The Captain's Daughter
For fans of Elin Hilderbrand and Emma Straub comes an emotionally gripping novel about a woman who returns to her hometown in coastal Maine and finds herself pondering the age-old question of what could have been.Growing up in Little Harbor, Maine, the daughter of a widowed lobsterman, Eliza Barnes could haul a trap and row a skiff with the best of them. But she always knew she'd leave that life behind. Now that she's married, with two kids and a cushy front-row seat to suburban country club gossip in an affluent Massachusetts town, she feels adrift.When her father injures himself in a boating accident, Eliza pushes the pause button on her own life to come to his aid. But when she arrives in Maine, she discovers her father's situation is more dire than he let on. Eliza's homecoming is further complicated by the reemergence of her first love--and memories of their shared secret. Then Eliza meets Mary Brown, a seventeen-year-old local who is at her own crossroad, and Eliza can't help but wonder what her life would have been like if she'd stayed.Filled with humor, insight, summer cocktails, and gorgeous sunsets, The Captain's Daughter is a compassionate novel about the life-changing choices we make and the consequences we face in their aftermath.

The Captain's Daughter Details

TitleThe Captain's Daughter
Author
ReleaseJul 18th, 2017
PublisherDoubleday Books
ISBN-139780385541251
Rating
GenreFiction, Womens Fiction, Chick Lit

The Captain's Daughter Review

  • Sarah Joint
    January 1, 1970
    This is women's fiction how I like it: no instant love between characters who just met, simply an emotional and lovely read. I really enjoyed it and while I didn't connect with all of the characters and there were moments that left me scratching my head, it's worth a read. The author goes into great detail about life both in the small hometown of the main character and considerably more affluent town she lives in now. She makes you feel like you're there with them, and maybe capable of hauling i This is women's fiction how I like it: no instant love between characters who just met, simply an emotional and lovely read. I really enjoyed it and while I didn't connect with all of the characters and there were moments that left me scratching my head, it's worth a read. The author goes into great detail about life both in the small hometown of the main character and considerably more affluent town she lives in now. She makes you feel like you're there with them, and maybe capable of hauling in lobster yourself. (I'm probably not.) Eliza and her husband enjoy the kind of wealth that provides yachts and hundred thousand dollar cars. Fancy, fancy. Eliza spent two years in medical school before dropping out to be a stay at home mother, and her husband has just begun a huge project as an architect which promises to be lucrative, but most of their money comes from his mother. Her cushy lifestyle could not be any different than her humble beginnings. She lost her mother when she was very young, leaving her with her gruff but dedicated father. He is and has always been a lobsterman, an extremely hard worker. He's always made his living with his hands, rising early in the morning and headed to bed around sunset. It takes a lot out of a person. His long history manning his boat, the Joanie B., may be at an end. Charlie had an accident onboard, leading him to ask for help for one of the first times of his life. Eliza rushes to his side, expecting him to recover quickly... but he's been keeping recent difficulties from his daughter. Spending more time in Little Harbor is starting to get to Eliza. She loves her husband, but what if things had been different? What if she'd stayed behind with her first love? Would she have an older daughter not unlike Mary, the shy seventeen year old who works at the cafe that she feels strangely protective over? Her husband is also having a difficult time juggling the job and their children, and the girls miss their mother terribly. She can't abandon her father, though. Is this where she's meant to be all along, or does she still belong in the country club crowd?I received an ARC of this book from Net Galley and Doubleday Books, thank you! My review is honest and unbiased.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    This could have been called "Despicable Me," except that title has already been claimed.While I enjoyed Moore's last novel, "The Admissions," this book is something else all together. I found it hard to connect with most of the characters, as their actions belied common sense. Several plot points seemed contrived (a character on death's door shows up out of the blue for a Clint Eastwood "Go ahead. Make my day" moment, among one of several head-scratchers).Not sure if I was "off" during the readi This could have been called "Despicable Me," except that title has already been claimed.While I enjoyed Moore's last novel, "The Admissions," this book is something else all together. I found it hard to connect with most of the characters, as their actions belied common sense. Several plot points seemed contrived (a character on death's door shows up out of the blue for a Clint Eastwood "Go ahead. Make my day" moment, among one of several head-scratchers).Not sure if I was "off" during the reading of this, or if it was the book. Thank you to NetGalley and Doubleday for a galley of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    In The Captain's Daughter, author Meg Mitchell Moore presents a female lead: Eliza who marries into a very different lifestyle that the one she was raised. Now, years later, during a trip back home she wonders what her life would have looked like had she remained a small-town girl. There are a ton of characters in this book and in my opinion, Ms. Moore was heavy-handed in her character development (I know, I know, authors can't get a break can they? It's either too little or too much...sorry). E In The Captain's Daughter, author Meg Mitchell Moore presents a female lead: Eliza who marries into a very different lifestyle that the one she was raised. Now, years later, during a trip back home she wonders what her life would have looked like had she remained a small-town girl. There are a ton of characters in this book and in my opinion, Ms. Moore was heavy-handed in her character development (I know, I know, authors can't get a break can they? It's either too little or too much...sorry). Eliza's internal conflict was one that I could relate to though which kept me engaged just enough to not DNF. I loved the coastal setting, I loved the scenes of lobster fishing and seeing Eliza out there working, and I loved the quality of life issue that was integrated within the story, but if I had to learn one more thing about any of these characters, their families, or the people in their town, I was going to blow. My favorite quote:"When in doubt, choose brave."Thank you to the following for permitting me access to an advance reader's copy (ARC) of The Captain's Daughter. This generosity did not impact my honesty when rating/reviewing.Source: NetGalleyAuthor: Meg Mitchell MoorePublisher: Doubleday BooksGenres: Women's FictionPub Date: 18 Jul 2017
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    All of my reviews can be found on www.novelgossip.comAre you guys going to kill me if I add yet another book to your summer reading list? I’m going to assume you’re all like me and add new books to your TBR daily, so naturally you’ll be happy to add another book. What’s one more anyway?! Meg Mitchell Moore is a new to me author and I really had no idea what to expect when I picked up The Captain’s Daughter, but if pushed I would’ve said that I was expecting a fun, lighthearted beach read, someth All of my reviews can be found on www.novelgossip.comAre you guys going to kill me if I add yet another book to your summer reading list? I’m going to assume you’re all like me and add new books to your TBR daily, so naturally you’ll be happy to add another book. What’s one more anyway?! Meg Mitchell Moore is a new to me author and I really had no idea what to expect when I picked up The Captain’s Daughter, but if pushed I would’ve said that I was expecting a fun, lighthearted beach read, something simple. While it most definitely was all of those things it was also insightful, touching and captivating too. This is told through multiple narratives, very reminiscent of one of my favorite authors, Elin Hilderbrand. There was that same great beachy vibe and the writing style was also similar. The conversational dialogue felt so genuine, it was as if I was listening to real people talk to each other. The whole book felt really authentic, from the location, to the characters to the situations they were in and the problems they were facing. One of my favorite things about this book was the stunning coastal setting the author portrayed. I’ve never been to an East Coast beach before and Mitchell Moore made me feel like I was actually in the town of Little Harbor, Maine. The characterization was also excellent, the residents were all very salt of the earth types who lead relatively simple lives, they were all very endearing. I especially connected with Mary, a local teen who crosses paths with Eliza. There was something so raw and vulnerable about her that really spoke to me. While this didn’t have any super heavy themes, it did have some good, strong ones, such as the power of feeling connected to your true home and the importance of familial relationships and being true to oneself. I’m a new fan of Meg Mitchell Moore now and am excited that I discovered a new author!
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  • Kate ☀️ Olson
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Doubleday Books for providing me with a finished copy of this book for review - all opinions are my own. THE CAPTAIN'S DAUGHTER is an exquisite story about motherhood, marriage, grief and being true to your roots, with much of the book being set in a gorgeous Maine fishing town. If you don't at least THINK about crying while reading this book, I'm fairly certain we can't be friends. It has ALL the feelings.Moore has touched on the very deepest thoughts in a mother's and daughter's h Thank you to Doubleday Books for providing me with a finished copy of this book for review - all opinions are my own. THE CAPTAIN'S DAUGHTER is an exquisite story about motherhood, marriage, grief and being true to your roots, with much of the book being set in a gorgeous Maine fishing town. If you don't at least THINK about crying while reading this book, I'm fairly certain we can't be friends. It has ALL the feelings.Moore has touched on the very deepest thoughts in a mother's and daughter's heart and combined them to expose just how complex modern womanhood can be. Eliza is just so incredibly real, with achingly beautiful moments and also moments in which she is fairly unlikable - just like the rest of us. As she struggles to mother her daughters while also coming to terms with her father's failing health and her marital issues, Eliza manages to maintain grace and kindness in her interactions with her new young friend Mary as Mary becomes in desperate need of a mother figure. I loved reading about their heartfelt feelings about parenthood and childhood and was able to relate to them so so closely. Everything involving Eliza's father Charlie made me love him so much and wish I knew him - he just jumps off the pages and is one of the most realistically written characters I have read in a long, long time. This is a tearjerker with bright moments of humor and insight that needs to be on your bookshelf - it is a book of the ages and one that will stay with me for a long time to come.
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  • Eileen
    January 1, 1970
    While this was a story of troubled people dealing with real challenges, the novel wasn’t dark. Nor was it chick lit or a frothy beach read. Set on the picturesque coast of Maine where the background was very much a part of things, The Captain’s Daughter was almost instantly engaging. I could smell the salt air and see the sunsets, but then New England has always been close to my heart! The quaintness of the old fishing town, the quirkiness of the folks, the down east mindset and strength of char While this was a story of troubled people dealing with real challenges, the novel wasn’t dark. Nor was it chick lit or a frothy beach read. Set on the picturesque coast of Maine where the background was very much a part of things, The Captain’s Daughter was almost instantly engaging. I could smell the salt air and see the sunsets, but then New England has always been close to my heart! The quaintness of the old fishing town, the quirkiness of the folks, the down east mindset and strength of character – they all enriched the telling. The plot revolves around Meg, a suburban housewife who has married into a life of privilege and must return to her seriously ill father, Charlie, and the small fishing town where she grew up. Contrasts between her current patrician lifestyle and her roots are rendered convincingly in an understated way. Ghosts of the past and relationship insecurities combine to produce a most readable tale! A minor observation might be the predictability element, as the stage is definitely set. That doesn’t amount to a negative, however. Particularly moving for me was the author’s final paragraph in the acknowledgements section following the conclusion, in which she explained how she arrived at the dedication for her novel.‘As I was finishing the final edits on this book my father-in-law, Frank Moore, lost his battle with lung cancer. I conceived this book and wrote most of it before he became ill, but now I see that some of the best qualities of Frank and some of the best qualities of the character Charlie Sargent echo each other – hardworking men who loved their families and lived lives that might have looked quiet from the outside but brimmed over from the inside. I like to think of the spirits of both living on.’ I also enjoyed The Arrivals by Meg Mitchell Moore, and I’m glad this was another keeper! Four stars.
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  • Eileen Goudge
    January 1, 1970
    Heartwarming and Well-written I really enjoyed this novel. The author deftly weaves together multiple storylines in a tapestry that’s richly realized and full of heart.
  • Alison Smith
    January 1, 1970
    I read the reviews for this book before I picked it up, but I didn't pay them much attention. "Be nice!" I thought. "It can't be THAT bad!" I thought.WRONG.The idea behind the plot is a good one, and I was interested to see how it went. But the characters were so one-dimensional and underdeveloped that I couldn't really enjoy the story. The actions were disconnected and too jumpy; for example, one chapter ended with a fall and the world going black, then later it was all good, with no explanatio I read the reviews for this book before I picked it up, but I didn't pay them much attention. "Be nice!" I thought. "It can't be THAT bad!" I thought.WRONG.The idea behind the plot is a good one, and I was interested to see how it went. But the characters were so one-dimensional and underdeveloped that I couldn't really enjoy the story. The actions were disconnected and too jumpy; for example, one chapter ended with a fall and the world going black, then later it was all good, with no explanation as to what happened. The protagonist, Eliza, goes back home to help her ailing father and dreads meeting up with her first love, Russell. But instead of getting to witness their reunion, we see them entering a coffee shop together, laughing and chatting, through the eyes of one of the employees! It was frustrating to get through the chapters without getting to experience the drama - and pivotal moments - in between.Sigh. Honestly, I couldn't wait to finish this one. There just wasn't enough there to make me feel invested in the characters or the story.Next time, I'll pay more attention to the reviewers. : )
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  • Cindy Roesel
    January 1, 1970
    It’s often said that we leave the best for last. But BookSparks Summer Reading Challenge 2017 has had the best of the best novels all summer. As we near Labor Day and the end of our visits to the beach and pool, we still have another fabulous seashore novel to share.A woman ponders the age old question: what could have been?In Meg Mitchell Moore’s, new novel, THE CAPTAIN’S DAUGHTER (Doubleday), Eliza Barnes returns to the small Maine town she left years ago, because her widowed father has been h It’s often said that we leave the best for last. But BookSparks Summer Reading Challenge 2017 has had the best of the best novels all summer. As we near Labor Day and the end of our visits to the beach and pool, we still have another fabulous seashore novel to share.A woman ponders the age old question: what could have been?In Meg Mitchell Moore’s, new novel, THE CAPTAIN’S DAUGHTER (Doubleday), Eliza Barnes returns to the small Maine town she left years ago, because her widowed father has been hurt in a boating accident. She finds much more than she ever expected.Growing up in Little Harbor, Maine, Eliza Barnes could haul a lobster trap and row a skiff with the best of them. But she always knew she’d leave that life behind, along with her widowed father. Now married, with two kids and permanently part of the country club set in the Massachusetts suburbs, she knows something inside her is missing.When she learns her father has been hurt and needs her help, Eliza pushes the pause button on her own life to come to his aid. But once she makes it back to Maine she realizes her father’s situation is worse that imagined. Complicating matters further, she comes across her first love and memories of secrets they shared are stirred. Eliza also meets a seventeen-year-old local, whose at the same crossroads Eliza once was years ago. Eliza can’t help but ask herself, what would her life be if she had never left Little Harbor, Maine? It’s a daunting task to honestly explore the life you have, while wondering, no doubt with some romanticism, what could have been.Much the same way, she drew me in as a reader, who became a fan after reading THE ARRIVALS and SO FAR AWAY, Meg Mitchell Moore has me hanging on every word she writes in THE CAPTAIN’S DAUGHTER. Life isn’t easy and certainly not to be taken lightly, at any stage. The life-changing decisions we make and live with are complicated. While reading THE CAPTAIN’S DAUGHTER, I could feel the undercurrent of emotions and characters wrestling between values and feelings. But guided by Moore’s laser focus and smart prose, I was once again thrilled to have extended my summer Holiday in Maine.
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  • Patty
    January 1, 1970
    The Captain's DaughterByMeg Mitchell MooreWhat it's all about...This book is about Eliza and her family. A bit of background about Eliza...her mom died way too early, she grew up in Maine with her gruff lobsterman father and she escaped what could have been a life changing early experience with her high school boyfriend. She has a husband and two daughters whom she adores. Summer has just begun...it's filled with activities...country club lunches, pools, boating...Eliza's life is full and rich a The Captain's DaughterByMeg Mitchell MooreWhat it's all about...This book is about Eliza and her family. A bit of background about Eliza...her mom died way too early, she grew up in Maine with her gruff lobsterman father and she escaped what could have been a life changing early experience with her high school boyfriend. She has a husband and two daughters whom she adores. Summer has just begun...it's filled with activities...country club lunches, pools, boating...Eliza's life is full and rich and nearly perfect when she is called back to Maine. Her father has had an accident which turns out to be much more than a simple accident. Why I wanted to read it...I love books that take place in Maine. The small town Eliza grew up in...the rocky coast...the hardworking lobster fishermen...the summer people. Eliza has such a different life now than the life she lived in Maine. She is back to help her dad but she has unfinished business with her old boyfriend. What made me truly enjoy this book...There is a lot going on in this book...there's Mary...a young girl from Eliza's town who needs help...there is her dad who needs help and there is the family she barely sees all summer because Eliza is needed so desperately in Maine. This all made this book so special. Why you should read it, too...This author writes beautifully. I was transported to Maine as I read this book. The dramas were real and so engaging. I loved every part of this book...readers who love lovely and intense dramas will love this incredible book. I know that I did!
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  • Jasmine Dale
    January 1, 1970
    Read this for a buddy read. It wasn't horrible but there was nothing great about it. All the issues were touched on pretty superficially. Just nothing significant.
  • Lorraine0528
    January 1, 1970
    This book was good, but not great. About half way through I wondered where it was going. I liked the way it ended because it tied up all the loose ends. There were a couple of controversial issues in this book that were kind of glossed over and would have been interesting for the author to explore. Still, it was worth reading.
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  • Chanele
    January 1, 1970
    I liked this book, but there were quite a few aspects of it that bothered me too much to say that I really liked it. It was an easy read, and the characters did manage to pull me in as the story progressed. That said, the book rubbed me the wrong way in two areas.First, this book was obnoxiously elitist. It was almost like an inside joke how many times the author could drop the Ivy League or Brown into the story. It was impossible to forget that these people went to Brown, as if they are some so I liked this book, but there were quite a few aspects of it that bothered me too much to say that I really liked it. It was an easy read, and the characters did manage to pull me in as the story progressed. That said, the book rubbed me the wrong way in two areas.First, this book was obnoxiously elitist. It was almost like an inside joke how many times the author could drop the Ivy League or Brown into the story. It was impossible to forget that these people went to Brown, as if they are some sort of superior life form in which we must be in awe. Eliza rose from poverty to ... GASP!! ... attend an Ivy League university. If she had attended anything less, it would clearly have not been impressive. (Insert random mention of Thayer Street in here to remind you these characters went to BROWN!) Ok, so my husband went to Brown. Do you know how often he mentions it? When he writes a resume, I guess. Maybe if someone asks. I think my mention here is more than he has done so in the past year. None of his friends have ever brought up Brown when we were talking. The reality is that no one cares nearly as much as the author about where these people went to school. Just chill with it already.Second, my inner feminist is sad. There was truly no strong female role model in this book. Eliza, the lead character, had great points of character, but she literally dropped out of medical school (even though SHE WENT TO BROWN) to have children. Manage a career and have a family? Naw, ladies, marry yourself a rich dude. But he's rich because his mom pays their bills. And to add insult to injury, Eliza felt the need to remind us she went to medical school repeatedly. Any mention of health was greeted with her inner med school dialogue. (And why so many references to cadaver dissection day? Is that an official school holiday?) So maybe Judith the maybe-evil, maybe-awesome mother-in-law had potential to be strong female, but she is too riddled with alcohol to be a role model. Then there are a few random women introduced in Little Harbor. One has pined for her best friend's husband for thirty years, one had a baby as a teen, one is the teen baby all grown up to become a teen mom herself.. and the others are lesbians. Because apparently the only way to come up with ladies not defined by their (usually awful) relationships with men was to make them gay. Sigh. All in all, this book made me feel really uncomfortable for the gender roles and stereotypes. All in all, there was a lot to dislike, yet the story was warm and fuzzy and I found myself giving in despite it all.
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  • Donna Hines
    January 1, 1970
    Emotionally gripping, dangerously exhilarating, powerful beyond all words.How often we've found ourselves torn between being caretakers and trying to find our own place in life?When life forces us to slow down by pressing the pause button and giving us something to think about such as being diagnosed with terminable brain cancer we realize just how precious time is and how valuable a commodity.In a way you can say we all are "captains" of our own ships and we are the ones who must find our way t Emotionally gripping, dangerously exhilarating, powerful beyond all words.How often we've found ourselves torn between being caretakers and trying to find our own place in life?When life forces us to slow down by pressing the pause button and giving us something to think about such as being diagnosed with terminable brain cancer we realize just how precious time is and how valuable a commodity.In a way you can say we all are "captains" of our own ships and we are the ones who must find our way through the rough seas and crazy storms that come our way.Eliza Barnes knew she was strong but now faces a bigger hurdle to climb.As the captains daughter of Charlie --a widowed lobsterman-- she learns just how tumultuous his life was and how hard he had to work to simply bring home a paycheck. She reminisced about days gone by and vowed to apologize and come to terms with how she may have treated her dad in those not so hot teen age years.Eliza had to come back to her hometown of Maine and leave behind her comfy cushy wealthy lifestyle she made with Rob back in Massachusetts ( who's mom helped keep him afloat) and start anew.Complicating the escalating illness of her father is the reemergence of a lost flame and first love.When Eliza meets Mary ( 17yo) with similar teen problems as her own she begins to ponder and decides had she had stayed all those years earlier would her life be a carbon copy of Mary's life now.Told with the beautiful backdrop of the sea and the mysteries that life holds The Captain's Daughter will be sure to make you laugh, cry, and rush out to live life to it's fullest.
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  • Debbie
    January 1, 1970
    Eliza ... The Captain's Daughter. Lost her mom at a young age. Her dad was a lobster boat "captain". She came from humble beginnings. She attended med school for a couple years, but never finished. She's married ... married well (country club well) and has two kids. Life is good and cushy and comfortable.Then her dad falls ill. She goes home to be with him. Learns it is aggressive brain cancer, but he is refusing treatment. She is torn - needed with her hubby and kids and needed with her dad.She Eliza ... The Captain's Daughter. Lost her mom at a young age. Her dad was a lobster boat "captain". She came from humble beginnings. She attended med school for a couple years, but never finished. She's married ... married well (country club well) and has two kids. Life is good and cushy and comfortable.Then her dad falls ill. She goes home to be with him. Learns it is aggressive brain cancer, but he is refusing treatment. She is torn - needed with her hubby and kids and needed with her dad.She decides to stay and spend all the time she can with her dad. This makes her question EVERYTHING. Did she make the right choices? So many what ifs! I won't tell more to spoil the story, but I found it an enjoying read for sure.Thanks to Netgalley and Doubleday for an ARC for a fair and honest review.
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  • Denise
    January 1, 1970
    Boring - nothing happens!
  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    I flew through the pages of this book. This was an outstanding story. A lobsterman's daughter has to go back to her roots when her father gets injured on the job, and ends up having to stay to help for reasons she only realizes when she gets there. If you like the writings of Jane Green, Billie Letts, or Karma Brown, I think you would enjoy this book.
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  • Jamie
    January 1, 1970
    I really can't even express my love for this book. I had been sitting on it for a while and then saw Elin Hildebrand recommend it on FB so I decided to pick it up. I'm so glad I did. There was not one character that I couldn't relate to in some way. Eliza dealing with family struggles, Mary with a precarious situation and bad relationship, Rob with social and financial pressures. I can't say enough good things about this one. This is my first of Meg Mitchell Moore's and certainly won't be my las I really can't even express my love for this book. I had been sitting on it for a while and then saw Elin Hildebrand recommend it on FB so I decided to pick it up. I'm so glad I did. There was not one character that I couldn't relate to in some way. Eliza dealing with family struggles, Mary with a precarious situation and bad relationship, Rob with social and financial pressures. I can't say enough good things about this one. This is my first of Meg Mitchell Moore's and certainly won't be my last. Thank you to the publisher for a review copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    Beautifully written with realistic characters. They aren’t perfect, they are flawed and they make questionable choices but they are still good people.Eliza is the daughter of a lobster man.Her mom died when she was young.Her dad raised her alone and Eliza grew up with little money.When she had a chance to leave town for college, she took it. She never went back home except for visiting.Now she is married, with two children of her own and a loving husband. She’s also extremely wealthy because of Beautifully written with realistic characters. They aren’t perfect, they are flawed and they make questionable choices but they are still good people.Eliza is the daughter of a lobster man.Her mom died when she was young.Her dad raised her alone and Eliza grew up with little money.When she had a chance to leave town for college, she took it. She never went back home except for visiting.Now she is married, with two children of her own and a loving husband. She’s also extremely wealthy because of her mother-in-law. She’s never felt good enough for the life she lives.When she finds out her dad is very sick, she goes back home to be with him.She leaves her husband and kids at home.Poor Eliza feels distant from both her father and her husband and kids.Sometimes I didn’t agree with the characters’ decisions but I didn’t have to in order to enjoy the story. All of the characters are likable, they’re just not perfect. It felt believable.I enjoyed the setting and I liked the characters.This is my first time reading a book by this author and I like her style of writing a lot.
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  • Lea Grady
    January 1, 1970
    Run of the mill, plotless, "sort" of boring book. Lots of words about nothing. Shallow. However, only thing noteworthy (and not in a good way) on the recorded version I listened to was how the narrator decided to interpret the voices of the characters, particularly her impression of Charlie (the captain) who she positively made sound like the poltergeist. She also forgot her other characters voices on occasion and poltergeisted an elderly lady name Val, changed how the other characters sounded f Run of the mill, plotless, "sort" of boring book. Lots of words about nothing. Shallow. However, only thing noteworthy (and not in a good way) on the recorded version I listened to was how the narrator decided to interpret the voices of the characters, particularly her impression of Charlie (the captain) who she positively made sound like the poltergeist. She also forgot her other characters voices on occasion and poltergeisted an elderly lady name Val, changed how the other characters sounded from time to time. I don't know what it is with the American narrators that have the need to sound like the opposite sex with deeper or even, as in this case, poltergeist type of voice. We know what a make or female sound like, please stop! I don't hear that ludicrousness on Australian or British recordings.
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  • Debbie
    January 1, 1970
    This was an entertaining read of adults with children rehashing their lives and wondering if they made a mistake in their earlier choices in life.The book deals with marriage, children, parents, ailing parents, and what could have been as well as dealing with issues on a daily basis in their lives.I enjoyed reading this book.Thanks to Doubleday Books and Net Galley for providing me with a free e-galley in exchange for an honest, unbiased review.
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  • Nicole
    January 1, 1970
    For the most part, this book was just ok. It was a story I was interested in, however, I felt like it was lacking somehow, even though I cannot say exactly how. The last quarter of the book improved for me somewhat, but I was still left feeling cheated.
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  • Kathy
    January 1, 1970
    I started this right after reading Moore's So Far Away. I didn't get very far, small town, tall, skinny girl, misfit. Then I was finished.
  • Sara Hill
    January 1, 1970
    Review can also be found on my blog HallelujahHill.com or https://www.hallelujahhill.com/home/2...What I loved about The Captain's Daughter by Meg Mitchell Moore is how realistic it is. It is not a story you would create in your mind daydreaming but more formed by life experiences. In some ways, this was enjoyable because it felt like I was walking through friends in times of need. In other ways, it was a slight let down because most times I read to escape the world for a little bit and experien Review can also be found on my blog HallelujahHill.com or https://www.hallelujahhill.com/home/2...What I loved about The Captain's Daughter by Meg Mitchell Moore is how realistic it is. It is not a story you would create in your mind daydreaming but more formed by life experiences. In some ways, this was enjoyable because it felt like I was walking through friends in times of need. In other ways, it was a slight let down because most times I read to escape the world for a little bit and experience something completely not in the realm of possibility. The shallowness of the characters kept me from feeling completely present in the story. I enjoyed how they played off of each other. In a way, the characters were like poetry as the newer generations were all repeating the older ones. There were some moral questions throughout the story. What was a pleasant surprise is both sides of the coin, in each situation, were presented to the reader. Many times I feel authors are trying to push a certain stance on an issue but this book was beautifully crafted to let the reader hear both sides and make up what they feel was the correct resolution to the situations. Ultimately, characters make their decisions but I am glad as a reader I can see multiple sides to a situation and do not feel like I have propaganda forced on me. The storyline was very realistic. No instant love story or crazy adventure. Just a beautiful story about family dynamics, moral lessons, and grief to name a few. The storyline moved at a decent pace in most parts. I did not expect the story to wrap up how it did. I will leave it at that so there are no spoilers. For anyone looking for a relaxing story that reads like nonfiction (even though it is fiction), The Captain's Daughter is a great reading choice. This was the first Meg Mitchell Moore book I have read and I look forward to reading more of her work in the future. I received this book complimentary through a Goodreads giveaway. Thank you Doubleday for sending me The Captain's Daughter by Meg Mitchell Moore for review. All opinions are 100% my own! Happy reading!
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  • Flavia
    January 1, 1970
    This is a pleasant light hearted read, although I detected a morality/rigidity that was disconcerting to me and ultimately undefined and carried through. The novel fluctuates from a number of character’s pov but they all circle Eliza’s plight. Moore’s characters aren’t particularly well rounded or empathetic but the story provokes lots of food for thought. This is a novel predominately about motherhood (or rather about mother-daughter relationships): about absent mothers, neglectful mothers, sub This is a pleasant light hearted read, although I detected a morality/rigidity that was disconcerting to me and ultimately undefined and carried through. The novel fluctuates from a number of character’s pov but they all circle Eliza’s plight. Moore’s characters aren’t particularly well rounded or empathetic but the story provokes lots of food for thought. This is a novel predominately about motherhood (or rather about mother-daughter relationships): about absent mothers, neglectful mothers, substitute mothers, mothers-to-be and good/bad mothers. The concept is fairly simple/straight-forward, as is the dichotomy she presents between rich and poor. Moore presents us with stereotypes, as well as characters that promise to be a little more complex, and implies that there is more depth to them; I remain unconvinced. I didn’t like Eliza and found her choices disappointing, possibly because I found her rather naïve and superficial; the other characters also flail about in passivity. Mary, as Eliza’s foil, is unlikeable to me for the same reasons. Moore manages to maintain a fairly delicate and sensitive nonjudgmental tone throughout the novel; I understand why but I also feel that this ultimately ensured that the storyline lost its fizz and became fairly flat (including the revelations made; for example the Phineas Tarbox reference was a bit of let down, as was the revelations of her mother’s surprisingly frivolous letter – even that last insert). If you don’t expect too much from this novel then it makes for an easy read; the dialogue and secrets that are revealed move the story fluidly along and there are many scenes I enjoyed (I particularly liked the chapter when Eliza was hauling lobsters with Russell – it was also very interesting). Moore unbuckles thoughts and sensations about everyday life, family, marriage, parenthood in modern times, money but ultimately I felt that her characters learned little and no major changes were made to the way they lived/felt/thought.
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  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    The Captain’s Daughter – Meg Mitchell MooreEliza Sargent Barnes grew up in the lobstering village of Little Harbor, Maine where she had a pleasant but complicated childhood. When she married, Eliza moved to Massachusetts. The reader is introduced to Eliza as a young wife and mother with two young daughters. She is married to Robert Barnes, her college boyfriend. Rob recently launched his own architectural firm and spends his time working with his very demanding and well-heeled first client. Eliz The Captain’s Daughter – Meg Mitchell MooreEliza Sargent Barnes grew up in the lobstering village of Little Harbor, Maine where she had a pleasant but complicated childhood. When she married, Eliza moved to Massachusetts. The reader is introduced to Eliza as a young wife and mother with two young daughters. She is married to Robert Barnes, her college boyfriend. Rob recently launched his own architectural firm and spends his time working with his very demanding and well-heeled first client. Eliza fills her days caring for her children and socializing with the affluent wives in her town. Eliza, and her Barton friends are members of an elite country club and spend their days discussing their families, fund raisers, and their lives. Despite the years she has lived in Barton, Eliza still believes she is an outsider and often feels detached from her peers.One day Eliza receives an unexpected phone call, from her first love and former boyfriend Russell, with news that her father Charlie Sargent had a boating accident and needs her to come home to Maine. A tough and skilled lobsterman, Charlie’s accident has Eliza concerned about her father's health. Eliza drops everything at home and drives north to Little Harbor, thinking she'll only be there for a several days. However, when she arrives in Maine Eliza finds out that Charlie’s situation is worse than she imagined and she will not be leaving for some time. While Eliza is in Little Harbor she spends time with Russell and long forgotten secrets, feelings and memories of her youth are revealed. Eliza meets Mary Brown, a seventeen-year-old local, who is at the same crossroads Eliza was at many years ago. Eliza can’t help but wonder what her life would have been like if she had never left Little Harbor, Maine? While she is in Maine caring for her father, Eliza takes the time to analyze her marriage and her present life in Barton. The Captain’s Daughter touches upon the topics of love, family, parenting, marriage, friendship, loss and forgiveness. It is a good book and an absorbing and credible story.
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  • Holly Robinson
    January 1, 1970
    If you're a fan of Elin Hilderbrand, you're going to love Meg Mitchell Moore. In The Captain's Daughter, Moore has written a lovely, often humorous, and emotional story of Eliza, who grows up in a small town in Maine, the daughter of a lobsterman, who ends up making it into an Ivy League college and marrying well enough to be living the posh country club life. When her father falls ill, she travels back to Maine to take care of him and figure out how she got to where she is at this moment in lif If you're a fan of Elin Hilderbrand, you're going to love Meg Mitchell Moore. In The Captain's Daughter, Moore has written a lovely, often humorous, and emotional story of Eliza, who grows up in a small town in Maine, the daughter of a lobsterman, who ends up making it into an Ivy League college and marrying well enough to be living the posh country club life. When her father falls ill, she travels back to Maine to take care of him and figure out how she got to where she is at this moment in life, as a mother and wife whose marriage is suffering. This may sound like a typical women's fiction, plot, but Moore is a gifted writer whose characters always surprise you. She even has a soft spot for the usual rich bitches that populate novels like these, and nobody writes better about parenting. If you don't want to spring for a hardcover, buy that person on your list one of Moore's other novels—I loved The Arrivals and The Admissions, and all of her novels have that same exquisite writing, generously optimistic spirit, and spots of high humor that make you feel like maybe the world isn't going to hell after all.
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  • Gena - My Book Reviews for You
    January 1, 1970
    This was an outstanding novel! I really enjoyed the way the families’ lives were depicted. The book had a realistic, modern day tone to it. The story is set in Massachusetts and in Maine during the present time. There are some parts that are glimpses of the past, memories that are necessary to understand the characters’ lives. Eliza lives a country club, affluent life in Massachusetts with her husband Rob and her children, Zoe and Evie. Suddenly, Eliza finds herself going home to Maine to see he This was an outstanding novel! I really enjoyed the way the families’ lives were depicted. The book had a realistic, modern day tone to it. The story is set in Massachusetts and in Maine during the present time. There are some parts that are glimpses of the past, memories that are necessary to understand the characters’ lives. Eliza lives a country club, affluent life in Massachusetts with her husband Rob and her children, Zoe and Evie. Suddenly, Eliza finds herself going home to Maine to see her father Charlie, who was hurt in an accident on his boat while out hauling his lobster traps. This novel is the story of Eliza and her relationship with her parents Charlie and Joanie. It is the story of her life with her husband and her children. We also get to know Eliza’s mother’s close friend Val who has been helping Charlie. And we get to know young Mary and her mother. This story is about families, love, and loss. It is about forgiveness, understanding, compromising, and most important starting over. All the characters are dealing with their own personal struggles, and finding the strength to make a new life.
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  • Lara Ryan
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Netgalley for providing me an advanced reader's copy in exchange for an honest review.Although I was not a huge fan of The Admissions, I was intrigued by this book's ties to coastal Maine and Massachusetts. I'm a sucker for storied that I can try to put real life perspective on, even if it's just the setting. So, I gave it a chance.I'm glad I did. The story had many underlying themes and storylines which kept the story flowing. Eliza is in the midst of taking care of her family now Thank you to Netgalley for providing me an advanced reader's copy in exchange for an honest review.Although I was not a huge fan of The Admissions, I was intrigued by this book's ties to coastal Maine and Massachusetts. I'm a sucker for storied that I can try to put real life perspective on, even if it's just the setting. So, I gave it a chance.I'm glad I did. The story had many underlying themes and storylines which kept the story flowing. Eliza is in the midst of taking care of her family now that it's the summer and schedules are hectic when she gets the call that her dad is not doing well. She drops everything to spend the summer caring for her dad, while leaving her family to navigate through the summer without her.The Captain's Daughter was a story about reliving and conquering childhood demons and coming to terms with the responsibilities that center around a sick/dying parent. Neither are easy and seem impossible to manage, until you are forced to. I admired Eliza's strength throughout. Moore did a great job of making her a strong but vulnerable female. This truly was a great summer read.
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  • Sue Seligman
    January 1, 1970
    This novel by Meg Mitchell Moore has everything that I crave in a contemporary women's novel. The themes of parent and child relationships, husband and wife relationships, marriage and in law situations, teen age pregnancy, the desire to fit in...it's all in this book. Eliza Sargent is the daughter of a lobster fisherman, Charlie. Although she loves her father unconditionally and misses her mother who died when she was twelve, she made her escape from the primitive lifestyle, attending college a This novel by Meg Mitchell Moore has everything that I crave in a contemporary women's novel. The themes of parent and child relationships, husband and wife relationships, marriage and in law situations, teen age pregnancy, the desire to fit in...it's all in this book. Eliza Sargent is the daughter of a lobster fisherman, Charlie. Although she loves her father unconditionally and misses her mother who died when she was twelve, she made her escape from the primitive lifestyle, attending college and two years of medical school, eventually marrying Rob Barnes, and becoming a member of an extremely affluent community reminiscent of the "housewives" shows. Sometimes Eliza feels as if she doesn't really belong in this situation, especially cognizant of the fact that without Rob's mother's money, they wouldn't be able to afford the luxury required in this life style. When Charlie becomes ill and Eliza returns home to Maine to care for him, she is forced to face her conflicted feelings about the life she left behind and the life she is leading now. This is an emotional novel with very realistic characters and vivid descriptions of the setting. An enjoyable summer read.
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