Lost Boy
From the national bestselling author of Alice comes a familiar story with a dark hook—a tale about Peter Pan and the friend who became his nemesis, a nemesis who may not be the blackhearted villain Peter says he is…There is one version of my story that everyone knows. And then there is the truth. This is how it happened. How I went from being Peter Pan’s first—and favorite—lost boy to his greatest enemy.Peter brought me to his island because there were no rules and no grownups to make us mind. He brought boys from the Other Place to join in the fun, but Peter's idea of fun is sharper than a pirate’s sword. Because it’s never been all fun and games on the island. Our neighbors are pirates and monsters. Our toys are knife and stick and rock—the kinds of playthings that bite.Peter promised we would all be young and happy forever.

Lost Boy Details

TitleLost Boy
Author
FormatPaperback
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 4th, 2017
PublisherBerkley Books
ISBN0399584021
ISBN-139780399584022
Number of pages304 pages
Rating
GenreFantasy, Retellings, Mystery, Horror, Fairy Tales, Fiction, Fairy Tale Retellings, Dark Fantasy, Young Adult, Drama

Lost Boy Review

  • karen
    February 19, 2017
    there are so very many enthusiastic superfans of Peter Pan out there, and so very many retellings and variations of the story have been published to entice these superfans. and before we go any further, let me out myself: i am not one of them.i don’t dislike Peter Pan, but my only exposure to the story has been through the disney-filter, and i was never really keen on any of the disney movies with people in them - give me The Fox and the Hound or The Aristocats any day, but Sleeping Beauty? snoo there are so very many enthusiastic superfans of Peter Pan out there, and so very many retellings and variations of the story have been published to entice these superfans. and before we go any further, let me out myself: i am not one of them.i don’t dislike Peter Pan, but my only exposure to the story has been through the disney-filter, and i was never really keen on any of the disney movies with people in them - give me The Fox and the Hound or The Aristocats any day, but Sleeping Beauty? snooore. so, while i saw the cartoon, and i read the little disney picture books about peter pan, i was never really driven to seek out the original, which i expect, given what i know about the disnification of other stories, is very different from its source material.all of that is to say that even though there are likely many references and allusions here that i didn’t catch or understand the full significance of that will no doubt delight you superfans, i still really enjoyed this book. i'm fond of the ‘villains redeemed’ genre that gregory maguire popularized and to which so many other authors have made offerings, and it's amazing to have such a wealth of retellings of beloved stories to satisfy readers’ cravings to revisit their favorite characters, no matter what shape the retelling takes, or how successful it is as a book on its own. i am myself a superfan of Wuthering Heights, and will read any and all retellings, even if they are atrocious. as many of them are.but fear not, peter pan kids, this one is a million miles away from atrocious. which is not surprising, considering how popular this author’s Alice in Wonderland retellings are, both of which were bought excitedly by me, only to sit unread on my shelves, because we have already established that i am the worst.but i read this one, so ppbblltt! and it is such a fun, bloody ride. here we have jamie, the future captain hook, and the first boy peter chose to join him in his world of adventures and eternal youth and endless irresponsibility. since then, jamie has been peter’s right hand man boy, his first and most special friend, and has witnessed the arrival of so many other chosen boys over the years. and he has also been responsible for burying them. because - fine print - eternal youth is not the same thing as immortality. and on peter’s island of fun and gleeful romping, there are also pirates and crocodiles and the many-eyed and illnesses and … the battles. and while one of the most appealing characteristics of boyhood is the freedom from thinking about the future, or consequences, or anything other than what the next adventure will be, jamie has started to feel the weight of his actual years, and is troubled by peter’s short memory when it comes to all of the unnecessary lives lost to dangers sought out for no other reason than a lark, an adventure, a game. which simmering disquiet is already beginning to complicate their friendship and is made worse when peter brings back a boy who is way too young for peter’s rough-and-tumble ways, and jamie feels responsible for protecting him from the many dangers of the island, not the least of which is peter’s easily-bored carelessness, jealousy, and inherent lack of remorse.it’s a really interesting dynamic, as jamie assumes the parental presence lacking in these boys’ lives even before they were abducted, and peter is just collecting temporary playmates, like a kid with a jar full of frogs who forgets to punch airholes in the lid. it's a clever twist, a great character study, and did i mention all the carnage? it’s like Lord of the Flies with a much higher body count. i am very eager to finally grab those two alice books from my shelf, as soon as the mighty stack of promises allows.
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  • Heidi The Hippie Reader
    June 13, 2017
    Christina Henry, author of the chilling Alice, which is a brilliant re-telling of Alice in Wonderland, has shifted focus to a new fairytale. In Lost Boy, readers get to experience the story of the boy-who-never-grew-up through the origin story of his arch-nemesis. And what a story it is."Peter will say I'm a villain, that I wronged him, that I never was his friend. But I told you already. Peter lies. This is what really happened." loc 85, ebook. Goosebumps? Yeah.Fans of the original tale will ne Christina Henry, author of the chilling Alice, which is a brilliant re-telling of Alice in Wonderland, has shifted focus to a new fairytale. In Lost Boy, readers get to experience the story of the boy-who-never-grew-up through the origin story of his arch-nemesis. And what a story it is."Peter will say I'm a villain, that I wronged him, that I never was his friend. But I told you already. Peter lies. This is what really happened." loc 85, ebook. Goosebumps? Yeah.Fans of the original tale will need to prepare themselves for having beloved characters shown in a new and sinister light. Think Longbourn, but worse, much worse. "I had been with Peter longer than I'd been in the Other Place, longer than I could count, anyway. The seasons did not pass here and the days had no meaning. I would be here forever. I would never grow up." loc 146, ebook. The others in Peter's group call the narrator, Jamie.He is a fierce fighter- the best. And he protects the younger and weaker members of those lucky few that Peter brings back from the real world or in this tale, the Other Place. This protective instinct is sneered at by Peter who accuses Jamie of "babying" or "mothering" the boys. In truth, there is no worse insult in Peter's arsenal. Grown ups either abuse you or take your stuff or both. They're pirates."(Peter) had invited us there, had promised us we would be young and happy forever. So we were. Unless we got sick, or died, or were taken by the pirates." loc 257, ebook. So, Neverland is not the paradise that it is portrayed as in the original tale. There are also monsters called Many-Eyed that eat the boys alive, if they catch them."Was this, I wondered, what it felt like to be a grown-up? Did you always feel the weight of things on you, your cares pressing you down like a burden you could never shake? No wonder Peter could fly. He had no worries to weight him to the earth." loc 1971, ebook.The stage is set. Love and hate intertwine with magic, blood and, of course, a little bit of fairy dust.If you enjoyed this tale, you may also want to explore some other Peter Pan re-tellings like Tiger Lily by Jodi Lynn Anderson or All Darling Children by Katrina Monroe. The last, a horror-filled offering, may really appeal to those who want to delve more into the potential shadows of Neverland. There's a price to pay for never growing up. In that tale, as in this, Peter pays it without a qualm.Thank you to NetGalley and Berkley Publishing for a free advance reader's copy of this book. Reminder: the short quotations I cited in this review may vary in the final published version.
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  • Carole (Carole's Random Life in Books)
    June 8, 2017
    This review can also be found at Carole's Random Life in Books.This was a lot of fun. I am not really someone who reads a lot of fairy tale retellings but the idea of this one really appealed to me. I really don't know a whole lot about the original Peter Pan story besides what I know from Disney which was probably one of the things that made me want to pick this book up. It did start out a bit slow for me and I was able to set it aside but once I really got going, I didn't want to put it down. This review can also be found at Carole's Random Life in Books.This was a lot of fun. I am not really someone who reads a lot of fairy tale retellings but the idea of this one really appealed to me. I really don't know a whole lot about the original Peter Pan story besides what I know from Disney which was probably one of the things that made me want to pick this book up. It did start out a bit slow for me and I was able to set it aside but once I really got going, I didn't want to put it down. This was really a great read.I have a weakness for villains but Jamie really doesn't feel like a villain in this story. I really enjoyed seeing Peter Pan, the island, and the other boys from Jamie's point of view. Jamie was the first boy that Peter brought to the island and he is the favorite. He takes care of the others and keeps things in line. For a boy that will never grow up he is really very mature.Peter wasn't the lovable innocent child that I know from the Disney movie. Not at all. Peter was cunning and thought only of himself. He brings boys to the island so that he will forever have playmates and he wants them all to love him. That doesn't mean that he cares about them all that much because if they die or get hurt he can just go and get more boys. Peter wants things the way that he wants them and he has all of the power on the island so the boys follow his lead.The story had a lot of exciting moments. I was happy to see the things that I remember from my limited knowledge of Peter Pan including the pirates, the tree, and mermaids. I was also thrilled to see a few surprises along the way. This was definitely not a Disney movie and some of the scenes were actually quite violent. There were plenty of characters to like and a few to hate. Once the book hit the mid-point the action really didn't let up until the final page.I would recommend this book to others. I thought it was a really well done story with great characters. This is the first book by Christina Henry that I have read but I hope to read more in the future.I received an advance reader edition of this book from Berkley Publishing Group via First to Read.Initial ThoughtsI don't really know much about the Peter Pan story besides what Disney has shown me. I must say that I really did enjoy seeing this other side of Jamie and Peter. I will have to check out some of Christina Henry's other books.
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  • Dianne
    June 16, 2017
    Peter lies. Peter is a manipulator. Peter thinks only of Peter. He is not the rescuer of unwanted children. He is not a magical hero or purveyor of fun and excitement. Peter is a monster, but the boys he brings to his island are too naïve to realize, until it is too late, but the boys did have Jamie.Jamie was one of Peter’s first boys. Jamie was the teacher, the nurturer, the voice of reason, the protector and the one whose attention Peter craved the most. Jamie knew the real Peter, the ugly sid Peter lies. Peter is a manipulator. Peter thinks only of Peter. He is not the rescuer of unwanted children. He is not a magical hero or purveyor of fun and excitement. Peter is a monster, but the boys he brings to his island are too naïve to realize, until it is too late, but the boys did have Jamie.Jamie was one of Peter’s first boys. Jamie was the teacher, the nurturer, the voice of reason, the protector and the one whose attention Peter craved the most. Jamie knew the real Peter, the ugly side of the boy who never wanted to grow up. What he didn’t realize was the length Peter to which would go to keep his island world as his personal fiefdom, until Peter pulled his most cruel stunt ever and Jamie fought back for all the boys lost, all the boys who were tricked by Peter and all the boys who died for his entertainment.Christina Henry’s Peter Pan is not the fantasy boy in a wonderful world of adventure. LOST BOYis a tale of a truly lost soul in search of the love he never understood, a boy jealous of real little boys who knew family and love and security, a boy just skewed enough to use his “boys” as pawns in his wicked games.Told through the eyes and heart of Jamie, we see a world that is not as pretty, not so magical, but rife with deceit, treachery and lies, because, as Jamie says, Peter lies…and someone must pay the price. That price will give rise to Captain Hook, as we must decide, was he really the villain or just another of Peter’s victims?Fabulous story telling with an intriguing concept that feels right as one boy fails to mature while those around him may, but only after they have seen through his façade and learn to think for themselves with both their minds and their hearts. For as much as I felt badly for Peter and his lost soul, there isn’t a boy in this tale that one wouldn’t want to protect and save.I received an ARC edition from Berkley in exchange for my honest review.Publisher: Berkley (July 4, 2017)Publication Date: July 4, 2017Genre: Fantasy | Fairy TalePrint Length: 302 pagesAvailable from: Amazon | Barnes & NobleFor Reviews & More: http://tometender.blogspot.com
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  • Ellen Gail
    February 26, 2017
    Peter promised we would all be young and happy forever. Peter lies. Ellen Gail tested. Chloe approved.In Lost Boy: The True Story of Captain Hook, Christina Henry does what she did insanely well in Alice and brings a good deal of bloody retelling fun to a classic fairy tale. In this case, it's the tale of Peter Pan - he never wants to grow up, and he just wants all of his friends to stay young and carefree with him.Peter's boys never grow up.What could possibly be wrong with that?Our main chara Peter promised we would all be young and happy forever. Peter lies. Ellen Gail tested. Chloe approved.In Lost Boy: The True Story of Captain Hook, Christina Henry does what she did insanely well in Alice and brings a good deal of bloody retelling fun to a classic fairy tale. In this case, it's the tale of Peter Pan - he never wants to grow up, and he just wants all of his friends to stay young and carefree with him.Peter's boys never grow up.What could possibly be wrong with that?Our main character here is Jamie, Peter's original lost boy. Peter brought him to his island so many years ago; his original home is nothing but a vague idea from a dream now. There have been other boys, some who are still with them, and many, many others who have long since passed.In all these hundreds of years together, Jamie has worshiped Peter, loved him. Peter loves all kinds of bloody fun and games, but Jamie is the one left to clean up the bodies.And after a few hundreds of years of being the grave digger, nursing sick and dying boys, and watching Peter go get new playmates when his old ones no longer amuse him, or heaven forbid grow up, Jamie is feeling a little frustrated. Fighting pirates, battling one another, swimming with the mermaids; all these adventures don't have the same joy they used to.When Peter's newest addition to his gang of lost boys is barely out of diapers, tensions reach an all time high between Jamie and his longest, his only friend. Why must he always shoulder the responsibility? What isn't Peter telling him about the island? Is he really Peter's right hand man? Or just another disposable plaything?Lost Boy is chock full of bloody adventures, the rowdy freedom of youth, monsters (both human and non,) and violent spasms of friendships being shredded into adulthood.Also crocodiles.So now the real question? Is it good?Mostly, yeah. It can't beat Alice, her best and most dynamic work. But it is a solidly entertaining story. I'm not familiar with the Peter Pan story intensely, not beyond the Disney movie anyway. It was never one of my favorites. Growing up when it was Friday night video store time, my sister without fail wanted Peter Pan or Cinderella. I would 9/10 times choose Pocahontas, the other 1/10 being The Lion King.If you'd like me to continue discussing Disney movies I can. I can discuss Disney's animated catalogue for dayyyyyys.Okay, so back to the book.Henry's writing is great as usual. She really hits a good balance between the more visceral action of the story and the emotional development of the characters. Jamie in particular goes through a lot of nice development as he feels the increasing weight of responsibility, pulling against his years of love for Peter. As for Peter, he's very much like a malicious child, collecting ants one minute, then burning them the next. He has no concept of right or wrong - there is only fun and if you aren't willing to play with him, and play according to his rules, what use are you?The biggest drawbacks of the story to me, fall into spoiler territory. There's really no easy way to discuss them without spoiling the ENTIRE story, which I don't really want to do. What I can say is that I found Charlie, the smallest and newest lost boy, to be necessary completely. The story would have been drastically different without him, in terms of plot and character. But this didn't mean that I liked him much. Also: Sal. I have a myriad of issues with Sal's character. Or not really with the character in particular, but in some decisions and reveals and reactions.I know that's horribly vague. You'll forgive me.Is Lost Boy great? Unfortunately no, it falls shy of Christina Henry's best. But it is good, and if you have an interest in reading a Peter Pan retelling full of violence, mischief, and childhoods that either last forever or end all too soon, this is likely a book for you! Thanks to Goodreads and Berkley for the arc! ----------------------UPDATE: Screw waiting for July, I have an arc! I'm reading this bitch now!-----------------------July has never seemed so far away.
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  • Elizabeth
    April 11, 2017
    This is Lord of the Flies meets Lord of the Lost Boys; you really aren't going to like Peter Pan any more. Taking oh so familiar story and making you rethink the logic of it from a grown-up perspective is a common trope but this one was so clear, so painfully true-to-life and logical that you wonder how you'd never seen it before. As a child I used to do all those ridiculously fearless things that children do. I leaped before I looked and it all turned out fine. And as a child I could think of n This is Lord of the Flies meets Lord of the Lost Boys; you really aren't going to like Peter Pan any more. Taking oh so familiar story and making you rethink the logic of it from a grown-up perspective is a common trope but this one was so clear, so painfully true-to-life and logical that you wonder how you'd never seen it before. As a child I used to do all those ridiculously fearless things that children do. I leaped before I looked and it all turned out fine. And as a child I could think of nothing more fun, nothing more innocent and free than such an adventure as one with Peter Pan. But I grew up and now I look before I leap because not everyone makes it safely over those rocks and maybe there's a safer way around if only we thought to find it. And now I wonder what kind of a monster steals children from their homes to fight pirates and monsters and calls it a grand adventure? It's Peter Pan; "full of fun and heartless with it". This book is a dark mirror of Peter Pan, telling the story of that time when we grow up and must suddenly start to see things differently. When we wobble at the precipice and learn to fear because, unlike Peter Pan, we cannot fly. And so we learn the story of Peter from the eyes of the first boy who loved him. And then grew up. "Peter smiled and made me think there was only joy. Even when there was blood he made me think it was only play, until there was so much of it even Peter couldn't pretend any more."
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  • Quirkyreader
    May 26, 2017
    Thank you Penguin for the ARC of the latest chapter of the Peter Pan mythos. I have previously read biographies of J.M. Barrie, so I had some idea of what I was getting into. As I have mentioned on other platforms, this is not the Disney version of the story. If you want to keep and cherish that version run far away from this story. It will change everything you love about the character.For those of you who wish to continue it is a well written story that continues ideas that one might have come Thank you Penguin for the ARC of the latest chapter of the Peter Pan mythos. I have previously read biographies of J.M. Barrie, so I had some idea of what I was getting into. As I have mentioned on other platforms, this is not the Disney version of the story. If you want to keep and cherish that version run far away from this story. It will change everything you love about the character.For those of you who wish to continue it is a well written story that continues ideas that one might have come up with whilst reading the original story. Spoiler ahead.............The Peter in this story is a narcissistic and bloody wraith out for his own pleasure and the young boys he takes end up being damaged for life.This story is well worth the time. And it might inspire you to re-read the original and see what is there.
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  • Destiny ➳ Howling Libraries
    June 29, 2017
    I dunno. I love Christina's writing but I'm not a big Peter Pan fan and this was just... I like dark and twisty, but I can't stomach that much violence and death regarding children. RTC maybe?
  • Jennymort *The Crimson Dark Lord, Scribe, House of Slytheread*
    February 27, 2017
    So, I saw this on my feed and zoomed in on it like some kind of fucking homing beacon. Peter Pan wasn't my go to movie while being a kid and surrounded by every freaking Disney movie you just HAD TO HAVE!But I digress. I still want this anyways as it seems as dark as my soul and not filled with fluffy romance shit like the rest of them are. *Le-fucking-sigh*I was just lazily scrolling along down my news feed when I see a review from Miss Karen, whom I feel has read every book in the world and th So, I saw this on my feed and zoomed in on it like some kind of fucking homing beacon. Peter Pan wasn't my go to movie while being a kid and surrounded by every freaking Disney movie you just HAD TO HAVE!But I digress. I still want this anyways as it seems as dark as my soul and not filled with fluffy romance shit like the rest of them are. *Le-fucking-sigh*I was just lazily scrolling along down my news feed when I see a review from Miss Karen, whom I feel has read every book in the world and then some. *ahem* Anyways, I always see her reading the good stuff and when I clicked 'read karen's review, I find myself sucked in and in the world of GIVE ME RIGHT THE FUCK NOW syndrom. So I go to the page and I'm so stupid super excited to click the 'add to tbr' thing-a-ma-jig thinking to myself that I'm going to go to the damn store, or amazon, and get this freaking book as soon as humanly possible. And guess what? GUESS WHAT!? It doesn't come out TILL FUCKING JULY!*my internal screaming*I just can't deal with authors right now.
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  • Heather
    March 27, 2017
    Review Originally Posted On The Sassy Book Geek **** Huge thank you to Berkley Books for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review!**** (This was a buddy read with Ariana @ The Quirky Book Nerd! I will be linking up her review when she has it up here and keep a look out for our buddy read discussion and Q&A!)As you all probably know by now I was a HUGE fan of Christina Henry’s “Alice” and “Red Queen” which were horror retellings of Alice in Wonderland. On top of that I “Peter Pan Review Originally Posted On The Sassy Book Geek **** Huge thank you to Berkley Books for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review!**** (This was a buddy read with Ariana @ The Quirky Book Nerd! I will be linking up her review when she has it up here and keep a look out for our buddy read discussion and Q&A!)As you all probably know by now I was a HUGE fan of Christina Henry’s “Alice” and “Red Queen” which were horror retellings of Alice in Wonderland. On top of that I “Peter Pan” is my all time favorite fairy tale so a Christina Henry retelling was going to be right up my alley……and it was! The Plot “This isn’t a wonderful place for boys to play and have adventures and stay young for always. It’s a killing place, and we’re all just soldiers in Peter’s war.” While this story is a retelling of “Peter Pan” it’s also an origin/redemption story for the character of Captain Hook/James Hook where we get to see his side of the story and here he is a boy known as Jamie who was whisked away to Neverland by Peter. He is the first and favorite Lost Boy who watches over all of the other Lost Boys because while in Peter’s mind the island is nothing but fun and games…..it’s quite the opposite for the boys.Enter the horror aspect of the story.Jamie has watched countless other Lost Boys succumb to the horrors of the island: pirates, the Many-Eyed, crocodiles, disease, and battles aka arena fights to the death. After so many years of this it starts to weigh on Jamie and it starts bothering him how Peter doesn’t seem to care about the well being of anyone but himself.The pacing is a tiny bit slow to start but once the plot picks up you won’t be able to put this book down. There’s plenty of twists and turns you most definitely will not see coming.I was absolutely blown away by how unique and twisted Christina Henry made the world we all know as Neverland. It was almost as if I was reading an entirely new story! Trust me when I say twisted too, this book is DARK and full of carnage, it’s almost like watching a slasher movie play out. She took the tale of “Peter Pan” and completely flipped it on its head and took us to its darkest depths.I also loved the world building that was given, it wasn’t a whole lot but more and more was revealed as the story went on. Could it have used more? Definitely. Did I still enjoy it? Of course! All of the allusions to the original tale were fun to pick out as well because they all had their own dark twists such as why Hook is missing his right hand and of course why Peter and he are sworn enemies.Be prepared for a very emotional ride because the things that happen to Jamie and the other Lost Boys can not only be terrifying but also extremely heart-breaking. You have been warned! The CharactersOf course the characters were fantastic since they are the driving force of the story here the main characters, Jamie and Peter, were incredibly complex.I really enjoyed these versions of Hook and Pan, plain and simple. Jamie is a bit of a mother hen, always looking out and caring for the other boys while Peter is selfish, jealous, and doesn’t show any remorse.Jamie is a very easy character to sympathize with as he is very caring towards the younger, inexperienced boys always helping them out and even burying them when they perish. He gets upset and angry with Peter over their deaths as Peter could care less and always goes off to get more boys as replacements.Peter on the other hand was easy to dislike, he’s the true villain of this story. He only cares about playing games and having the boys adore and worship him, he grows very jealous if anyone is getting more attention than he is. However, even though he needs the constant attention of his Lost Boys he is very careless about looking after them and shows no guilt when one of them dies.I have to say it was truly horrifying to see such a twisted, sick version of Peter Pan but I also loved every second of it. However, I can say my childhood may be ruined and I don’t know if I’ll ever look at Peter Pan the same ever again!As for the secondary characters they didn’t really get a lot of depth but this makes sense as most of them are fodder for the island anyways……However, notable Lost Boys that I absolutely adored were Nod and Fog, Sal, and Charlie. In ConclusionI need to scream my love of this book to the heavens! It was perfection! It was everything I was hoping for!What I Loved: -Unique, horrifying twists on the original story (and just in general) -Complexity of Jamie and Peter -Great allusions to the original story -Even to fast pacing -Horror, carnage, and shockers! (this may not be a plus to some people but it was to me!)What I Didn’t Love: -The world building could have been a little more fleshed out (Other than that it was FANTASTIC!) Recommend? I highly, highly, highly recommend reading this book if not just checking it out! If you love “Peter Pan”, fairy tale/classic story retellings, or even just horror stories then you most certainly will find something to love with “Lost Boy: The True Story of Captain Hook”!
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  • Wendy Darling
    November 29, 2016
    SO EXCITED.
  • Kate
    June 14, 2017
    4.25/5stars I received an e-book copy of this book from NetGalley Okay. I am very... conflicted on how to feel about this. Because, on the majority of my hands, I LOVED this, but on a tiny pinky of a hand I'm a little bit annoyed.This tells the beloved story of Peter Pan, but before he flew off into the sky to retrieve Wendy and her brothers; back when Jamie was Peter's very best friend, his very FIRST friend, and the two of them fled into a hole in the ground to go find new playmates together. 4.25/5stars I received an e-book copy of this book from NetGalley Okay. I am very... conflicted on how to feel about this. Because, on the majority of my hands, I LOVED this, but on a tiny pinky of a hand I'm a little bit annoyed.This tells the beloved story of Peter Pan, but before he flew off into the sky to retrieve Wendy and her brothers; back when Jamie was Peter's very best friend, his very FIRST friend, and the two of them fled into a hole in the ground to go find new playmates together. This is the story of how Jamie once loved Peter Pan, and slowly grew up to hate him. Because "Peter needed to be a hero, so somebody needed to be a villain."This was, hands down, my FAVORITE portrayal of Peter Pan. Christina Henry PERFECTLY captured how he was in my head from my reading of the original story, and how I just always imagined him - because, I've read a handful of retellings so far and Peter is always just a little too innocent and nice or just a little too overly evil. Peter is just a boy - a little, eleven year old boy who wants what he wants when he wants it. He throws temper tantrums, he screams and fights when he's upset, and he's a horribly manipulative little creature. As a person who almost solely worked with boys between the ages of 8 and 12 for almost six years, I will be the first to tell you that (although you may think it) that age group isn't actually as evil as they're made out to be. They aren't innocent either - they're more just horribly simple and one track minded (for the most part). And Christina Henry captured this in-between PERFECTLY to me. Peter was perfect in this book.And Jamie! Oh Jamie, he was wonderful too. I REALLY enjoyed her twist that James was originally a lost boy - not just any lost boy, but Peter's FIRST lost boy. It was a really, truly refreshing look on the story. And it made their rivalry as Captain Hook and Peter Pan seem all the more horrific and childish - which, I enjoyed.I also LOVED that Christina Henry didn't hold back. There are so many flaws in Peter Pan's little world on the island; so many things that simply don't add up. And Henry totally pulls those things to the forefront and exploits them. SO MANY people die. there's illness, there's blood, there's boys who hate each other and there are boys who don't fit in on the island. Some of her descriptions were seriously gruesome and I swear a certain death is always going to stick in my head (view spoiler)[ just imagining a canon ball ripping through six little boys and leaving their tops barely even attached to their bottoms serious is like WOW how'd you think that up Henry thanks for the nightmares (hide spoiler)]Overall I fucking enjoyed this so much. I never didn't want to be reading it - it captured my heart from the start and I'm angry I got this book at such a busy time in my life or I would have read it in a single sitting rather than a day. And please PLEASE don't think I'm writing this review so well because I got it from NetGalley (legit just go look at my other review I did for a book from them cause I tore it apart and hated it lol) because I will legit be preordering my copy RIGHT NOW and ordering all of Henry's other books because I'm in love.But.There's always a but isn't thereThere is a small, tiny little thing that bothered me.It's slight spoiler territory so I will be hiding it but it has to do with the romance in this book.(view spoiler)[I feel like I shouldn't be so annoyed with this, because no where does it say that this was going to happen in the description, but, I'm still a little peeved. Basically, throughout 75% of this book, Jamie talks about how much he's in love with Peter Pan. Not just how much he likes Peter or how much he enjoys being around him and playing with him. He talks about how he's IN LOVE with Peter Pan. How he just wants to see Peter smile and how he would do anything for Peter and how he's fuCKING IN LOVE WITH PETER PAN.I feel queer baited. I shouldn't. But I do.If you give me a character who, from page one, is telling the reader how much he loves another character you'd think those characters were going to have a slightly more-than-friends relationship, RIGHT??The majority of my highlights in this book are Jamie AND PETER talking about how much they love each other.Now, I understand there are multiple types of love. (I am asexual, obviously I understand there's romantic love, platonic love, family love, etc. etc.) But when you say you're IN LOVE with someone usually that implies romantic feelings??????I dunno, I just wanted something. Cause, even though I knew where this book was going to end up, I still felt like the author could have done SOMETHING with this whole LOVE thing??Okay, that is all.(hide spoiler)]but yes this book comes out July 4th and I highly recommend it if you're a fan of Peter Pan or "Lord of the Flies" because tbh it was VERY similar to that book which makes total sense that I loved this book so much cause PP and LOTF are my two all time favorite classics.
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  • Shelley
    June 22, 2017
    *Source* Publisher**Genre* Young Adult, Fantasy, Retelling*Rating* 4.0*Full Review Pending*LOST BOY is both a prequel and reboot of Peter Pan that gives readers insight into how the loathed Captain Hook became the nemesis of the “boy who wouldn’t grow up.” But instead of following in J.M. Barrie’s footsteps, Henry takes the tale in a bold new direction that posits: What if Peter was the real sociopath all along? In Henry’s vision, Neverland becomes more of a prison than an escape for the boys Pe *Source* Publisher**Genre* Young Adult, Fantasy, Retelling*Rating* 4.0*Full Review Pending*LOST BOY is both a prequel and reboot of Peter Pan that gives readers insight into how the loathed Captain Hook became the nemesis of the “boy who wouldn’t grow up.” But instead of following in J.M. Barrie’s footsteps, Henry takes the tale in a bold new direction that posits: What if Peter was the real sociopath all along? In Henry’s vision, Neverland becomes more of a prison than an escape for the boys Peter woos with promises of eternal youth and freedom. It’s daring and riveting— imagine Peter Pan meets Lord of the Flies. A really decent retelling of the tale of Captain Hook and Peter Pan told through the experiences of Captain Hook. One of the rare stories that really makes you wonder how Hook and Peter Pan became enemies.
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  • Kira Simion
    June 22, 2017
    Gimme!I'm super curious to see if this will somewhat mesh the original Peter Pan story with maybe more? I mean, look at the cover! GIMME!
  • Katelyn (Lost as Alice, Mad as the Hatter)
    April 21, 2017
    WARNING: RANTER REVIEWER AT WAR WITH HERSELF Was it good? Yes. Was the world full of well rounded, rich detail? No.Did we need this? I...suppose not. Were the characters multifaceted and we'll developed? The MCs were. What about the other characters? They only developed when and if they needed to...otherwise they acted as fodder for the grind. BUT in a way that emphasized the MCs feelings on the matter. Was the plot unique? Sadly, no. Does the book have merit? Oh, yes.Was it enjoyable? In th WARNING: RANTER REVIEWER AT WAR WITH HERSELF Was it good? Yes. Was the world full of well rounded, rich detail? No.Did we need this? I...suppose not. Were the characters multifaceted and we'll developed? The MCs were. What about the other characters? They only developed when and if they needed to...otherwise they acted as fodder for the grind. BUT in a way that emphasized the MCs feelings on the matter. Was the plot unique? Sadly, no. Does the book have merit? Oh, yes.Was it enjoyable? In the way you cannot help but rubber neck at a car wreck— there is so much tragedy in this book that it flits the balancing act of wisdom when it cares to. ....and back and forth I went. Gut time: 3.8 stars. (It cannot be 4 because I was bored during the beginning. But more on that later.) "I hate Peter Pan." In case the title did not clue you, this is a Peter Pan retelling. (Whew. Now that that is out of the way...) And like our MC, I should start this by saying that I am most definitely not a Peter Pan fan, so that could lend toward some bias. Also, between the title and the Prologue, you pretty much know how this one is going to play out. Although at the time I read this I had never seen the subtitle and I STILL predicted how it was going to play out, so there is that. Fact is, unlike Alice this tale stays pretty true to Peter Pan. It is the Prequel to the tale Disney so kindly sensored for our first time way back when. In fact, some of those nit picky questions are addressed here. (view spoiler)[ Questions like: why is there only one fairy in this whole deal or what the deal with crocodiles is or how this youth fountain works. (hide spoiler)]All that being said, I did get bored. *flinched at the admittance.* Maybe I was comparing it to much to The Child Thief or Alice (both which I rave and recommend, by the way.) Whatever the case, the beginning of this tale just did not do it for me although it did pick up later. To better explain...TO THE STORY! “He wanted the boy and Peter got what he wanted—always." In a way, this entire story is about a boy. Only it is not about the boy you may think it is. Peter Pan treks into the real world and brings boys back to 'play' with him. However his way of play is quite different from our own and many, many boys die. But there had to be a first boy. And for whatever reason, the very first boy that Peter brought over has lasted the longest and is the fiestiest. He has loved Peter for what could be over a hundred years. But a disagreement over one of the newest recruits could be just the thing to change all this. ...Sounds intriguing? Yeah...and yet... the first bit is the dreadfully dull bit. The first 8 chapters are in 'Part One' and are the worst of the lot in my opinion. There is too much introspection into the underdeveloped mind of a 12-year-old-going-on-grown-up. Back and forth we go as he argues (unconvincing) with himself and describes the very limited world he lives in. BUT if you can slog through Part One, you will not be disappointed. Both the pace and the plot pick up from here. “It’s not such a wonderful thing, to be young,” I said. “It’s heartless, and selfish.” "Et tu Brute?"Betrayal has a way of livening things up. So does jealousy. And so does anger. Here we begin to see the dark nature that Christina Henry won me us over with. The problem with children is that ID overrides ego and superego. What they want goes. What seems good, is. Personal gratification and selfishness are the hallmark of childhood. What would become of such a child over years when you take away the innocence and leave the rest? Would, could a monster grow? And who is the monster? The one who remains savage or the one who becomes savage in a singular purpose? Oh Freud, what a field day you would have with this book. "Was this, too, part of growing up? Was it facing the bad things you’d done as well as the good, and knowing all your mistakes had consequences?" When Peter goes too far in his fun and games he may just leave behind the one person the game was supposed to ensnare. And by doing so it could turn out that Peter is given revelations that he was not prepared for. And what does a sulkly, cruel boy do when he does not get his way? Blood Bath. A blood bath that leaves the lost boys wondering just what happened to all those promises of childhood joy. “WHAT HAVE YOU DONE?” I roared.“Only what I had to,” he said, and he was serious in a way that I rarely witnessed. “Nobody will take you from me..." As I have come to expect from Mrs. Henry, the dialogue was superb. The scenes flowed flawlessly. You can not imagine a story being told any other way. That being said....(Well...except for the beginning. That one hitch. What happened?! It was a long, drawn out bore! The MCs were one dimensional and the imagery was flat. How did ut change so rapidly from show to tell? It wad like she was trying to hard to paint us a picture that she TOLD us rather than showed us at first. No need. The story was already there! All we needed was to be plunged in!)Personally I think that the author was handicapped by how closely she kept the world to the original. Nothing was built on Neverland. It was the same as we know it. So if you adore this author for her world building, this will be a shock. Brace yourself and you will be happier reading it. THAT ASIDE: the dark prose and mind catching MCs kept me well invested if only a little wanting. Like before, as soon as I got into this author's work I did not come up for air until it was finished. And, like her other retelling, this one kept me thinking long after I set it down. Such was the underlying commentary on society and preconceptions. It might have even changed who I root for in the battles to come. “We all loved you, and so we loved Peter too, because you did. But when you stopped, so did the rest of us. You always made us see him through your eyes.” Overall I thought this book was well written if a bit rocky at the beginning. While we did not get the author's trademark world building genius, we did get her richly dark prose and flawless understanding of how character's should behave. Even her flat characters had a purpose (view spoiler)[ if Peter does not see them as human we should not either (hide spoiler)] which added to the tale. I would suggest this to those who like the darker sides of classics; but still want to recognize the original work in them. THIS ARC WAS PROVIDED VIA NETGALLEY FOR AN HONEST REVIEW.
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  • Lindsay Seddon
    June 27, 2017
    Gripping throughout, this version of Peter Pan stays close to the original in so many aspects but with a darker spin. The paradise where the lost boys call home is tougher than they were promised, the circumstances surrounding their places on the island is suspect, and Peter keeps a lot close to his chest. The writing style is interesting - slightly old fashioned, which keeps the fairytale element alive. It was also a relief to find that Jamie's narration is more mature than his age would sugges Gripping throughout, this version of Peter Pan stays close to the original in so many aspects but with a darker spin. The paradise where the lost boys call home is tougher than they were promised, the circumstances surrounding their places on the island is suspect, and Peter keeps a lot close to his chest. The writing style is interesting - slightly old fashioned, which keeps the fairytale element alive. It was also a relief to find that Jamie's narration is more mature than his age would suggest and so it doesn't limit itself to a young adult/teenage audience too much. Even though I couldn't put it down this doesn't get full marks as I guessed very early on something which would be revealed on the last few pages. Maybe this is intentional for those who are very familiar with the original story, but I'd have liked to have been more surprised.
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  • Nicola Clingham
    June 21, 2017
    ‘Lost Boy’ by Christina Henry is set before the events of J. M. Barrie’s ‘Peter Pan’. Henry’s tale is told from the point of view of Jamie, Peter’s first Lost Boy, who tell us how he became Peter Pan’s arch nemesis. This book is much more than a fairy tale retelling, exploring the dark side of life as a Lost Boy, their psychologically manipulative leader, and Jamie’s journey to adulthood. I was surprised by the emotional maturity of Jamie, and found myself rooting for him even though I knew what ‘Lost Boy’ by Christina Henry is set before the events of J. M. Barrie’s ‘Peter Pan’. Henry’s tale is told from the point of view of Jamie, Peter’s first Lost Boy, who tell us how he became Peter Pan’s arch nemesis. This book is much more than a fairy tale retelling, exploring the dark side of life as a Lost Boy, their psychologically manipulative leader, and Jamie’s journey to adulthood. I was surprised by the emotional maturity of Jamie, and found myself rooting for him even though I knew what was to become of him; that is what makes this book so gripping. I enjoyed reading ‘Lost Boy’ and would recommend it to fans of Angela Carter, Gregory Maguire or Neil Gaiman. Thank you to Titan Books for my copy – I look forward to its official release in July.
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  • Darque Dreamer
    June 27, 2017
    We all know the story of the heroic Peter Pan, and the villainous Hook. But, what if that story wasn't the whole truth? Lost Boy is a dark, imaginative retelling of the illusive Captain Hook. Christina Henry paints us a dangerous picture of Neverland and our beloved Peter Pan. This one is a story of peril and nightmares, of sorrow and betrayal.The Plot: Peter promised Jamie they would be friends forever. He promised they would never grow up and never die. Peter made a lot of promises, but the pr We all know the story of the heroic Peter Pan, and the villainous Hook. But, what if that story wasn't the whole truth? Lost Boy is a dark, imaginative retelling of the illusive Captain Hook. Christina Henry paints us a dangerous picture of Neverland and our beloved Peter Pan. This one is a story of peril and nightmares, of sorrow and betrayal.The Plot: Peter promised Jamie they would be friends forever. He promised they would never grow up and never die. Peter made a lot of promises, but the promise he didn't make was to care for the boys he brought to the island and ensure their safety. It's all fun and games until a boy gets eaten by a crocodile, or killed by a pirate.Lost Boy hooked me from the beginning. I fell in love with the lost boys and cared for Jamie. I feared Peter Pan. I found humor in the games the boys played, and felt sadness when a lost boy died. I felt fear when the boys faced the Many Eyed, and felt wonder when the island was described to me in detail. The author did an amazing job with transforming Neverland in to something dark and dangerous. She made me feel like I was fighting alongside of the boys and gave the characters such depth. I didn't need long histories on each boy to know that they came to the island with Peter because their lives in the Other Place were unsatisfactory, and dangerous even. I felt the childish innocence and the child-like wonder emanating from each character.Jamie, of course, was my favorite character. He cared so much for the boys, and at one point, cared deeply for Peter. He had a hard life in the Other Place, so it was no wonder that he followed Peter to the island. He was a major father figure to the rest of the lost boys, and through his struggles on the island, it is obvious why he would become Captain Hook.Peter was such a complex character. It is definitely hard to re-write a beloved character from a classic tale that everyone loves, but Henry did such a phenomenal job with his development and characteristics. He was dark and dangerous. Brooding and conniving, yet he had all the boys fooled in to loving him. He cared only for himself and about having fun and playing games, but underneath he was quite murderous. He definitely prayed on the younger, weaker boys like Charlie.Charlie is so adorable and lovable. He represents the childish innocence of all the boys. He is kind and caring, and definitely a little gullible. He is taken under Jamie's wing and is a wonderful representation of Jamie's heart.Lost Boy is a fantastic, horrific retelling of two characters we have grown up with. Their personalities are redefined so well that you can really believe that this is the true story of Captain Hook and Peter Pan. This book holds all the fun, humor, and child-like wonder that we know and love from the original story, but offers so much more in the way of darkness, peril, betrayal, and heartache.Thank you to NetGalley and Berkley Publishing Group for providing me with this free e-ARC in exchange for my honest review!
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  • Jessica
    June 28, 2017
    In a world full of fairy tales and happily ever afters, it's always refreshing to read a retelling that has a dark side. LOST BOY: THE TRUE STORY OF CAPTAIN HOOK by Christina Henry definitely fit the bill and I loved every creepy, eerie, and scary moment of it. The entire story was just cloaked in darkness. If you love Peter Pan...well, let's just say you won't after reading this retelling. Jamie is our narrator for the entirety of the book, and we get to see from the perspective of a boy who ha In a world full of fairy tales and happily ever afters, it's always refreshing to read a retelling that has a dark side. LOST BOY: THE TRUE STORY OF CAPTAIN HOOK by Christina Henry definitely fit the bill and I loved every creepy, eerie, and scary moment of it. The entire story was just cloaked in darkness. If you love Peter Pan...well, let's just say you won't after reading this retelling. Jamie is our narrator for the entirety of the book, and we get to see from the perspective of a boy who has been there from the beginning. The story we all know and love about Peter Pan is far from the truth. The promise of never growing up, adventures, and endless fun are how Peter lures his new play things to his island and away from The Other Place. In reality, the island was full of nothing but darkness, death, and danger - in the form of the pirates that Peter taunts, and the Many-Eyed, just one of the monsters that inhabit the island (their entire chapter gave me the CREEPS). I don't want to give away too much of the story. It's an adventure all its own and I would hate to ruin it. Jamie - who will later become Captain Hook - is slowly beginning to see Peter for what he really is and because of this the wonder and love is wearing off. Jamie is slowly beginning to grow up as he learns new things about his friend. With new boys being brought to the island by Peter, Jamie learns the hard way that caring for and watching over them is a bad idea. Peter will go to extreme and twisted lengths to keep Jamie all for himself. We quickly learn that everything Peter does is just to keep Jamie as his friend and play thing - and he does NOT like to share. If you want a great retelling with a slasher movie twist, then you need this one! Not only will you love Captain Hook, but your love for Peter Pan might disappear with this one! Henry did an incredible job setting the scene, developing the characters, and building a story so that the reader's rose tinted glasses are taken off so we can see the real Peter Pan. I give this 5/5 stars! Big thanks to Berkley Publishing for sending me a copy in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Danielle Steenrod
    June 12, 2017
    Peter lies. I was hooked straight from the prologue. This is a dark, twisted version of Peter Pan that makes Peter the villain and Captain Hook the protagonist. This story is full of blood and betrayal along with monsters, fairies, and of course pirates. If you're a Peter Pan fan, this is a great twist on the story we all know and love.
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  • Ariana
    June 27, 2017
    Full review to come!
  • Shannon
    June 3, 2017
    Thanks to Goodreads and Berkley for the ARC giveaway to review!Before I really get into my review, let me tell you that I love Peter Pan. When I read the novel by JM Barrie for the first time in my 20s, I cried at the end when Wendy had to grow up and Peter forgot about her. When I think about that Peter Pan, that Neverland, I smile. To me, Peter Pan has all the beauty of youth. Peter Pan is the embodiment of life, childhood, joy, mischief, and lack of responsibility. And then, his nemesis, Capt Thanks to Goodreads and Berkley for the ARC giveaway to review!Before I really get into my review, let me tell you that I love Peter Pan. When I read the novel by JM Barrie for the first time in my 20s, I cried at the end when Wendy had to grow up and Peter forgot about her. When I think about that Peter Pan, that Neverland, I smile. To me, Peter Pan has all the beauty of youth. Peter Pan is the embodiment of life, childhood, joy, mischief, and lack of responsibility. And then, his nemesis, Captain Hook, is what a lot of us adults wish we could've fought against. Hook is the fear of growing old. Hook is the old man, afraid of a silly crocodile that ticks. Hook is a dandy and a cod-fish. Hook is the grown up filled with impotent rage at a harmless little boy and his compatriots. How many of us wish we could've found that second star to the right and flown straight on till morning to the unending beauty of Neverland?If you've seen Once Upon a Time or read "Alias Hook" by Lisa Jensen, you know that the idea of "Peter Pan as Villain" is not a new one. On Once Upon a Time, Peter was a man named Malcolm who made a wish. He wished to be a child forever, leaving behind all of his worries and problems. This Peter (played brilliantly by Robbie Kay) was a vindictive, sarcastic, nasty boy. And though Hook (played by Colin O'Donoghue) was a villain, Peter didn't cut off his hand. And our dear Captain's main enemy wasn't Pan himself. Hook, in fact, used Neverland's magic to his advantage to stay young enough until the day came when he could finally track down and skin his own Crocodile."Alias Hook" has that relatively family story of Peter cutting off Hook's hand. He's a pirate and Peter's enemy. But like Peter, Hook is cursed to live forever, playing in this endless game of hero and villain with the boy who never grows old. Now matter how many times Peter and the Lost Boys feed him to the Croc, Hook comes back."Peter lies. Peter will say I'm a villain, that I wronged him, that I never was his friend. But I told you already. Peter lies."And so begins Henry's tale of young Jamie, Peter's first and best friend. Though Christina Henry never uses "Peter Pan" (only calling him Peter) or "Neverland" (only calling it "the island"), we still know exactly who and what the boy named Peter and his magical island are.Many, many, many years ago, too many to count, a happy, laughing, ginger haired, green eyed 11 year old named Peter brought a little boy named Jamie to a magical island. On this island, Peter said, they would never grow old, never get in trouble, have fun, and be friends forever and always. For a very long time, this island and Peter make Jamie very happy. And soon, a few more boys join the gang. Almost always, new boys are chosen from the Other Place by Peter and Jamie. They choose boys who are lonely, angry, poor, who hate grown up and all they stand for.Peter, Jamie, and the boys spend their days raiding pirates who dock in the cove, swimming with mermaids, hunting, fishing, running, and playing. When the pirate raids to end in death, Jamie even has a trademark move. Can you guess what it is? For each pirate that he's fought and bested (even if he hasn't killed them), Jamie has cut off that pirate's right hand. Sometimes, the boys will have a battle in a special place on the island that looks just like an arena. Peter never fights and Jamie always wins. Boys die in Battle. They also die from pirate raids or illness or thoughtless actions. Jamie cares when the boys die and hurts each time he has to bury a friend. And yet, Peter forgets them as soon as, or even before, they're in the ground. He simply goes to the Other Place and finds more boys to play with.After so, so, so many years of playing and fighting and killing, Jamie finally starts to feel like something might be very wrong with the island and, more importantly, with Peter. He begins to see that the boy who never grows up is hiding so many secrets - talking to fairies, colluding with monsters, actively trying to get other boys killed. Jamie doesn't know exactly what's happening, but each day he changes, each day he moves away from being Jamie, Peter's first and best friend, toward being Captain Hook, Peter's one true nemesis.Had I not already been accustomed to the "Peter Pan as Villain" idea, I think "Lost Boy" would've shocked me more than it did. Usually, when we think of Peter Pan, we see Disney's Peter, or the one from the stage musical, or even the Peter from the Steven Spielberg film"Hook." We don't see that beautiful boy as a villain. We see him as hope, a hope for eternal youth and beauty that hovers just out of our reach, beyond the second star to the right.Because I was ready for Peter to be evil, I thoroughly enjoyed "Lost Boy." In Henry's novel, Peter still has all the traits we know - carelessness, a mischievousness that can sometimes be dangerous, and the desire to be young an play forever. This time, though, those traits take on a very sinister side. We begin to wonder just why it is that Peter can stay young forever, why he forgets boys he claimed were his friends the moment that they die, why he knows so many secrets about the island, and why he sometimes even seems to control the island itself.I wouldn't exactly call Jamie (later Captain Hook) a "hero," but unlike Peter, even young Jamie has a moral compass, an idea of what is right and wrong, even if he doesn't always practice it. The character was so deep and so well written that I couldn't help but like him and hate Peter. In the end, Peter is the worst of childhood - selfishness, carelessness, violence - rather than the best - innocence, playfulness, and freedom. I think Jamie sees Peter through "rose colored glasses" for a very long time, because Peter chose him first. Jamie is the only Peter seems to truly care about. But does he really? Does Peter care about anything at all?The only thing, for me, that was a little off is that the ending comes up too quickly, it feels rushed. I think this is true for a lot of books, though. But don't let this put you off of reading "Lost Boy." The novel is deep and dark and incredibly thoughtful. It also has the weirdness factor (that I personally love) of turning a traditional story on its head. I highly recommend "Lost Boy" if you enjoyed Henry's dark and twisted take (that I think Lewis Carroll himself would be proud of) on Alice in Wonderland. I'd also recommend it if you're cool with seeing Captain Hook and Peter Pan portrayed in completely new ways.Happy reading!
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  • Jessica (Lovin' Los Libros)
    November 19, 2016
    LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVEEEEEE.THIS BOOK.BLOWN AWAY.You THINK you know Peter Pan? THINK AGAIN.#peterlies
  • Jessica (a GREAT read)
    June 26, 2017
    I received this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest and voluntary review. I was in no way compensated for this review.I’ve always loved fairy tales, fairy tales in their original format and even Disney-ified! Retellings were soon added to that list when I discovered them some years ago, and after enjoying Christina Henry’s twist on Alice in Wonderland, I was ecstatic to learn she had a Peter Pan retelling, once more, a Captain Hook origin story! For how is it that we have an adult I received this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest and voluntary review. I was in no way compensated for this review.I’ve always loved fairy tales, fairy tales in their original format and even Disney-ified! Retellings were soon added to that list when I discovered them some years ago, and after enjoying Christina Henry’s twist on Alice in Wonderland, I was ecstatic to learn she had a Peter Pan retelling, once more, a Captain Hook origin story! For how is it that we have an adult pirate in a land filled with children who never grow up? It was always a mystery to me as a kid, and now we have an answer with Lost Boy: The True Story of Captain Hook.Also to note, it’s best to think of the fairy tale and not the Disney movie when it comes to retellings. While I love Disney and the things that they do, they themselves are simply making retellings of fairy tales! Fairy tales were even meant for adults too, in the beginning, any Grimm fairy tale can pretty much confirm it! I’m wondering if that’s where we get the word “grim” from now that I think on it! Lol!So here we follow the story of a young boy named Jamie. He’s lived with Peter for ages now. Peter took him away from a cold life in the Other Place and brought him to his island so that they can always have fun and play games together. And then eventually, Peter started bringing more boys over, because of course, more boys means more fun! Soon Jamie took to caring for the boys that Peter brought over. He would look after them and help them with injuries, make sure they ate. He cared for them. Then Peter brought over a very young boy, despite Jamie’s protests that he was too young for the island life. Peter thought he was cute and would be fun. For Peter is never wrong and always gets what he wants. This boy, Charlie, was rather young and he took more of a liking to Jamie since Jamie cared for him. Charlie is about five years old whereas the other boys are closer to Peter’s eleven years.Soon we learn that life on the island—for it’s not called Neverland in this version—isn’t as fun and carefree as Peter led them to believe. Things take a darker turn. There are monsters known as the Many-Eyed who will gladly eat the boys if they came to their part of the island. Pirates wreak havoc on the cove, mermaids cause mischief in their usual lagoon, and then of course there’s crocodiles to be wary of. And when Peter starts to get jealous of Jamie’s attention going towards young Charlie, things get real scary, real fast.As twisted as it may seem, I always love a retelling that takes your traditional villain and make them the one you root for. Though, if you know your fairy tales well, you pretty much know the outcome anyway. But the journey is always surprising anyway! While things in this version of Peter Pan wasn’t all we’re used to, there are still some very familiar aspects and we see more and more of them as the story goes on. And that’s another thing I always love about retellings when authors include the familiar with the new! It makes for fascinating story!While we all know the general story of Peter Pan, we never really got to learn about Captain Hook. At least in the fairy tale sense, as we have had a few more origin stories pop up in recent years. This is his story. We learn that he too once was once a boy who wanted to have fun and stay young forever. But then he learns that Peter lies. There is much more to the world of “Neverland” than we ever knew before. It’s almost heartrending with the outcome, though again, it’s one we already know. But the details, the details are heartrending! Lost Boy was a fantastically magical read and I loved every moment of it!Overall Rating 5/5 starsLost Boy releases July 4, 2017
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  • Kristen
    May 4, 2017
    Full review is here, on my blog.The idea that the villain of a story that you've loved since forever and ever isn't actually the villain is kind of awesome, really. I love alternate retellings of stories I like (be they mythology or not, as it happens), so this one was right up my alley. Having binged on Once Upon a Time a couple years back (don't judge me >.>), I was already on board with the idea that Peter might just be the villain of the story after all. The idea is really compelling t Full review is here, on my blog.The idea that the villain of a story that you've loved since forever and ever isn't actually the villain is kind of awesome, really. I love alternate retellings of stories I like (be they mythology or not, as it happens), so this one was right up my alley. Having binged on Once Upon a Time a couple years back (don't judge me >.>), I was already on board with the idea that Peter might just be the villain of the story after all. The idea is really compelling to me. And of course, when it is presented in a lovely package like this story is, I can't help myself!This reads a bit like a combination of Peter Pan and Lord of the Flies in parts. I'm pretty sure that any large group of unattended 8-12 year old boys left to their own devices for years and years would be similar in nature to this group. Perhaps not quite as brutal as Peter and his Lost Boys are a lot of the time, but dirty, boastful, and prone to bouts of fighting all the same. They play games like Battle and Pirate Raid, which sound childish, when you think of a group of children playing them, but they are in actuality exactly what they sound like they are. Battle is very likely to be to the death, and every time the lost boys go a-raiding, the pirates' first mate gets his hand cut off. It's a tradition, you see.Oh Peter, you little shit. I wasn't expecting to hate you so quickly, but here we are. I immediately cheered for Jamie, because while he has been on Peter's island for countless years, he isn't quite as... ehh let's go with 'selfish' - he's not as selfish as Peter is. He defends the weaker boys from the stronger ones. He still cares about... anything. I pretty much immediately loved Jamie as a character. Peter though, well, I immediately wanted Peter to get a good comeuppance for all his ridiculousness. Because Peter doesn't care about anything at all except himself. Everything he does is for him alone, but he's got this group of kids brainwashed into thinking he is the absolute shit. Peter and Jamie are so well written that I loved one and loathed the other within chapter one. Bloody brilliant.The story sucked me right in and wouldn't let go until I had finished. When I get busy in my everyday life, which I have been lately, I find myself leaving my book at home, because I won't have time to read at work. Well, this one was either in my bag or on my desk at any given point. It's a shame I couldn't down it all in one go, but alas. Sometimes you just can't. I savored it when I could. Going back to a book you really enjoy when you have a few minutes is a real reward. :)Very well written and immersive. The imagery was on point, and I felt like I was on the island with them. Neverland has the mermaids, pirates, and crocodiles that I was expecting, but it had the unexpected as well. I didn't go in expecting a story that I know well, retelling or not, to be full of surprises and twists and turns, but as it turns out, it totally was. Parts had me on the edge of my seat. I uttered an unapologetic 'OH SNAP!' once or twice as well. That ending was intense!I loved this book. Love, love loved every moment I had with it in my limited reading time these last few weeks. So, I heartily recommend it to anyone who enjoys Peter Pan... but is also alright with the idea of a role reversal... :D You won't be disappointed!
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  • Austine (NovelKnight)
    June 30, 2017
    I've never liked Peter Pan.It's one of those stories that just didn't capture my attention and no matter how it's spun, Peter strikes me as an awful little boy. So I was very excited to read of Captain Hook's origins, fully expecting Peter to be the villain and I wasn't disappointed.I was hesitant to read Lost Boy at first as I wasn't a huge fan of Henry's  Alice  or  Red Queen (then again, I've yet to fine a re-telling of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland that I really like).The book opens with I've never liked Peter Pan.It's one of those stories that just didn't capture my attention and no matter how it's spun, Peter strikes me as an awful little boy. So I was very excited to read of Captain Hook's origins, fully expecting Peter to be the villain and I wasn't disappointed.I was hesitant to read Lost Boy at first as I wasn't a huge fan of Henry's  Alice  or  Red Queen (then again, I've yet to fine a re-telling of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland that I really like).The book opens with Jamie (Hook before he was Hook) as "second-in-command" of Peter's boys as they run rampant across the island. But things are changing. Jamie is changing. And that change packed a punch. Despite the writing style not grabbing my attention for some time, Jamie did. Jamie, the boy who cares for everyone else before himself, who wants to see the best in the boys, in Peter, and who is disappointed time and again. My heart went out to him.Though the story is told from Jamie's perspective, it still provided insight into each of the other boys as, one by one, they reached their limits. This book is not for the faint of heart and features a lot of violence toward and involving children. Henry didn't hold back on that front and every detail is blasted across the pages. The more Jamie realizes that Peter isn't the boy he thought he was, the more gruesome the story becomes.Especially the big reveal near the end. I felt like I should have expected it, given the way the story was leading up to it, but WHAM it hit me like a semi flying down the highway. I hadn't realized how attached I became to the characters until that moment. It had been a subtle thing, the pull on the heartstrings as Jamie began to lose everything he loved, to become the so-called villain of Peter's island.I think Henry excelled here to capture the story as some might remember it but also put a horrific spin on it. Though I found the pacing to be a bit sluggish at times, it soon picked up into the shock-and-awe horror I've come to expect from this author.To be quite honest, I'm not sure how I got through this book. The sheer amount of gore, especially toward the second half of the book, and with children (yes, I know, it's Peter Pan Take 2 but doesn't make it easier to handle)... It made me uncomfortable. And perhaps that was the point, because Jamie was realizing it too and you could feel the shift in his thoughts, his actions. It was all very well done. Just... bloody.Overall, a horrific origin story for the infamous Captain Hook, but I wouldn't say he's really the villain anymore. If the violence doesn't bother you, then I'd certainly recommend this book. Good writing. Well-developed characters. A darker Peter Pan re-telling, I've never read.
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  • Laura
    June 27, 2017
    Originally posted on:> http://www.laurapatriciarose.co.uk/20...I have always been enamoured with fairytales, be they the Disney version, the Brothers Grimm or Hans Christina Anderson or even just retellings. I simply cannot get enough. This time Christina tells us the story of Peter Pan and his lost boys, before Wendy, before Michael and John and even before Tink and the 'magic' that we know. In fact we meet a lost boy we never expected to meet, one we classed as the villain and made us think Originally posted on:> http://www.laurapatriciarose.co.uk/20...I have always been enamoured with fairytales, be they the Disney version, the Brothers Grimm or Hans Christina Anderson or even just retellings. I simply cannot get enough. This time Christina tells us the story of Peter Pan and his lost boys, before Wendy, before Michael and John and even before Tink and the 'magic' that we know. In fact we meet a lost boy we never expected to meet, one we classed as the villain and made us think Peter the hero, until we very quickly realised that Peter lied...Jamie has been a lost boy for the longest. He was the first and that makes him special. Lots of boys have come and gone since Jamie arrived. Jamie has lost count of how many seasons he has been on the island with Peter, but he knows he has not grown proportionally to that amount of time. The longer Jamie is there though the more he feels responsible for the boys, if he doesn't look after them he knows that Peter certainly won't. You will know from the original stories how selfish Peter can be, but this Peter Pan is a whole new level of selfish and Neverland is not quite the magical island that we knew. Christina truly shakes off the Disney version of the story to give us a darker retelling and one that is truer to the original story.I will say that I am so glad that I didn't see the subtitle explaining what this story was exactly about as it would have taken away some of the story. I did figure it out halfway through, but that was through my own assumptions. I still think you will enjoy it if you know exactly who's story it is, but for me the guessing and the twists felt more mysterious.Every time I read a book of Christina's I am instantly gripped. Her writing is so engaging to the point that I have to take a moment to come to my senses when I stop reading. When a writer can do that it really shows how immersive their storytelling is.Immersive, compelling and another fantastically dark fairytale retelling from Christina.
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  • Stormi (Books, Movies, Reviews. Oh my!)
    June 24, 2017
    I have heard of lot about this author from her Alice book but since I am not a Wonderland fan I never tried it. I am on the other hand a Captain Hook fan and I am not a Peter Pan fan which is a good thing cause I hated Pan in this book. :)Jamie is Peter's first boy and the one he loved the most but as years went by watching all those other boys die because of Peters fun and games he is starting to see another version of Peter. In trying to save the lost boys that are left Jamie starts to grow up I have heard of lot about this author from her Alice book but since I am not a Wonderland fan I never tried it. I am on the other hand a Captain Hook fan and I am not a Peter Pan fan which is a good thing cause I hated Pan in this book. :)Jamie is Peter's first boy and the one he loved the most but as years went by watching all those other boys die because of Peters fun and games he is starting to see another version of Peter. In trying to save the lost boys that are left Jamie starts to grow up. Just a little at a time and he hopes that Peter doesn't notice because he doesn't allow boys to grow up.Peter never cared about any of the boys but Jamie. He didn't care if a boy got killed as he would just go and get a new boy. When he got Charlie and he was to small to really play with he gets jealous of Jamie's relationship with the young boy. It starts a spiral of events.I felt so bad for Jamie and could slowly see why he would start to grow up. His blinders are taken off when it comes to the Peter that is not fun but evil. Peter is just pure evil, those who like Peter Pan might not like this book, but since I was not a fan I loved hating Peter. I rooted for Jamie and the other lost boys. Not all the lost boys were great but they never deserved the bad things that happened, well there was one I hated and he deserved what he got but the others didn't.I have never read the original Peter Pan but I have never been a fan of any of the movies, except Hook, so I don't know exactly how Peter is in that story but this is a very dark story. It has a few features that you might associate with Peter Pan like the crocodile. :) It could be a little gory at times as well. At times in the beginning it was a little slow to me but once it picked up I just had to know how it was going to end.
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  • M.
    June 27, 2017
    Received a free copy in exchange for an honest review.I've seen many Peter Pan retellings out there that were based on Peter, Wendy, The Darlings, The Lost Boys, and Tiger Lily. But I have yet to come across one based on Captain Hook. Until this book came along. Knowing how popular Christina Henry's The Chronicles of Alice duology is (which I did not read...yet), I knew I had to request this one as soon as I got a chance. And boy was I glad.Jamie is the narrator and the main character in this bo Received a free copy in exchange for an honest review.I've seen many Peter Pan retellings out there that were based on Peter, Wendy, The Darlings, The Lost Boys, and Tiger Lily. But I have yet to come across one based on Captain Hook. Until this book came along. Knowing how popular Christina Henry's The Chronicles of Alice duology is (which I did not read...yet), I knew I had to request this one as soon as I got a chance. And boy was I glad.Jamie is the narrator and the main character in this book (aka future Captain Hook). As the first boy that Peter chose to bring onto this mysterious island, Jamie is basically Peter's second-in-command. Over the years, he has seen many other young boys come and go and sadly, has also been in charge of burying them when they are killed from illness, monsters, pirates, and battles. All the boys live each day freely without thinking of the consequences and as such, they do not grow up. But soon Jamie begins to question Peter and this island, especially after the arrival of a too-young boy named Charlie.This is a bit of Lord of the Flies with a Peter Pan twist. The boys are encouraged to battle each other to the death and they do so willingly and happily. The Peter here is not the one from the Disney movie - he is cruel, manipulative, and selfish. He only cares about having fun and does not care for any of the boys at all (except maybe Jamie). There is murder, deceit, and betrayal. Christina Henry's Peter is a twisted boy who steals young boys to use as pawns in his neverending games. We see that the true villain here was not Captain Hook, but in fact, Peter all along.This is my first book by Christina Henry and now I'm dying to try out her Alice duology.
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  • Amy Braun
    June 29, 2017
    If you're a fan of Peter Pan or the trend of stories being retold from the villain's perspective, or if you just like an excellent book, you NEED LOST BOY in your life. Without question one of the best books I've read this year. If I could, I'd give it 10 stars. Fantastic from start to finish, it has definitely left its mark on my soul. I'm a huge fan of villain POV stories as well as Christina Henry, so I knew this would be a wild, brutal story (check out her CHRONICLES OF ALICE series for more If you're a fan of Peter Pan or the trend of stories being retold from the villain's perspective, or if you just like an excellent book, you NEED LOST BOY in your life. Without question one of the best books I've read this year. If I could, I'd give it 10 stars. Fantastic from start to finish, it has definitely left its mark on my soul. I'm a huge fan of villain POV stories as well as Christina Henry, so I knew this would be a wild, brutal story (check out her CHRONICLES OF ALICE series for more like this), and therefore I went in with high expectations. And I had them blown out of the water. Right from the get-go, the story takes a unique twist with main character Jamie being a "father" while Peter is doing things that all wild boys do. From there, we're taken on a huge adventure full of surprises, danger, monsters, drama, and grief. But this story is so much more than that. There is symbolism and parallels everywhere, adding for a deep story about the struggles boys go to as they begin their journey into manhood, a journey that some are willing to accept while others are ready to fight tooth and nail to stay in childhood. The writing is absolutely beautiful, with the dialogue perfectly encapsulating the characters and how they would think. I honestly couldn't wait to dive into this story and enjoy the emotional roller coaster that it was. Seriously, I LOVED LOST BOY and will recommend it to every person who asks me about it or mentions Peter Pan. Dark, engrossing, and dramatic, this is a book you MUST read this summer. Don't miss it!
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