The Marsh King's Daughter
The suspense thriller of the year - The Marsh King's Daughter will captivate you from the start and chill you to the bone.'I was born two years into my mother's captivity. She was three weeks shy of seventeen. If I had known then what I do now, things would have been a lot different. I wouldn't have adored my father.'When notorious child abductor - known as the Marsh King - escapes from a maximum security prison, Helena immediately suspects that she and her two young daughters are in danger.No one, not even her husband, knows the truth about Helena's past: they don't know that she was born into captivity, that she had no contact with the outside world before the age of twelve - or that her father raised her to be a killer.And they don't know that the Marsh King can survive and hunt in the wilderness better than anyone... except, perhaps his own daughter.Packed with gripping suspense and powerful storytelling, The Marsh King's Daughter is a one-more-page, read-in-one-sitting thriller that you'll remember for ever.

The Marsh King's Daughter Details

TitleThe Marsh King's Daughter
Author
FormatHardcover
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 13th, 2017
PublisherG.P. Putnam's Sons
ISBN0735213003
ISBN-139780735213005
Number of pages320 pages
Rating
GenreThriller, Fiction, Mystery, Suspense

The Marsh King's Daughter Review

  • Deanna
    May 1, 2017
    My reviews can also be seen at: https://deesradreadsandreviews.wordpr...I came across this book a few months ago. I knew it wasn't going to be released until June but I couldn't wait to read it. Once I started reading I didn't want to stop.The narrator tells us that her mother was famous for things no one would never want to be famous for. She says we may recognize her mother's name, but we probably haven't thought about her for years....but she is sure we would remember she had a daughter and w My reviews can also be seen at: https://deesradreadsandreviews.wordpr...I came across this book a few months ago. I knew it wasn't going to be released until June but I couldn't wait to read it. Once I started reading I didn't want to stop.The narrator tells us that her mother was famous for things no one would never want to be famous for. She says we may recognize her mother's name, but we probably haven't thought about her for years....but she is sure we would remember she had a daughter and we would wonder what happened to her."But I won't tell you my mother's name. Because this isn't her story. It's mine" Helena was twelve and her mother was twenty-eight when they were recovered from their captor. Helena had no idea they were captives. She never went to school, never rode a bicycle, never knew electricity or running water and only ever spoke with two people in twelve years. Her mother and father.We learn that after leaving the marsh, Helena really struggled with social skills. After years of living only with her mother and father, Helena had to learn how to fit in and how to act in public and social situations. "Shake hands when you meet someone. Don't pick your nose. Go to the back of the line. Wait your turn. Don't burp or pass gas in the presence of others" After all these years, Helena seems to finally have the life she deserves. The bad days are behind her. Happily married with two daughters and her thriving business.Unfortunately, the past isn't as buried as deep she thought.....The story begins in the present. Helena Pelletier is dropping off orders of her homemade jam. Tourists and locals love her jam and sales are good. Helena decides to take her three-year old daughter, Mari to the beach after deliveries are done. She loses track of time and needs to hurry to meet her older daughter's bus. She turns on the radio in hopes that the music will help with her toddlers current meltdown. As she flips through the radio stations she hears the words escaped....prisoner ....armed and dangerous. It repeats. A dangerous man has escaped from prison, killing two guards in the process. They believe he's headed for the wild life refuge close to her home. But when she hears the name of the prisoner her heart nearly stops.Jacob Hollbrook aka "The Marsh King" was serving a life sentence for child abduction and other crimes. The reason Helena is so horrified is that SHE is the one who put him in prison.Jacob Hollbrook.....is her father.She worries the police won't find him. He's in his element in the woods. She may have felt safe from him when he was behind bars. But now everything has changed. She hoped she would be able to tell her husband, Stephen all of the things she meant to tell him all of these years. However, before she has the chance, the police arrive to question her. They want to know if she knows where her father is. Stephen is in shock and also terrified for his family. He decides they should go to his parents until her father is captured. Helena tells him she must stay behind to help the police. Which is only partially true.What she doesn't tell her husband is that she is going to go after her father. She's the only one who will be able to find him...using the skills her taught her himself.She is The Marsh King's daughter and he taught her well.The book alternates between the past and the present. Told from Helena's perspective, we learn a lot about her childhood. Her relationship with her father at the centre of it all. I can't imagine the internal struggle and conflicting emotions she would have, growing up the way she did. Twelve years is a long time and the bond has been created whether we like it or not. It would not be as easy as we think to turn off those feelings. "part of me that will forever be the little pigtailed girl who idolized her father" The Marsh King's Daughter fairy tale by Hans Christian Anderson, is interspersed between chapters, which added to the story.I've often wondered about women like Elisabeth Fritzl, Amanda Berry, and Jaycee Dugard and so many other women who have escaped or been rescued after being held captive for years. I've occasionally wondered about the children as well but this book really made it hit home for me. Of course it's difficult for the women who were help captive, but the children who were conceived and born in similar conditions? How would they acclimate to their new world?...new lives?The characters, setting, and the plot are very well developed. Karen Dionne did an amazing job bringing her characters to life. Helena is damaged but also very brave and strong. I'm not a hunter so I did have a hard time reading some of the aspects of the hunting, killing and cleaning of the animals. However, I don't feel it was done in a way to glorify violence but it's a part of the story. This is how they lived and survived and it's amazing the things Helena learned at such a young age.An amazing read that I really could have read it in one sitting. As I neared the end there's not much that could have torn me away. Compelling, intense, and unputdownable. This book is one that is going to stay with me for a very long time. I can't wait to see what Karen Dionne writes next.Thank you G.P. Putnam's Sons and Karen Dionne for providing an advanced readers copy of this book for me to read in exchange for my honest review.
    more
  • Paromjit
    February 23, 2017
    This is atmospheric and brilliant storytelling from an author whose talent becomes increasingly obvious as you begin to read this tale. Its appeal lies in the twin interweaving of dark fantastical fairytale and the more human tale of the hunter and the prey, where these roles shift, change, merging into a hypnotic dance between father and daughter. Helena is married to Stephen, a photographer and has two daughters, Iris and Mari. She lives in Michigan's Upper Peninsula on the edge of the marsh w This is atmospheric and brilliant storytelling from an author whose talent becomes increasingly obvious as you begin to read this tale. Its appeal lies in the twin interweaving of dark fantastical fairytale and the more human tale of the hunter and the prey, where these roles shift, change, merging into a hypnotic dance between father and daughter. Helena is married to Stephen, a photographer and has two daughters, Iris and Mari. She lives in Michigan's Upper Peninsula on the edge of the marsh wilderness. She created a new identity to escape the media coverage that followed her mother's kidnapping at 15 by the notorious Marsh King, Jacob Holbrook, Helena's father. Helena is brought up on the marshes, seeing no other humans until she is 11 years old. She is a wild child, a daddy's girl, and instrumental in ensuring that her father went to prison. Her family know none of her well publicised history. The Marsh King has escaped, killing two guards, with the consequent police manhunt and media spotlight. Helena can no longer hide, she knows the only person with the skills to find her father is her, no-one knows him better, he is Nanabozho, the trickster, and she loves him. She is determined that she will return him to prison. The book is an intimate character study delivered from Helena's perspective. Each chapter starts with a part of the The Marsh King's Daughter fairytale by Hans Christian Anderson with inescapable connections to Helena's life. Her father is a storyteller whose tales whilst blurring the line between fact and fiction are hardwired into her psyche, into her blood, and her sense of identity. He is the sole contributer to her unsurpassed abilities in hunting, tracking, wilderness and survival skills. He is everything, her mother barely features. She is him, his shadow, the pea to his pod. We learn of her time growing up in the marshes, her obsession with 50 year old National Geographics - her only knowledge of the world outside, her enthrallment with the Vikings, her use of the doll that her mother made for her for target practice. We are given glimpses into her father's volatility and his need for absolute control. But can Helena remember everything? What exactly happened? What of Cousteau and Calypso? A faint memory tugs from her subconscious...something about the story her mother told her. This shapes a dangerous and blood spattered hunt for her father where her family is at stake into a journey into the past to come to terms with and acknowledge who she is.This is a wonderful novel, it burrows into your consciousness and takes residence. It has an insidious charm with its themes of what it is to survive, love, loss, memory, and the problems associated with doing the right thing in a complicated family set up. The book has a riveting narrative interweaving the fantastical with the everyday, of a nature red in tooth and claw side by side with glimpses of nurture and protection. Helena is complex and her life has not been easy, you cannot help but want to know more about her. We come to understand the call of the wild is a representation of home. The Marsh King is not purely a figure of evil but a father who loves and is intimately connected with his daughter. The family, the roles and relationships within it, is often a can of worms exploited in fairytales and fiction, the author beautifully explores this territory. Cannot recommend this enough. Many thanks to Little, Brown for an ARC.
    more
  • Dem
    May 5, 2017
    I really think that 2017 is fast becoming the year of the Thrillers and the The Marsh King's Daughter is without doubt a smart well thought out and entertaining read and one that I can see becoming a big hit over the summer.When I read the premise of this Novel it really caught my attention and I couldn't wait to get my hands on it........ 'I was born two years into my mother's captivity. She was three weeks shy of seventeen. If I had known then what I do now, things would have been a lot differ I really think that 2017 is fast becoming the year of the Thrillers and the The Marsh King's Daughter is without doubt a smart well thought out and entertaining read and one that I can see becoming a big hit over the summer.When I read the premise of this Novel it really caught my attention and I couldn't wait to get my hands on it........ 'I was born two years into my mother's captivity. She was three weeks shy of seventeen. If I had known then what I do now, things would have been a lot different. I wouldn't have adored my father.'When notorious child abductor - known as the Marsh King - escapes from a maximum security prison, Helena immediately suspects that she and her two young daughters are in danger.The book alternates skillfully between Helena's past and present and the reader learns about Helen and her life. Characters are well drawn and the plot is well thought out and chilling in places.I was a little afraid going into this one that it might be very graphic and while I did find a few of the hunting scenes quite tough reading, I understand the authors need to write these scenes as part of the bigger picture and they can be easily skimmed over if the reader finds them too much.A really well written novel, chilling, suspenseful, fresh and certainly one I will be recommending to my friends to pack for holidays this summer. My thanks to Net Galley for the chance to read an advance copy in return for an honest review
    more
  • Cheri
    April 11, 2017
    4.5 StarsGrowing up, Helena never knew that they were different from other families; she didn’t know the story of how she came to be, didn’t know that her father had abducted her mother for the purpose of taking her as his wife. She loved her father, and didn’t think of him as a bad or dangerous man, although she knew that he was quick to anger toward her mother, at times. She really didn’t know any better, and how could she? She was his ”Bangii-Agawaateyaa”, his Little Shadow. The cabin they li 4.5 StarsGrowing up, Helena never knew that they were different from other families; she didn’t know the story of how she came to be, didn’t know that her father had abducted her mother for the purpose of taking her as his wife. She loved her father, and didn’t think of him as a bad or dangerous man, although she knew that he was quick to anger toward her mother, at times. She really didn’t know any better, and how could she? She was his ”Bangii-Agawaateyaa”, his Little Shadow. The cabin they lived in out in the wild marshlands of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula was completely isolated. If it weren’t for the old National Geographic magazines she had seen and read, she would know little about other people, about the world in general. But knowing about it, and living in it are different. She knew that there was a world out there, she just didn’t know how close, or how different it was from how they lived. She just didn’t know. This is so beautifully written, the characters so fully drawn. Helena is a composite of her surroundings, her father, her isolation, her lack of understanding of any other kind of life than the one she’s living – with the exception of those inside her magazines – such a wonderful, complex protagonist. With confident, gorgeous prose transporting you back and forth effortlessly through time and place, from Helena’s childhood to the day she hears the emergency news broadcast. The man she knows as her father has escaped prison, the prison where he has been for fifteen years. Since the day she put him there. She knows the police will never find him. Only she knows how her father thinks, his skills, the things he taught her about tracking, the survival skills he has. She knows his ways, his stories, She also knows if she doesn’t find him, her husband and her two girls lives will never be the same. This suspenseful story has a somewhat brooding tone, atmospheric, troubled, with the sense of disquiet building as the memories come to light. There’s an edge of psychological suspense, while you anxiously wait to see how the story unfolds. A tale certain to leave you breathless, heart pounding and wishing you could read it all over again for the very first time.RecommendedPub Date: 13 Jun 2017Many thanks for the ARC provided by G.P. Putnam’s Sons
    more
  • Sandy
    March 5, 2017
    4.5 starsAt first glance, Helena Pelletier seems like an average young woman juggling a busy life. Married to Stephen, mother of Iris & Mari & purveyor of homemade jellies & jams. But one look at the book blurb tells you she’s anything but.Her mother was 13 years old when she was abducted by Jacob Holbrook & taken to a remote cabin in Michigan’s upper peninsula. At 16, she gave birth to Helena. Twelve years later, mother & daughter escaped & their story became an internat 4.5 starsAt first glance, Helena Pelletier seems like an average young woman juggling a busy life. Married to Stephen, mother of Iris & Mari & purveyor of homemade jellies & jams. But one look at the book blurb tells you she’s anything but.Her mother was 13 years old when she was abducted by Jacob Holbrook & taken to a remote cabin in Michigan’s upper peninsula. At 16, she gave birth to Helena. Twelve years later, mother & daughter escaped & their story became an international sensation. In the years since, Helena worked hard to hide her identity & live a “normal” life. Well, it was nice while it lasted. After 13 years in prison, Jacob escapes & disappears into the thick forests of a nearby national wildlife refuge. Helena’s carefully crafted world implodes & she realizes the only person capable of tracking him down is her. After all, she is the Marsh King’s daughter.The book opens in the present as Helena prepares to hunt down her father. During her search, we get detailed flashbacks that give us the full story of life with Jacob from her first memories til the day she & her mother were found. In alternate passages throughout the book is a retelling of the classic fairy tale by Hans Christian Andersen that gives the book its title & serves as an allegory of Helena’s journey.This is a book that reels you in from page 1. Tense, layered, affecting, disturbing, honest, poignant…these are just some of the descriptors bouncing around in my head jostling for position & they all apply. It succeeds on many levels but if I had to pick one thing that ensured I kept turning the pages, it would be the main character. Unlike many books currently on the market, the author chose to go with one narrator. It’s a risky move. Her first person narrative is the lone voice in your head & if the reader doesn’t connect with or like her, it’s game over. Not only did I like her, she’s one of my favourite characters so far this year.There are so many ways she could have been portrayed. The story revolves around difficult subject matter & could easily have descended into a version full of sensational, lurid detail with an emotional wreck as the MC. Thankfully, Ms. Dionne chose another route. As Helena began to tell her story, I was immediately struck by her pragmatic, no-nonsense style of speech. There’s not a drop of drama queen in her veins & ironically, it’s this lack of histrionics that makes her delivery all the more believable & chilling. As she describes events from her childhood, you’re reminded that every kid thinks their life is normal because it’s all they know. By the time Helena learns the truth about her family, she’s had 12 formative years of guidance & attention from a man she idolizes. So it’s no wonder she still struggles with conflicting emotions as she tries to reconcile her 2 fathers. One taught her how to hunt & survive in the wilderness she loves. The other is a murdering rapist.So by now you’re probably wondering why I left off half a star after babbling away about why this is such a great read. If I had to explain it to the author, it could be boiled down to this: it’s not you, it’s me. Right after Helena made the decision to search for Jacob, I settled in with a white knuckled grip on my kindle & waited for the chase to unfold. It’s during this section of the book that we get the history of her childhood in passages that are richly atmospheric & detailed. These have a slower pace that gives you a chance to get to know the characters & fully grasp the significance of events from those years. My problem is I’m an impatient reader & desperately wanted to know how the game of cat & mouse would play out in the present. So it’s purely a reflection of personal preference & many will find themselves caught up in the developing father/daughter relationship.The style of prose makes for effortless reading & I bet you’ll find yourself chanting “just one more page” into the wee hours. In case some prospective readers are wondering, there are scenes of violence but no graphic sexual content. Go on then, toss this on the TBR pile. The author is a gifted story teller & if this book doesn’t make you feel a dozen different emotions, you should immediately be checked for a heartbeat.
    more
  • Emma
    December 11, 2016
    4.5 stars4.5 starsThe strongest part of this novel is the titular character. Her name is now Helena Pelletier, but she is also, even more so, the Marsh King’s Daughter. And while the plot is suspenseful and the revelations make it a type of psychological thriller, it is the character development, revealed through the perceptive, evocative, and striking language of the author, that packs the biggest punch. For me, it read as a coming of age story, a child’s growth to themselves, outside the bound 4.5 stars4.5 starsThe strongest part of this novel is the titular character. Her name is now Helena Pelletier, but she is also, even more so, the Marsh King’s Daughter. And while the plot is suspenseful and the revelations make it a type of psychological thriller, it is the character development, revealed through the perceptive, evocative, and striking language of the author, that packs the biggest punch. For me, it read as a coming of age story, a child’s growth to themselves, outside the boundaries of their parents’ influence and control. As this is a crime novel, this path has a rather dark shade. Yet what the book is about is Helena’s desire not to be defined by her father’s actions and the label ‘the Marsh King’s Daughter’ given to her by the voracious media after her escape. From her birth to the now, she tells us the story of how she was first made and how she remade herself, with the events in this book providing the final conclusion to her development. It’s this that makes it much more than your average crime novel.Highly recommended.ARC via Netgalley
    more
  • Book of Secrets
    May 19, 2017
    Wow, wow, wow. Review coming soon!
  • Carole (Carole's Random Life in Books)
    May 5, 2017
    This review can also be found at Carole's Random Life in Books.I really enjoyed this book. I decided to pick this book up simply because the story sounded interesting. I had never read anything by the author so I really didn't know what to expect. I was immediately hooked. I actually ended up reading the whole book in a little more than a day because I wanted to read it during every free second I had. If I wasn't reading, I was thinking about this captivating story. I am very happy that I decide This review can also be found at Carole's Random Life in Books.I really enjoyed this book. I decided to pick this book up simply because the story sounded interesting. I had never read anything by the author so I really didn't know what to expect. I was immediately hooked. I actually ended up reading the whole book in a little more than a day because I wanted to read it during every free second I had. If I wasn't reading, I was thinking about this captivating story. I am very happy that I decided to give this book a try.This was a really exciting story told from a very unique point of view. I really liked how the story was told through present day events and memories. Helena was a wonderful character. She has lived a life very different than other people. She spent the first portion of her life with her mother and father in their home in the wilderness. She never saw anyone else and they were her entire life and that was her normal. In reality, her situation was anything but normal because her father had kidnapped her mother and was holding her captive.Helena learns that her father, known as the Marsh King, has escaped from prison. She knows him better than anyone in law enforcement so she sets out to try to catch him herself. Helena's father taught her how to navigate in the wilderness. She knows how to track and hunt because her father made sure that she had those skills. She needs those skills to find him before it is too late.I really enjoyed the way this book was written. I think that having the entire book come from Helena's point of view really worked well. Helena has a very unique point of view with memories from her childhood told through an adult's filter. The were times that we see things as she saw them as a child but other times that her adult views play a role. The book is set in the wilderness of northern Michigan and the descriptions were vivid in detail. The parts set in the present day were nicely balanced with the memories from the past.I would highly recommend this book to others. It is an exciting story told from a very unique point of view. I couldn't turn the pages fast enough because I was eager to learn how everything would end. This is the first book by Karen Dionne that I have read but I look forward to reading more in the future.I received an advanced reader edition of this book from G.P. Putnam's Sons via First to Read.Initial ThoughtsVery well told story with a very interesting point of view.
    more
  • Nigel
    April 15, 2017
    That is a damn good book. I doubt anyone will want to put it down during the last 20% even if it is one of those that you don't really want to reach the end of. Full review nearer publication.
  • Liz Barnsley
    December 19, 2016
    I’m busy getting ahead of myself on reading (who can resist 2017 so far, not me that’s for sure) so this is a bit of an early review but trust me I’ll be talking about this one again nearer to the publication date – having finished it late last night though I can’t resist saying a few words now.Talk about addictive quality – this book has that in spades and then some, once I started I could barely put it down, if it wasn’t for the fact that I kind of need to keep my job I would have dumped every I’m busy getting ahead of myself on reading (who can resist 2017 so far, not me that’s for sure) so this is a bit of an early review but trust me I’ll be talking about this one again nearer to the publication date – having finished it late last night though I can’t resist saying a few words now.Talk about addictive quality – this book has that in spades and then some, once I started I could barely put it down, if it wasn’t for the fact that I kind of need to keep my job I would have dumped everything in favour of doing this in one sitting – Karen Dionne weaves a beautifully intense story here, with a strong and unique character voice and a twisted fairy tale vibe that is utterly gripping.The Marsh King’s Daughter is both pacy and considered in its construction – Helena and her unconventional upbringing form the heart of the story, the emotional core, whilst in the present day we are treated to a thrilling hunt through the wilderness as Helena tracks her Father determined to return him to his jail cell. The two strands of the story, all seen through Helena’s eyes, are both totally compelling whilst the descriptively alluring setting comes alive in the telling.The soul of this one is in the father/daughter relationship – and indeed the blurred lines of Helena’s relationship with her mother – divisive and fascinating, I loved how the author made it all so real and unpredictable. Helena, after all, has a different worldly view, nature AND nurture – watching her come to terms with the realities of her situation, wondering and deciding who she is going to be, creates a strong bond between reader and novel that is intriguingly irresistible.The Marsh King’s Daughter is, put simply, an exquisite page turner.Highly Recommended.
    more
  • Joanne Robertson
    May 31, 2017
    This is going to be one of the big books for Summer 2017 and I can absolutely understand why! The Marsh Kings Daughter is a sumptuously dark and atmospheric thriller with a heroine you won't ever forget. I don't think I've read such an intricately detailed and unique plot like this for a very long time. It wasn't at all what I was expecting and I enjoyed it all the more for that. There are many real life documented cases where babies have been born to women in captivity, but here there is no sen This is going to be one of the big books for Summer 2017 and I can absolutely understand why! The Marsh Kings Daughter is a sumptuously dark and atmospheric thriller with a heroine you won't ever forget. I don't think I've read such an intricately detailed and unique plot like this for a very long time. It wasn't at all what I was expecting and I enjoyed it all the more for that. There are many real life documented cases where babies have been born to women in captivity, but here there is no sensationalized return to real life for Helena, who has spent the first 12 years of her life living in an isolated cabin with her mother and her father. There she was a daddy's girl who learnt to hunt and fish, idoling her father as she explored the wilderness of the marshes. Until the day she discovers the truth about her birth. Years later, Helena is almost unrecognisable as that young girl and is married with two small daughters. She still uses her hunting skills whilst her foraging expertise has lead to her own business selling  jams and jellies to local outlets. But when her father escapes from prison she knows she is going to have to use those skills to outwit The Marsh King.Once I started to read that first page, I was hooked. I loved how the retelling of the fable of The Marsh Kings Daughter ran throughout the book parallel to Helena's narrative as she slowly reveals the secrets of her childhood. In fact, everything about this original and gripping literary thriller kept me deeply enthralled due to its authentic and convincing storylines. Be warned that it was rather tough reading at times though, especially when observing Helenas differing attitudes towards her parents and there is also a lot of detail in the hunting scenes that could be a little overpowering for some but was a huge part of what made Helena who she is today.The Marsh Kings Daughter is a must read summer 2017 book. It's an intelligently written, intriguing book that everyone will be talking about so buy your copy now!
    more
  • Denise
    March 17, 2017
    This book was not a suspense thriller nor did it "chill me to the bone." Mostly it pissed me off. Sorry, but amid all the glowing 4 and 5 star reviews, there is my takeaway. I detested the main character, Helena, and I am sorry for the couple of hours I spent of my life reading this.It had a great premise, the daughter of a man who abducted a young teenaged girl and kept them in the marsh for years, comes of age and FINALLY decides to DO SOMETHING about the life she is living though she worships This book was not a suspense thriller nor did it "chill me to the bone." Mostly it pissed me off. Sorry, but amid all the glowing 4 and 5 star reviews, there is my takeaway. I detested the main character, Helena, and I am sorry for the couple of hours I spent of my life reading this.It had a great premise, the daughter of a man who abducted a young teenaged girl and kept them in the marsh for years, comes of age and FINALLY decides to DO SOMETHING about the life she is living though she worships her horror of a father. The "Marsh King" is a sadistic bastard, a narcissitic sociopath, who tutors his daughter on the ways of the native Americans who lived in the upper peninusla. The skills he teaches her are meant only to recreate Helena in his image, and take her love away from her poor mother. Helena has little use for her abused mother wanting only to please her monster of a father. Helena learns to hunt, track and kill. When she makes a mistake, she is punished. But does that affect her feelings for her father -- oh no. Yeah, I get that she's a child but she totally lacks any empathy or insight. When help comes in the form of a lost snowmobiler, she finally decides it's time to take her mother away.This was a very depressing book. I am sure that I will be in the minority not finding anything redemptive in Helena's final stand. Too little, too late. I really wanted to like it, but I didn't. Every little petty thought Helana had made me angry. I get that she and her mother were VICTIMS, but instead of being some sort of solace to her mother, she chose her father's path. Sure she was a bit afraid of her father, but she did not really see his evil -- oh yes, I understand that he was all she knew of men. Their isolated life, their lack of any information about the world outside. Helena had no empathy for her mother's plight nor did she care much about her. Definitely Helena was the Marsh King's Daughter above all else. She had a bit of psychopathy herself!Thank you to NetGalley and Edelweiss as well as the publisher for the e-book ARC to read and review. It was just not my cup of tea and I wouldn't recommend it.
    more
  • Quirkyreader
    April 20, 2017
    Thank you Pengin Random House for the ARC. I have been to many of the places mentioned in this story. That was one of the big reasons why I selected it. This story is a non-stop ride narrated by one of the main characters. She talks of her childhood and her life with with parents that she thinks is completly normal. That is until she finds out the truth.For some readers their might be trigger events in the story. So read all the reviews and information you can before deciding to read it or not.I Thank you Pengin Random House for the ARC. I have been to many of the places mentioned in this story. That was one of the big reasons why I selected it. This story is a non-stop ride narrated by one of the main characters. She talks of her childhood and her life with with parents that she thinks is completly normal. That is until she finds out the truth.For some readers their might be trigger events in the story. So read all the reviews and information you can before deciding to read it or not.I suggest grabbing a copy as soon as it comes out.
    more
  • Sarah
    February 14, 2017
    I have just read the sampler of this and I cannot wait to read the entire thing!Helena, the daughter of the Marsh King, the man who kidnapped and raped her mother and then kept them captive until she was 12, has begun to live her life with a husband and 2 children, making jams and jellies for the local stores and enjoying her family, when she hears a police bulletin saying that he's escaped, she put him in prison and now she will have to prepare herself for what is to come.Does she have the stre I have just read the sampler of this and I cannot wait to read the entire thing!Helena, the daughter of the Marsh King, the man who kidnapped and raped her mother and then kept them captive until she was 12, has begun to live her life with a husband and 2 children, making jams and jellies for the local stores and enjoying her family, when she hears a police bulletin saying that he's escaped, she put him in prison and now she will have to prepare herself for what is to come.Does she have the strength to protect herself and her family? I am on the edge of my seat to find out!!*Huge thanks to Karen Dionne, Little, Brown Book Group UK and NetGalley for this copy which I chose to read and all opinions are my own*
    more
  • Dorie
    May 24, 2017
    I’m usually not a fan of books where there is a “chase” type of situation, they can get to be predictable. This book, however, is definitely the exception to this. The plot of this story can be told quickly. A young girl, age 14, is abducted from a small town and never found. We later find that she was held for many years and had a daughter who was aged 12 when she was finally rescued and the man who abducted and raped her was put in prison.The marsh king’s daughter, named Helena, is still livin I’m usually not a fan of books where there is a “chase” type of situation, they can get to be predictable. This book, however, is definitely the exception to this. The plot of this story can be told quickly. A young girl, age 14, is abducted from a small town and never found. We later find that she was held for many years and had a daughter who was aged 12 when she was finally rescued and the man who abducted and raped her was put in prison.The marsh king’s daughter, named Helena, is still living close to where her father is imprisoned. Her grandparents left her the property and she had her father’s home demolished and is currently living in a mobile home with her husband and two daughters. She hears an announcement on the radio of an escaped prisoner and soon discovers it is her father. She decides that the only one who will be able to find him is her because he trained her in hiding and tracking techniques.We get to know all of the characters very well, the prose is exceptional. I did find myself eagerly turning pages to find out what would happen when Helena met up with her father. One small problem that I had with the story was that if I were Helena I would have left that area and gone as far away as possible when I was old enough. Even though she did inherit property I still had a problem believing that she would stick around.The author is an extremely talented writer, her descriptions of the plants and fauna of their area in the marsh were so well described I could definitely picture it. I live in Wisconsin, not that far, and I had no knowledge of these extensive marshlands in the UP of Michigan. The love for the marshlands may have been a reason that Helena would stay, she loved that part of her childhood, when her father was teaching her about something in nature.The story is a unique one and the characters are outstanding. I think that I would put this book in the genre of literary fiction rather than mystery/thriller, because the only mystery is what happens in the end. At any rate, pick up this book, you will have a great read. Oh and the cover is gorgeous, completely reels the reader in.I received an ARC of this novel from the publishers, thank you.
    more
  • Bettie☯
    May 10, 2017
    Description: When the notorious child abductor known as the Marsh King escapes from a maximum security prison, Helena immediately suspects that she and her two young daughters are in danger.No one, not even her husband, knows the truth about Helena's past: they don't know that she was born into captivity, that she had no contact with the outside world before the age of twelve - or that her father raised her to be a killer.And they don't know that the Marsh King can survive and hunt in the wilder Description: When the notorious child abductor known as the Marsh King escapes from a maximum security prison, Helena immediately suspects that she and her two young daughters are in danger.No one, not even her husband, knows the truth about Helena's past: they don't know that she was born into captivity, that she had no contact with the outside world before the age of twelve - or that her father raised her to be a killer.And they don't know that the Marsh King can survive and hunt in the wilderness better than anyone... except, perhaps his own daughter.
    more
  • Lucy Hay
    January 17, 2017
    This is ROOM meets THE REVENANT and has screenplay adaptation shot through it like a stick of rock. Helena is an enigmatic female lead and a real product of her environment growing up, yet at the same time capable of critical thinking and compassion: the decisions she makes are understandable, sometimes tragic and often heart-breaking, especially regarding her poor mother. It is a grudge match between Helena and her father, one in which she is never given any 'get out of jail free' cards by virt This is ROOM meets THE REVENANT and has screenplay adaptation shot through it like a stick of rock. Helena is an enigmatic female lead and a real product of her environment growing up, yet at the same time capable of critical thinking and compassion: the decisions she makes are understandable, sometimes tragic and often heart-breaking, especially regarding her poor mother. It is a grudge match between Helena and her father, one in which she is never given any 'get out of jail free' cards by virtue of being a woman OR his daughter. Jacob too is electrifying, a man of many layers: he is very much the lone wolf, but also the perfect Daddy any little girl would want; he's the sadistic pyschopath AND the spiritual Native American warrior. The plot is fantastic but it is the characters that set the page alight here and I love that Helena is never once reduced to 'woman in peril' - she is Jacob's equal and it is up to her to catch him, no one else. LOVED LOVED LOVED this book, finished it incredibly quickly and now wish I could read it all over again!! Am certain this will be one of my top reads of 2017. Read it!!!
    more
  • Tammie
    May 19, 2017
    'I was born two years into my mother's captivity. She was three weeks shy of seventeen. If I had known then what I do now, things would have been a lot different. I wouldn't have adored my father.' The Marsh King's Daughter is the first book I've read by this author and I must say it was a very compelling read. I love it when I get pulled into a book from the very first page like I was with this one. Based on the description and tag lines, I was expecting a bit more of a thriller here. It was m 'I was born two years into my mother's captivity. She was three weeks shy of seventeen. If I had known then what I do now, things would have been a lot different. I wouldn't have adored my father.' The Marsh King's Daughter is the first book I've read by this author and I must say it was a very compelling read. I love it when I get pulled into a book from the very first page like I was with this one. Based on the description and tag lines, I was expecting a bit more of a thriller here. It was more psychological than thriller, although it did have its moments, especially towards the end. Helena is married with two daughters and she's been keeping a secret from everyone, including her husband. Helena was born into captivity. Her father was the infamous Marsh King, the man who abducted a 14 year old girl and kept her there as his 'wife' and after Helena was born kept her there too in a remote cabin away from civilization. Helena wasn't aware of any of this as she grew up, not until she and her mother escaped when she is 12 years old. One day on the way home from an outing Helena hears on the radio that her father has escaped from prison and immediately fears for her family's safety. The book alternates between past and present as Helena tells us her story. "I won't tell you my mother's name. Because this isn't her story. It's mine" I appreciated the fact that this wasn't Helena's mother's story and that I wasn't privy to the horrible things she went through any more than her daughter was. The details of rape and most of the beatings were left out of the story. I don't think that I could have read this had it been from the mother's perspective.I think the author did an admirable job of showing what it would be like to be raised in captivity (even though Helena didn't know she was) and the psychological effect it has on her and on her mother. The way her father shaped who she became, the way he turned her against her mother, and the way her mother was almost invisible as a person to her was hard to read at times. There were times when I wanted to hate Helena because she idolized her father and felt next to nothing for her mother, but I could understand why so I couldn't hate her. Even as an adult though, sometimes her thoughts about her parents infuriated me, then I would have to remind myself that she was psychologically manipulated as a child and so her view was inaccurate to an extent even as an adult. In the end though it did seem like she finally understood everything the way it really was. I liked the ending of the book and the showdown with her father was good and had its thrilling moments, but it felt a bit rushed considering how much time was spent on the backstory. I felt like the past, even though it was essential to the story, actually took over a little too much of the book. Overall this was very good though and I recommend it.Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher G.P. Putnam's Sons for giving me a copy of this book.You can read more of my reviews at https://writingsofareader.blogspot.com/
    more
  • Craig Sisterson
    May 5, 2017
    I've seen a lot of pre-release hype about this book, which isn't always a good thing. Fortunately, Dionne's new novel delivers: it is an engaging, propulsive tale that could certainly be a breakthrough book for her (she has written five other crime novels, including two TV drama tie-ins). While I don’t think it quite rises to all the ‘suspense thriller of the year’ pre-release fanfare (I've already read a couple of books this year that I'd rank ahead of it), it is a really great read that I thor I've seen a lot of pre-release hype about this book, which isn't always a good thing. Fortunately, Dionne's new novel delivers: it is an engaging, propulsive tale that could certainly be a breakthrough book for her (she has written five other crime novels, including two TV drama tie-ins). While I don’t think it quite rises to all the ‘suspense thriller of the year’ pre-release fanfare (I've already read a couple of books this year that I'd rank ahead of it), it is a really great read that I thoroughly enjoyed, found incredibly difficult to put down, and would highly recommend. Helena lives a simple country life in Michigan's Upper Peninsula, selling handcrafted jams made from wild ingredients, and living on land her grandparents once owned, with her husband Stephen, young daughters Iris and Mari, and their dog Rambo. All of that's upturned when an infamous convict escapes, slaughtering two prison guards in the processAlmost three decades ago, 'The Marsh King' snatched a fourteen-year-old girl and took her to a remote cabin in the marshlands, keeping her in captivity as his wife. Helena is the daughter of that abducted girl, and the daughter of the Marsh King. She was raised in the wild, learning not only to fish and hunt, but how to track, how to gut, skin, and tan deer hides, and more. In many ways she loves the man who raised her, who'd kept her apart from the world but taught her to love the outdoors and be able to survive in the wilderness. Who told her stories from their Ojibwa culture. As law enforcement launches a manhunt, Helena knows her father, with all his survivalist skills and tracking abilities, will simply disappear into the wilderness, if that's what he wants. But what does he want? This loving and cruel man who raised her, both a mentor and a narcissistic bully. Helena realises she may be the only one who can find him, using the very skills he taught her. This is a thoroughly engaging read that's quite different to most of the crime fiction out there, both for its depiction of 'live off the land' life, and the fairy tale themes running throughout. THE MARSH KING'S DAUGHTER is largely told in flashback, revealing Helena’s life growing up isolated from civilization, while interspersing snatches of Hans Christian Andersen’s fairy tale of the same name.As Helena hunts her father in the present and reminisces on her past, Dionne superbly captures the mixed emotions, the love and hate. How people are never just one thing. She keeps the pages whirring through a creeping sense of unease bubbling beneath day-to-day life in the isolated cabin. For me, having grown up in an outdoorsy part of the world as a keen hiker of surrounding national parks, the scenes of hunting and basic life in the wild are particularly evocative. Dionne takes us deep into aspects of life that most readers will have little knowledge of, while never overwhelming with too much information (although some readers may find scenes relating to hunting etc tough). There's plenty of darkness in this tale - how could there not be when it deals with child abduction, people living in captivity and deprivation? - but also light. THE MARSH KING'S DAUGHTER flies along, but also makes you ponder. An exquisitely crafted tale that builds to a thrilling denouement. This review was written for Crime Watch: http://kiwicrime.blogspot.com, and will be published there closer to the release date of 13 June
    more
  • Tina Woodbury
    May 23, 2017
    For all of my book reviews: https://readingbetweenthepagesblog.wo...Helena is happily married with two daughters, Iris and Mari. She has her own business selling jelly and jam to local businesses and online. Her husband Stephen sells lighthouse photographs. Life is going well for them, and Helena has buried her true identity from everyone, even Stephen. All of that is threatened when Helena hears a news alert on the radio about an escaped prisoner. He is armed and dangerous, his name is Jacob Ho For all of my book reviews: https://readingbetweenthepagesblog.wo...Helena is happily married with two daughters, Iris and Mari. She has her own business selling jelly and jam to local businesses and online. Her husband Stephen sells lighthouse photographs. Life is going well for them, and Helena has buried her true identity from everyone, even Stephen. All of that is threatened when Helena hears a news alert on the radio about an escaped prisoner. He is armed and dangerous, his name is Jacob Holbrook aka The Marsh King. Her father.“Come inside,” Stephen says. Not to me, but to them. He drops my hand and leads the officers across our front porch and into our house. And just like that, the walls of my carefully constructed second life come tumbling down.After reading the synopsis for this book, I knew this was a book I wanted to read. I was expecting a dramatic hunt for the Marsh King, while Helena tries to protect her family. While this is true on some level, it’s actually a whole lot more. What I wasn’t expecting is to hear in such great detail about Helena’s life, while living in the marsh, from the time she was born until her escape. The storyline goes back and forth between current day and life while living in the marsh. The marsh storyline is so well written I felt like I was reading a true story of a young girl, born in captivity, raised by a narcissistic father and a mother who feared him. It was absolutely fascinating to me, on a psychological level. I loved that the story was told from the perspective of Helena, rather than her mother. Helena gives a tense, disturbing, and yet honest account of her world and life with her parents.This is a fantastic story! It’s a suspenseful, troubling story of relationships, family, and even love. I highly recommend it and think it will be a top summer read.Thank you Penguin – First to Read for the opportunity to read and review this book for my honest opinion.
    more
  • Abby (Crime by the Book)
    May 29, 2017
    Review/rating to come! This book didn't quite work for me as well as it could have, unfortunately, but the ending had me hooked.
  • Thebooktrail
    January 15, 2017
    There’s a lot to say about this one - and it’s not out until June! I wanted to read this one now however and it was a chillingly brilliant haunting read.The Marsh King takes its title from a Hans Christian Anderson fairy story and we all know how dark those fairy tales can get! Well,this book is dark - a girl who was effectively locked up as those two in that gingerbread house in the forest.....This is a thriller surrounded in mist, dark fog and a very dark heart. Are you brave enough to venture There’s a lot to say about this one - and it’s not out until June! I wanted to read this one now however and it was a chillingly brilliant haunting read.The Marsh King takes its title from a Hans Christian Anderson fairy story and we all know how dark those fairy tales can get! Well,this book is dark - a girl who was effectively locked up as those two in that gingerbread house in the forest.....This is a thriller surrounded in mist, dark fog and a very dark heart. Are you brave enough to venture into the woods?Full review to follow nearer date of publication
    more
  • Jo
    January 28, 2017
    4.5 starsSuper duper good!
  • Latkins
    April 20, 2017
    This is a really intense and suspenseful story about a woman who grew up in an isolated marsh. It's narrated by the main character Helena, now in her late 20s, as she hears that her father has escaped from prison, killing two guards in the process. Until the age of 12, she lived in the marsh land of Michigan's Upper Peninsula, a wilderness, and had no contact with the outside world. Her father, who was partly Native American, had kidnapped her mother when she was just 14, and kept her captive in This is a really intense and suspenseful story about a woman who grew up in an isolated marsh. It's narrated by the main character Helena, now in her late 20s, as she hears that her father has escaped from prison, killing two guards in the process. Until the age of 12, she lived in the marsh land of Michigan's Upper Peninsula, a wilderness, and had no contact with the outside world. Her father, who was partly Native American, had kidnapped her mother when she was just 14, and kept her captive in a log cabin there, as his 'wife'. Helena grew up knowing none of this, she worshipped her father, who taught her how to hunt and track, and resented her mother, who seemed so passive and unloving towards her. Only as she began to grow up did she realise that the violence and cruelty of her father were not normal or right.The book has two time lines - one in the present, as Helena tries to track her father, scared that he might go after her husband and two young daughters, who know nothing of her past. The second is Helena's account of her upbringing in the cabin. Throughout, we also get extracts from Hans Christian Andersen's fairy tale The Marsh King's Daughter, which has some resonance with Helena's own story.At the heart of this at times macabre story is love and betrayal - Helena feels betrayed by her father when she realises the enormity of his crimes, and yet a part of her can never quite stop loving him to some extent. This is a superior thriller, and I think those who don't normally read thrillers will enjoy it, as it provides an insight into the development of human emotions and empathy.
    more
  • Tracy Fenton
    March 28, 2017
    The Marsh King's Daughter is a story about Helena, a young woman with 2 daughters, a loving husband and a thriving business making jam and jelly, who grew up in captivity in a cabin with her mother and father who happens to be a child abductor and murderer and has just escaped from prison. The Marsh King's Daughter is a beautifully written story that is so much more than your average run-of-the-mill crime thriller. It is an incredibly descriptive, atmospheric and captivating account of Helena's The Marsh King's Daughter is a story about Helena, a young woman with 2 daughters, a loving husband and a thriving business making jam and jelly, who grew up in captivity in a cabin with her mother and father who happens to be a child abductor and murderer and has just escaped from prison. The Marsh King's Daughter is a beautifully written story that is so much more than your average run-of-the-mill crime thriller. It is an incredibly descriptive, atmospheric and captivating account of Helena's life. Switching between present day and the past the author brings to life Helena's relationship with her father and mother, examines her complex and emotional feelings towards her father's ranging from love and adoration to fear and anger. Focusing mainly on emotions, feelings and the relationships between families, this is a stunning book which is original and powerful. My thanks to Little Brown Book Group and Netgalley for the opportunity to read this book prior to publication.
    more
  • Heather Nicole
    April 19, 2017
    This was hauntingly beautiful story. I devoured each page! Thank you #firsttoread #penguinhouse so a young teen gets kidnapped and is held captive in the wilderness marshs and bores a daughter to said kidnapper. But the story is the daughters! She doesn't even know her predicament until she is about 11! Her childhood is mesmerizing. Could not put it down! Can't wait to read more books by said author.
    more
  • Jean Brown
    February 3, 2017
    4 Stars...ARC to be published June 13, 2017.
  • Bkwmlee
    May 10, 2017
    This book was nothing like I thought it would be. The summary led me to believe that this would be one of those gripping, edge-of-your-seat thrillers that will leave your heart racing and “chill you to the bone.” Hmm, well….not quite (ok, technically not even close!). To be honest, there really wasn’t a whole lot of suspense, the ending was predictable and expected, and there were barely any twists and turns to warrant placement in the thriller/suspense category -- so from a genre perspective, t This book was nothing like I thought it would be. The summary led me to believe that this would be one of those gripping, edge-of-your-seat thrillers that will leave your heart racing and “chill you to the bone.” Hmm, well….not quite (ok, technically not even close!). To be honest, there really wasn’t a whole lot of suspense, the ending was predictable and expected, and there were barely any twists and turns to warrant placement in the thriller/suspense category -- so from a genre perspective, this book was severely overhyped. However, from the perspective of “general work of contemporary fiction,” this book is exceptionally well-written and definitely deserves a read. If I had to describe this book, I would say that it is a thoughtfully written coming-of-age story about a girl born into captivity to a teenage kidnap victim and her captor, a man known as the Marsh King. The story begins 15 years after Helena and her mother were rescued from the isolated marshlands where they lived for many years. Now married with 2 daughters of her own, Helena has worked hard to bury her past and escape from the shadow of what happened to her mother – she changed her name, her hair color, her appearance and was careful about not drawing attention to herself. Her husband Stephen doesn’t know a thing about her past and so together, they are able to live a happy, ordinary life in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. That is, until Helena hears on the news that her father – the notorious Marsh King – has escaped from prison and instinctively, she knows that her family is in danger. As her newly rebuilt life starts to crumble around her, Helena embarks on a “cat and mouse chase” to hunt down her father and put him back in prison before he gets the chance to harm her family. It is here that the narrative starts to switch back and forth in time as Helena recounts her story of how life was like growing up in the marsh. At the same time, Helena struggles to come to terms with her feelings for a father who deliberately raised her to be in his likeness, his “Little Shadow” – the adoration she had for her father during their years in the marsh, when she was completely ignorant of what had happened to her mother, versus the hatred and resentment afterwards when the reality of her father as a cold-blooded kidnapper, rapist, and murderer sinks in.Overall, this was an enjoyable read, though not necessarily an easy one due to the premise of the story revolving around a kidnapping and forced captivity. Some parts of the book frustrated me, especially when it came to the actions and attitudes of some of the characters and also the graphic depictions of violence as well as cruelty to animals (though thank goodness there wasn’t a whole lot of the latter in the book – just a few scenes that were largely glossed over). For the most part though, the story was well-told, with Helena’s first person narrative powerful in giving us a unique perspective on a hideous crime and its lasting impact on her life as well as the lives of those she loves. Another unique aspect of this story is the thoroughness with which the author incorporates details that explain why certain characters acted the way they did, answering common “questions” that undoubtedly would arise in our (the readers’) minds as the story evolved – for example, why didn’t Helena’s mother leave when given the chance, why did Helena continue to heed her father’s wishes a few times even after finding out what kind of person he was? Some of these “answers” were subtle and some were directly explained, but either way, in the end, everything made sense and I didn’t come away with a feeling of being unsatisfied with how the story progressed. For those who may be wondering about the significance of the title – yes, the author does incorporate parts of Hans Christian Andersen’s classic The Marsh King’s Daughter into the story, with alternating chapters that start off with excerpts from the fairytale. The author also cleverly weaves parts of the fairytale into Helena’s story itself, with some parts converging and paralleling each other at certain points. Now, I can’t say whether this story is actually a modern re-telling of the fairytale or not, since I’ve never read Andersen’s version of The Marsh King’s Daughter (and in fact didn’t even know there was such a story until I read this book). But I did like the way the fairytale, plus a few other mythical as well as historical elements, were incorporated into the story.This is a recommended read – one that I think most will find engaging and absorbing, though die-hard thriller/suspense fans may find disappointing in its lack of true suspense elements. I would say approach this book without the expectation of “roller-coaster ride” type twists and turns and instead look at it more as a fictionalized account of a potentially true crime story and you should be fine.Received advance reader’s copy from G.P. Putnam’s Sons via Penguin First-to-Read program
    more
  • Kira
    May 31, 2017
    A Penguin First to Read ARC e-book in exchange for an honest review.It was a good life. Until it wasn’t.Helena is the daughter of a notorious child abductor who is dubbed The Marsh King. Two years into her mother’s captivity Helena is born, her mother wasn’t even seventeen.The Marsh King taught his daughter everything he knew about hunting and tracking. Now Helena needs to use those skills to hunt him down.I liked the struggle that Helena relays on her emotions around her father. Yes, to us he w A Penguin First to Read ARC e-book in exchange for an honest review.It was a good life. Until it wasn’t.Helena is the daughter of a notorious child abductor who is dubbed The Marsh King. Two years into her mother’s captivity Helena is born, her mother wasn’t even seventeen.The Marsh King taught his daughter everything he knew about hunting and tracking. Now Helena needs to use those skills to hunt him down.I liked the struggle that Helena relays on her emotions around her father. Yes, to us he was a horrible monster and there were no buts on what we should feel, hate and disgust. On Helena’s part though, her life was very much normal. For 12 years she did not know any better. Her mother never told her and her father was her idol in the world that only consisted of the three of them and a couple National Geographic’s. It does not matter what Helena learned later, she will always love her father that she remembers as kind, the one that taught her all her life skills. She knows what he did was horrible, the kidnapping and abuse to herself and her mother, and she does hate those things about him but that doesn’t mean she cannot be conflicted at times.It was a quick read but with difficult subject matter (rape, domestic abuse, child abuse).
    more
  • Mary
    May 13, 2017
    Wicked good!! I'm so sad it's over. Karen Dionne is so brilliant with description and details that I had to remind myself, it's only fiction. I'll say it again, it astounds me that writers can create such vivid, psychological terror, where an entire world comes to life in my hands and it's all made up!!!! Excellent storytelling. Using Hans Christian Andersen's fairytale, of the same name, to tell the story adds suspense and has me questioning the moral compass of Helena, daughter of the cold, ca Wicked good!! I'm so sad it's over. Karen Dionne is so brilliant with description and details that I had to remind myself, it's only fiction. I'll say it again, it astounds me that writers can create such vivid, psychological terror, where an entire world comes to life in my hands and it's all made up!!!! Excellent storytelling. Using Hans Christian Andersen's fairytale, of the same name, to tell the story adds suspense and has me questioning the moral compass of Helena, daughter of the cold, calculating Marsh King. This is an intelligent suspense from start to finish. There's so much story between the pages of this book. This one's gonna stick with me. *Received a DRC through Penguin's First to Read program. Opinions are my own.
    more
Write a review