaves you hanging as the end of the book. LOVE! Cannot wait to get a print copy and get this into the hands of students.
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  • Heather
    April 17, 2017
    While I appreciate the verse style will work for some - and I loved "crossover," this book was simply too long for me to be written in such a manner. It was difficult to read and to follow at times. This would have been easier to read as a short novel but I also acknowledge that the emphasis would not be the same had that been the case. Overall, this one was not for me.
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  • Chris
    June 20, 2017
    Review based on a digital ARC provided by Netgalley.Blade Morrison is having a crisis. He is graduating from high school near the top of his class, he has a girlfriend that he loves, he is planning on college in the fall and he crafts and plays beautiful love songs on the guitar, but these are just the surface details of a life in turmoil. Told through verse, with tracks from famous rock songs as section headings, this story delves into the very personal life below the surface. A famous rock sta Review based on a digital ARC provided by Netgalley.Blade Morrison is having a crisis. He is graduating from high school near the top of his class, he has a girlfriend that he loves, he is planning on college in the fall and he crafts and plays beautiful love songs on the guitar, but these are just the surface details of a life in turmoil. Told through verse, with tracks from famous rock songs as section headings, this story delves into the very personal life below the surface. A famous rock star father dealing with addiction, trouble with the aforementioned girlfriend, and a devastatingly revealed secret, all drive Blade to take a journey to Africa to learn more about himself.The novel in verse format gives weight to the words, each chosen carefully to reflect the feelings and thoughts of Blade as he moves through the story. Blade’s character is well developed and sympathetic. He does not react in a perfect way to the situations he finds himself in, but his reactions are natural and realistic. I wish the character of Chapel were delved into a little more deeply, as it is difficult to tell why Blade loves her so much. And while it is obvious where Blade’s father’s pain comes from, near the end of the book, an event occurs that I wonder how he will deal with in the long run. However, this is not a story about his father or about Chapel. It is a story about Blade, his journey and his acceptance of himself and the things that have happened in his life. I like how the story ended. There was no neat resolution, no perfect ending, as there never is in life. The ending was filled with possibilities – hopeful, yet unsure. The situation that Blade finds himself facing at the end of the book merits this sort of ending.
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  • Julie
    June 7, 2017
    Kwame Alexander’s Solo has his characteristically beautiful prose and focused topic that makes it an easy recommendation for many students. Solo’s protagonist is Blade Morrison, son of in-and-out-of-rehab rock legend, Rutherford Morrison, who has the talent, soul, and drive of a musician. Unfortunately, the rich and famous lifestyle that he gets from his father isn’t all it’s cracked up to be. Rutherford ruins Blade’s high school graduation, makes his girlfriend’s father distrust Blade, and can Kwame Alexander’s Solo has his characteristically beautiful prose and focused topic that makes it an easy recommendation for many students. Solo’s protagonist is Blade Morrison, son of in-and-out-of-rehab rock legend, Rutherford Morrison, who has the talent, soul, and drive of a musician. Unfortunately, the rich and famous lifestyle that he gets from his father isn’t all it’s cracked up to be. Rutherford ruins Blade’s high school graduation, makes his girlfriend’s father distrust Blade, and can never be counted on to come through for Blade. Blade’s relationship with his girlfriend, Chapel, was a frustrating part of the book for me. She is his world, and he seems to try to fill the emptiness that resulted from his mother’s death 10 years ago with this relationship. Chapel, like most 17-year-olds, cannot possibly fill this kind of void in her boyfriend’s life, and she definitely can’t do that when (view spoiler)[ she's making out with someone else. I really appreciated the lesson he learns about tattooing a person’s name on your arm though… (hide spoiler)]During a fight with his sister and Rutherford, a family secret comes out and puts Blade’s life in an even more uncertain place—a place where he doesn’t even find comfort in his music anymore. He feels like he needs to be on his own, away from his Rutherford, away from Chapel, and away from the life he’s known. To deal with the news and to find answers, he winds up in Ghana, trying to find himself, his family, and his joy. I wanted to love this book, and even though I liked it, some of the moments toward the end that should have packed an emotional punch fell flat for me.
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  • Suz
    May 29, 2017
    Kwame Alexander's first YA novel blends his style of novels in verse with teenage angst and a journey of self-discovery. Blade Morrison is salutatorian at his high school, all set to head off to college in the fall. He plans to do that with his girlfriend Chapel, although her parents have forbidden them to see each other. The reason? Blade's father is a rock star who is frequently in and out of rehab and the tabloid headlines. When his father publicly embarrasses him once again, Blade sets off t Kwame Alexander's first YA novel blends his style of novels in verse with teenage angst and a journey of self-discovery. Blade Morrison is salutatorian at his high school, all set to head off to college in the fall. He plans to do that with his girlfriend Chapel, although her parents have forbidden them to see each other. The reason? Blade's father is a rock star who is frequently in and out of rehab and the tabloid headlines. When his father publicly embarrasses him once again, Blade sets off to find his roots. So he heads from Hollywood to Ghana.The story unfolds through a mix of song lyrics Blade writes, texts between the characters (Blade, Chapel, Blade's sister and father), and poetic narrative stretches. Along with the usual teenage search for identity and independence, the story also deals with themes of betrayal, loss, love, forgiveness, celebrity lifestyles, and what makes a family.Although it has such meaningful content, it is a quick read due to the way the verse carries you along. Meant for YA and too mature for younger readers, Solo is another masterpiece by Alexander. Readers who are music buffs will enjoy the references to musicians and particular songs that are scattered throughout the book. (They may also wince over the fate of a certain Eddie Van Halen Frankenstrat.)I read an e-book provided by the publisher through NetGalley.
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  • Jennifer
    June 25, 2017
    Received advanced reader copy from publisher via Baker & Taylor book supplierBlade always has lived in the shadow of his famous rocker father, Rutherford. Tabloid headlines are the norm, fueled by Rutherford’s wild lifestyle. But when Blade learns a family secret, he takes a journey from his family’s Hollywood Hills mansion to a village in Ghana and winds up finding not only family but self.Novels in verse are a bit difficult for me. Poetry always has been a struggle for me to read – which i Received advanced reader copy from publisher via Baker & Taylor book supplierBlade always has lived in the shadow of his famous rocker father, Rutherford. Tabloid headlines are the norm, fueled by Rutherford’s wild lifestyle. But when Blade learns a family secret, he takes a journey from his family’s Hollywood Hills mansion to a village in Ghana and winds up finding not only family but self.Novels in verse are a bit difficult for me. Poetry always has been a struggle for me to read – which is ironic considering how much I love and adore Shakespeare. But, like with Shakespeare, once my mind got used to the rhythm, I fell right into the prose and deep into the story.During a fight with his sister and father, Blade is dealt a powerful blow in the revealing of a secret. One would think it couldn’t get worse, but of course it does. That he chooses to run to Ghana is a treat for the reader as the colorful richness of the small village makes itself known. I love that Blade discovers so much by travelling so far. And the cast of supporting characters are splendid and fun. Sia grabbed at my heart just as she did Blade’s: slowly but then all at once!This is the first Kwame Alexander book I’ve read. It won’t be my last.
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  • Tiffany Turner
    July 2, 2017
    Kwame Alexander never disappoints. Solo is written in his trademark style--verse intermixed with "dialogue", infused with figurative language and topped off with amazing sensory detail. In this story, Blade, the son of a demon battling rock star, has big ambitions in life--music and his girlfriend Chapel. College is on the horizon and living his life outside of the shadow of his father is starting to develop. However, secrets emerge that make him question everything he has know about all those t Kwame Alexander never disappoints. Solo is written in his trademark style--verse intermixed with "dialogue", infused with figurative language and topped off with amazing sensory detail. In this story, Blade, the son of a demon battling rock star, has big ambitions in life--music and his girlfriend Chapel. College is on the horizon and living his life outside of the shadow of his father is starting to develop. However, secrets emerge that make him question everything he has know about all those that surround him and supposedly love him. Blade takes us on a soul searching trip to Ghana in the hopes of answering many heartfelt questions-including who he really is and whether his love of music is part of that answer.
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  • Yapha
    June 22, 2017
    Blade Morrison has grown up watching his super star rocker father spiral out of control. He learned to avoid social media and tabloid magazines. When his own high school graduation is marred by his father's antics, it firms up Blade's resolution to get as far away as possible. Then his sister drops a bombshell and Blade's entire world tilts on its access and he starts a voyage of self-discovery that changes his understanding of life, love, and the world around him. Told in Kwame Alexander's rich Blade Morrison has grown up watching his super star rocker father spiral out of control. He learned to avoid social media and tabloid magazines. When his own high school graduation is marred by his father's antics, it firms up Blade's resolution to get as far away as possible. Then his sister drops a bombshell and Blade's entire world tilts on its access and he starts a voyage of self-discovery that changes his understanding of life, love, and the world around him. Told in Kwame Alexander's rich poetry and prose, readers will be drawn into Blade's soul. I need to make a playlist of the songs in this book, AND I want to hear Blade's original compositions! For grades 8 and up.eARC provided by publisher via Edelweiss.
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  • Maggie Burgess
    June 29, 2017
    I've been waiting to write my review for this one, because I just cannot figure out how to put into words how I feel about this book. Unfortunately, I'm not sure that will ever happen, so I might as well go ahead and put some thoughts down. I highly recommend this book, for adults and teens. Read it. Absorb it. Soak it in. There were times I had to set the book down just to think about and process what I had just read. Other times, I had to reread a page three or four times to really absorb it. I've been waiting to write my review for this one, because I just cannot figure out how to put into words how I feel about this book. Unfortunately, I'm not sure that will ever happen, so I might as well go ahead and put some thoughts down. I highly recommend this book, for adults and teens. Read it. Absorb it. Soak it in. There were times I had to set the book down just to think about and process what I had just read. Other times, I had to reread a page three or four times to really absorb it. This book really makes you think. Makes you feel things. Mr. Alexander and Ms. Hess really nailed this one. I liked it even better than the Crossover (and Booked!)
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  • Maureen
    June 23, 2017
    Blade Morrison is a smart young man who has experienced love and loss in his young life. He lost his mother and his rock and roller father is addicted to drugs and alcohol. When Blade learns a family secret about himself and when he suffers another loss, he decides to go on a journey that can possibly change his life the lives of those around him. #SoloBook is about love and growth and acceptance and change. It another Kwame Alexander masterpiece, written in verse, with music included. I am than Blade Morrison is a smart young man who has experienced love and loss in his young life. He lost his mother and his rock and roller father is addicted to drugs and alcohol. When Blade learns a family secret about himself and when he suffers another loss, he decides to go on a journey that can possibly change his life the lives of those around him. #SoloBook is about love and growth and acceptance and change. It another Kwame Alexander masterpiece, written in verse, with music included. I am thankful to Netgalley for the opportunity to be an early reader in exchange for my fair and honest review.
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  • Molly Dettmann
    July 1, 2017
    4.5 Wow, Kwame Alexander does it again with the heartstrings! Solo is a beautiful book about a Blade, a boy with a tragic rock star father, finding his own music. Filled with love, heartbreak, family, drama, and lots of musical inspiration, Solo will find many fans among Alexander's readers, though this one does read a little older (his father is very rock and roll). This book went from family drama and teenage love story, to a truly profound story about finding yourself. Set in Hollywood, and e 4.5 Wow, Kwame Alexander does it again with the heartstrings! Solo is a beautiful book about a Blade, a boy with a tragic rock star father, finding his own music. Filled with love, heartbreak, family, drama, and lots of musical inspiration, Solo will find many fans among Alexander's readers, though this one does read a little older (his father is very rock and roll). This book went from family drama and teenage love story, to a truly profound story about finding yourself. Set in Hollywood, and ending in Africa, this story did a total 180, but I loved the contrast between the two halves. That ending would have made me cry like a baby, but I was finishing it on my lunch break at work.
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  • Caitie
    June 29, 2017
    Like everything else Kwame Alexander has written, I read this in a sprint and devoured the whole 400+ page book in two sittings. This book is definitely more YA than middle grade, which I hadn't realized before I started reading it, but Alexander knocks it out of the park. The poetry is lyrical and gorgeous, Blade's voice and emotional wounds come through as clear as a bell, the musical allusions are a delightful Easter Egg but won't pull non-Rock 'n' Roll fans out of the story, and the mid-poin Like everything else Kwame Alexander has written, I read this in a sprint and devoured the whole 400+ page book in two sittings. This book is definitely more YA than middle grade, which I hadn't realized before I started reading it, but Alexander knocks it out of the park. The poetry is lyrical and gorgeous, Blade's voice and emotional wounds come through as clear as a bell, the musical allusions are a delightful Easter Egg but won't pull non-Rock 'n' Roll fans out of the story, and the mid-point twist leads us on a journey unlike anything I've read in YA before. Pre-order it now or grab a copy when it comes out on August 1! #solobook
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  • Sarah (Books Before Bandaids)
    June 19, 2017
    From the outside Blade has it all. His famous rock star father provides a life of ease, but loves the bad boy life too much and his sister lives a life Blade doesn't want to emulate. Looking to leave his family's shadow is difficult when the paparazzi follows his every move so when the secret of his own heritage is finally revealed in a brutal family fight he leaves everything to search for who he truly is. Ending up in Ghana he begins to find a sense of purpose and with it a sense of self. This From the outside Blade has it all. His famous rock star father provides a life of ease, but loves the bad boy life too much and his sister lives a life Blade doesn't want to emulate. Looking to leave his family's shadow is difficult when the paparazzi follows his every move so when the secret of his own heritage is finally revealed in a brutal family fight he leaves everything to search for who he truly is. Ending up in Ghana he begins to find a sense of purpose and with it a sense of self. This novel in verse is grounding and necessary. Note: I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review
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  • Kip
    July 1, 2017
    Kwame Alexander has outdone himself again. After I read THE CROSSOVER, I didn't think I could love another of his books more (then came BOOKED, which I adored), and now with SOLO, my heart is bursting again. I'm going to be raving about this book for quite a while. Blade Morrison is such a compelling character, and his emotional journey gave me all the feels. Beside him, the other characters--especially Blade's dad, Rutherford, and Joy in Ghana--jumped off the page as well. On top of this, the m Kwame Alexander has outdone himself again. After I read THE CROSSOVER, I didn't think I could love another of his books more (then came BOOKED, which I adored), and now with SOLO, my heart is bursting again. I'm going to be raving about this book for quite a while. Blade Morrison is such a compelling character, and his emotional journey gave me all the feels. Beside him, the other characters--especially Blade's dad, Rutherford, and Joy in Ghana--jumped off the page as well. On top of this, the music and playlist peppered through the book, along with Kwame's always-gorgeous verse, made this book impossible to put down for me. Definitely a must-read!
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  • Becky
    May 12, 2017
    Thanks to Net Galley for the ARC in exchange for this honest review.My favorite Kwame book yet. Blade lost his mother at a young age. Even though he lives a privileged life because his dad is a rock star, that doesn't prevent the rest of his world from falling apart. As Blade looks for love in the right and wrong places, he goes on a quest for truth, wrestles with his demons, finds joy in simplicity, and breathes music back into his soul.This novel in verse is layered in meaning and beautiful an Thanks to Net Galley for the ARC in exchange for this honest review.My favorite Kwame book yet. Blade lost his mother at a young age. Even though he lives a privileged life because his dad is a rock star, that doesn't prevent the rest of his world from falling apart. As Blade looks for love in the right and wrong places, he goes on a quest for truth, wrestles with his demons, finds joy in simplicity, and breathes music back into his soul.This novel in verse is layered in meaning and beautiful and I am already ready to read it again. It is that good.
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  • Cassie Thomas
    June 28, 2017
    Kwame is definitely a lyrical genius. I stayed up late to finish Solo and am already ready to re-read the story. This is a YA book, but I can definitely see it being shared with mature 5th and middle school students. The story is about 17 year old Blade Morrison who has been around the rock lifestyle his whole life, his father who at one time was a rock band legend ends up spiraling downward into sex, drugs, rock & roll stereotype, Blade who finds himself wanting anything to be but a Morris Kwame is definitely a lyrical genius. I stayed up late to finish Solo and am already ready to re-read the story. This is a YA book, but I can definitely see it being shared with mature 5th and middle school students. The story is about 17 year old Blade Morrison who has been around the rock lifestyle his whole life, his father who at one time was a rock band legend ends up spiraling downward into sex, drugs, rock & roll stereotype, Blade who finds himself wanting anything to be but a Morrison discovers some truths that help him figure out just that. In a poetic verse novel this is one that students will love and cling to. There are multiple uses of figurative language and music from past decades to entice readers to find their voice through the music. Must read.
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