Best American Poetry 2017
Edited by Pulitzer Prize-winner and nineteenth US Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey, The Best American Poetry 2017 brings together the most notable poems of the year in the series that offers “a vivid snapshot of what a distinguished poet finds exciting, fresh, and memorable” (Robert Pinsky).Librarian of Congress James Billington says Natasha Trethewey “consistently and dramatically expanded the power” of the role of US Poet Laureate, holding office hours with the public, traveling the country, and reaching millions through her innovative PBS NewsHour segment “Where Poetry Lives.” Marilyn Nelson says “the wide scope of Trethewey’s interests and her adept handling of form have created an opus of classics both elegant and necessary.” With her selections and introductory essay for The Best American Poetry 2017, Trethewey will be highlighting even more “elegant and necessary” poems and poets, adding to the national conversation of verse and its role in our culture.The Best American Poetry is not just another anthology; it serves as a guide to who’s who and what’s happening in American poetry and is an eagerly awaited publishing event each year. With Trethewey’s insightful touch and genius for plumbing the depths of history and personal experience to shape striking verse, The Best American Poetry 2017 is another brilliant addition to the series.

Best American Poetry 2017 Details

TitleBest American Poetry 2017
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 5th, 2017
PublisherScribner
ISBN-139781501127632
Rating
GenrePoetry

Best American Poetry 2017 Review

  • Joseph
    January 1, 1970
    Best American Poetry 2017 series edited by David Lehman and guest edited by Natasha Trethewey is the 30th edition of this collection. Lehman is a poet and the series editor for The Best American Poetry series. He teaches at The New School in New York City. Trethewey is an American poet who was appointed United States Poet Laureate in 2012 and again in 2014. She won the 2007 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry for her 2006 collection Native Guard, and she is a former Poet Laureate of Mississippi. She is al Best American Poetry 2017 series edited by David Lehman and guest edited by Natasha Trethewey is the 30th edition of this collection. Lehman is a poet and the series editor for The Best American Poetry series. He teaches at The New School in New York City. Trethewey is an American poet who was appointed United States Poet Laureate in 2012 and again in 2014. She won the 2007 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry for her 2006 collection Native Guard, and she is a former Poet Laureate of Mississippi. She is also the Robert W. Woodruff Professor of English and Creative Writing at Emory University, where she also directs the Creative Writing Program.It has been a troublesome year for many. Lehmann opens with the controversial selection of Bob Dylan as the recipient of the Nobel Prize in Literature. The selection divided many in the poetry field and was met by disappointment that a woman was not selected. Other were satisfied that some in the more bardish sense had won. Shortly afterward the United State held an election that further divided the country. Many in the arts were unhappy with the electoral results. Soon Twitter was ablaze with the "Resist" message from poets and writers. The new year also seemed to fill its pages with stories of police shooting unarmed men, women, and even children of color with follow-up stories of no charges filed against the shooter. For many, it was a fearful year and that despair is also reflected in this year's collection of poetry.Bob Dylan only gets a passing mention in this collection by Chase Twichell in "Sad Song". However, the rest of the collection does reflect the other concerns in the previous paragraph. For those who read poetry because it offers an escape from modern problems and takes the reader to their own "Tintern Abbey", this collection is a reminder of the real world and your news feed. From the opening poem "Weapons Discharge Report" by Dan Albergotti through Monica Youn's "Greenacre" the tone is set. Pamela Sutton's "Afraid to Pray" almost seems to predict the recent trouble in Charlottesville.  R.T. Smith's "Maricon" reminds the reader that hatred goes deeper than race.  The poems are not all of rage but of reflection.  Danusha Lameris' "The Watch" runs deep.  This year's Best American Poetry is not the escapism or the celebration usually associated with a "best" series.  It takes poetry as a voice of resistance and information.  Like people, in general, poetry can hide in the background and not become a political or social tool for change, but only for so long.  Arts are meant to be a reflection of society.  Today art is being cut in public schools to save costs.  The current proposed budget plans to cut both the NEA and NEH.  When art, as well as people, are threatened they fight back.  Here, poetry is using its voice to remind us what society and its leaders have become.  We are losing our ability to evade the outside world with arts be it reading, painting, or music. Although it would be hyperbole to compare this collection to Picasso's Guernica, it is a warning. 
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  • Jeimy
    January 1, 1970
    As with any poetic anthology there are hits and there are misses. What fascinated me were the poems that Tretheway, the guest editor, chose. It felt like she is allowing the reader into her concerns about identity, politics, religion, and race relations. Ultimately, this was a satisfying read.
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  • Terri
    January 1, 1970
    The Best American Poetry 2017 is a diverse collection of work that hits on a bit of everything from politics and race to personal relationships and contemplation. The collection also includes a wide range of writing styles that can appeal to every poetry reader's appetite. There wasn't a single poem that stuck out to me as being a true masterpiece of the collection, but I will say that the collection as a whole is worth checking out--and much better than the 2016 collection. What I'm surprised a The Best American Poetry 2017 is a diverse collection of work that hits on a bit of everything from politics and race to personal relationships and contemplation. The collection also includes a wide range of writing styles that can appeal to every poetry reader's appetite. There wasn't a single poem that stuck out to me as being a true masterpiece of the collection, but I will say that the collection as a whole is worth checking out--and much better than the 2016 collection. What I'm surprised about with this collection is the diverse style, range and subject matter, considering the small number of publications included from where these pieces were originally published. Those who enjoy reading poetry should be able to find a few pieces they like. *Book provided by Net Galley
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  • Ace Boggess
    January 1, 1970
    As with every edition of BAP, I'm not fond of every poem in here, but I love and connect with the majority of them, while recognizing what qualities this year's editor sees in the rest. It's an outstanding edition. Series Editor David Lehman's introduction is likely his best in several years, especially while musing on the debate over Bob Dylan's Novel win. Enough said. You know you're going to buy this book, so just do it already.
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  • Dan Wilcox
    January 1, 1970
    Find out what I think by coming to the review of this book I will be presenting in the Book Talk Series sponsored by the Friends of the Albany Public Library at 12:15, Tuesday, September 26, 2017, at the Albany Public Library Washington Ave. Branch, Albany, NY -- free! & refreshments!
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  • Judi
    January 1, 1970
    My Disclaimer:I was provided a free copy of this book by the author’s representative, NetGalley. I am voluntarily providing an honest review in which all opinions are fully my own. I am not being compensated in any way.~ Judi E. Easley for Blue Cat ReviewMy Review: ✭✭✭✭⭑This is a powerful and moving collection of poems that speak of the condition of life in our country and in our homes and families. Some were sad. Some were painful. Some were elegant and wonderful. And some were just so much gib My Disclaimer:I was provided a free copy of this book by the author’s representative, NetGalley. I am voluntarily providing an honest review in which all opinions are fully my own. I am not being compensated in any way.~ Judi E. Easley for Blue Cat ReviewMy Review: ✭✭✭✭⭑This is a powerful and moving collection of poems that speak of the condition of life in our country and in our homes and families. Some were sad. Some were painful. Some were elegant and wonderful. And some were just so much gibberish. Remember this is my opinion. Poetry is a personal experience and needs to speak to the reader.There are 75 poems in this collection. I chose 24% of the collection, that’s 18 poems that really spoke to me personally and had particular meaning to me for one reason or another. I read the bios and comments on those poets and really enjoyed them. They made the poems even more meaningful to me and connected me to the poets more personally. I’m very glad this section was done the way it was with the comments from the poets on their state of mind when they wrote these particular poems. I haven’t read any of the previous collections in this series, so I don’t know if this is the standard format, but I really liked this inclusion.I fully intend to seek out previous years’ collections and read some of them. The quality of the poetry is impressive. It also struck a chord within me to continue my own pursuit of poetry, as I too enjoy writing in the free-form style. I entered the giveaway, but if I don’t win, I fully intend to buy a print copy of this book to keep on my shelf and enjoy.I can’t recommend this highly enough to those of you who enjoy poetry. And to those of you who aren’t that familiar with it, give this book a try. You may find that this will appeal to you and speak to you as it is really about our lives today as we live it and see it played out on the nightly news and in the papers. Kudos, to Natasha Trethewey for her efforts.WIN A COPY OF THIS BOOKBest American Poetry 2017 by David LehmanBest American Poetry 2017by David Lehman, Natasha TretheweyRelease date: Sep 05, 2017Enter to win a copy of Best American Poetry 2017, this year’s addition to the brilliant series of the most notable poems of the year, edited by Pulitz…moreFormat: Print bookAvailability:10 copies available, 268 people requestingGiveaway dates: Aug 09 – Sep 06, 2017Countries available: US
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  • Michelle Kidwell
    January 1, 1970
    Best American Poetry 2017by David Lehman; Natasha TretheweyScribnerPoetryPub Date 05 Sep 2017 I am reviewing a copy of Best American Poetry 2017 through Scribner and Netgalley:This collection is edited by David Lehman with guest editor Natasha Tretheway who served two terms as the nineteenth Poet Laureatte 2012-2014 for the United States and 2012-2016 for the Poet Laureatte for Missississippi.The poems in this collection deal with everything from war to racial relations. It deals with art as wel Best American Poetry 2017by David Lehman; Natasha TretheweyScribnerPoetryPub Date 05 Sep 2017 I am reviewing a copy of Best American Poetry 2017 through Scribner and Netgalley:This collection is edited by David Lehman with guest editor Natasha Tretheway who served two terms as the nineteenth Poet Laureatte 2012-2014 for the United States and 2012-2016 for the Poet Laureatte for Missississippi.The poems in this collection deal with everything from war to racial relations. It deals with art as well as the art of poetry. The poems deal with everything from nature to life.Some of the poems deal with forgiveness, from sickness to healing. I give Best American Poetry four out of five stRs!Happy Reading!
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  • Vintage274
    January 1, 1970
    As a retired educator and writer, I appreciate good poetry; but I continue to read poetry recreationally because it speaks to both my mind and my soul. This most satisfying collection provided me with new work from old favorites as well as introducing poets with whom I hope to become more familiar. I received a galley copy of this text in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to NetGalley for the ARC, provided by the author and/or the publisher in exchange for an honest review.A great collection spanning subjects from the quiet and curious to the powerful and political.
  • Emily Arrow
    January 1, 1970
    I love this selection of poetry and feel it truly represents this year's emotions. My favorite poem in the collection is "Good Bones," a must read.
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