The Alexander Inheritance
NEW TIME TRAVEL ALT. HISTORY FROM A MASTER: Flint's Ring of Fire and Boundary series have proved him to be a master of time travel alternate history. Here then, a new tale of persons displaced in time, fighting for their lives. Twice before, mysterious cosmic catastrophes have sent portions of the Earth across space and back in time first, with the Grantville Disaster in West Virginia, and then again with a maximum security prison in southern Illinois. Now, the planet is struck with yet another such cataclysm, whose direct impact falls upon the Queen of the Sea, a cruise ship in the Caribbean. When the convulsions subside, the crew and passengers of the ship discover that they have arrived in a new and frightening world. They are in the Mediterranean now, not the Caribbean. Still worse, they discover that the disaster has sent them more than two thousand years back in time. Following the advice of an historian among the passengers, Marie Easley, they sail to Egypt or, at least, where they hope Egypt will be. Sure enough, Egypt is there ruled over by Ptolemy, the founder of the Ptolemaic dynasty and one of Alexander the Great s chief generals. Alexander the Great, it turns outs, died just two years ago. The western world has just entered what would become known as the Hellenistic Period of history, during which time Greek civilization would spread around the Mediterranean and beyond. But the first fifty years of the Hellenistic Period was the Age of Diadochi the Time of the Successors when Alexander s empire would collapse into chaos. By the time the Successors finished their strife, every single member of Alexander s dynasty would be murdered and only three of the generals who began that civil war would still be alive. That is the new world in which the Queen of the Sea finds itself. Can Marie Easley and Captain Lars Flodden guide the crew and passengers through this cataclysm? Fortunately, they have some help: a young Norwegian ship s officer who forms an attachment to Alexander s widow; a French officer who is a champion pistol marksman; a canny Congressman from Utah and, most of all, many people of the time who are drawn to a vision of the better world of the future. About Eric Flint s Ring of Fire series: This alternate history series is a landmark Booklist [Eric] Flint's1632universe seems to be inspiring a whole new crop of gifted alternate historians. Booklist reads like a technothriller set in the age of the Medicis Publishers Weekly"

The Alexander Inheritance Details

TitleThe Alexander Inheritance
Author
FormatHardcover
ReleaseJul 4th, 2017
PublisherBaen
ISBN1481482483
ISBN-139781481482486
Number of pages400 pages
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Alternate History, Time Travel, Historical, Action, Fiction

The Alexander Inheritance Review

  • Lexxi Kitty
    July 10, 2017
    An overall interesting and good book about a huge 21st century cruise ship that gets, for the lack better explanation, magically transported from said 21st century to the 4th. Some dates would make things easier to understand, especially since I didn't do things like include A.D. and B.C.I'm not actually sure what date it left 'our' time, but somewhere around 2016 (or, at least, some time after 2011 since there is a comment made about an event that had occurred in that year) A.D. is the origin d An overall interesting and good book about a huge 21st century cruise ship that gets, for the lack better explanation, magically transported from said 21st century to the 4th. Some dates would make things easier to understand, especially since I didn't do things like include A.D. and B.C.I'm not actually sure what date it left 'our' time, but somewhere around 2016 (or, at least, some time after 2011 since there is a comment made about an event that had occurred in that year) A.D. is the origin date of the cruise ship, and something like 323 B.C. is the arrival date (an exact year was mentioned, I don't recall what that exact year was, give or take a few years, the boat of 5000 passengers (and however many crew) arrived a few years after the death of Alexander the Great.I kind of had the impression that the wife, Roxane, and baby Alexander had been more or less killed immediately, but she's still alive when the cruise ship arrives. Though she's in something like 'protective custody', a playing piece for the generals fighting over the empire Alexander had made. Also alive are a bunch of Alexanders former Generals, plus his half-brother Philip (who falls somewhere in the Autism spectrum) - and Philip's 17 year old wife (with Philip being somewhere in his mid-thirties I believe). Cleopatra also plays a part, though no I'm not referring to the one who ruled Egypt and 'did things' with Caesar. I'm referring to Alexander's last remaining full-blood sibling, his sister. And a cruise ship full of other people.While enjoyable I did have a few problems with the book. Mention of health came up, including a couple of references, I'm sure to reassure people, about how the people aboard the 21st century cruise ship weren't carrying anything that would endanger 'the natives'. But, part of the mentioning of the health involved noting that the ship arrived back in time and then used up a good significant portion of their medication treating passengers and the like. And seriously? 5000+ 21st century AD humans and not a one has anything that would adversely impact 'the natives' of the 4th century BC? Heck, one of the crew members was shown basically humping every native he could find - unless this was a new development in his life, he likely was doing that in the 'modern' world - and he had no types of illness or the like? Really? One of the interesting things that occurs during the course of the book is the cruise ship appearing off Trindad. The ship is observed as it approaches. By a trader. And I'm immediately reminded of a nonfiction book I read recently. About a lost city found in, if I recall correctly, Guatemala (or Honduras?). A city from a civilization that doesn't even have a name of its own because they had been overshadowed by the others, the Mayans and the like - a city that died and was 'lost' because of the Europeans arrival. And the speculation that the reason that it died - even in it's remote location - is because the various city-states and the like weren't cut off from each other. And it's known that Columbus, with ill crew members on board, had visited the coast of Central America - and that there were native traders there at the time - who spread the disease that helped wipe out a good many natives. And here we have this book showing a 21st century cruise ship coming in and a native trader watching it. The kind of flippant - 'they didn't have anything bad health wise, unlike Columbus' - was annoying.Another issue: sex. I was perfectly happy to just watch everything unfold as events unfolded, content to let relationships not be delved into. But then the authors decided to start having people circle each other, then engage in 'relations' behind. Not graphically. No, that's not the issue. And even one relationship wasn't the issue. It's how there kept being these couplings pop up and . . . every single bloody one of them was heterosexual in nature. Every bloody one of them. There was a joke tossed out about the time period and the people, something like 'well, they are Greeks and you know what they are like in sexual matters' but . . . that's the only non-heterosexual thing in the book. The joke. As I said, I'd have been content but for the fact that many different couplings suddenly started popping up late-ish in the book. Some of them kind of 'well, we are both here, and I assume you'll go with me because we are close in age' ((view spoiler)[thinking here specifically of that smug Captain assuming that that woman near his own age . . well, let's just move on (hide spoiler)]).Last problem? My understanding is that this, along with the one where a prison got sent back in time to the dinosaur era, were just stand-alone's. Related, but stand-alones. And this book? Doesn't really have an ending. Hell, it ends with almost a break in action (a ship that might cause 'issues', due to who is on the ship, approaches the cruise ship and . . . book over). (That ending, by the way, was after about 30 names got mentioned "this person from x; that person form y; Q from xx" etc. - in a way that's 'okay' in that a convention occurred, but . . . none of the people named really mattered beyond giving more glimpses of the period and the convention itself was kind of overlooked).Right, so. It's funny, in its way, but I felt 'closer' to the people of the ancient world than those being held up as being from the 21st. Quite frankly I preferred those sections that dealt directly with the 'ancient people's and less with the 'modern people'. Rating: 4.35June 10 2017
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  • Dan
    April 16, 2017
    Very good, I read it in less than 1 day, nearly non-stop.
  • Liviu
    July 6, 2017
    fast and ok'ish but no 1633/34, more like some of the mediocre sequels in the sprawling 163* multi-author series; the narrative fragmentation and lack of interesting characters beyond a few like Alexander's wife and Ptolemy are balanced here by the newness of the series and the world building set in another turbulent and interesting historical period; will take a look at the inevitable sequel (nothing is settled by the end not even at the level of 1633 which had a closure of some sort) but needs fast and ok'ish but no 1633/34, more like some of the mediocre sequels in the sprawling 163* multi-author series; the narrative fragmentation and lack of interesting characters beyond a few like Alexander's wife and Ptolemy are balanced here by the newness of the series and the world building set in another turbulent and interesting historical period; will take a look at the inevitable sequel (nothing is settled by the end not even at the level of 1633 which had a closure of some sort) but needs considerable improvement for me to keep reading the series
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  • Hilari Bell
    July 23, 2017
    I'm a big fan of the Ring of Fire books that are actually BY Eric Flint--and some of the others are great too, but that depends on which of multiple authors wrote them. This one is actually by several authors. but it's a pretty good book. The bad news is that it has too many POV characters for my taste, as does most of this series now--and it doesn't do much in terms of developing any of those characters in depth. The good news is that I found the situation interesting enough, and the characters I'm a big fan of the Ring of Fire books that are actually BY Eric Flint--and some of the others are great too, but that depends on which of multiple authors wrote them. This one is actually by several authors. but it's a pretty good book. The bad news is that it has too many POV characters for my taste, as does most of this series now--and it doesn't do much in terms of developing any of those characters in depth. The good news is that I found the situation interesting enough, and the characters engaging enough to make it a good, fun read.
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  • Jo (Mixed Book Bag)
    April 26, 2017
    This is a new world created by those aliens who's art keep moving parts of earth between different time periods. This time it is a cruise ship that goes from the Caribbean to the Mediterranean. But they don't just change locations they change time periods and this time it is just after the death of Alexander the Great. I did find this one a little harder to swallow. This was a ship with 5000 people on board and having been on a cruise ship for 4 months at a time the lack of information about mos This is a new world created by those aliens who's art keep moving parts of earth between different time periods. This time it is a cruise ship that goes from the Caribbean to the Mediterranean. But they don't just change locations they change time periods and this time it is just after the death of Alexander the Great. I did find this one a little harder to swallow. This was a ship with 5000 people on board and having been on a cruise ship for 4 months at a time the lack of information about most of those was not very realistic. It was however fun. There are the historical characters and the fictional ones all interacting as they try to get a different result from the one that is written in the cruise ships history. I do recommend it just take it with a grain of salt. I found it the least believable book of the series.
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  • Daniel Shellenbarger
    July 27, 2017
    The Alexander Inheritance is technically a part of Eric Flint's Ring of Fire series begun with 1632. In the multiverse of the Ring of Fire (or Assiti Shards as it is sometimes called, though that name has kind of fallen out of use), an advanced alien species, the Assiti, practice an art-form of sorts involving quantum strings in deep space. By Providence or dumb-luck the detritus of one of their art displays impacted Earth in the year 2000, sending the environs of Grantville, West Virginia back The Alexander Inheritance is technically a part of Eric Flint's Ring of Fire series begun with 1632. In the multiverse of the Ring of Fire (or Assiti Shards as it is sometimes called, though that name has kind of fallen out of use), an advanced alien species, the Assiti, practice an art-form of sorts involving quantum strings in deep space. By Providence or dumb-luck the detritus of one of their art displays impacted Earth in the year 2000, sending the environs of Grantville, West Virginia back to Germany in the midst of the Thirty Years War and spinning off an alternate universe in the process, leading to the events that are described in the 1632 series, as the Americans kick-start the rise of democracy 150 years early. Later, a second shard impacts a prison in Alexandria, Illinois (which is confusing given the title of this book), sending the inmates and guards back to prehistoric times, which was the subject of the book Time Spike, which was probably supposed to be the start of a second series, but it didn't really draw in the RoF fandom (also, amusingly, I seem to remember that early on in the Ring of Fire series, Flint was apparently working on a story where George Washington and Frederick the Great ended up getting thrown back to Greco-Roman times). Full disclosure, I haven't read Time Spike (reviews aren't that positive and I don't remember that my library ever had a copy). Anyway, the Alexander Inheritance begins in pretty much the modern day. A third shard impacts in the Bahamas and conveys a cruise ship, its tender-tug and a bit of dock back to the late 4th century B.C. (I refuse to use the ridiculous C.E./B.C.E. notation, so there), right after the death of Alexander the Great. The international crew and (mostly American) passengers of the Norwegian cruise ship Queen of the Seas are thereafter confronted by a world that's tearing itself to pieces as without Alexander's charisma and military acumen to hold everyone together, his generals and family are all out to carve themselves a slice of his Empire.What I liked: I thought the authors did an excellent job of contemplating how a cruise ship and its crew/passengers would impact the world of 320(ish) B.C., the ship is pretty much invulnerable at sea due to its speed, construction, and sheer bulk, but it is in constant need of things it can't get on its own, forcing them to trade and seek good relations with anybody they can. In turn, the knowledge the ship and its people (I refer to them as the New Americans, since that's what the majority end up calling themselves, but ship-people would be more accurate) provide can transform the Hellistic world, but there is a crazy-wide culture gap that makes the up-timer/down-timer differences in the 1632 series seem like nothing. As a long-time 1632 fan, I also loved the juxtaposition between the two series. Some of the things that have been such a pain for Grantville to acquire are really easy for the New Americans to get because they have a cruise ship that can take them anywhere, they have the (admittedly tainted) fount of all human knowledge that is Wikipedia, and they have the advantages of "smart" technology (like translator tablets) and modern computer-assisted machining, allowing them to (for instance) build powerful weapons from scratch in a believable but surprisingly short time. That said, whereas Grantville was a living breathing city full of families, the New Americans have a disproportionately old population and must assimilate others into their society if they have any hope of surviving, much less passing on their traditions. In an interesting side-note, the characters of the Alexander Inheritance are aware of the Grantville/Alexandria disappearances and thanks to that knowledge they are much quicker to figure out what's happened to them. In another major difference, the 1632 series has been driven by the unity of the vision of the main protagonist, Mike Stearns and his friends, family, and allies. In the Alexander Inheritance, the New Americans are divided (and somewhat bitterly at that) between the views of a U.S. Congressman, the ship's captain, and a historian on holiday. Each of them has different priorities after "The Event" (as they call the Ring of Fire), the captain is worried almost exclusively with the day-to-day survival of the ship (the narrow perspective), the historian sees a chance to nudge history down a different path and she is rather forward in testing her thesis (the broad perspective), while the congressman sees his duty as being finding a place for the people of this ship to survive and rebuild in this strange old world (somewhere in the middle). The difference between these POV's (and the inherent lack of bonds among the crew/passengers given the utter happenstance of their coexistence) makes relations among the New Americans quite tense in the early chapters of the book. Another key difference is that whereas 1632 is driven primarily by the actions of the up-time characters (at least in the early books) and spends most of its time developing those characters, the Alexander Inheritance is much more interested in the locals rather than the New Americans, and the book does a good job of developing the personalities of the many key players among Alexander's generals and family.What I didn't like: I'm going to go on a bit here about one thing that REALLY bugged me, and from the big picture of the story it was minor, but it rubbed me all sorts of the wrong way due to the shear pointless idiocy of it. Namely, what I'm talking about is the "Baptist" pastor who wants to pave the way for Christ's arrival (reasonable, I guess) and declares (later in the book) that he wants to prevent his crucifixion, which is one of the most ludicrous statements a fake-Christian in a book has ever made since any halfway knowledgeable Christian would know that the death of Christ is an essential underpinning of the doctrine of salvation. It is lazy characterization by the authors and either reflects a frankly shallow understanding of Christian theology (unlikely given how important it is in the 1632 books) or an intent to make the only identifiably Christian character in the book into a laughingstock, which is sad, because there's some good potential in the crisis of faith of a man who must deal with the fact that he is in a universe where the crucial event underpinning his beliefs has not yet happened and where he must decide if its happening in this universe matters or if the fact that it happened in another universe is enough. THAT would've been an interesting character arc, and given the frankly horrific nature of the local customs the New Americans encounter, there's far better use for a Bible-thumping Baptist than running around Canaan like an idiot, but the authors either chose not to see this or were too blinded by their own preconceptions to see this possibility. This character arc, while secondary to the story grated me whenever it came up, especially since all the other religious figures are given far more credibility, even the societies who literally MURDER CHILDREN as sacrifices to their gods (think about that statement for a bit because that perfectly encapsulates just how lazy and stupid this characterization is). Another thing that bothered me is that the personalities and backgrounds of the New Americans are given surprisingly short-shift as is their plot arc. While I understand that (as with the 1632 series, which has shifted its focus to down-timers over the course of the series) the most important figures are always going to be the people with the power in the then-now and that's Roxane and Eurydice and Ptolemy, etc., but it's hard to really connect with them as people, particularly given just how, hmmm... extreme some of the differences in cultural mores are. Even worse, it feels like the authors cut out big sections that would've been focused on the New Americans (particularly, the siege of Fort Plymouth, the Orinoco Expedition, and the aftermath of the Tupky War, all of which occur for the most part off-page despite how important they are to the future of the New Americans in this world) as they basically drop out of the story in the second half and everything we learn about them is via info-dumps, which is disappointing. Finally, the ending of the book is rather abrupt and brings little closure to any of the major plot pointsAll in all, I loved the story, I liked most of the characters, I enjoyed how this series acts as a counterpoint and sort-of reboot/spin-off of the 1632 series (though obviously, we're still getting 1632 books, it's a reboot in the video game/movie sense, in that it's been long enough since the original came out that you can do the same basic idea but with changes in tech and culture, you get a very different sort of story). I was annoyed by the religion element as Flint and company seem far too willing to trash monotheism even while making it perfectly clear that the pagan religions of the Mediterranean were blood-thirsty and provided pretty much no moral guidance, encouraging their followers to do whatever they liked so long as they made the right sacrifices to the right gods. Their unwillingness to put any serious thought into the collision of modern day religions and ancient religions is frankly an embarrassing misstep (especially given that just four centuries on, Christianity would be spreading like wildfire among the still mostly-Hellenistic world of the eastern Mediterranean) in an otherwise fascinating book that takes its premise seriously while also having a lot of fun and is fully deserving of a sequel (and possibly its own series as I would be very interested to see what this world would look like 10 or so years down the road).
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  • Matt
    July 7, 2017
    Good - a little helter skelter in terms of the number of characters and settings introduced with little depth. I presume the author is thinking to initiate another world/universe similar to the original ring of fire franchise.That being stated - I enjoyed the book and exploring a new time and place.
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  • Margaret Ball
    June 28, 2017
    For somebody who is seriously interested in the political maneuverings after the death of Alexander the Great, this would doubtless be a fascinating book. For me, I'd rather have read more about how the people on the cruise ship adapted to being stranded in this time and how they affected the cultures around them, and less about the plots and counterplots of Alexander's successors. I guess I was hoping for another "1632." This isn't it.
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  • Ron
    July 21, 2017
    If you like the genre and know what to expect this is quite an interesting text. For those who complain of the overlarge amount of characters and disjointed plotlines, remember the time of the Diadochi is a time period where the entirety of the mediterranean ruling class spent most of its time and resources in plotting and warring against each other and which in turn completely transformed the balance of power and political structures of what we laughingly refer to as the civilized world. Whoeve If you like the genre and know what to expect this is quite an interesting text. For those who complain of the overlarge amount of characters and disjointed plotlines, remember the time of the Diadochi is a time period where the entirety of the mediterranean ruling class spent most of its time and resources in plotting and warring against each other and which in turn completely transformed the balance of power and political structures of what we laughingly refer to as the civilized world. Whoever expects a story taking this social, political and cultural mess as its basis to be neatly contained in tidily delineated and structured tidbits of easily digestible plot menus is clearly deluded. If anything, Flint underestimates the chaos and upheaval dropping a culturally and socially heterogenous group of twentyfirst-century refugees with their offensive sensibilities and uncertain loyalties into this mess.Once again Flint provides an interesting panoply of historical trivia and offers some entertaining if not always convincing historical explanations. I enjoyed this aspect of the book well enough to be satisfied with my expenditure, even if I am convinced that I will have to be more than patient in waiting for the sequel the ending of the book leads its readers to expect.
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  • Leons1701
    July 28, 2017
    Despite being smack dab in one of my favorite genres and the main author being Flint, one of the stronger practitioners of said sub-genre, this ended up bordering dangerous close to meh. Some definite potential for the sequel(s) but nowhere near as strong as 1632. Perhaps it's the lack of real connection to most of the characters, with viewpoints being far too scattered to really fix on more than one or two strong characters (and with none of those being entirely memorable). Perhaps it's the rus Despite being smack dab in one of my favorite genres and the main author being Flint, one of the stronger practitioners of said sub-genre, this ended up bordering dangerous close to meh. Some definite potential for the sequel(s) but nowhere near as strong as 1632. Perhaps it's the lack of real connection to most of the characters, with viewpoints being far too scattered to really fix on more than one or two strong characters (and with none of those being entirely memorable). Perhaps it's the rush of events, with little time spent on explaining how people are dealing with them. Most likely, its a combination of the two, a cast of thousands and a relatively modest tome covering a very eventful year mean there is little to no depth to this book, and that is sad. There's some nice stuff about the resources of a modern cruise ship and some fair evidence the writers have done their research, but I can't help but feel a lot of things just get glossed over. This could easily have been a four or maybe even five star book, instead I find myself wondering if just maybe three stars wasn't generous.
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  • Tony
    August 1, 2017
    This book was entertaining. That said, I found the treatment pre-Alexander historical events suspect. Most can be explained by misunderstanding of the characters, but the biggest one to bug me was the supposed Christian wanting to prevent the death of Jesus Christ. According to the New Testament, Jesus came to die for our sins, so why would a Christian want to prevent such an essential event to our Christian faith? Like the Apostle Peter, none of us would want Jesus to die, but all true Christia This book was entertaining. That said, I found the treatment pre-Alexander historical events suspect. Most can be explained by misunderstanding of the characters, but the biggest one to bug me was the supposed Christian wanting to prevent the death of Jesus Christ. According to the New Testament, Jesus came to die for our sins, so why would a Christian want to prevent such an essential event to our Christian faith? Like the Apostle Peter, none of us would want Jesus to die, but all true Christians understand why He had to die, and then rise again. So if just did not make sense for a Christian to want to stop that pivotal event. Another reviewer mentioned this same issue, and to them it felt either lazy on the part of the authors, or just treating the Christian as an idiot while every other religious person makes a certain degree of sense, whether we agree with them or not.Now, the story of the above mentioned Christian is actually a very minor subplot. The rest was quite interesting. Not my favorite Flint book, but also not a waste of my time.
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  • Andreas
    July 27, 2017
    A modern cruise liner is transported back to the beginning of the "Time of the Diadochi", after the death of Alexander the Great, when his successors fought over his splintering empire.The premise is a fine idea, but unfortunately the story suffers from being set in a very messy historical time. Dozens of players are rapidly introduced, leading to just as rapid confusion. While the story does gel somewhat around the characters of Roxane and Euridyce, it is hard for the reader to get to grips wit A modern cruise liner is transported back to the beginning of the "Time of the Diadochi", after the death of Alexander the Great, when his successors fought over his splintering empire.The premise is a fine idea, but unfortunately the story suffers from being set in a very messy historical time. Dozens of players are rapidly introduced, leading to just as rapid confusion. While the story does gel somewhat around the characters of Roxane and Euridyce, it is hard for the reader to get to grips with the wider political situation. Where the book shines is when dealing with the culture shock of people from ancient civilisations being suddenly introduced to things like steam engines, refrigeration and modern views on gender equality. There is a wide ranging discussion of slavery which manages to be quite interesting.This book is part of the wider Assiti Shards Universe, though it can be treated as a singleton.http://www.books.rosboch.net/?p=2072
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  • C.
    August 1, 2017
    I very much wanted to like this; I'm fond of the authors, and the concept is cool. But it just felt like it badly needed another pass of editing and revision. Too many dropped narrative threads that didn't go anywhere yet, too many conversations where people reached conclusions without any apparent means of getting there... it felt a little too much like the characters had already read the forum discussion about the planning of the series.Also, while the one point where a couple of the uptime ch I very much wanted to like this; I'm fond of the authors, and the concept is cool. But it just felt like it badly needed another pass of editing and revision. Too many dropped narrative threads that didn't go anywhere yet, too many conversations where people reached conclusions without any apparent means of getting there... it felt a little too much like the characters had already read the forum discussion about the planning of the series.Also, while the one point where a couple of the uptime characters make a homophobic joke didn't really bother me overmuch, it was clearly not meant maliciously and was in character for their friendly banter, but it did make it all too obvious that somehow this ship of 5,000 people had no visible queer characters.
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  • MAB LongBeach
    May 15, 2017
    A side book to Flint's long-running Ring of Fire series, of which the 1632 universe is the best-known portion. A modern cruise ship and its fuel tender are tranferred from the present day Caribbean to the Mediterranean a few years after Alexander the Great's death. Their presence promptly starts to change things, perhaps for the better.The writing is smooth enough, it's an interesting premise, and the effects seem well-worked-out to this non-scholar. But most of the characterizations are pretty A side book to Flint's long-running Ring of Fire series, of which the 1632 universe is the best-known portion. A modern cruise ship and its fuel tender are tranferred from the present day Caribbean to the Mediterranean a few years after Alexander the Great's death. Their presence promptly starts to change things, perhaps for the better.The writing is smooth enough, it's an interesting premise, and the effects seem well-worked-out to this non-scholar. But most of the characterizations are pretty sketchy. The ending leaves a lot of room for a sequel; if so, I'll probably read it. Overall, it's not a bad book. But it isn't as good as it could be.If this sounds like your kind of thing, it's worth picking up.
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  • Allen McDonnell
    July 14, 2017
    Fast readI bought this novel yesterday morning and finished it just after noon today, a fast read and hard to put down. I enjoyed the story and I understand the focus on the Empire built by Alexander the Great, but I find myself wishing for a set of common folks of the era viewpoints. Yes they lacked overt political power, but introduction of 15th through 19th century technologies would be incredibly disruptive to lifestyles on every strata of society. The elites make it in the history books, bu Fast readI bought this novel yesterday morning and finished it just after noon today, a fast read and hard to put down. I enjoyed the story and I understand the focus on the Empire built by Alexander the Great, but I find myself wishing for a set of common folks of the era viewpoints. Yes they lacked overt political power, but introduction of 15th through 19th century technologies would be incredibly disruptive to lifestyles on every strata of society. The elites make it in the history books, but they are a tiny slice of the total population.Other than that objection I highly recommend the novel and very much enjoyed the ideas it has sparked for the playgrounds of the mind.
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  • Dani
    July 29, 2017
    "The Alexander Inheritance" is a spinoff from the '1632' franchise. If a modern town can be transported to 17th-century Germany and change history, why shouldn't a modern cruise ship be transported to the Mediterranean, shortly after Alexander's death, when his empire was starting to disintegrate?The book has the flaws of the weaker books of the 1632 franchise. They are exposition heavy: The authors spent a lot of time and effort researching the era, and they want to share. The characters are tw "The Alexander Inheritance" is a spinoff from the '1632' franchise. If a modern town can be transported to 17th-century Germany and change history, why shouldn't a modern cruise ship be transported to the Mediterranean, shortly after Alexander's death, when his empire was starting to disintegrate?The book has the flaws of the weaker books of the 1632 franchise. They are exposition heavy: The authors spent a lot of time and effort researching the era, and they want to share. The characters are two-dimensional and hard to care about. (These are not general weaknesses in Flint's writing, but this book isn't really "by Eric Flint", but by other writers playing in Flint's literary back yard.) And there isn't much story supporting the authors' competent technical what-if exercise.
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  • Kevin Brown
    July 20, 2017
    A bunch of people on a cruise ship get transported back in time to the end of Alexander's Empire is such a great idea. Making all of the characters feel like everyone else is making foolish decisions is deliciously hilarious but also very realistic. Things come apart and smash together in a very enjoyable way.
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  • Carl Schierhorn
    July 8, 2017
    Enjoyable but not 1632 caliber. Biggest problem was lack of strong 20th Century protagonist. There were good people, but no one was developed enough to really identify with.Strongest characters were the two Alexandrian queens, especially Roxane.
  • Brian
    July 4, 2017
    A Promising StartThe Alexander Inheritance seems to be a promising start to a new series about refugees in time. It would be nice if there was more "show" instead of "tell" in future entries.
  • Barbara Ghylin
    July 6, 2017
    having read several of the "ring of fire" series. I am having a great time reading this one. Keep it up Eric Flint!!!๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿ‘Not ready for this one to end๐Ÿ˜Ÿ
  • Frank
    July 19, 2017
    I liked the idea. The book was a little lackluster.
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