Meddling Kids
For fans of John Dies at the End and Welcome to Night Vale comes a tour de force of horror, humor, and H.P. Lovecraft. The surviving members of a forgotten teenage detective club (and their dog) must reunite as broken adults to finally solve the terrifying case that ruined them all and sent the wrong man to prison. Scooby Doo and the gang never had to do this!1990. The teen detectives once known as the Blyton Summer Detective Club (of Blyton Hills, a small mining town in the Zoinx River Valley in Oregon) are all grown up and haven't seen each other since their fateful, final case in 1977. Andy, the tomboy, is twenty-five and on the run, wanted in at least two states. Kerri, one-time kid genius and budding biologist, is bartending in New York, working on a serious drinking problem. At least she's got Tim, an excitable Weimaraner descended from the original canine member of the team. Nate, the horror nerd, has spent the last thirteen years in and out of mental health institutions, and currently resides in an asylum in Arhkam, Massachusetts. The only friend he still sees is Peter, the handsome jock turned movie star. The problem is, Peter's been dead for years.The time has come to uncover the source of their nightmares and return to where it all began in 1977. This time, it better not be a man in a mask. The real monsters are waiting.With raucous humor and brilliantly orchestrated mayhem, Edgar Cantero's Meddling Kids taps into our shared nostalgia for the books and cartoons we grew up with, and delivers an exuberant, eclectic, and highly entertaining celebration of horror, life, friendship, and many-tentacled, interdimensional demon spawn.

Meddling Kids Details

TitleMeddling Kids
Author
FormatHardcover
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 11th, 2017
PublisherDoubleday Books
ISBN0385541996
ISBN-139780385541992
Number of pages336 pages
Rating
GenreHorror, Mystery, Fiction, Fantasy

Meddling Kids Review

  • Morgannah
    January 26, 2017
    This book is a disguise. What appears to be an action packed somewhat silly story about a grown up Scooby Gang is actually an intelligent piece of satire filled with brilliance and acute observations about coming of age and facing your fears and reality.At just over 330 pages there is not a wasted word nor a wasted sentence. It is drum-tight and relentlessly smart and, though it does have cartoonish moments, it's deeply felt and incredibly moving.This genre defying tale is part horror, part scie This book is a disguise. What appears to be an action packed somewhat silly story about a grown up Scooby Gang is actually an intelligent piece of satire filled with brilliance and acute observations about coming of age and facing your fears and reality.At just over 330 pages there is not a wasted word nor a wasted sentence. It is drum-tight and relentlessly smart and, though it does have cartoonish moments, it's deeply felt and incredibly moving.This genre defying tale is part horror, part science fiction, part mystery and much more. I do fear that the average every day reader looking for an action adventure will not be able to peel back the layers of everything the author has done here. It is absolutely unlike anything I have ever read. I highly recommend it on entertainment factor alone but also for the wonderful prose and thought provoking moments.Many thanks to Mr. Cantero for my review copy.
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  • Evie
    June 3, 2017
    Whoa! This was intensely fun and entertaining! Probably the coolest book I've read this year. Fans of H.P.Lovecraft and Scooby Doo will devour this. Think Meddling Kids only much darker and more twisted, with a truly gripping, edge-of-your-seat storyline. 5 shining stars from me!
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  • Sadie Hartmann
    June 24, 2017
    Oh....this book. It took me awhile to formulate what I really wanted to say about this book while also trying to maintain a constructive attitude about it. It's not my job as a reader to totally dismantle another person's hard work, so I won't let this digress.The premise (and the cover) and the way it was presented to me are the reasons I accepted this ARC (Thank you Doubleday for this ARC for an honest review)Scooby Doo meats Lovecraft.An interesting pairing. Like chewing Bubblegum and a drink Oh....this book. It took me awhile to formulate what I really wanted to say about this book while also trying to maintain a constructive attitude about it. It's not my job as a reader to totally dismantle another person's hard work, so I won't let this digress.The premise (and the cover) and the way it was presented to me are the reasons I accepted this ARC (Thank you Doubleday for this ARC for an honest review)Scooby Doo meats Lovecraft.An interesting pairing. Like chewing Bubblegum and a drinking a fine wine at the same time.I knew within twenty pages that this book was going to slide off the rails for me. First, it should be a screenplay. The author dips in and out of a screenplay format which was so jarring to the flow of the story I cannot believe it will make it past an editor that way.There are literally stage directions in the middle of the narrative. Sometimes dialogue is written in a traditional way for a novel and sometimes it's like you're reading a manuscript for a play. WTF?I'm sorry but that angered me.Also, the author invents his own words. Words that shouldn't exist for a reason!Example:A character offers the others a bit of movie trivia and instead of the author saying, "he said" the author said he "triviaed"A character "innerstruggled" to tell someone something important.A character "tragichuckled".I got so irritated with these ridiculous words that I almost DNF but I pushed on.The plot got better once the characters went back to their childhood vacation spot to revisit a mystery they all solved when they were kids. But really, everything else about this book clouded my judgment and eventually ruined the story for me as well.I'm afraid the only thing keeping this book from a one star review was that there were a few creepy moments and this was a clever story-it's just a shame the author didn't see fit to write a novel straight and chose to dazzle us with his cleverness. I wasn't dazzled.
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  • Amanda
    March 10, 2017
    Blogged here! The buzz about Meddling Kids focuses on its similarity to Scooby-Doo, Where Are You!, the 70's era Hanna-Barbera show about four teenagers tooling around their mystery machine and solving improbable mysteries, which followed a strict formula: * A [ghost/ werewolf/ vampire/ lagoon creature] is bedeviling the [fairground/ haunted mansion/ local library/ gas station]!! The gang investigates. * At some point, they split up to look for clues. * They're chased by the monster(s), usuall Blogged here! The buzz about Meddling Kids focuses on its similarity to Scooby-Doo, Where Are You!, the 70's era Hanna-Barbera show about four teenagers tooling around their mystery machine and solving improbable mysteries, which followed a strict formula: * A [ghost/ werewolf/ vampire/ lagoon creature] is bedeviling the [fairground/ haunted mansion/ local library/ gas station]!! The gang investigates. * At some point, they split up to look for clues. * They're chased by the monster(s), usually some zany way involving corridors or staircases or suits of armour. * Eventually, the kids realize that the [ghost/ werewolf/ vampire/ lagoon creature] and any paranormal activity is just a hoax. * They use an overly-complicated Rube Goldberg-esque trap designed by Fred to capture and unmask the villain. * His identity and dastardly deeds exposed, the villain exclaims, "... and I would have gotten away with it, too, if it hadn't been for you meddling kids!" The DNA of Meddling Kids definitely owes a debt to the Scooby Gang - Kerri's glorious red hair (which has a personality all it's own), is an homage to Daphne's ginger crowning glory. In Meddling Kids the kids have named themselves the "Blyton Summer Detective Club (BSDC)", and are famed for solving the same sorts of mysteries as the Scooby Gang, following the same formula (improbably traps and all), and having a large, enthusiastic dog to assist (a Weimaraner as opposed to a Great Dane, but close enough).Dig a little deeper, though, and you'll spot that Meddling Kids has just as much in common with other teen-detective stories. The town they did their investigative work is named Blyton hills - so named, clearly, for Enid Blyton, author of the Famous Five and Secret Seven series'.  In the Famous Five, there are four teens – well, tweens, really, as they are all about 11 to 13 (the same age range as the BSDC when they started solving crimes). They too, have a dog (the indomitable Timmy), they spend their time camping and fishing (as to the BSDC) and Meddling Kids' Andy is clearly the Latina version of fiery-tempered tomboy George.The allusions to kid detectives don't end there - an article written about the BSDC's exploits has the byline Nancy Drew. I'm sure there were even more references I just didn't catch, or take note of!Meddling Kids opens thirteen years after the BSDC's final case. A case that left them afraid, and damaged. One has died of an overdose, one is a fugitive, one is an alcoholic, and one has committed himself to an asylum.  Andy rounds up the surviving crew (and Tim, the grandson of the original excitable Weimeraner): it's time to return to Blyton Hills, and solve this once and for all.A crazy mishmash of pop-culture references, stylistic changes, sudden tonal shifts, crafty wordsmithing, Meddling Kids is the "Enid-Blyton-meets-Buffy-meets-Scooby-Doo-meets-Lovecraft" story you didn't know you needed, but do.  The horror is horrifying, the sense of dread appropriately creepy, the dialogue snap-crackle-pops. Underneath it all, beneath the quirk and the ichor, lurks its secret heart: a coming-of-age tale about childhood friendships surviving to adulthood, the anomie of reaching your 20's and feeling adrift,  overcoming your (sometimes literal) demons and finally, maybe, growing up.Provided by Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Tammy
    January 15, 2017
    DNF. I tried, I really did try, but I could not finish. Excellent premise for a story--that of a "scooby gang" finding out there was always something more lurking behind their innocent childhood mysteries. I really liked who the characters are in the present and where they've traveled since their childhood, and I liked their various reactions to returning. But this book badly needs some editing. It was nowhere near ready to be sent out as an ARC. One thing that drove me bats was the author's res DNF. I tried, I really did try, but I could not finish. Excellent premise for a story--that of a "scooby gang" finding out there was always something more lurking behind their innocent childhood mysteries. I really liked who the characters are in the present and where they've traveled since their childhood, and I liked their various reactions to returning. But this book badly needs some editing. It was nowhere near ready to be sent out as an ARC. One thing that drove me bats was the author's resistance to "said" instead using words like "wowed" and "tragichuckled."I would like to read this book someday after it's gone through a few rounds of editing. I think there's an entertaining story in there.[I received this book free from NetGalley in exchange for an unbiased review.]
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  • L.P. Logan
    January 24, 2017
    As far as chintzy retellings of Scooby-Doo go, this one wasn't too bad -- but it wasn't that great either. You see, I think it lost some things in trying to tell things from an "adult" perspective. Suddenly there are love stories, and mental issues, and deaths, and yada yada yada, that really took away from the story instead of adding to it. Stick with the original, tried and true storylines and you've got yourself a keeper. So would I recommend this book to anyone?? Probably not. Would I say it As far as chintzy retellings of Scooby-Doo go, this one wasn't too bad -- but it wasn't that great either. You see, I think it lost some things in trying to tell things from an "adult" perspective. Suddenly there are love stories, and mental issues, and deaths, and yada yada yada, that really took away from the story instead of adding to it. Stick with the original, tried and true storylines and you've got yourself a keeper. So would I recommend this book to anyone?? Probably not. Would I say it was horrible, Probably not. Which leaves me square in the middle of being both disenchanted and appreciative of the author's efforts.
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  • Nancy
    June 25, 2017
    Review to follow
  • Jennifer
    January 8, 2017
    First off, I gotta say this is a fantastic premise for a book--one which will likely make any child of the 70s squeal. It's basically the Scooby Gang if all the stuff the gang THOUGHT was going on was actually happening. In other words, there is no guy in a spooky mask faking it all, there are actually people being raised from the dead and walking wheezing demons and blood offerings. So, is this a scary book? Eh. I'm not sure I'm the right one to ask. Likely might be for some. Certainly spooky. First off, I gotta say this is a fantastic premise for a book--one which will likely make any child of the 70s squeal. It's basically the Scooby Gang if all the stuff the gang THOUGHT was going on was actually happening. In other words, there is no guy in a spooky mask faking it all, there are actually people being raised from the dead and walking wheezing demons and blood offerings. So, is this a scary book? Eh. I'm not sure I'm the right one to ask. Likely might be for some. Certainly spooky. Certainly funny though, too.There is a lot going on in this book, stylistically. Too much? Perhaps. Sometimes the editorial adventures (like switching from narration or script style, or entire paragraphs that appeared to be one sentence, or blurring the line between what's written and what's read-- i.e. "two lines later, they were still stunned") were delightful, but other times I felt like I was sitting on the floor in front of a newly woken puppy, shouting "JUST HOLD STILL SO I CAN ACTUALLY LOVE YOU!" Basically whoever edited this book has some serious balls. Even if I didn't always appreciate that fact while I was READING the book, I appreciate the spirit, overall.Thanks to the author and NetGalley for granting me the opportunity to read this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Steph
    January 18, 2017
    Meddling Kids takes place in 1990; thirteen years since the Blyton Summer Detective Club disbanded after their final and most unsettling case. Now the kids are in their 20s and are reuniting to revisit the dark scene of the Sleepy Lake Monster Case. It's tempting to cast these new characters as the members of the Scooby Doo gang; familiar figures whose lives have gone terribly wrong. The dead Peter, who visits the story as a frequent hallucination, is described as the "golden boy" and leader of Meddling Kids takes place in 1990; thirteen years since the Blyton Summer Detective Club disbanded after their final and most unsettling case. Now the kids are in their 20s and are reuniting to revisit the dark scene of the Sleepy Lake Monster Case. It's tempting to cast these new characters as the members of the Scooby Doo gang; familiar figures whose lives have gone terribly wrong. The dead Peter, who visits the story as a frequent hallucination, is described as the "golden boy" and leader of the group - clearly Fred. Brainy Kerri, who intended to become a biologist but has become an alcoholic, would be Velma. The next two are more of a stretch. The tough latina lesbian, Andy, is a drifter with violent tendencies; far more interesting than Daphne ever was. Nate has the smallest personality of them all; he is obsessed with horror and has been shuffled through several mental institutions - perhaps Shaggy?But I think these new characters are fleshed-out enough to stand on their own. They are more than mere caricatures of the Scooby Doo gang. Especially because they are never without their Weimaraner, Tim - an adorable dog with just as much personality as Scooby ever had. This is a dark story that often relies on comic relief, and the funniest parts are those involving Tim's doggy cuteness.Meddling Kids is not without twists, but to me the biggest surprise was the excellent writing. I expected a basic monster mystery with some Scooby Doo vibes, but this book has so much more. It has been a long time since I've read a book that is so literary, so image-saturated, so heavy on the metaphors. Cantero's writing can be so poetic: Night closed in on them. For a while they stayed on I-84, flowing along with other blurry sets of white and red lights, carrying other silent wraithlike people in their tiny warm sepia-lit cubicles pretending to have their own places to go and lives to live, and Andy gazed at them while Kerri drove and silently challenged them to have a better story to tell. And Cantero does not stop with beautiful prose; his writing is peppered with not-quite-words ("myriaphonic"? "hyperadjectivated"?) which get their point across, even if they cannot be found in any dictionary. I adapted my attitude to allow me to enjoy Cantero's over-the-top writing style, but I imagine his writing might be an annoyance to those who are just here for the Scooby Doo nostalgia and the monster mystery tropes.As for the Scooby Doo theme - Meddling Kids contains many references to the Scooby Doo universe (most memorably, one local landmark is the Zoinx River). However, it is also incredibly self-referential. It is cinematic, and frequently lapses into script-format for short sequences. This might feel like a bothersome reminder that Meddling Kids is purely fabricated fiction, but I found it to be an effective way of telling some parts of the story. And the cinematic style feels like a nod to the illogical placement of a laugh track in the early animated episodes of Scooby Doo; its oddity lightens the mood.Throughout the story, many Scooby Doo tropes are fondly revisited: outlandish physical comedy (led by the dog); a road-trip in this gang's own version of a Mystery Machine; arrival at the familiar but now-deserted town of the protagonists' youth; an abandoned chemical plant; an abandoned mine; a haunted house; encounters with two different brands of lake monster; and even a self-described "lengthy villain monologue."This is a mystery, of course, and there is a lot of action. Long action sequences are not something I particularly enjoy reading, so I did some skimming during these scenes. Especially when things got really violent. Unnecessary descriptions of violence and gore are not my thing, and I think this story was dark enough without showing every splash of lake monster blood.I can overlook the violence and some other stylistic choices that bothered me. What I cannot overlook is the misplaced ignorance and bigotry in this story. At first it was just a creeping inkling of ickiness - an extremely minor character is described using the outdated and offensive term "hermaphrodite." Further, this character is described as having a "split brain." The ignorance here is particularly astounding because it is so unnecessary - this has no place in the story. Later on, there is a similarly uncomfortable twist - (view spoiler)[we discover that the villain, Dunia Deboen, is actually the immortal Damian Deboen of folklore, after having had a sex change. Yes, really. In 2017, this is the kind of twist that is being written. Maybe it could work if it were written properly, but I feel that it was just added for shock value, to keep us from suspecting Deboen and to make her seem even more strange and villainous - classic queer-coding (hide spoiler)]. On top of this, as the story progresses, there is an increasing level of unnecessary misogynistic epithets - usually yelled by our protagonists - probably as an attempt at comic relief?? That's my only guess, because I honestly don't know why Cantero would choose to include so many offensive words; it is really unacceptable.As far as gender stuff, the redeeming factor is Andy. Andy is amazing. She is an unapologetically gender-non-conforming woman; she is the best fighter of the group; she leads the story. And, of course, she has harbored love for Kerri since their youth. I kept waiting for something terrible to happen to Andy, or for something to sabotage her chances with Kerri - but Cantero is merciful, more or less. Andy is the most likable and most well-developed character in the story; without her, I would not have enjoyed Meddling Kids nearly as much.There are definitely things that I wish were different about the book (even aside from the offensive elements - there are many loose ends and other iffy parts of the story). But overall, I think it's a boldly written book; recommended for nostalgic Scooby fans.Thank you to Netgalley and Doubleday Books for providing me with a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All quotes are from the advance copy and are subject to change upon publication.
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  • Kayla Ashley
    December 19, 2016
    I was absolutely obsessed with all things Scooby Doo growing up. Therefore, I'm incredibly excited to read this! This book better be awesome!!!
  • Chessa
    June 12, 2017
    As a lifelong fan of Scooby Doo (who had VERY STRONG OPINIONS of such things as the creators changing the theme song when I was 4), I thought this sounded like a fun romp of a book. It might have been, but it contains some really troubling language that was both unnecessary and extrememly disappointing.For example: Pretty early on, as we're getting introduced to all the main players in the story, we're taken to an asylum. The opening scene there is one of the main trouble spots. The author is se As a lifelong fan of Scooby Doo (who had VERY STRONG OPINIONS of such things as the creators changing the theme song when I was 4), I thought this sounded like a fun romp of a book. It might have been, but it contains some really troubling language that was both unnecessary and extrememly disappointing.For example: Pretty early on, as we're getting introduced to all the main players in the story, we're taken to an asylum. The opening scene there is one of the main trouble spots. The author is setting the scene, talking about other patients there before we even meet Nate. On one page he describes a character named Kimrean - so the character has a name. But in two different instances, the character is referred to as "the hermaphrodite." At first, the term took me aback, because we have much better language to talk about trans/intersex life these days. I wondered if I was being "overly sensitive" because it IS supposed to be 1990. But then when I went back to reread it, it's not just the term hermaphrodite that is troubling. It's the fact that he refers to a named character as both "the schizophrenic hermaphrodite" and again as "the hermaphrodite." Why?! It's such incredibly othering language, and it's just lazy. That is what makes it offensive. Despite it being set in 1990, it was written long after that -and I am CERTAIN that the author could have handled this scene with more care. Instead, he went for the cheap laugh (of the "look at all the freaky people!" variety), and it really failed.So, if I could excise that scene from the book and my memory, how would I feel about the book? It was okay. I didn't love it, but it was definitely a unique story. There is a sense of snarky, overly clever humor (the kind where you can imagine the author being so entertained by his own wit) threaded through that might work really well for you, or it might make you cringe - it was about 30/70 worked/didn't work for me. Words like "tragichuckled" don't exist FOR A REASON.The pacing was odd. And there are no chapters, just Parts (I think 1-5). I kind of missed the endpoint of chapters for pacing's sake. It was the kind of book where if I was reading it, I found it compelling enough, but I was NOT rushing to get back to it between readings. I should say that I have never read Lovecraft, so I can't speak to that aspect of the book.If it was cleaned up a LOT, and sensitivity readers/writers were brought in, it could make a fun summer movie - that's what I kept thinking as I read it. It needs a rewrite. I could not in good conscience recommend this book to anyone as it is now.Thanks to NetGalley and Doubleday for a copy of this book in exchange for a very honest review.
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  • David Sodergren
    June 16, 2017
    It's tough to review anything that has a lot of humour in it, because what I find funny could be very different to you. The humour in Meddling Kids mostly failed to connect with me, which is a shame as the dramatic parts of the book are often terrific. There are two sequences (one by a foggy lake and one underground) that were actually pretty scary, although the climax is somewhat undone by a lot of anachronistic humour and pages and pages of exposition. That said, I was entertained for large pa It's tough to review anything that has a lot of humour in it, because what I find funny could be very different to you. The humour in Meddling Kids mostly failed to connect with me, which is a shame as the dramatic parts of the book are often terrific. There are two sequences (one by a foggy lake and one underground) that were actually pretty scary, although the climax is somewhat undone by a lot of anachronistic humour and pages and pages of exposition. That said, I was entertained for large parts of the book, which honours its inspirations - Scooby Doo and Lovecraft - admirably. But why oh why is so much of the dialogue written in screenplay format, complete with stage and editing directions? It must be intended as an homage to the television origins of Scooby Doo, but it kinda comes across as a lazy way of writing dialogue.I may sound overly critical, but I really wanted to love this book. It's definitely worth a read, and if you enjoy the humour then add another star onto my rating. I just wish it was a 50/50 split between Scooby and Lovecraft - as it is, the goofball humour wins out over the scares.
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  • Lisa
    April 18, 2017
    “I would have gotten away with it, too, if it wasn’t for those meddling kids!” If you grew up watching Scooby Doo, you’re familiar with that sentiment. The latest book by Edgar Cantero, Meddling Kids , certainly takes its inspiration from that classic animated series — it could also be comfortably at home alongside Buffy the Vampire Slayer, It, or Stranger Things. With a healthy dash of H.P. Lovecraft thrown in for good measure.It’s a familiar premise. Teen sleuths (and their dog) solving myste “I would have gotten away with it, too, if it wasn’t for those meddling kids!” If you grew up watching Scooby Doo, you’re familiar with that sentiment. The latest book by Edgar Cantero, Meddling Kids , certainly takes its inspiration from that classic animated series — it could also be comfortably at home alongside Buffy the Vampire Slayer, It, or Stranger Things. With a healthy dash of H.P. Lovecraft thrown in for good measure.It’s a familiar premise. Teen sleuths (and their dog) solving mysteries, fighting monsters, and saving the day. What happens when those teens grow up, though? Could they still be haunted their cases? Are there questions left unanswered or mysteries unresolved? How would that affect them going forward in their lives? Meddling Kids aims to address those questions, and does so in an entertaining and meaningful way.The plot has its roots in the mid-70s, when best friends Kerri, Nate, Andy, Peter, and their dog Sean made up the Blyton Summer Detective Club. After the summer of 1977, the kids move on with their lives — but each remains haunted by their final case. Fast forward to 1990. Andy, the tomboy, has anger issues and is on the run after escaping prison. Nate, the horror/fantasy nerd, has been in and out of mental institutions. Kerri, budding scientist and the brains of the group, has a drinking problem. Peter, the golden boy, saw success as a movie star, only to have his life end in suicide. The doesn’t stop him from visiting his old friend, Nate, however.Andy realizes the only way for them all to truly move on is confront their nightmares and re-open their last case. To do that, they must return to Blyton Hills. They soon realize that there are very real monsters waiting for them, and they are the only ones properly equipped to deal with them once and for all. They are joined in their efforts by Tim, a descendant of their canine companion, Sean.Cantero has written fresh characters that pop off the page in an authentic way. Each one, with their myriad issues, is fully formed and relatable. We all know these people, to some degree. We’ve all had those deep childhood friendships that never really go away, no matter how the years pass or the miles separate. That’s what makes you root for these people. And Tim - He's the best!The plot takes several surprising turns and keeps you guessing till its satisfying end. It’s filled with humor, intelligence, heart, and genuine scares and thrills as the detectives get closer to the truth. Cantero is also a very visual writer, so it’s not difficult to see the story unfold in your mind’s eye. Meddling Kids is scheduled for release this July, and it would make a fine addition to your summer reading list! Note: This book is geared toward adult readers.(Thank you to Penguin Random House for providing a copy of this book for review purposes.)
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  • Al
    February 6, 2017
    So, so much fun. Not quite as mind-bending as Supernatural Enhancements, but the humor in this more than made up for it. Funny, fun, disturbing and offbeat with moments that are truly scary, this book was pretty much everything I was hoping it would be.
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  • Heather
    March 31, 2017
    Scooby-Doo meets Lovecraft, this novel was both wittier and darker than I expected. I am a huge Scooby-Doo fan, which made this novel a must-read. Cantero took the framework of that beloved show and built a new world around it - one full of shadow creatures, necromancy, and the concept of growing up. To balance these darker elements, he added wit and satire and a few laugh-out-loud moments. I thoroughly enjoyed this novel and will be recommending it a lot.
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  • Jen Naughton
    June 13, 2017
    I bailed on this book at the 29% mark at the word "tragichuckle" It's a miss for me. Great premise, it just didn't pan out.
  • Jennifer
    January 22, 2017
    This was great fun. I'm a late 60s-early 70s kid, the original Scooby-Doo cartoons, and the lure of teen sleuths with a loyal dog returning as 20-somethings to solve a mystery was too much to pass up. I would recommend people just go along for the ride...suspend disbelief (it's fiction, folks, and a horror story at that!) and enjoy! Many thanks to Edelweiss and the publisher for the EARC.
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  • Carrie Nelson
    March 17, 2017
    Meddling Kids is the love child of Scooby Doo and H.P. Lovecraft. Cantero created a wild and crazy ride with a little surprise at the end. Highly recommended if you're looking for something fun to read.
  • Stephanie Mohler
    December 26, 2016
    ARC from Edelweiss Weird- very weird, yet entertaining book. Not sure who I'd reccomend this one to- someone who liked Scooby Doo as a kid?
  • Juli
    June 4, 2017
    So.....what if the members of a certain famous teenage sleuthing group (and their dog) grew up into (seriously damaged) adults and realized they had been totally wrong about their most famous case? Throw in a bit of Lovecraftian creepiness and serious homage to that-Saturday-morning-cartoon-that-shall-not-be-named (Cough...Scooby....Cough), and you've got Meddling Kids.Back in 1977 the meddling kids and their dog solved the Sleepy Lake Mystery. Well, actually, they thought they did. It's now 199 So.....what if the members of a certain famous teenage sleuthing group (and their dog) grew up into (seriously damaged) adults and realized they had been totally wrong about their most famous case? Throw in a bit of Lovecraftian creepiness and serious homage to that-Saturday-morning-cartoon-that-shall-not-be-named (Cough...Scooby....Cough), and you've got Meddling Kids.Back in 1977 the meddling kids and their dog solved the Sleepy Lake Mystery. Well, actually, they thought they did. It's now 1990, and the former members of the Blyton Summer Detective Club discover the old man they sent to prison wasn't really the culprit behind their famous case. The monster that was creeping through the woods wasn't an old man in a costume.....it was....a real monster. [Insert familiar music stab here] Dah-da-dah-dah-dah! I love this book! Not only is it sprinkled with a lot of references from my youth, but it's just a cool story based on what might have happened if certain meddling kids and their stupid dog actually ran up against a case that wasn't as easily solved as the others. The book is a fun read! I loved how the author chose unusual words and turns of phrase within the story. It just fit the quirkiness of the plot, and gave the story a fun(ny) edge. As soon as I finished reading my digital review copy I put in a preorder for the actual book that comes out in July. This is definitely a fun, quirky read that is going on my keeper shelf. :) This book is not for kids -- it's an adult book. There are some colorful metaphors and adult situations. The gang has grown up....so use parental guidance when allowing your meddling kids to read this one. PG13 at least in my opinion. Edgar Cantero is also the author of The Supernatural Enhancements. To find out more about the author, please check out his website: http://punkahoy.blogspot.com/
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  • Sofie
    June 20, 2017
    I absolutely loved this book. High-tempo, fun, lovecraftian horror and trope twisting. While not perfect in every way it still had me completely engulfed and thrilled. The book is a spin on the teenage detective trope where the kids in the end solved the case/demasked the villain and that was it. This takes it a step further. 13 years has passed and the remaining "kids" are still traumatised by their childhood adventures. They return to the scene of one of their famous cases with the idea that m I absolutely loved this book. High-tempo, fun, lovecraftian horror and trope twisting. While not perfect in every way it still had me completely engulfed and thrilled. The book is a spin on the teenage detective trope where the kids in the end solved the case/demasked the villain and that was it. This takes it a step further. 13 years has passed and the remaining "kids" are still traumatised by their childhood adventures. They return to the scene of one of their famous cases with the idea that maybe that monster wasn't just a man in a mask. The book is well written and I love what they did with the characters. Everyone got a fair treatment. My favourite from the Five books George gets her revenge her, not fitting in to the 50's typecasting of girls she has found her niche in the 90's. For me the book could have been less slasher and still great, but we can't get everything.
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  • Megan
    June 14, 2017
    The writing was interesting. I loved the description of one of the characters hair as an almost sentient being. It was kind of wonderful. So were the dog and the penguin. There were moments when I was sure the author was unnecessarily employing a thesaurus, a couple fight scenes dragged on a bit and I would have liked an ending that balanced a bit differently, but this was a fun original story full of satire, witty dialogue, and cool characters. It was exactly what I wanted. I strongly recommend The writing was interesting. I loved the description of one of the characters hair as an almost sentient being. It was kind of wonderful. So were the dog and the penguin. There were moments when I was sure the author was unnecessarily employing a thesaurus, a couple fight scenes dragged on a bit and I would have liked an ending that balanced a bit differently, but this was a fun original story full of satire, witty dialogue, and cool characters. It was exactly what I wanted. I strongly recommend it to and anyone who likes the idea of the Scooby Squad vs Cthulhu should pick up this book. Fans of A. Lee Martinez and Joss Whedon shows will enjoy.
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  • Emily
    June 8, 2017
    A delightful read, fun, quick, and snappy. What if Scooby Doo & the gang met Cthulhu?
  • Kelsi
    January 31, 2017
    Fun read! I enjoyed every single character, especially Nate and Tim! I felt very theatrical, like I was reading a movie script instead of a novel which really worked for this type of plot and characters. I was not expecting the supernatural/alien twist! I'm not certain if I liked it or if I just rolled with it because it brought out a lot of funny dialogue.
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  • Stella
    March 16, 2017
    Did you love Scooby Doo? Do you love kooky mysteries? Do you love other worldly, terrifying things?Meddling Kids by Edgar Cantero opens thirteen years after the Blyton Summer Detective Club’s final case. The final case that changed their lives. One became a Hollywood star and fell into the Hollywood trap and has died of an overdose, one is a fugitive, one is an alcoholic, and one has committed himself to an asylum. Andy (our fugitive) rounds up the surviving crew (and Tim, the grandson of the or Did you love Scooby Doo? Do you love kooky mysteries? Do you love other worldly, terrifying things?Meddling Kids by Edgar Cantero opens thirteen years after the Blyton Summer Detective Club’s final case. The final case that changed their lives. One became a Hollywood star and fell into the Hollywood trap and has died of an overdose, one is a fugitive, one is an alcoholic, and one has committed himself to an asylum. Andy (our fugitive) rounds up the surviving crew (and Tim, the grandson of the original excitable Weimeraner), to return Blyton Hills, and solve the final mystery, once and for all.Cantero has created an entire new genre of books. Is this a mystery? A thriller? A nostalgia romp for children of the 70′? Whatever it is, I loved it. With elements of sci-fi, mystery, humor and the tiniest bit of romance, Meddling Kids is a enjoyable read that is, in the end, the story about those lasting childhood friendships that will never end.Thanks to NetGalley, Edgar Cantero and the publisher for a copy of this book in exchange for this review.
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  • Brooke
    January 10, 2017
    I received this from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.So this is a schlocky romp where an approximation of the Scooby Doo gang is all grown up and fighting the Old Gods. It's silly at times and there are some problematic things in the book, but if you don't mind over the top, campy horror, you will probably enjoy this. However, the story was not strong enough to overcome the problematic issues I had with the book.
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  • Rosa
    January 27, 2017
    Lovecraftian Scooby-Doo
  • David Watson
    June 29, 2017
    Imagine what a story would be like if you had 4 kids and their dog who went around solving mysteries. Each time they solved a mystery they discovered that the culprit was someone in a fake monster suit. Does this sound familiar? This book isn’t about that group of detectives, this story is about the Blyton Summer Detective Club. Back in 1977 they solved their last case throwing a man in jail for pretending to be a lake monster and life hasn’t been the same since.Kerri went on to become a biologi Imagine what a story would be like if you had 4 kids and their dog who went around solving mysteries. Each time they solved a mystery they discovered that the culprit was someone in a fake monster suit. Does this sound familiar? This book isn’t about that group of detectives, this story is about the Blyton Summer Detective Club. Back in 1977 they solved their last case throwing a man in jail for pretending to be a lake monster and life hasn’t been the same since.Kerri went on to become a biologist but can’t seem to hold onto a job and she still lives with a dog who is the descendent of the club’s original dog. Andy is a tomboy wanted in two states who can’t get over the fact that they sent the wrong man to prison. Peter has died of a drug overdose and Nate has been in and out of mental asylums and still talks to Peter’s ghost. All of them are broken adults and the only way to put the past behind them is to return to the scene of their last case and confront the real life monsters at the bottom of the lake.Meddling Kids by Edgar Cantero is what you get when you combine Scooby Doo with H.P. Lovecraft. Hearing the description of this book, I considered it a must read and despite some flaws, it doesn’t disappoint. What makes it stand out is how the story unfolds. In the beginning you hear about how the detective’s last adventure was an open and shut case. Then you see how all of them are damaged in their own way and you realize that there is more to it then meets the eye. You could say that the main idea of this book is about facing your fears. Each of the main characters tried to deny the truth about what happened and acted like they were fine but the truth ruined them and 13 years later they had to face their fears to be able to move on.The thing I didn’t like about Meddling Kids was that it felt like it needed a good editor. Some parts felt dragged out. For instance, there was a scene in a mine shaft that was long and unnecessary, I couldn’t figure out why they had to go down there in the first place. Then there was a scene where Nate reads a passage from an ancient text to bring the lake creatures to life where I was wondering “why is he doing that and why aren’t the others stopping him.” Also, Andy’s obsession with Kerri’s hair really got on my nerves after a while.That being said, this book is worth your time if you like a good mix of horror and humor. The detail that goes into the characters lives shows that Edgar Cantero has a real passion for his creations. It’s like he sat down and said “I wonder what the Scooby gang would be like in real life” and came out with a very detailed description of all of them. What I liked most about this book is that the author gives a mythological explanation for what is going on and he also gets into a scientific explanation as well. There is one scene where Nate and Kerri are arguing about the reason for what’s happening with one talking science and one blaming everything on old gods and ancient texts that make this a must read.
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  • Jill
    June 18, 2017
    In a simpler time, there was a group of kids who solved mysteries. Two guys, two girls, and a dog who spent their summers investigating spooky mansions and haunted houses. Usually, they found that it was just an adult in a costume behind all the "ghost" sightings, and the kids became famous for uncovering the nefarious deeds and the reasons behind them. But during that last case, something happened. Something they couldn't understand. Or explain. Or even talk about. Now it's 13 years later, and In a simpler time, there was a group of kids who solved mysteries. Two guys, two girls, and a dog who spent their summers investigating spooky mansions and haunted houses. Usually, they found that it was just an adult in a costume behind all the "ghost" sightings, and the kids became famous for uncovering the nefarious deeds and the reasons behind them. But during that last case, something happened. Something they couldn't understand. Or explain. Or even talk about. Now it's 13 years later, and the kid detectives are no longer kids. But they're not quite adults either. Each struggling in their individual lives, they decide that the only way to move forward in their lives is to go back. To go back to the last mystery of the Blyton Summer Detective Club of Blyton Hills, Oregon. Keri, the biologist with the flowing red hair, and her weimaraner. Andy, the tomboy who now has to give a court-ordered speech about the danger of her kick to the crotch before getting into a bar fight. Nate, the nerdy sci-fi reader who occasionally checks himself into a mental institute to try to straighten out his head. And Peter, the all-American who became an actor and got hooked on drugs, even Peter is there in his own way. It will take all of their courage, strength, determination, and combined intelligence to solve this final mystery.Edar Cantero took a familiar theme and turned it into a comedic horror novel of epic proportions. The result is Meddling Kids, a laugh-out-loud take on the cartoons of Scooby Doo, with a hearty helping of other pop culture references as well. I don't exactly know how to talk about this book. Because I loved this book. I LOVED this book. It is not enough merely to say this. If I had the means, I would buy palettes of this book and hand it out at malls, at grocery stores, at food kitchens, bookstores, libraries, schools, or anywhere I might find people who know how to read a book. Because I FREAKIN' LOVED THIS BOOK. I have already told my friends to buy this book and read it. I tell everyone I pass in hallways to read this book. And now I am telling you: READ! THIS! BOOK! We all know the Scooby-Doo legend. We all watched the cartoons growing up. This is your chance to go back and relive those moments again, but in the most perfectly amazing way possible. Have I mentioned that I love this book and want everyone to read it? Actually, why are you still reading this? Go buy the book, Meddling Kids by Edgar Cantero, and read it now. Right now! And then tell everyone you know to read it too. You will thank me for this, I promise. Galleys for Meddling Kids provided by Doubleday Books through NetGalley.com, with all of the thanks I could possibly hold. 
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  • Pop Bop
    March 17, 2017
    Forget It Jake, This Is Cantero-TownThere are lots of very earnest reviews of this book that highlight it's take on Scooby-Doo and similar kid detective classics. (The book has shout outs to Enid Blyton and Nancy Drew and so on, and about a million sly references to the whole Scooby-Doo canon, right down to who has red hair. And of course there are lots of Lovecraft references.) There is also a lot of discussion by readers about whether the book works as a horror/humor/Lovecraft/detective mashup Forget It Jake, This Is Cantero-TownThere are lots of very earnest reviews of this book that highlight it's take on Scooby-Doo and similar kid detective classics. (The book has shout outs to Enid Blyton and Nancy Drew and so on, and about a million sly references to the whole Scooby-Doo canon, right down to who has red hair. And of course there are lots of Lovecraft references.) There is also a lot of discussion by readers about whether the book works as a horror/humor/Lovecraft/detective mashup. All of that, of course, is legit, interesting and helpful.But, it should be noted and emphasized that this is a book by Edgar Cantero, and that guarantees it will be both more and less than just a straight up entertainment. Cantero's "The Supernatural Enhancements" delighted some and frustrated, annoyed and outraged others, and this book is a milder chip off that block. So, be warned that this book is a lot more than just a fond trip down Scooby-Doo memory lane.At the risk of introducing the dreaded "meta-fiction" word, that's in part what we have here. Cantero comments on his book as a book within the text of the book. (Along the lines of "...two lines later, they were still stunned".) He occasionally throws in a script format. He makes up words. He uses ridiculously obscure words. ("Borborygmic thunder", where borborygmic means the rumbling sounds made by movement of gas through the intestines.) He addresses the reader. He uses inapt similes and metaphors. He peppers the characters' dialogue with non sequiturs and random thoughts. Verbs become nouns and anything can be an adjective or adverb. People don't see things when they can laser them. Sometimes his intentionally awkward sentence structure makes Cantero feel like English is his second language, after Venusian. Some readers, like me, think this is a hoot; some just get fed up. (BTW, actually and truthfully, he usually writes in Catalan or Spanish. "The Supernatural Enhancements" was his first novel in English.)What is sometimes off-putting with Cantero is that he occasionally seems willing to mock the characters, the genre and his readers. One sometimes gets the feeling that he is above the whole writing-a-book thing and exists on some higher plane than mere book-reading mortals. But then, he tosses in some heart-breaking or lovely bit of prose, or some ridiculously funny throw away line, and you love him all over again.So, you can read this and enjoy it as a Scooby homage/lark. Or, you can read it as an idiosyncratic, experimental, anything-for-a-laugh, meta project by an interesting and sometimes maddening one of a kind author with a taste for disguised bizarro. Whichever way you go this is certainly a lot more interesting, entertaining and rewarding than any other Scooby-Doo based novel you're likely to find. I always enjoy checking out what Cantero is up to. Consider yourself warned, or is it invited?(Please note that I received a free advance ecopy of this book without a review requirement, or any influence, (which I would in any event ignore), regarding review content should I choose to post a review. Apart from that I have no connection at all to either the author or the publisher of this book.)
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