Restart
Chase's memory just went out the window.Chase doesn't remember falling off the roof. He doesn't remember hitting his head. He doesn't, in fact, remember anything. He wakes up in a hospital room and suddenly has to learn his whole life all over again . . . starting with his own name.He knows he's Chase. But who is Chase? When he gets back to school, he sees that different kids have very different reactions to his return.Some kids treat him like a hero. Some kids are clearly afraid of him.One girl in particular is so angry with him that she pours her frozen yogurt on his head the first chance she gets.Pretty soon, it's not only a question of who Chase is--it's a question of who he was . . . and who he's going to be.From the #1 bestselling author of Swindle and Slacker, Restart is the spectacular story of a kid with a messy past who has to figure out what it means to get a clean start.

Restart Details

TitleRestart
Author
FormatHardcover
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 30th, 2017
PublisherScholastic Press
ISBN1338053779
ISBN-139781338053777
Number of pages256 pages
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Realistic Fiction, Young Adult

Restart Review

  • Ms. Yingling
    February 26, 2017
    Copy provided by publisher at ALAChase has fallen off the roof of his house and can't remember anything. Not his mother, not his best friends, and not his school. The concussion he has sustained keeps him out of playing football, which makes his father (a former jock himself) unhappy. Chase doesn't mind. His friends Bear and Ambrose aren't the nicest guys-- the three have done something Chase does not remember that has led them to be sentenced to do community service at a retirement facility. Th Copy provided by publisher at ALAChase has fallen off the roof of his house and can't remember anything. Not his mother, not his best friends, and not his school. The concussion he has sustained keeps him out of playing football, which makes his father (a former jock himself) unhappy. Chase doesn't mind. His friends Bear and Ambrose aren't the nicest guys-- the three have done something Chase does not remember that has led them to be sentenced to do community service at a retirement facility. The "new" Chase doesn't mind, and enjoys talking to the residents, especially Mr. Solway, a decorated Korean war veteran. Chase is also enjoying working on the school video year book with Brendan. He notices that most of the people he runs into, including his young step sister, Helene, seem afraid of him, but he doesn't remember why. He slowly learns the truth, but realizes that he never wants to go back to being the "old" Chase. Strengths: This is a bit of a departure for Korman. If you had given it to me blind, I would have assumed it was Sonnenblick. It's very beautifully done, and even though I normally am not a fan of books with bullying, this really worked. Even the video year book and the video competition seemed plausible. That's what it is. Korman excels at putting characters in unlikely situations, and aside from the amnesia itself, this book is completely plausible. Really great story. This would make a fantastic class novel or literature circle book. I'm not generally a fan of everyone reading the same book, but this would lead to lots of good discussions. Weaknesses: This took me a while to get into, which is unusual. I think it was the disjointed feeling that Chase was experiencing-- I felt disjointed, too!What I really think: Definitely purchasing. I'm also really excited that many of Korman's backlist titles are being released with new covers. Need to refresh your copy of Born to Rock? Now's the time!
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  • Jennifer
    February 28, 2017
    I don't know how Gordon Korman does it. He cranks out so many book each year, but they still display a high level of writing and thought. He respects middle grade years and gives them great stories. This one is a quick read about an awful bully who gets a brain injury, which results in amnesia. He's shocked and disturbed to learn about the person he once was. 3.5 stars
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  • Jackie
    April 21, 2017
    What would it be like to start over? What if you were a bully extraordinaire and everyone was scared to face you in the school hall? What if you were a talented football star who suddenly is forced to stand on the sidelines and watch your friends play without you? All this, and MORE happens to Chase Ambrose. During one of his outrageous escapades, he falls off the roof of his house and suffers injuries. In time, his physical injuries will heal, but most distressing is his Acute Retro-Grade Amn What would it be like to start over? What if you were a bully extraordinaire and everyone was scared to face you in the school hall? What if you were a talented football star who suddenly is forced to stand on the sidelines and watch your friends play without you? All this, and MORE happens to Chase Ambrose. During one of his outrageous escapades, he falls off the roof of his house and suffers injuries. In time, his physical injuries will heal, but most distressing is his Acute Retro-Grade Amnesia. He cannot remember anything or anybody that was part of his previous 13 years. He doesn't even remember his family! As he prepares to go back to school for the start of 8th grade, snippets of flash-backing memory slowly creep into his brain. It's distressing, though, because he cannot make sense of them. The kids at school avoid him, except for his friends, Aaron and Bear...and, yet they seem to be bullies. Now, Chase wants nothing to do with their vindictiveness and hatred. He tries to reach out to others in the school, but how can they possibly forget what Chase has done to them in the past? Eventually the video club embraces him but some members are still wary. Chase tries to apologize and let his new-found kindess shine through, but as with all hurtfulness , it takes time to alleviate the effects. Will his memory ever come back? And, how will he handle the realization of his wrong-doings? Will others accept his new persona? Restart is begging to be read as a group, especially as a read-aloud, since discussion about bullies and their hate will surely need to be addressed. This book speaks to the power of forgiveness, kindness, criminal acts, and retribution. A lesson can be learned from this....can restarting one's life erase the past? Maybe, maybe not, but how does one move forward and how do others get passed the hurt inflicted? A powerful book for those who appreciated the message in books such as Touching Spirit Bear and Leverage.
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  • Trisha Perry
    May 29, 2017
    Chase doesn't remember falling off of the roof, Chase doesn't remember anything! He gets to reboot his life, now what he does with it is his own to make for better or worse, but what he finds of his old self is a shock to his new self. When school starts some kids treat him like a god and others like a demon the only problem is Chase finds he doesn't want to be around those that treat him like a god he finds them cruel, he'd rather hang out with the other kids but they are afraid of him for some Chase doesn't remember falling off of the roof, Chase doesn't remember anything! He gets to reboot his life, now what he does with it is his own to make for better or worse, but what he finds of his old self is a shock to his new self. When school starts some kids treat him like a god and others like a demon the only problem is Chase finds he doesn't want to be around those that treat him like a god he finds them cruel, he'd rather hang out with the other kids but they are afraid of him for some reason, and he must earn their trust. Even his own little sister is scared to be around him. As Chase gets his memories back he must decide which Chase he is going to be the one he wants to be or the one he thinks everybody thinks he is.This was a very interesting book and I am sure many of us wishes more bullies could suffer amnesia and turn out like Chase but this is not that kind of world but books do let us escape those worlds for a while and that is an awesome thought. I also love how they spent time with Mr. Solway and brought him out of his depression from his wife dying. Overall a awesome book, except for the huge mistake in the first place by Chase, Bear and Aaron thinking they would ever get rich selling a Medal of Honor, jokes on them because you can't sell a Medal of Honor, no one would touch that on with a ten foot poll.
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  • Josh Newhouse
    May 29, 2017
    This was another great quick read by Gordon Korman... I really enjoyed it... it had a nice character arc, some good humor... all that said, something bugged me... it's a small thing... maybe not even a thing but it felt a little dated... the jocks vs geeks thing feels a bit played out, the use of flipcams not smartphones... I wonder if my kids will see it that way... the main plot is strong; the questions it brings up are interesting... can people really change? Some of the side characters did f This was another great quick read by Gordon Korman... I really enjoyed it... it had a nice character arc, some good humor... all that said, something bugged me... it's a small thing... maybe not even a thing but it felt a little dated... the jocks vs geeks thing feels a bit played out, the use of flipcams not smartphones... I wonder if my kids will see it that way... the main plot is strong; the questions it brings up are interesting... can people really change? Some of the side characters did feel a little flat... I did like the multiple perspectives though... a very solid read by a fantastic author but just short of 5 stars...
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  • Jayne Bartrand
    April 23, 2017
    This book kept me interested. I enjoyed the alternating points of view. Hopeful ending that people can change and especially those who are willing to give another chance (sometimes many chances!) to those who have done them wrong. I was surprised nothing really happened to the other two bullies. . .makes for a good class read and discussion.
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  • H B
    May 31, 2017
    The plus side: An interesting perspective on bullying and self identity.The minus side: The main character becomes more upset by a remembered theft than by remembered physical abuse. This awkward set of priorities seems to be shared by many of the characters. Hmmm.
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  • Linda Atkinson
    April 17, 2017
    Korman delivers every single time. Loved Restart.
  • Judy Desetti
    June 1, 2017
    Korman hits it out of the park, again. Wow. Great story. I think kids will love it. You really root for this kid to be the best he can be and wonder just how despicable he was prior to his amnesia. This is one I sat and read all day to see how it turns out. Recommend
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  • Jenny
    May 29, 2017
    Thanks for the referral Mallory!
  • Lonna Pierce
    March 15, 2017
    Chase Ambrose was a "thug bully sociopath," gifted athlete, and world-class jerk, along with Neanderthal football pals Aaron & Bear. But that was before Chase fell off a roof, was in a coma, and awoke with retrograde amnesia. With no memory of the living hell he put other students through. Finding a home in video club and learning about a Medal of Honor winner puts him in touch with his artistic side and his former targets. Chase becomes a different guy. Or does he? As his past comes back to Chase Ambrose was a "thug bully sociopath," gifted athlete, and world-class jerk, along with Neanderthal football pals Aaron & Bear. But that was before Chase fell off a roof, was in a coma, and awoke with retrograde amnesia. With no memory of the living hell he put other students through. Finding a home in video club and learning about a Medal of Honor winner puts him in touch with his artistic side and his former targets. Chase becomes a different guy. Or does he? As his past comes back to accuse him, the real Chase emerges, and challenges others to restart their middle school persona.
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  • Jaina
    May 5, 2017
    4.5 stars. This review is also available on my blog, Read Till Dawn.Do you know, I was supposed to be studying for my AP exams all day today. That was the goal, at least, until that little yellow package from Scholastic showed up on my doorstep. Once I pulled out my brand new ARC of Restart, the newest Korman novel, then my day was doomed. I dropped everything and devoured the entire thing in about two sittings (the one break consisted of my trying to get back to work, failing, and then shruggin 4.5 stars. This review is also available on my blog, Read Till Dawn.Do you know, I was supposed to be studying for my AP exams all day today. That was the goal, at least, until that little yellow package from Scholastic showed up on my doorstep. Once I pulled out my brand new ARC of Restart, the newest Korman novel, then my day was doomed. I dropped everything and devoured the entire thing in about two sittings (the one break consisted of my trying to get back to work, failing, and then shrugging and picking the book up again).I don't know what it is about Gordon Korman, but his books always suck me in. Perhaps it's because I've been reading them for so long now, his distinctively funny yet deep writing style makes me nostalgic and lets me pretend that I'm a little kid again and not a high school senior preparing to head off to college. Perhaps its simply because of the intriguing storylines or because he always takes the story the way I'm hoping. Maybe it's a combination of all of those things.Because on the surface, Restart is not the most amazing book I've ever read. I mean, its premise is awesome–a bully who's lost his memory and is nice now? Sweet!–but it's also incredibly unrealistic. Take it from the girl who was supposed to be studying AP Psychology all afternoon. And a lot of the elements that make up Restart have shown up in previous Korman novels. I was especially reminded of No More Dead Dogs and The Chicken Doesn't Skate, because all three books have elements of social blending, with kids from wildly different clubs and interests coming together in a combination of sports and theater/filmmaking/science (respectively). I also noticed a few character archetypes, like the filmmaker addict and the main girl who starts out hating the protagonist, and the slightly spacey fangirl chasing after the protagonist. All of these characters show up in at least two of the three books I mentioned, and some of them in others besides.But you know what? I just don't care. Gordon Korman does middle schools books well. And I love the elements he pulls together, and Restart is actually a really good book. Because you see, I adored No More Dead Dogs and The Chicken Doesn't Skate. To this day, they still rank on my list of favorite books ever. If Korman wants to revisit some of his greatest successes and borrow a few devices, then I am totally okay with that.And besides, how could I not love the "bully with amnesia" angle? Realistic or not, it's played amazingly here. My main critique, honestly, is that we don't get enough details about Chase's ordeal. I would have loved much more time spent just on watching him adjust to life without any of his memories, and I wouldn't have even minded getting more medical mumbo-jumbo to explain why his whole personality suddenly shifted with the bump on the head!Anyway, I'll stop the review here because I don't actually have my copy of the book anymore: my elementary-school-aged brother came into my room tonight, asked for Restart,and disappeared with it. And honestly, if that doesn't tell you something about the universal appeal of Korman's books, then I don't know what would.[Update: Just thought you'd like to know that within the first two days of Restart being in the house, three of us read it: I finished it the first day, my brother borrowed it that night and finished it by lunch the next day, and my mom borrowed it that night and stayed up past midnight reading it (on the landing, because my dad kicked her out so he could go to sleep). Like I said, my family love Gordon Korman books.]Disclaimer: I received an unsolicited copy of this novel from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • J.
    April 1, 2017
    I received an ARC from the publisher via work, with no obligation to leave a personal review.This is an excellent novel. It's immediately engaging (i.e., has a great hook) and easy to get into. I don't always love multiple perspectives, but it works really well here, and this story has a lot going for it: redemption, mystery, forgiveness, humor, you name it.Chase is a main character you really root for from the beginning, even when you realize he used to be a huge bully. His turnaround is really I received an ARC from the publisher via work, with no obligation to leave a personal review.This is an excellent novel. It's immediately engaging (i.e., has a great hook) and easy to get into. I don't always love multiple perspectives, but it works really well here, and this story has a lot going for it: redemption, mystery, forgiveness, humor, you name it.Chase is a main character you really root for from the beginning, even when you realize he used to be a huge bully. His turnaround is really satisfying, and Korman does a great job grappling with the different implications, especially with his two former best friends.This isn't a super long or complex novel, but it's a really solid one with a lot of interest and it handles its subject well.
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  • Rose Dillard
    April 4, 2017
    4.5 stars is more accurate, but a really good book. This book was perfect for my Spring Break. I bought it for my 6th grade son from Scholastic and he got it on Monday. He finished it in a few days and said, "Mom, this is really good. You should read it too!" I am a sixth-grade teacher, so I like to read novels that are appropriate for my middle-school students as well as my children. This book bounces between multiple characters and is easy to read. I don't remember quite the level of bullying 4.5 stars is more accurate, but a really good book. This book was perfect for my Spring Break. I bought it for my 6th grade son from Scholastic and he got it on Monday. He finished it in a few days and said, "Mom, this is really good. You should read it too!" I am a sixth-grade teacher, so I like to read novels that are appropriate for my middle-school students as well as my children. This book bounces between multiple characters and is easy to read. I don't remember quite the level of bullying or sports driven popularity that is described in the novel, but it was a very readable and somewhat believable story. The emotion of the characters is what gets to me. I love a book that can make me laugh, cry, and root for the underdog. A great book to read during our beach vacation.
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  • Violet
    April 26, 2017
    I loved this book so much! I'm SO glad I was able to receive an ARC!This had been on my TBR pile as soon as I had heard about the book, and receiving an ARC was absolutely amazing!RESTART is a very different book than what I normally read, but I REALLY liked it. It even made some fluids leak out of my eyeballs, and I hardly ever cry when I read.The characters kept me engaged and I loved the multiple view points. My favorites definitely have to be Chase, Shoshanna, and Brendan. I also am really g I loved this book so much! I'm SO glad I was able to receive an ARC!This had been on my TBR pile as soon as I had heard about the book, and receiving an ARC was absolutely amazing!RESTART is a very different book than what I normally read, but I REALLY liked it. It even made some fluids leak out of my eyeballs, and I hardly ever cry when I read.The characters kept me engaged and I loved the multiple view points. My favorites definitely have to be Chase, Shoshanna, and Brendan. I also am really glad about the shipping arrangement in this book, and was happy with the end result.Overall, it was a great book, good story, engaging characters, and great development.
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  • Sarah
    April 15, 2017
    Gordon Korman has once again created a book that my students will love. It is not your typical bullying story- as it's told from different points of view after the bully survives an injury but has amnesia and then returns to school. This would make a good read aloud or book group choice due to the opportunity for great class discussion.
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  • Marti Dolata
    May 11, 2017
    because it is told from the first person, it is a natural for being read aloud. Should make a great audio book.
  • Cathlin
    March 9, 2017
    really good. Definitely going into my teacher read aloud stack for my class
  • Cynthia
    February 5, 2017
    A definite page-turner! Classic Korman!
  • Isabella Torres
    May 11, 2017
    I loved this book so much. I was so happy Chase changed his ways! If Chase stayed the same I would have been so mad at him! I loved this book so much, I never wanted to put it down. I would read this book over and over again. I recommend this book to everyone.
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  • Leanne
    May 7, 2017
    Strong and swift storytelling strikes again! Self actualization through the eyes of a recovering amnesiac who was once the biggest middle school athlete bully - Korman nails the dialogue and provides opportunities for kids to discuss bullying issues.
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  • Pam
    May 1, 2017
    I received an ARC from Scholastic.The story begins with a young man (Chase) in the hospital after falling from the roof. He has almost complete amnesia. The doctor offers encouragement to discover who he wants to be from now on.Each chapter is told from a different character's point of view. We learn as much about them as we do about Chase. As with all of us, he has those who appreciated him and those who didn't. The reader discovers that he may not have been very likable in the past.Korman work I received an ARC from Scholastic.The story begins with a young man (Chase) in the hospital after falling from the roof. He has almost complete amnesia. The doctor offers encouragement to discover who he wants to be from now on.Each chapter is told from a different character's point of view. We learn as much about them as we do about Chase. As with all of us, he has those who appreciated him and those who didn't. The reader discovers that he may not have been very likable in the past.Korman works his usual magic and creates a believable world with credible people. His words bring out the emotions for all of the characters through their interactions and insights.I do recommend this book for middle-schoolers struggling to change and reinvent themselves.
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