Fall Down 7 Times Get Up 8
From the author of the bestselling The Reason I Jump, an extraordinary self-portrait of life as a young adult with autismNaoki Higashida was only thirteen when he wrote The Reason I Jump, a revelatory account of autism from the inside by a nonverbal Japanese child, which became an international success.Now he shares his thoughts and experiences as a twenty-four-year-old man living each day with severe autism. In short, powerful chapters, Higashida explores school memories, family relationships, the exhilaration of travel, and the difficulties of speech. He also allows readers to experience profound moments we take for granted, like the thought-steps necessary for him to register that it's raining outside. Acutely aware of how strange his behavior can appear to others, he aims throughout to foster a better understanding of autism and to encourage society to see people with disabilities as people, not as problems.With an introduction by bestselling novelist David Mitchell, Fall Down 7 Times Get Up 8 also includes a dreamlike short story Higashida wrote especially for this edition. Both moving and of practical use, this book opens a window into the mind of an inspiring young man who meets every challenge with tenacity and good humor. However often he falls down, he always gets back up.

Fall Down 7 Times Get Up 8 Details

TitleFall Down 7 Times Get Up 8
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 11th, 2017
PublisherRandom House
ISBN-139780812997392
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Autobiography, Memoir, Biography

Fall Down 7 Times Get Up 8 Review

  • Lin
    January 1, 1970
    Review coming soon.
  • sevdah
    January 1, 1970
    I'm fairly ignorant on the subject of autism, meaning I have Wikipedia-type knowledge of it. I've heard of Higashida's first book, an attempt to explain his severe autism to others, written when he was only 13 - but this one sort of just fell into my hands and I decided to start with it. It has definitely done for me what I expected it to, it's deepened my understanding and knowledge, and it's managed to surprise me enormously. His explanations in plain, simple, precise language of various thing I'm fairly ignorant on the subject of autism, meaning I have Wikipedia-type knowledge of it. I've heard of Higashida's first book, an attempt to explain his severe autism to others, written when he was only 13 - but this one sort of just fell into my hands and I decided to start with it. It has definitely done for me what I expected it to, it's deepened my understanding and knowledge, and it's managed to surprise me enormously. His explanations in plain, simple, precise language of various things - among them what he wants from life, what his perception of time is, what's going on to make him bite into his clothes or lose control in other ways, and his ideas on special needs schools - were all fascinating to me. I've walked into this with a limited knowledge and every time I've closed the book, I've felt changed. It was a good read for me.
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  • Caren
    January 1, 1970
    The author, who has a nonverbal form of autism, has done an incredible job of allowing the reader inside his thought processes by means of thinking the characters of the Japanese alphabet, then mentally transcribing and touching the letters of the Roman alphabet on a homemade QWERTY keyboard. A transcriber then takes down the words and slowly sentences are built. The description of this process alone has to give you an enormous respect for the author. It must have taken time and patience to writ The author, who has a nonverbal form of autism, has done an incredible job of allowing the reader inside his thought processes by means of thinking the characters of the Japanese alphabet, then mentally transcribing and touching the letters of the Roman alphabet on a homemade QWERTY keyboard. A transcriber then takes down the words and slowly sentences are built. The description of this process alone has to give you an enormous respect for the author. It must have taken time and patience to write a book in this way. What he has created, however, is a wholly unique entry into his mind, which is really amazing. His thoughts are often moving and eloquent and range widely, from what sets off a "melt-down", to what he wishes others would know about how a person with his disability may prefer to be treated, to his abiding love for his family, to his travels, and even simply how he perceives a sudden rain shower. I found some of this thoughts to contain profound wisdom about the human condition in general. Here is one:"So: people with autism might talk and behave in peculiar-seeming ways, but this shouldn't relegate us to a lesser branch of humanity. Please give us the benefit of the doubt and act on the assumption that we're good people. If you suspect we're a lost cause, we pick up on that. The value of a person shouldn't be decided by the judgments of other people. Kindness brings out the best in all of us.' (pages 171-172)Here is another:"Everyone ought to be worthy of respect. The word evokes reverence---an image of admiring a person, or of striving to emulate them. In my case, however, the people I respect outside my family are those who have taught me various things as I've moved through life. Schoolmaster-type instruction leaves me a little cold: what impresses me more is how a person lives his or her life." (page 187)This message could be for any parent:"Your child, too, will one day be an adult. For them to live life with the same degree of independence as neurotypical offspring might be difficult, but one day your child-rearing, child-minding days will come to an end. Parents grow older until they can no longer look after their adult children. The period in which we are together as parents and child is finite. So please, while the child still is a child, and while you're still around to do so, support them well. Laugh together and share your stories. You won't be revisiting these years. Value them. That's all I'd ask." (page 201)Amen to that, Mr. Higashida.
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  • Laurie
    January 1, 1970
    Higashida is on the spectrum; he was nonverbal for a long time and even today he struggles with expressing himself verbally; he has what he calls restricted speech. He finds it easier many times to use his computer or a spelling board to communicate. When he was thirteen he wrote his first book, ‘The Reason I Jump’ to try and explain some of his actions to neurotypical folks. His new book, written as a 24 year old, takes that further, telling us what it’s like to live in his world. It includes s Higashida is on the spectrum; he was nonverbal for a long time and even today he struggles with expressing himself verbally; he has what he calls restricted speech. He finds it easier many times to use his computer or a spelling board to communicate. When he was thirteen he wrote his first book, ‘The Reason I Jump’ to try and explain some of his actions to neurotypical folks. His new book, written as a 24 year old, takes that further, telling us what it’s like to live in his world. It includes some of his ‘aha’ moments, when he figured out things that most of us take for granted. His is a life of anxiety and distractions coming from his own brain. He absolutely doesn’t feel sorry for himself, though; while he’s unhappy with parts of his life- like his inability to properly express to his mother how grateful he is to her- he is in general upbeat. I found it very interesting that he has obsessions that have to be dealt with to stay calm- as one with OCD myself, I could certainly those, as well as his sensory overload. The book is written in short chapters; some only a couple of pages long. Many are posts from his blog, so this gives a bit of a disjointed feeling reading the book. The translators have a child on the spectrum themselves, and I suspect this gave them a special attachment to this project. I recommend this book to anyone with a family member or friend on the spectrum, especially if that person has trouble communicating. Five stars.
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  • Kerran Olson
    January 1, 1970
    "Spoken language is a blue sea. Everyone else is swimming, diving and frolicking freely, while I'm alone, stuck in a tiny boat, swayed from side to side"This memoir is so eloquently written, and, like The Reason I Jump, gave me a lot more insight into the life of someone with autism, this time from a more mature, reflective perspective as the writing in this book was written during Higashida's teenage and young adult years. This was a quick read as the chapters are very short, but I thoroughly e "Spoken language is a blue sea. Everyone else is swimming, diving and frolicking freely, while I'm alone, stuck in a tiny boat, swayed from side to side"This memoir is so eloquently written, and, like The Reason I Jump, gave me a lot more insight into the life of someone with autism, this time from a more mature, reflective perspective as the writing in this book was written during Higashida's teenage and young adult years. This was a quick read as the chapters are very short, but I thoroughly enjoyed every page. I especially liked the short story and the poems included.
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  • Steph
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book again the author gives an amazing insight into an autistic person's thoughts and feelings. I really enjoyed how the author has grown and his explanation and reasoning are more in depth than in his first book. I would recommend this book to anyone who cares for someone with autism as it would give them a deeper understanding of their behaviours, wants and needs.
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  • Karrie
    January 1, 1970
    I loved The Reason I Jump, it was unique and poignant and made this one top of my TBR pile. Higashida shares more of his outlook on living in a neuro typical world being atypical. He covers everything from his parents to badminton to poetry. I still find his observations fascinating and informative, but missed his use of metaphor from the first book. A line that has stuck with me is in regards to helping those with special needs - don't be the first one to walk away.
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  • Carol
    January 1, 1970
    Previously, I have read The Reason Why I Jump by Naoki Higasida. I just looked back at my review of that book and everything that I said in that review is valid for this book too. I read this book because of my brother who has severe autism. I think that having learned a special keyboard when younger has enabled the author to be able to communicate his thoughts and feelings with his family and others. I wish that I could some way to get through to my brother that there are others like him. As fa Previously, I have read The Reason Why I Jump by Naoki Higasida. I just looked back at my review of that book and everything that I said in that review is valid for this book too. I read this book because of my brother who has severe autism. I think that having learned a special keyboard when younger has enabled the author to be able to communicate his thoughts and feelings with his family and others. I wish that I could some way to get through to my brother that there are others like him. As far as I know he is not aware that there are other severely autistic people besides him. The author describes his loneliness that he had no way of communicating in the chapter on Wordlessness. Growing up with my brother, I have felt his agony of not be able to communicate. This book is loaded with insights on what is life is like as a non-neurotypical person. Some I have figured out for myself so it is good to have the author say that they are true. He has helped me understand my brother so much more. What I really want is a simple picture book for my brother that tells him that he is not alone in this world. I highly recommend this book for all who have relatives or friends of people with severe autism.I received this Advance Reading Copy by making a selection from Amazon Vine books but that in no way influenced my thoughts or feelings in this review. I also posted this review only on sites meant for reading not for selling.
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  • Noah
    January 1, 1970
    An insightful and fascinating book into the life of someone with autism! "Fall Down 7 Times Get Up 8: A Young Man's Voice from the Silence of Autism" by Naoki Higashida is an interesting book that show's you the point of view of someone with Autism!You get to see the personal perspective of someone with autism. That aspect i feel was the heart warming aspect of the book, it was not just informative but had an emotional human element. You get to learn about Autism as well as learn about the life An insightful and fascinating book into the life of someone with autism! "Fall Down 7 Times Get Up 8: A Young Man's Voice from the Silence of Autism" by Naoki Higashida is an interesting book that show's you the point of view of someone with Autism!You get to see the personal perspective of someone with autism. That aspect i feel was the heart warming aspect of the book, it was not just informative but had an emotional human element. You get to learn about Autism as well as learn about the life of someone with Autism! There are a lot of personal experience's highlighted in the novel, that helped to add depth to the story and really immerse the reader into the book. One thing that subtracted from the immersion was the section aspect of the book, it detracted a bit from the immersion, but the sections do help to make each section an even more and interesting story. Each story is full of character and at times emotion. This is a great book that will take the reader into the mind of someone with autism, which will help others to understand that we are all unique and that is perfectly fine! A great book for readers curious about autism, who also want to see the perspective, in the mind of someone with autism! 4 Stars won in goodreads giveaway!
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  • Wendy
    January 1, 1970
    Having already written an international best seller “The Reason to Jump” at thirteen, Naoki Higashida a twenty-four-year old young man from Chiba, Japan restricted by severe, non-verbal autism has put his thoughts, feelings and experiences into another compelling novel, “Fall Down 7 Times Get up 8” which I won through Goodreads Giveaways. Beautifully written in short chapters he expresses his challenges, the anxieties and distractions that often muddle his brain and his difficulties in communica Having already written an international best seller “The Reason to Jump” at thirteen, Naoki Higashida a twenty-four-year old young man from Chiba, Japan restricted by severe, non-verbal autism has put his thoughts, feelings and experiences into another compelling novel, “Fall Down 7 Times Get up 8” which I won through Goodreads Giveaways. Beautifully written in short chapters he expresses his challenges, the anxieties and distractions that often muddle his brain and his difficulties in communicating. Powerfully moving and informative Naoki with the use of his alphabet grid and computer breaks his silence bringing to life his school memories, family relationships and even his elation at being able to travel, inspiring society to appreciate the unique individuality of people with disabilities. With his insights, remembrances, poetry and even a short story his life does shine with promise like a “shimmering star” as he brings a new awareness to people about autism.I thoroughly enjoyed “Fall Down 7 Times Get up 8” and expect this book will be as well received as the one before it.
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  • Cherise
    January 1, 1970
    It's important to remember that this book isn't just one book, but pieces of Naoki's other work that has been released in Japan put into one book. Personally, I think you can feel that. It all follows a similar theme but doesn't always match with the stories around it. Sadly, I believe like the first one, my ADHD brain had a hard time grasping everything being said in the chapters, my brain would glaze over after a few hours when I got too tired. But I do believe that Naoki's writing was well do It's important to remember that this book isn't just one book, but pieces of Naoki's other work that has been released in Japan put into one book. Personally, I think you can feel that. It all follows a similar theme but doesn't always match with the stories around it. Sadly, I believe like the first one, my ADHD brain had a hard time grasping everything being said in the chapters, my brain would glaze over after a few hours when I got too tired. But I do believe that Naoki's writing was well done and elegant. I think his writing is also important to better understand him, but also anyone with any sort of disability. I do recommend it, though I do have to warn that it does repeat itself a bit, understandably. I think that was my downfall when reading it at night. Also know there is a story of fiction thrown in there without properly being labelled as such. I spent most of that story confused until I realized at the end that it wasn't something from his life like the other stories.(Full review to come on my blog)
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  • Kathleen
    January 1, 1970
    This book moved me in so many ways. From David Mitchell's helpful introduction to the last chapter "Mother's Day, 2013", I was immersed in another world.Unlike some reviewers of this book, I do not have a family member with autism. However, as a public school teacher I have had some students whose manifestations of autism are toward the Asperger's end of the continuum. As an anthropologist, I have wanted to understand other's experiences and world views and to be enriched by this knowledgeFrom h This book moved me in so many ways. From David Mitchell's helpful introduction to the last chapter "Mother's Day, 2013", I was immersed in another world.Unlike some reviewers of this book, I do not have a family member with autism. However, as a public school teacher I have had some students whose manifestations of autism are toward the Asperger's end of the continuum. As an anthropologist, I have wanted to understand other's experiences and world views and to be enriched by this knowledgeFrom his metaphor of spoken language as a deep blue sea, to a moment when Naoki does not recognize his own reflection in a mirror, to a poem in which he tells us there is no need to swallow the feelings encasing words --- I was struck by Naoki's kindness, emotional range, and search for meaning.The short story "A Journey" reminded me of some of my own dreams. It was episodic with not quite recognized characters and situations, and dark emotions, but ultimately ending in light.I recommend that you take the journey of reading this book.
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  • Konstantin
    January 1, 1970
    [rating = B-]This is a nonfiction book about a book with severe nonverbal autism. It is a fascinating look into the life of a neuro-atypical child and his point of view on matters concerning himself and his disability. Higashida is very aware of himself and it shows in his advise about autism and how neuro-typical people can understand and help those with special needs. The most interesting parts are when he describes his life and how he overcomes his panic attacks and other effects of his autis [rating = B-]This is a nonfiction book about a book with severe nonverbal autism. It is a fascinating look into the life of a neuro-atypical child and his point of view on matters concerning himself and his disability. Higashida is very aware of himself and it shows in his advise about autism and how neuro-typical people can understand and help those with special needs. The most interesting parts are when he describes his life and how he overcomes his panic attacks and other effects of his autism. Although at times he can be a bit aggressive, perhaps harmlessly, about the treatment of people with autism, he does suggest ways that one can better help/understand the situation. He can also sound like he is speaking for all autistic kids everywhere, though I doubt he means to appear so (and he can be a bit repetitive too). All in all, a wonderful look into the life of a neuro-atypical child and how he has, not overcome, but has adapted and believed in himself.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Goodreads and the publisher for a free copy of Fall Down 7 Times Get Up 8. I found this an exceptional read for two main reasons:Firstly, so many times when I look up information on autism, I find things written by neurotypical parents, other family members, friends of people with autism, etc. And while they certainly can share valuable information, I find myself wanting to read something by someone on the autism spectrum, someone who is experiencing things first-hand. This book doe Thank you to Goodreads and the publisher for a free copy of Fall Down 7 Times Get Up 8. I found this an exceptional read for two main reasons:Firstly, so many times when I look up information on autism, I find things written by neurotypical parents, other family members, friends of people with autism, etc. And while they certainly can share valuable information, I find myself wanting to read something by someone on the autism spectrum, someone who is experiencing things first-hand. This book does just that.Secondly, the writing itself is poignant and beautiful. Naoki Higashida writes lovely vignettes and musings. I was not surprised to find out that he also writes poetry.
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  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    I listened to this book through radio 4 as it is book of the week. the book is from the perspective of a young man Naoki who has severe autism and is non verbal and he uses his computer to communicate his feelings about autism and how it has affected his relationships. this is a sequel to The Reason I Jump written by the author at age 13. it illustrates that autism is a processing disorder and it has not impaired the authors cognitive functioning as he does not have a learning disability. I work I listened to this book through radio 4 as it is book of the week. the book is from the perspective of a young man Naoki who has severe autism and is non verbal and he uses his computer to communicate his feelings about autism and how it has affected his relationships. this is a sequel to The Reason I Jump written by the author at age 13. it illustrates that autism is a processing disorder and it has not impaired the authors cognitive functioning as he does not have a learning disability. I work in the autism field and I have found this book interesting,inspiring and accessible. It should be read by all interested in learning more about autism and how it affects a person's life.
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  • Lynn
    January 1, 1970
    Naoki Higashida has severe autism and is considered nonverbal though he can say a few words and make sounds. His communication is done through a QWERTY board, both on a manual board and on computer. Naoki wrote a book at age 14 that was surprising and a sensation because a nonverbal person with autism has never write book before. This book is a sequel and Naoki is now an adult and speaking for acceptance and respect as one. Written in short chapters and from magazine articles, this is a book tha Naoki Higashida has severe autism and is considered nonverbal though he can say a few words and make sounds. His communication is done through a QWERTY board, both on a manual board and on computer. Naoki wrote a book at age 14 that was surprising and a sensation because a nonverbal person with autism has never write book before. This book is a sequel and Naoki is now an adult and speaking for acceptance and respect as one. Written in short chapters and from magazine articles, this is a book that many people should read.
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  • Kylie
    January 1, 1970
    An amazing second book full of wisdom and insight. My favourite part isWhat I wish to say is this: the value of a person shouldn’t be fixed solely by his or her skills and talents—or lack of them. It’s how you strive to live well that allows others to understand your awesomeness as a human being. This miraculous quality touches people. Via this “how,” people consider the sanctity and validity of everyone’s life, whether special needs are involved or not.”As s parent of a child with autism I enjo An amazing second book full of wisdom and insight. My favourite part isWhat I wish to say is this: the value of a person shouldn’t be fixed solely by his or her skills and talents—or lack of them. It’s how you strive to live well that allows others to understand your awesomeness as a human being. This miraculous quality touches people. Via this “how,” people consider the sanctity and validity of everyone’s life, whether special needs are involved or not.”As s parent of a child with autism I enjoyed the opportunity to understand this young man's experience of autism.
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  • Stephen
    January 1, 1970
    I won this book as part of a Goodreads Giveaway.This book provides an interesting glimpse into the world of a non-verbal man with autism. Not only are we able to see some of the difficulties that he faces, but he shares his thoughts on a variety of topics. It provides a reminder that just because someone has autism and may be non-verbal, does not mean they are incapable of thinking or expressing themselves.In reading this book, it is important to keep in mind the saying: "If you've seen one pers I won this book as part of a Goodreads Giveaway.This book provides an interesting glimpse into the world of a non-verbal man with autism. Not only are we able to see some of the difficulties that he faces, but he shares his thoughts on a variety of topics. It provides a reminder that just because someone has autism and may be non-verbal, does not mean they are incapable of thinking or expressing themselves.In reading this book, it is important to keep in mind the saying: "If you've seen one person with autism, you've seen one person with autism." Autism manifests differently for every person and so we should be careful with generalizing.This book was unique, with a simple but powerful writing style. I would recommend this book to anyone who is interested in autism, or who wants to hear a personal account of some of the challenges faced in living with autism.
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  • Monica Penthor
    January 1, 1970
    This book is written by Naoki Higashida and translated from Japanese to English by David Mitchell and his wife, Keiko Mitchell. They also have an autistic child. Naoki is a severely non-verbal autistic young man who lives in Japan. I already read about him previously in his book "The Reason I Jump" written when he was a 13 year old boy. He has mastered communication via an alphabet board and his computer. We are privy to his perspective on his life as a young man with autism. We as the reader ge This book is written by Naoki Higashida and translated from Japanese to English by David Mitchell and his wife, Keiko Mitchell. They also have an autistic child. Naoki is a severely non-verbal autistic young man who lives in Japan. I already read about him previously in his book "The Reason I Jump" written when he was a 13 year old boy. He has mastered communication via an alphabet board and his computer. We are privy to his perspective on his life as a young man with autism. We as the reader get a different slant of what is normally known about autism from Naoki.
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  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    I read Naoki's book The Reason I Jump and loved it and his account of living as a person with autism. With Fall Down 7 Times Get Up 8 his readers can clearly see how he had grown and developed as a person of courage to live his life fully even with severe autism. Much of his book is profound. Here is just one example of many. Page 87: "There are many ways of living, and this goes for people with special needs as well. We grow and bloom best in company. There must be so many of us with dreams tha I read Naoki's book The Reason I Jump and loved it and his account of living as a person with autism. With Fall Down 7 Times Get Up 8 his readers can clearly see how he had grown and developed as a person of courage to live his life fully even with severe autism. Much of his book is profound. Here is just one example of many. Page 87: "There are many ways of living, and this goes for people with special needs as well. We grow and bloom best in company. There must be so many of us with dreams that we yearn to see come true someday. May Your futures and our futures come together."
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  • Maureen
    January 1, 1970
    This is the follow up book to The Reason I Jump It is made up of very short chapters that provoke thought and get you thinking about everyday life experiences from a new side. It's endearing how wonderful his family is. They accept each other for who they are. They have patience. They don't expect everyone to be the same. The author insists that he is not regretful or sad about being autistic. That's a wake up call for "neurotypical" people. I like that.
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  • Kathy
    January 1, 1970
    A different 5 star rating but such a well written book by a 24 year old describing his severe autism. Short, easy to read chapters that really help the reader try to imagine an autistic world. At 13, this non-verbal boy wrote The Reason I Jump (which I now want to read) and then 11 years later he shares his memories, experiences and thought processes that better explain the complexity of autism. "I, too, aspire to be better than I am." (p.26) Brilliant.
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  • Richard Janzen
    January 1, 1970
    It is fascinating to get a glimpse into the world of someone dealing with autism. Especially for parents, friends, teachers, etc....this kind of book challenges many of the stereotypes and assumptions held about autism. I only gave 3 stars because a) it doesn't carry me much further than his book "The Reason I Jump"; and b) so much of this is a compilation of short blog-type entries that lack much continuity.
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  • Sue Goult
    January 1, 1970
    Amazing life of an autistic personThis is an amazing book by someone who is classed as an autistic mute.However he does have the odd word or phrase, but spells thing out on a board like a typewriter.He has little or no self pity, and asks us all for a little understanding Superb book.
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  • Luisa
    January 1, 1970
    I won a copy of this book on goodreads in exchange for an honest review. I enjoyed this book, it tells a stoy of autism through the eyes of someone that has it. I liked the lay out of the book and found it an enjoyable read. Yes I would recommend this book. Coincidently today on the online version of the Toronto star excerts of Fall Down 7 Times Get Up 8 were featured.
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  • Josephine
    January 1, 1970
    A very interesting read, for a neurotypical person, to gain access to the world of people living with autism. It is not a novel but rather short anecdotes and insights more or less related to one another. Nonetheless, I think the author did an incredible job at explaining the reality of autism. Thank you Goodreads giveaway for giving me the opportunity to discover this author.
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  • Lorelei
    January 1, 1970
    While I found his first book more riveting, this one also has gems of wisdom that increase understanding. The world needs neuro-atypical people. History has taught us they are some of the most profound forces in arts, sciences and literature. I'm so grateful for the growth that has come to my life by raising an Aspie child. The young years were tough but what an amazing human being he is!
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  • Roxanne
    January 1, 1970
    I won this as a giveaway. Thank you so much I really enjoyed the insight jnto someone's life with autism. It was very well done, Naoki you did an amazing job!!I would recommend this book to everyone :)
  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    Insight in to a different way of seeing the world. I've never read anything else like it. Written in very short chapters. Everyone should read for a better understanding of a population that doesn't have a wide-spread, well-known voice.
  • Samantha
    January 1, 1970
    This was a Goodreads Giveaway...3.5 stars. This was an interesting read that changed my view on how autistic children think. I will never look at someone with autism in the same way again. The author is poetic and inspiring and very much capable of abstract thought.
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