A Paris All Your Own
A collection of all-new Paris-themed essays written by some of the biggest names in women's fiction, including Paula McLain, Therese Anne Fowler, Maggie Shipstead, and Lauren Willig, edited by Eleanor Brown, the New York Times bestselling author of The Weird Sisters and The Light of Paris. "My time in Paris," says New York Times-bestselling author Paula McLain (The Paris Wife), "was like no one else's ever." For each of the eighteen bestselling authors in this warm, inspiring, and charming collection of personal essays on the City of Light, nothing could be more true. While all of the women writers featured here have written books connected to Paris, their personal stories of the city are wildly different. Meg Waite Clayton (The Race for Paris) and M. J. Rose (The Book of Lost Fragrances) share the romantic secrets that have made Paris the destination for lovers for hundreds of years. Susan Vreeland (The Girl in Hyacinth Blue) and J. Courtney Sullivan (The Engagements) peek behind the stereotype of snobbish Parisians to show us the genuine kindness of real people. From book club favorites Paula McLain, Therese Anne Fowler (Z: A Novel of Zelda Fitzgerald), and anthology editor Eleanor Brown (The Light of Paris) to mystery writer Cara Black (Murder in the Marais), historical author Lauren Willig (The Secret History of the Pink Carnation), and memoirist Julie Powell (Julie and Julia), these Parisian memoirs range from laugh-out-loud funny to wistfully romantic to thoughtfully somber and reflective. Perfect for armchair travelers and veterans of Parisian pilgrimages alike, readers will delight in these brand-new tales from their most beloved authors.Content:Thirteen Ways of Looking at a French WomanToo Much ParisParis is Your MistressA Myth, a Museum, and a ManFrench for "Intrepid"Paris, Lost and FoundFailing At ParisThe Passion of RoutineInvestigating ParisMy Paris DreamsWe'll Never Have ParisReading ParisFinding Paris's Hidden PastSecret EatingsUntil We Meet AgainA Good Idea?Paris AloneThirty-Four Things You Should Know About ParisWhat is it about Paris?

A Paris All Your Own Details

TitleA Paris All Your Own
Author
FormatPaperback
ReleaseJul 4th, 2017
PublisherG.P. Putnam's Sons
ISBN0399574476
ISBN-139780399574474
Number of pages304 pages
Rating
GenreTravel, Writing, Essays, Cultural, France, Autobiography, Memoir, Nonfiction, Anthologies

A Paris All Your Own Review

  • Amina
    June 21, 2017
    1) Get passport2) Read this book 📖☕3) Ponder which you would love more, the bread or chocolate4) Realize the answer is both and this is why pain au chocolat exists5) Fantasize about whisking self away to Paris6) Repeat step #37) Wonder if it would ever occur to hubs to whisk you away to Paris [or anywhere]8) Try to recall dusty high-school French 9) Look on Yelp where to find #410) Start mulling next adventure 11) Allons-y! 1) Get passport2) Read this book 📖☕️3) Ponder which you would love more, the bread or chocolate4) Realize the answer is both and this is why pain au chocolat exists5) Fantasize about whisking self away to Paris6) Repeat step #37) Wonder if it would ever occur to hubs to whisk you away to Paris [or anywhere]8) Try to recall dusty high-school French 9) Look on Yelp where to find #410) Start mulling next adventure 11) Allons-y!
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  • Sue
    July 6, 2017
    I must start this review by telling you that I travel a lot and Paris is absolutely my favorite city to visit. If I was a little younger and a lot braver, I would probably live there but I think its a little late in life for me to make such a change. I love reading books about Paris when I can't be there and this book didn't disappoint me - in fact, I loved it. I have read books by all 18 of the authors who contributed and since they all write different types of books, the essays all took differ I must start this review by telling you that I travel a lot and Paris is absolutely my favorite city to visit. If I was a little younger and a lot braver, I would probably live there but I think its a little late in life for me to make such a change. I love reading books about Paris when I can't be there and this book didn't disappoint me - in fact, I loved it. I have read books by all 18 of the authors who contributed and since they all write different types of books, the essays all took different slants on their love or lack of love for Paris. As with any anthology, I loved some of the essays and wasn't too crazy about others. Whether you've visited Paris or want to visit or just enjoy reading about that beautiful city, this is a great book to read.
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  • Kate Olson
    June 30, 2017
    I'll preface this with the fact that I have never been to Paris, but am obsessed with reading about it......if a title or book description has Paris in it, I. am. in. This book of 18 essays includes an astounding collection of female writers, all with books set in Paris, and provides a thoroughly well-rounded take on visiting, as well as living and writing in (and about!) Paris. I say well-rounded not because the essays cover all different topics (although many do), but because the authors are r I'll preface this with the fact that I have never been to Paris, but am obsessed with reading about it......if a title or book description has Paris in it, I. am. in. This book of 18 essays includes an astounding collection of female writers, all with books set in Paris, and provides a thoroughly well-rounded take on visiting, as well as living and writing in (and about!) Paris. I say well-rounded not because the essays cover all different topics (although many do), but because the authors are refreshingly diverse on their feelings about Paris. This is a love letter to Paris, but it's also a letter home to your parents from Paris-camp about why it's not as amazing as Mom promised and you really just want to go home. There is love, but there is also loneliness. There are amazing sights and experiences, but there are also rainy days and an inability to communicate in French. There are essays that are laugh-out-loud funny, and there are essays that are incredibly detailed accounts of the history of Paris during different time periods, as well as essays about mother-daughter relationships and romantic relationships - and more! I adored reading about how these authors all wrote about Paris, but also how they researched their books and ensured the authenticity of their stories. Authors who weren't able to visit Paris before starting their books, but read and read and read extensively and went to Paris later.It's hard to really describe this whole book since it's such a diverse range of essays, but here are my overall takeaways:1) I still want to visit Paris2) I should learn French, but even if I do it won't be usable in Paris so I should just speak English and admit that I'm a tourist3) Go without an agenda or schedule4) Sit and watch people 5) Eat all the food6) Drink all the wine7) Hotel rooms are small8) SO MUCH HISTORY9) Lines for major attractions are so so long - buy tickets ahead if you can, maybe skip some of the most touristy stuff10) Walk and walk and walk and see the REAL ParisThis is a must-read for anyone who longs to visit Paris, or reads books set in Paris.....or anyone who loves reading about writing in general!Thanks to Net Galley for the advance copy of this title for review - all opinions are my own.
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  • Kim
    July 1, 2017
    “A Paris All Your Own” is an anthology of eighteen stories. More than just a collection, it’s a literary guidebook, filled with out of the way places often accidentally discovered. It’s as much a reflection of the writers themselves as it is a reflection of the City of Light. These stories are funny, introspective, sad, honest, relatable, and most importantly personal.Even though there are eighteen different authors, there are several running themes throughout the collection. The main one concer “A Paris All Your Own” is an anthology of eighteen stories. More than just a collection, it’s a literary guidebook, filled with out of the way places often accidentally discovered. It’s as much a reflection of the writers themselves as it is a reflection of the City of Light. These stories are funny, introspective, sad, honest, relatable, and most importantly personal.Even though there are eighteen different authors, there are several running themes throughout the collection. The main one concerns expectations. Paris comes with a mindset. It’s been chronicled for centuries. Parts have been destroyed, and others saved. Monuments and museums are everywhere. It’s a city known for indulgence, for love, for style, for class, and for culture. It’s simply Paris.After each story is the author’s social media information, their book pertaining to Paris, and recommendations of what you “should” and “shouldn’t” do while there. This was my favorite part. My exploding TBR thanks the editor for this.Instead of critiquing each individual story, I have decided to sum up each story in one word. It’s up to you to decide if your interest is piqued. (I also concede that if you aren’t, the fault is mine, not the author’s.)J. Courtney Sullivan - expansiveMichelle Gable - intimateEllen Sussman - invigoratingSusan Vreeland - informativeMegan Crane - apprehensivePaula McLain - biographicalEleanor Brown - honest (my favorite)Jennifer L. Scott - elegantCara Black - literaryM.J. Rose - intenseJennifer Coburn - inspirational (another favorite)Cathy Kelly - alliterate (literary and literal love of a local)Rachel Hore - surprisingJulie Powell - mouthwateringLauren Willig - misplacedTherese Anne Fowler - empoweringMaggie Shipstead - productiveMeg Waite Clayton - endearingI highly recommend this collection. I was an Anglophile, but now I consider myself a Francophile in training.Thanks to GoodReads for sponsoring this giveaway, and thanks to Flatiron Books for sending me the ARC.
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  • Sarah Swann
    July 4, 2017
    Great anthology! Now I really want to go to Paris. I like the fact that not all of these stories are just glowing love letters to the city. There are some stories of hardships there and some authors didn't have good experiences and don't love the city. I liked the different takes on it. My favorite was Paula McClain's and now I can't wait to read The Paris Wife. * I was sent a review copy from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.
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  • Montcrieff
    July 4, 2017
    I have been in Paris with family, with lovers, with friends, and I have been in Paris totally alone. It takes a special fortitude to be in Paris alone, while surrounded by people making memories with others. Therefore, the highlight of this collection is Maggie Shipstead's essay, "Paris Alone." Ship- stead writes:Being alone is simple. Other people are unpredictable; they complicate things.Actively looking—noticing—is a bulwark against boredom. When I’m alone, I like that there’s no pressure to I have been in Paris with family, with lovers, with friends, and I have been in Paris totally alone. It takes a special fortitude to be in Paris alone, while surrounded by people making memories with others. Therefore, the highlight of this collection is Maggie Shipstead's essay, "Paris Alone." Ship- stead writes:Being alone is simple. Other people are unpredictable; they complicate things.Actively looking—noticing—is a bulwark against boredom. When I’m alone, I like that there’s no pressure to turn what I see into conversation, to describe or opine in the moment. Days spent alone aren’t filtered through anyone else’s moods or subject to another’s whims or preferences; likewise, I don’t have to manage or compromise my own moods or whims, because they don’t affect anyone but me.To this day I almost never get lonely when I am by myself, but I am sometimes lonely among other people: at a party where I feel out of place, for example, or when I’m angry at a loved one or drained by too much small talk. Loneliness, for me, isn’t rooted in the fact of being alone but in feelings of estrangement from others, in frustration and disappointment at the imperfection of my connections. Of course, all human connections are imperfect, and loneliness is part of being human. Each of us is isolated inside one consciousness, one body, one life, and so we are all inherently and permanently alone. But most of us spend our lives making endlessly hopeful attempts to connect, to peck our way out of our aloneness like chicks out of eggs, and there is a great and poignant beauty in the effort and great joy and peril in our successes. At the same time, maybe the sanctuary of the self, where you are both king and kingdom, is too often forgotten and neglected."I had no friends in Paris and no reason to turn my nose up at someone who might or might not have been part humpback whale, but friendship, at the time, wasn’t something I was after. In fact, when faced with a friendly overture, I was capable only of evasive maneuvers. I was alone, you see, which for me isn’t a moment-to-moment condition, easily changed, but a way of being. Solitude is a well I fall (or jump) into from time to time and don’t try to climb out of. I sit down there and enjoy the quiet."I wanted to explore the city a little bit at a time, no hurry. The winter is a fantastic time to walk in Paris, when there are few tourists and the city is just going about its business. I walked grand boulevards and narrow alleys. As snow sifted down from low clouds, I walked along the iced-over Canal Saint-Martin on my way to an afternoon showing of The Descendants. I strolled under denuded branches in the Tuileries and around the big fountain in the Jardin du Luxembourg, its water frozen into a cascading ice chandelier. During the winter sales I dug through bins of marked-down lingerie at Printemps even though I had no one to wear any of it for. I took in the stately pomp of the Pantheon, admired the stained-glass jewel box that is Sainte-Chappelle, watched white clouds of my breath dissipate in Notre-Dame’s majestic nave. I visited the graves of Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir, Susan Sontag, Marguerite Duras, Victor Hugo, Marie Curie. I climbed to the dome of Sacré-Coeur. I peered into shadowy cast-iron family chapels decaying among the graves at Père Lachaise. I walked the bone-lined tunnels of the catacombs. (Paris seems like an okay place to be dead—good company, at least.)
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  • Rhiannon Johnson
    July 4, 2017
    Read my full review here: https://ivoryowlreviews.blogspot.com/...
  • Lesa
    July 8, 2017
    After Eleanor Brown researched her own book, The Light of Paris, she wondered why people love Paris so much. And, she was surprised to see how many female, heterosexual, white women, bestselling authors, had written about Paris. So, she went to seventeen other women writers from the United States, England, and Ireland, and asked them to write about their experiences in Paris. The result is a collection of essays, A Paris All Your Own.Brown's question actually was, "Why do we love writing - and r After Eleanor Brown researched her own book, The Light of Paris, she wondered why people love Paris so much. And, she was surprised to see how many female, heterosexual, white women, bestselling authors, had written about Paris. So, she went to seventeen other women writers from the United States, England, and Ireland, and asked them to write about their experiences in Paris. The result is a collection of essays, A Paris All Your Own.Brown's question actually was, "Why do we love writing - and reading - stories about Paris?" Why are we obsessed with it? Each woman had a different answer. Some, like Brown, did not fall in love with the city. She saw it just as another city. Michelle Gable, author of A Paris Apartment and I'll See You in Paris, made the mistake of going with her parents, husband, and children. The family trip was a disaster. Her daughter's favorite part of the trip was the plane, and the family preferred London. M.J. Rose wrote of the romance of the city, as did Meg Waite Clayton. Clayton's essay, entitled "Thirty-Four Things You Should Know About Paris", is fun. She honeymooned in Paris, and admits they may have missed a few things. But, she makes suggestions. One of my favorite essays was by Cara Black, but I'm prejudiced. I know Cara, and she's given me tips for my first trip to Paris. Cara's essay, "Investigating Paris", talks about her love of the city, the mystery of it as it links to the writing of mysteries and Georges Simenon's Inspector Maigret. But, she also says Paris will always be a mystery.You'll recognize many of these authors - Paula McLain, Susan Vreeland, Lauren Willig. And, if you read the book, you'll realize you've seen many of the other names as well.I appreciated the notes after each essay. Brown tells who the authors are, where to find their websites and other social media contacts, lists the Paris books. Then, each author lists their favorite Paris moment, their least favorite, the song that reminds them of Paris, and a suggestion. "In Paris, you must..." It's those suggestions, "In Paris, you must..." that I'm going to take with me to Paris. My conclusion? Paris is different for everyone, as is any city. And, in my opinion, every trip is special, if you make it so.
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  • Jennifer
    July 17, 2017
    Edited by Eleanor Brown (The Light of Paris), A Paris All Your Own is a charming collection of 18 Paris-themed essays written by bestselling female authors who have each published novels set in the City of Light. Authors like Paula McLean - The Paris Wife, Julie Powell - Julie and Julia, and Michelle Gable - A Paris Apartment.In this anthology each woman was asked to share their own personal stories of Paris.And Paris, with all of her sophistication and experience, is not a simple city. She is k Edited by Eleanor Brown (The Light of Paris), A Paris All Your Own is a charming collection of 18 Paris-themed essays written by bestselling female authors who have each published novels set in the City of Light. Authors like Paula McLean - The Paris Wife, Julie Powell - Julie and Julia, and Michelle Gable - A Paris Apartment.In this anthology each woman was asked to share their own personal stories of Paris.And Paris, with all of her sophistication and experience, is not a simple city. She is kind to some and not to others.There were romantic stories solidifying our understanding of why Paris is the city of romance and love, and then other stories that pretty much went the way you'd imagine them to go if you were thinking about dragging sleepy teens around Paris.Apart from allowing me to daydream about my next trip Paris, I really enjoyed learning about the research phase of the writing process many of the authors described. Some visited the city before writing, some while writing, and others didn't visit until after their books were complete. Nonetheless, it was fascinating to learn about the role that Paris played in their lives and in their careers.As a final bonus, upon reading A Paris All Your Own, you instantly have the titles of more than 18 Paris-themed books by these authors to add to your "to be read" list! Z: A Novel of Zelda Fitzgerald by Therese Anne Fowler, is one of the new titles I'm interested in checking out.Whether you've travelled previously to Paris or not, you will love to visit it from the coziness of your own home through A Paris All Your Own.Disclaimer - I received a complementary copy of A Paris All Your Own from Penguin Random House Canada. All thoughts and opinions are entirely my own.
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  • Susan (The Book Bag)
    July 4, 2017
    A trip to Paris is on my bucket list of places to visit someday. I have always wanted to go there. It just seems like such a beautiful, romantic place to be so how could I not love a whole book about Paris? People have a passion for Paris, whether it's real or their fantasy.A Paris All Your Own is a wonderful anthology of Paris stories written by eighteen fabulous authors. The book is full of personal stories about the Paris that each of these women experienced. Some of the experiences were wond A trip to Paris is on my bucket list of places to visit someday. I have always wanted to go there. It just seems like such a beautiful, romantic place to be so how could I not love a whole book about Paris? People have a passion for Paris, whether it's real or their fantasy.A Paris All Your Own is a wonderful anthology of Paris stories written by eighteen fabulous authors. The book is full of personal stories about the Paris that each of these women experienced. Some of the experiences were wonderful, like you would expect, and then some of them were not. It just goes to show that everyone's expectations and experiences are different.Some of the women are authors that I have read before and I loved reading their stories. Others were new-to-me authors and I enjoyed the little taste that I got of their writing style. Each chapter was a little autobiographical glimpse into the author's life. I learned about their personalities which is something that you typically don't get in their normal work.And at the end of the chapters, each author lists some interesting facts for the reader, such as what a person must do when visiting Paris and a list of things to skip. It's sort of like a little travel guide for Paris. Bonus!
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  • Eleanor Harte
    July 21, 2017
    I loved this book. It made me very homesick for Paris but in a good way, because it reminded me of all the wonderful things I love about the city.
  • Carol Fitz
    July 22, 2017
    Delightful seeing the sites and experiences of Paris through so many different perspectives. I enjoyed the short biographical details at the end of each writer and have expanded my "to read"list to include many of the Paris books listed.
  • Jane
    July 14, 2017
    Thanks to Goodreads and Putnam for this book.I have to admit I'm not an anthology reader but this book appeared to me since I've never been to Paris. This book took me there and may not even travel there in the future. I've read some of these authors and I liked their writing before and like their perspective of Paris and all the touristy spots and some off the beaten track. Some stories are more interesting to me than others and that's just my personal opinion. A few of them are: Michelle Gable Thanks to Goodreads and Putnam for this book.I have to admit I'm not an anthology reader but this book appeared to me since I've never been to Paris. This book took me there and may not even travel there in the future. I've read some of these authors and I liked their writing before and like their perspective of Paris and all the touristy spots and some off the beaten track. Some stories are more interesting to me than others and that's just my personal opinion. A few of them are: Michelle Gable, Eleanor Brown, Jennifer L. Scott, Lauren Willig and Meg Waite Clayton.
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  • Susan White-Riggs
    July 15, 2017
    I liked this book-of course I LOVE Paris, so no surprise there. But it was interesting to hear the different perspectives of the women and their trips and experiences of Paris. And I got a lot of tips, too!
  • Beth
    June 12, 2017
    I received this book as a first reads giveaway winner and am so glad I did! I'm currently only through two of the selections, but eager to read more! I love the personal stories and finding out from each author what Paris is all about and what makes it memorable for the author. I especially enjoy the answers from each author at the end of her selection of her favorite Paris moment, favorite book about Paris, favorite song about Paris and what is on her "must see" list! It lets me travel there wi I received this book as a first reads giveaway winner and am so glad I did! I'm currently only through two of the selections, but eager to read more! I love the personal stories and finding out from each author what Paris is all about and what makes it memorable for the author. I especially enjoy the answers from each author at the end of her selection of her favorite Paris moment, favorite book about Paris, favorite song about Paris and what is on her "must see" list! It lets me travel there with them and makes me yearn to see it some day.
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  • Elaine
    July 1, 2017
    This is a compilation of stories about Paris from authors who've written books based in Paris. There are nineteen stories that range from love off Paris, love in Paris and not loving Paris so much at all.Chapters:Thirteen Ways of Looking at a French WomanToo Much ParisParis is Your MistressA Myth, a Museum, and a ManFrench for "Intrepid"Paris, Lost and FoundFailing At ParisThe Passion of RoutineInvestigating ParisMy Paris DreamsWe'll Never Have ParisReading ParisFinding Paris's Hidden PastSecret This is a compilation of stories about Paris from authors who've written books based in Paris. There are nineteen stories that range from love off Paris, love in Paris and not loving Paris so much at all.Chapters:Thirteen Ways of Looking at a French WomanToo Much ParisParis is Your MistressA Myth, a Museum, and a ManFrench for "Intrepid"Paris, Lost and FoundFailing At ParisThe Passion of RoutineInvestigating ParisMy Paris DreamsWe'll Never Have ParisReading ParisFinding Paris's Hidden PastSecret EatingsUntil We Meet AgainA Good Idea?Paris AloneThirty-Four Things You Should Know About ParisWhat is it about Paris?"No other city's name conjures the same weight and cachet. To invoke Paris means something, makes whatever it touches more beautiful, more elegant, more...well, Parisian. Paris is berets and cafes, is romance and the lights on the Eiffel Tower, is wide boulevards and window boxes bright with flowers, is Les Miserables and Picasso and Chanel. Paris is so many things, all of them wonderful."  -Eleanor Brown"Through a company called Paris Walks, I hire a private guide, Brad, who takes us around Montmartre, where he lives. I have been before, but now I notice new things... Before, in Paris, I was always self-conscious. Did I sound like a stupid American? Was my accent atrocious? But in the role of writer, I'm too curious to care" -J. Courtney Sullivan"Travel meant staying in a nice hotel room and eating in fine restaurants. It meant an easy roller bag, not, say a backpack that required lugging while drenched in sweat. It was reading an interesting book in a busy cafe while dressed like Aubrey Hepburn. It meant Paris in the springtime, just like the song..." -Megan Crane"What I wanted to do was lie on that bed and try to recover from my arrogant assumption that not speaking the language would not be a problem or that doing something that scared me would make me less scared while I was doing it. Possibly in the fetal position." -Megan Crane"And the people...well, the people, as Eddie Izzard says, 'are kind of fucking French at times.' Paris can literally drive you crazy. Or not. Maybe Paris isn't the problem. Maybe, as with Paris Syndrome, it's us and our expectations of it. Maybe it wasn't Paris at all. Maybe it was me." - Eleanor BrownI've been to Paris. For me it's a beautiful city full of museums and artifacts. It's beauty is matched by it's overwhelming smell of urine (I was there during the summer and let me tell you the city of lights doesn't smell great in the heat of the day). The food was out of this world and plentiful. My fondest memory was sitting at a Parisian cafe eating a charcuterie platter and people watching. I was overwhelmed by the amount of people. Every place we went was crowded and hot. There was long lines for most everything. This book taught me that I did Paris wrong. Well, maybe not wrong, but I had a first time experience that's not abnormal. I saw all the highlights that I've seen in the movies. I experienced the tourist side of Paris. A Paris All Your Own encouraged me to go back and experience the outskirts of Paris. The small cafes and shops. The smaller, less well known museums that hold just as much beauty at the Louvre. We will make it back to Paris someday and I will use many of these stories as a guide book!This is a great read to dream about the city of lights through other people's experiences. 
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  • Mary
    July 16, 2017
    I found this book through an excerpt on LitHub--the chapter by Maggie Shipstead called "Paris Alone." This essay was interesting enough to motivate me to request A Pris All Your Own through our local library. But as good as it was, there were better ones! I liked the editor Elanor Brown's essay "Failing at Paris" with its good dose of reality to any travel expectations. I loved however M. J. Rose's very romantic "My Paris Dreams" and Jennifer Coburn's "We'll Never Have Paris" which was really mo I found this book through an excerpt on LitHub--the chapter by Maggie Shipstead called "Paris Alone." This essay was interesting enough to motivate me to request A Pris All Your Own through our local library. But as good as it was, there were better ones! I liked the editor Elanor Brown's essay "Failing at Paris" with its good dose of reality to any travel expectations. I loved however M. J. Rose's very romantic "My Paris Dreams" and Jennifer Coburn's "We'll Never Have Paris" which was really more about her far more successful jaunt in Greenwich Village with her mother than her time in Paris with her--although those few hours gave me a laugh aloud moment.The only authors I had read previously were Cara Black (one of her Aimee Ludac series) and Julia Powell (Julie and Julia). I was hoping this anthology would give me lots of ideas for further reading but when I looked up various novels by these women I realized that many of these "best selling authors" were writing in the genre of romantic fiction--or of even less interest to me, historical romantic fiction. Once again, I am aware that I really do enjoy memoirs and that real life tales can be stranger than fiction anyway!
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  • Charlotte Lynn
    July 7, 2017
    I am not a world traveler. I don’t dream of visiting Paris but I love to read about Paris. The Paris of different eras, different stations in life, and for different people all intrigue me. This collection of short stories about Paris is wonderful. I love that not every short story is the same. There are stories of family visits, stories of visiting the tourist stops, stories of the art and galleries, and stories of not enjoying Paris. There were so many different views and perspectives of visit I am not a world traveler. I don’t dream of visiting Paris but I love to read about Paris. The Paris of different eras, different stations in life, and for different people all intrigue me. This collection of short stories about Paris is wonderful. I love that not every short story is the same. There are stories of family visits, stories of visiting the tourist stops, stories of the art and galleries, and stories of not enjoying Paris. There were so many different views and perspectives of visiting, living, and seeing Paris that I found myself devouring each one. I was anxious to get to the next story.Between each story there were short bios of the authors along with their likes, dislikes, and memories of Paris which I found informative. It was interesting to learn a little about the authors along with what influenced their memories of Paris. Whether you have visited Paris, dream of visiting Paris, or just like to live vicariously through what you read this is a great collection of short stories. Thank you Carolyn Darr of Putnam Publicity for a copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Helois
    July 2, 2017
    "Paris is always a good idea" well, so the saying goes anyway. Certainly all these lovely ladies thought so.What we have here are 18 authors (all of them have published books set in Paris), all women, who have written essays regarding their time in the City of Light. Personal account of people's travels always fascinate me, how do they deal with the stress of travel, did the place live up to their expectations or fail miserably. Since each author's essay is unique to them, you end up with a well "Paris is always a good idea" well, so the saying goes anyway. Certainly all these lovely ladies thought so.What we have here are 18 authors (all of them have published books set in Paris), all women, who have written essays regarding their time in the City of Light. Personal account of people's travels always fascinate me, how do they deal with the stress of travel, did the place live up to their expectations or fail miserably. Since each author's essay is unique to them, you end up with a well rounded view of Paris over several time periods. Not all of them enjoyed their time in Paris, some of them did, some of them had to change the way they approached the city in order to enjoy their time there. Basically it was like sitting down with a group of friends to chat about the trip.I was a little disappointed in some of the stories, because they fell kind of flat and honestly were a little boring, but on the other hand several of them were so good they had me chuckling and wishing they were longer.Overall, it was a lovely view of Paris both the good, the bad and the indifferent, made me want to visit and have a little wander around myself.* I was sent an early copy for review purposes.
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  • Meghannf
    June 30, 2017
    It is an interesting book as it regroups different stories and point of views about Paris. As a Parisian, it is enjoyable to see the city through the eyes of American modern authors. Concerning the writing style, it is an easy read, the language is perfect for people having English as a Second Language. Now about the stories, I expected them to be more moving, funny or profound. Some passages felt flat, others convey interest but not in the long run. My favorite is from Cara Black. There is a Fr It is an interesting book as it regroups different stories and point of views about Paris. As a Parisian, it is enjoyable to see the city through the eyes of American modern authors. Concerning the writing style, it is an easy read, the language is perfect for people having English as a Second Language. Now about the stories, I expected them to be more moving, funny or profound. Some passages felt flat, others convey interest but not in the long run. My favorite is from Cara Black. There is a French essence in it, symbolism and culture.
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  • Christy
    June 30, 2017
    I was lucky enough to win a copy of this book from Goodreads Giveaways. It is full of essays on Paris written by authors who happen to be women. The stories were lovely and it was a fun, easy read. This is the perfect read for your flight over to Paris, or for the person who dreams of making the trip. I enjoyed it very much.
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  • Alex Reneski
    July 21, 2017
    18 short stories, quite varied, for Paris-philes. Stories from family visits, family life, to romance and glamor. A must for those for whom Paris is the City of Light, interesting stories for those who see Paris mainly as the capitol of France.Also, listings of other books written by the authors about Paris.A goodreads giveaway.
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  • Summer
    July 21, 2017
    Almost every chapter made me put my hand over my mouth and weep with "home" sickness for Paris, a city I love so deeply, and also weep with joy and awe that our world is lucky enough to have this magical, beautiful city. There really is no where on Earth as lovely as Paris.
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  • Kristen
    July 16, 2017
    This was a cute book of stories about different authors' experiences in Paris. Some stories were better than others, but overall it was enjoyable and made me want to visit Paris.
  • Holly
    July 24, 2017
    If you can't go to Paris..you can read about authors who did :) Great range of stories about visiting Paris
  • Maureen M
    June 1, 2017
    In “A Paris All Your Own,” 18 bestselling women authors take turns describing the hold the city has on them.Eleanor Brown (“The Weird Sisters”) conceived the idea when she wrote her own Paris book (“The Light of Paris” ) and realized she was part of a trend. She assembled essays from 17 other women who had written at least one book about Paris, and, voilà!The essays are an engaging mix of memoir and travel guide. Contributors include Paula McLain, author of “The Paris Wife,” who gives a chatty a In “A Paris All Your Own,” 18 bestselling women authors take turns describing the hold the city has on them.Eleanor Brown (“The Weird Sisters”) conceived the idea when she wrote her own Paris book (“The Light of Paris” ) and realized she was part of a trend. She assembled essays from 17 other women who had written at least one book about Paris, and, voilà!The essays are an engaging mix of memoir and travel guide. Contributors include Paula McLain, author of “The Paris Wife,” who gives a chatty account of her attempts to trace the haunts of Hemingway’s first wife, Hadley. Michelle Gable (“I’ll See You in Paris”) recalls a family vacation worthy of a “National Lampoon” sequel. Julie Powell (“Julie & Julia” ) vents her frustrations as a nanny to two bored boys 20 years ago, memories now softened by time. “I think I’d be satisfied if I only knew they remember the Nutella crêpes,” she reflects.Throughout runs an homage to the city’s power to change lives. Harlequin writer Megan Crane describes the impact of “what Paris did for me, one long ago weekend on my own. It scared me, then it challenged me. And then it set me free.” I expect to refer back to the fun appendices full of dueling advice of what to see and what to skip on visits to Paris. (The Eiffel Tower makes both lists.)
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  • Melissa
    July 5, 2017
    Somewhere between a 3 and 4. I ultimately went with a 3 because the collection began to feel very homogenous to me at about the 50% mark - overwhelmingly white and cis-het. Brown gives kind of a mea culpa in the Introduction that since they only chose bestselling women writers whose books are set/in about Paris that it was a limited pool to start with. Overall, this is a nice collection of personal essays about traveling/living in/thinking about Paris (I particularly liked Susan Vreeland's piece Somewhere between a 3 and 4. I ultimately went with a 3 because the collection began to feel very homogenous to me at about the 50% mark - overwhelmingly white and cis-het. Brown gives kind of a mea culpa in the Introduction that since they only chose bestselling women writers whose books are set/in about Paris that it was a limited pool to start with. Overall, this is a nice collection of personal essays about traveling/living in/thinking about Paris (I particularly liked Susan Vreeland's piece).
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  • Elizabeth
    July 17, 2017
    This was a super cute and easy read. I want to go back to Paris now.
  • Karen
    July 9, 2017
    As a Francophile, I loved this book!
  • Jennifer Coburn
    November 26, 2016
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