Record of a Spaceborn Few (Wayfarers, #3)
From the ground, we stand. From our ship, we live. By the stars, we hopeThe incredible new novel by Becky Chambers, author of the beloved The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet.Centuries after the last humans left Earth, the Exodus Fleet is a living relic, a place many are from but few outsiders have seen. Humanity has finally been accepted into the galactic community, but while this has opened doors for many, those who have not yet left for alien cities fear that their carefully cultivated way of life is under threat.Tessa chose to stay home when her brother Ashby left for the stars, but has to question that decision when her position in the Fleet is threatened.Kip, a reluctant young apprentice, itches for change but doesn't know where to find it.Sawyer, a lost and lonely newcomer, is just looking for a place to belong.When a disaster rocks this already fragile community, those Exodans who still call the Fleet their home can no longer avoid the inescapable question:What is the purpose of a ship that has reached its destination?

Record of a Spaceborn Few (Wayfarers, #3) Details

TitleRecord of a Spaceborn Few (Wayfarers, #3)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 24th, 2018
PublisherHodder & Stoughton
ISBN-139781473647602
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Fiction, Space, Space Opera

Record of a Spaceborn Few (Wayfarers, #3) Review

  • Kai
    January 1, 1970
    If there was ever such a thing as cover porn then this series hit the nail on its head.
  • Kaitlin
    January 1, 1970
    * I was sent this from the publisher in exchange for an honest review * "From the ground, we stand. From our ships, we live. By the stars, we hope..." This book isn't quite a direct sequel to the events of The Long Way To A Small Angry Planet, but it does start at the same time as the events in tLWtaSAP are finishing up. We follow a host of entirely new host of characters, all of whom are connected to, or interested in, the Exodus Fleet. One of these characters has a tie to Ashby from the first * I was sent this from the publisher in exchange for an honest review * "From the ground, we stand. From our ships, we live. By the stars, we hope..." This book isn't quite a direct sequel to the events of The Long Way To A Small Angry Planet, but it does start at the same time as the events in tLWtaSAP are finishing up. We follow a host of entirely new host of characters, all of whom are connected to, or interested in, the Exodus Fleet. One of these characters has a tie to Ashby from the first book, she's his sister, but other than that, there's not a lot of connections between the characters, it's more about a new focus within the same universe. The Exodus Fleet is the fleet of space-ships specially designed by humanity to blast their culture into the stars away from Earth and to never go back. It was built at a time when humanity was desperate, and the slow shift from lone voyagers to becoming part of the GC was a long time coming. We pick up the Fleet many generations later when they have been a part of the GC for quite a few decades, and we follow a variety of people who all have an interest in the Fleet.What i love about Becky Chamber's writing is that it never feels like a big space battle, but more of a focus in on the everyday lives of those who live in this universe. She's very good at showing you a society where things are better, people are more open and accepting, and she can draw you into the narratives of the characters too. I really think her books are about people who just so happen to be in Space, as they are thought-provoking and honest and emotional. Some of the characters we follow included:- Isobel and her wife. They are some of the older members of the Fleet so they remember the time that was spent trying to convince the other alien races of the GC that Humans were a species worth inviting in. She works in the Archives, and she has a great understanding of what the Fleet stands for and what it seeks to protect. She also has a friend Harmaegeon (sp? - I don't have my copy of the book with me as I am writing this) who is interested in coming to examine the Fleet, and she brings xry in to the lifestyle there.- Eyas is a young worker who works in the Fleet as a composter and burial expert. Her time is spent preparing corpses to return to the Earth and give back to the community as they are now in Space and have limited resources Her job is vital to the survival of the Fleet, and she sees her task as a monumental one which gives value to those who have left this life. She's proud of her job, and yet she seeks something more for her Fleet. - Kip is a teenage boy who is bored with his lot in the Fleet. He's grown up here his whole life and he can't seem to find anything he particularly likes and wants to get involved in. He's a typical teen who does stupid stuff because his friends tell him to, and yet he learns a lot about his own heritage and place by the end of the story. - Tessa is the sister to Ashby (a character from tLWtaSAP) and she has two kids, Ky and Aya. They are both quite young and she spends most of her time taking care of them when she's not at work. Her aspirations aren't quite clear at the start of the book as she isn't quite clear on them herself, but she has a strong motherly desire to protect her kids and when they are later put under pressure she has to think about whether the Fleet can offer what they need.- Sawyer is an outsider to the Fleet, although he is Human and somehow generations back he's connected to them. He comes from Mushtullo which is a place of crime and hunger and he's heard that the Fleet will always feed everyone and always provide for their own. He wants to make a go of it, and so he travels to the Fleet to start a new life there.- Gol'loloha (sp? - this for sure isn't the spelling of this, but I will correct it when I have my copy in my hands) is a Harmaegeon (sp?) alien who is interested in learning about the Fleet from another point of view. Xe is not overly familiar with Human ways, and so xe comes tot he Fleet to learn and to write about it and let the other people in the GC learn about them too. The Fleet is quite insular at times, and so not too much is actually known y those who aren't a part of it and so xyr job is to inform others. What I love about this solar system is just how nice everyone is. Sure, there are plenty of bad things that happen and it's not all sunshine and roses, but the people and aliens know that the only way to survive is to be accepting and open and try to listen. I feel like the integrating of xe/xyr pronouns and same-sex couples was seamless and fit the universe. It makes perfect sense that these things would become completely 'normal' and beyond comment in a society such as the one Chambers is showing us. I love it, and I think she's done an excellent job.Overall, this was brilliant. Each story opens up the character and the universe more, and with every book in this universe (and in my opinion she could go on writing in this universe forever and I would read them all) I feel like I am more enchanted and captivated. 5*s of course, and I will be eagerly awaiting the next thing she decides to write :)
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  • Jenny (Reading Envy)
    January 1, 1970
    I loved the first two Wayfarers books, each for different reasons. This one follows several stories inside the Exodus Fleet, the people who left Earth but weren't rich enough to move places like Mars. They've continued living and building upon the ships they left in, and have slowly created a sustaining colony. The book starts with a disaster that sets a few stories in motion.Like all Chambers books, I appreciate the focus on people and relationships, interesting aliens and their places in the u I loved the first two Wayfarers books, each for different reasons. This one follows several stories inside the Exodus Fleet, the people who left Earth but weren't rich enough to move places like Mars. They've continued living and building upon the ships they left in, and have slowly created a sustaining colony. The book starts with a disaster that sets a few stories in motion.Like all Chambers books, I appreciate the focus on people and relationships, interesting aliens and their places in the universe, and seeing the "civilization" perspective of the salvage crew that shows up. One character is an Archivist, keeping a video record of events. Another is a caretaker, welcoming those newly born to the community and aiding those who pass to contribute in other ways. One is a teenager looking for a purpose, and another is an exile from another place, looking for a home. The alternating narratives make for a quick and pleasurable read.Thanks to the publisher for giving me access to this title via Edelweiss. It comes out in the United States on 24 July, 2018.
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  • Joanne Harris
    January 1, 1970
    I was lucky enough to snag a copy of the ARC of this from my publishers, and I'll be buying the hardback version when it comes out. Yes, these books really are that good. I loved the two previous books in this (Series? Cycle?), especially the way in which the stories slot together in a non-linear fashion within an expanding fictional world, which means they can be read and re-read in any order, with equal enjoyment. And oh, how they are enjoyable - on many different levels. I have spoken before I was lucky enough to snag a copy of the ARC of this from my publishers, and I'll be buying the hardback version when it comes out. Yes, these books really are that good. I loved the two previous books in this (Series? Cycle?), especially the way in which the stories slot together in a non-linear fashion within an expanding fictional world, which means they can be read and re-read in any order, with equal enjoyment. And oh, how they are enjoyable - on many different levels. I have spoken before of the excellent characterization; the masterly exploration of diversity and the subtle treatment of different races. I may also have mentioned how engaging the world is, and how easy and pleasurable it is to immerse oneself into it again. Those things continue to be true, but I think that in some ways this book is even more subtle and accomplished than the first two. Imagine THE GRAPES OF WRATH, set in space, with all the intensity, heartbreak and tension that implies. And grieve a little for the fact that the mainstream literary world is so slow in acknowledging the scope, skill and literary value of sci-fi - although frankly, anyone who scorns sci-fi as a lesser genre really doesn't deserve to read anything as splendid as this.
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  • ✨ jamieson ✨
    January 1, 1970
    THAT COVER IM CRYING ITS SO BEAUTIFUL OH MY GODTHIS WHOLE SERIES IS SO BEAUTIFUL AND MAKES ME SO HAPPY AND LITERALLY MELTS MY ENTIRE INSIDES TO GOO BECAUSE ITS SO PURE N GOOD SAVE MESAVE MEI MISSED THE CREW SO MUCH IM CRYING
  • Hiu Gregg
    January 1, 1970
    I'm not sure if I wanna write a very long review for this one, as there are some books that you just wanna kinda... keep for yourself. Those books that you don't want to sit and analyse, because you'd rather just enjoy the fact that you've just read a great book that really got you.Recor of a Spaceborn Few is a wonderful story that made me tear up a whole bunch of times. It's an exploration of humanity, and of what society could be... But on a very relatable level. It's a slice-of-life tale abou I'm not sure if I wanna write a very long review for this one, as there are some books that you just wanna kinda... keep for yourself. Those books that you don't want to sit and analyse, because you'd rather just enjoy the fact that you've just read a great book that really got you.Recor of a Spaceborn Few is a wonderful story that made me tear up a whole bunch of times. It's an exploration of humanity, and of what society could be... But on a very relatable level. It's a slice-of-life tale about the lives of a small cast of characters, their struggles, and their dreams.There's a kid trying to discover what he wants to do with his life. There's a young adult searching for a place to call home. There's a mother trying to care for herself and her family, and there's a woman who helps others grieve when the time comes.All of this is set against the backdrop of a truly "equal" society. There's no need for money, as everyone is provided the same food and standard of living. Nobody needs to work, but they do it for the good of their community. This is the life of the Exodan Fleet, a group of humans that lives in a giant honeycomb-like system of spaceships around a star.I'm making it sound like a perfect utopia, but the beauty of this setting is that it's anything but perfect. Resources may be allocated equally, but that just means that everyone has the same sparse lifestyle, without much in the way of luxuries. To the other species in the universe... the Exodan humans are almost seen as a charity case. Becky Chambers takes the time to explore the problems and challenges of the society she has created. She presents her world to the reader without judgement, and allows them to draw their own conclusions.This is a beautiful, shining little gem of a book. It's wholesome, tragic, thoughtful, and uplifting. Somehow all at once. It took me a little while to forge a connection with the characters, but when I got it... Man, did I care.This is a fantastic addition to the Wayfarers series, and if you're a fan of The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet or A Closed and Common Orbit, you should pick this up immediately.My only complaint about Becky Chamber's books is that when they're finished... They're finished. I just want to read about these characters forever.
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  • Elenora
    January 1, 1970
    This early review is brought to you by fate and amazing luck! I work in a book store, and we were sent a proof for whoever might want to read it, and it had been tossed on the staff table. When, during a break, I glimpsed the title on the spine, half hidden under a stack of papers and other proofs, I shrieked, making everyone jump a bit out of their chairs, and dived for it. So hey, this is a proof review, but I didn't promise anyone an honest review! No matter, let me be entirely honest: Record This early review is brought to you by fate and amazing luck! I work in a book store, and we were sent a proof for whoever might want to read it, and it had been tossed on the staff table. When, during a break, I glimpsed the title on the spine, half hidden under a stack of papers and other proofs, I shrieked, making everyone jump a bit out of their chairs, and dived for it. So hey, this is a proof review, but I didn't promise anyone an honest review! No matter, let me be entirely honest: Record Of A Spaceborn Few may simply be Chamber's best novel yet. There, I said it.I think, having sat on it a couple of days, that it's her most mature work and it bests the first two books in that way. Now, hear me out. The Long Way was so far my favourite. I enjoyed Closed and Common Orbit, and cried a few times, but I felt that the MC was a little bit annoying in her endless adolescent struggle, and the book showed somehow that this was a full time, 9 months writing project, whilst the Long Way was a 10 years pet project. If I had to put things in numbers, my own rating would be like that :Long Way: 9/10Common Orbit: 7/10Spaceborn Few: 10/10Now some details : We follow a lot of characters, in lots of short chapters. Sometimes the chapters are just 3-4 pages long. This gives everything a fast pace that makes the book super hard to put down. Spaceborn Few is also a full time author's work, but it has all of the heart of Long Way, plus two whole books writing experience. The prose was really good! Becky definitely found her voice, and man, is her dialogue amazing! In the Long Way (ok, now I'll use LW, CCO, etc.), I felt like the dialogue were sometimes a little bit exaggerated, especially the two comp techs. Plus the technique of introducing a character through reading their file is considered a sort of rookie technique. It worked, it gave a lot of charm to a strong debut novel... But Spaceborn Few has none of that : the dialogue is so vibrantly real, every character on the page sounds like someone you could get to know. A lot of humour had me laughing out loud in this book, and it's often delivered through the dialogue.The way the world building was handled was also fantastic.Again if you're looking for action packed space opera, the book will disappoint. However, please bring your tissues, cause crying, in a happy, contented way or just ugly or sad, happens a lot.The plot is very human, and explores themes that mean a lot to us now and will probably mean a lot to us still in thousands of years... Tradition and its change, the way we react to foreigners, what it all means, and how hard it can be to do the right thing, the role of parents, children, and most importantly: belonging, be it to a family, a society or a species. It was all handled with care, and man DID. I. CRY. Best of warm feelings though. I was so happy when the book ended, and so sad at the same time, because it's the end of a trilogy... You go READ THIS BOOK, as soon as you can! Do it! And when Becky Chambers comes to the UK to tour and sign, I'll hound her until I can ask the burning question of whether or not she's planning to keep writing in this universe... I wish she would, it'd be amazing... But at the same time, this book was amazing in and of itself, as I've been trying to explain, in such a way that I'm now entirely comfortable with the idea of Chambers starting something entirely different and new, and I'd still pick it up. I know now that even if she goes for a basic urban fantasy plot, she'll manage to create loveable, compelling characters in plots that are enthralling despite the lack of evil villains and the absence of world-ending consequences. Becky Chambers' work is a gulp of fresh air in sci fi we should all take. Thank you so much for this amazing trilogy, and waiting now eagerly to hand-sell your books like hot red coaster buns. Also for the day I get my beloved proof dedicated! And for your next work... Yes, so looking forward to your future as an author!
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  • Elise (TheBookishActress)
    January 1, 1970
    look! at! the! cover!"But this is old history. Today, the Exodus Fleet is a living relic, a place many are from but outsiders have seldom seen. Exodans take great pride in their community and traditions, but the cultures from beyond their bulkheads have profoundly influenced their own. Those who have not yet left for alien cities and terrestrial colonies are left grappling with questions: What is the purpose of a ship that has reached its destination? Why remain among the stars when there are ha look! at! the! cover!"But this is old history. Today, the Exodus Fleet is a living relic, a place many are from but outsiders have seldom seen. Exodans take great pride in their community and traditions, but the cultures from beyond their bulkheads have profoundly influenced their own. Those who have not yet left for alien cities and terrestrial colonies are left grappling with questions: What is the purpose of a ship that has reached its destination? Why remain among the stars when there are habitable worlds within reach? How can they maintain their carefully balanced way of life — and is it worth saving at all? Record of a Spaceborn Few unravels this complicated reality through a cast of new voices: A young apprentice unsure of his future. A lifelong spacer who wonders if her children might be better suited for the ground. A planet-raised traveler. An alien academic. A caretaker for the dead. And of course, the Archivist, who ensures no one’s story is forgotten."The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet - ★★★★★A Closed and Common Orbit - TBD
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  • Hannah (fullybookedreviews)
    January 1, 1970
    THAT COVER! THAT BLURB!
  • Alice, as in Wonderland
    January 1, 1970
    *SCREAMS* I am so ready to be devastatingly loved and buoyed by a book. THE TEARS ARE READY TO BE SHED.
  • Glitterbomb
    January 1, 1970
    I don't think anyone understands just how impatiently eagerly I'm awaiting this release...unless you do.Also, just quietly.....That cover is magnificent!
  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    This Wayfarers sequence of novels is marvellous (an understatement) and the trend continues with Record of a Spaceborn Few. We have new characters in a new environment - the Exodus Fleet - although there is a link to Small Angry Planet through one of Exodans who is the sister of the Wayfarer captain. Warm, compassionate, emotional - this is beautiful writing and once more Becky Chambers writes with such insight about the human condition and relationships, as well as the poignant relationship of This Wayfarers sequence of novels is marvellous (an understatement) and the trend continues with Record of a Spaceborn Few. We have new characters in a new environment - the Exodus Fleet - although there is a link to Small Angry Planet through one of Exodans who is the sister of the Wayfarer captain. Warm, compassionate, emotional - this is beautiful writing and once more Becky Chambers writes with such insight about the human condition and relationships, as well as the poignant relationship of the inhabitants of the Exodus Fleet with Earth, the planet left behind. Review to follow closer to publication on For Winter Nights.
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  • Tiger
    January 1, 1970
    IM SO EXCITED THE TITLE IS GREAT AND THERES A RELEASE DATE YESSSSSSSS
  • Lauren James
    January 1, 1970
    As a massive fan of Becky Chambers, it's saying something that this is my favourite of her books so far. It follows the lives of several humans all living aboard the Exodus fleet - a group of spaceships built when Earth became uninhabitable, which the poorer population built from scavenged metal to escape the planet. The richer countries moved to Mars, and the rest travelled on the Exodus fleet until they found a new home. The book is set generations later, when that home has been found - and hu As a massive fan of Becky Chambers, it's saying something that this is my favourite of her books so far. It follows the lives of several humans all living aboard the Exodus fleet - a group of spaceships built when Earth became uninhabitable, which the poorer population built from scavenged metal to escape the planet. The richer countries moved to Mars, and the rest travelled on the Exodus fleet until they found a new home. The book is set generations later, when that home has been found - and humans have to decide whether they should stay living on the old ships in rooms which have been occupied by the last ten generations of their family, or move to alien cities as immigrants. It's an emotional, moving look at what it means to be human, and the importance of heritage and legacy. It tackles some difficult questions, such as what happens to the remains of your loved ones in space, where nutrients are a valuable commodity, the morality and ethics of sex work in a small population and how a community operating on trade and barter can take part in a inter-planetary economy. It's also an incredibly touching look at what family means when they might live on the other side of a galaxy.Becky Chambers is such a reliable author, and her books never fail to make my heart brim with love for humans and her wonderful visions of aliens. Her books always offer such unique and optimistic looks on difficult issues like gender, social equality, racism and hope. I wouldn't mind living in her future, which isn't something I say often about science fiction.
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  • Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    So my toes had been left cold since finishing Long Journey to A Small Angry Planet, and I was all too ready to dive right into bed with the comfort blanket that is Becky Chambers' world. And oh my did this instalment deliver! I haven't actually read the second in the series, however hope to pick it up in the coming weeks before meeting Becky at an upcoming local bookshop event.But back to the book in question. Following six different narratives (the only link to her debut being that one of the c So my toes had been left cold since finishing Long Journey to A Small Angry Planet, and I was all too ready to dive right into bed with the comfort blanket that is Becky Chambers' world. And oh my did this instalment deliver! I haven't actually read the second in the series, however hope to pick it up in the coming weeks before meeting Becky at an upcoming local bookshop event.But back to the book in question. Following six different narratives (the only link to her debut being that one of the characters, Tessa, is Ashby's exodan-dwelling sister) Chambers broadens the depth of the Galactic Commons by focusing on a specific group; the Exodan fleet i.e. the spacecraft (or homesteader) species of human that left Earth but did not colonise planet-side. If you are looking for plot this is not the book for you. But if you want to soak up the minutiae of other species ways of life, if you love relationship dynamics and rich characters full of warmth love and all their flaws, if you want just a bloody immersive read in a world/worlds that is so frank and often humourous, kind and loving, then this is definitely the book for you.I love how Chambers makes you feel as a reader, no, as a human. The deeper concepts of her book are what, for me, make her such a stand out author within both science-fiction and general literature. She weaves into her storylines many anthropologically crucial topics, such as immigration, colonialism and societal hierachy as well as race and gender equality issues. But how she does this is utterly beautiful and natural, rather than blatantly injecting a few wider concepts for obvious allegorical parallels to our own lives.I loved all of these characters as much as I did those in her first book, and that in itself is a testament as the Wayfarer crew felt like my family and when I found they wouldn't be in this book I was quite sad! But this 'spaceborn few' offer so much depth and insight into Exodan culture. I heard that Chambers creates these characters/species as a form of escapism to a place she'd rather be, and I would like to join her frankly. For example the Exodan species living quarters (such a visual description of their homesteader crafts) are focused on recycling and sustainability to such an extreme that, to many may be considered quite grotesque, but is explained in such a way that I think it is utterly beautiful.I must stop rambling, but I loved this book so much and can not recommend it enough. I went back and read the start of her first book and there are so many tie-ins that, while the novels technically could be read as stand-alones, these cross-references make me so full of joy and show just how accomplished Becky Chambers is as an author.Thank you Becky, I think you have made me a better human being.
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  • Benjamin Appleby-Dean
    January 1, 1970
    Honestly the most forward-thinking part of Becky Chambers' books isn't the convincing alien societies or the credible, well-developed technology but in daring to imagine a future society in which people are basically decent and caring towards one another.
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  • Ali (the bandar blog)
    January 1, 1970
    While this one was my least favorite of the three, it still has ALL of the sci-fi charm and warm fuzzy moments that the others have. Becky is so good at making her book endings give you chills, and she did not fail here: each of the character's last chapters made me teary-eyed, hopeful, happy, curious, and thoughtful. Why did I like this one the least? - It focuses a lot more on humans than the other two. (I ADORED the AI/alien aspect of the other two, so the fact that this had a lot less of it While this one was my least favorite of the three, it still has ALL of the sci-fi charm and warm fuzzy moments that the others have. Becky is so good at making her book endings give you chills, and she did not fail here: each of the character's last chapters made me teary-eyed, hopeful, happy, curious, and thoughtful. Why did I like this one the least? - It focuses a lot more on humans than the other two. (I ADORED the AI/alien aspect of the other two, so the fact that this had a lot less of it was bound to be something I didn't enjoy as much). - It really has one setting. You get to know that setting quite well, but in the previous books I really enjoyed seeing the different worlds.- For some reason this one took me quiet a while to get into. I think bouncing around all of the different perspectives (there were 5, I think?) made it a little harder to settle in and get comfy.That being said, Becky is a wizard at writing about space and making it SO RELATABLE to our life. I can't emphasize this enough. She is incredible! I read these books and am repeatedly astounded by her skill. She is smart about the technology (enough so that you don't feel skeptical about how things are working in the context of the worlds she is writing in) and is sensitive to alien/foreigner cultures and feelings despite the face that they're completely fiction. It's so impressive. If you enjoyed her other two, or even if you enjoyed one of them, I would highly recommend reading this one. Bravo Becky!
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  • Lucille
    January 1, 1970
    4,5/5
  • Bethwyn (Butterfly Elephant Books)
    January 1, 1970
    Review to come!
  • Wendy
    January 1, 1970
    I received an uncorrected proof as part of a Goodreads giveaway.This is a quiet profound book about finding your place in the universe.The. Exodian fleet left a dying Earth hundreds of years ago, but even now that Humans are part of the greater galactic society and have many choices about where and how to live their lives there are those who still choose to live aboard the ships that first took them to the stars.Through the various characters we meet - a young mother, a restless teenager, a youn I received an uncorrected proof as part of a Goodreads giveaway.This is a quiet profound book about finding your place in the universe.The. Exodian fleet left a dying Earth hundreds of years ago, but even now that Humans are part of the greater galactic society and have many choices about where and how to live their lives there are those who still choose to live aboard the ships that first took them to the stars.Through the various characters we meet - a young mother, a restless teenager, a young man born on a planet who yearns to be part of something, a caretaker for the dead, a sex worker, an archivist, and the friends and family around them - we get a glimpse of viewpoints and personal journeys and ultimately their choices to stay or to go, to change not just for the sake of change but to take the values you hold with you wherever you choose to go.it is not strictly necessary to have read the first two books, although The Long Way To A Small Angry Planet will give you a grounding in who the various species are and the various societies. I adored the first two books, which are in their own ways about finding your place, neither of them made me weep like this one.It's been a liong time since I've given a book 5 stars, but it was really the only choice for this one.
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  • Penelope
    January 1, 1970
    Well it's not The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet and it's not A Closed and Common Orbit but it is every bit as splendid and fantastic as both of these books but in it's own special way. I think the Ms Chambers is very clever not writing direct sequels as it makes it impossible to compare one to the other as each is so different. I started it, much like the last one, wishing I was back with the crew of book one but pretty soon became immersed in the world of Exodus, a world that the author des Well it's not The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet and it's not A Closed and Common Orbit but it is every bit as splendid and fantastic as both of these books but in it's own special way. I think the Ms Chambers is very clever not writing direct sequels as it makes it impossible to compare one to the other as each is so different. I started it, much like the last one, wishing I was back with the crew of book one but pretty soon became immersed in the world of Exodus, a world that the author describes so vividly. This book moved me in a way that the others didn’t, it made me think about what it means to be human and how the opportunities are already there for us to become better people before we destroy the planet and our species. In fact by the end it moved me to tears but with all the emotions not just sadness.
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  • lindsey
    January 1, 1970
    this cover is so gorgeous i can’t wait for becky to destroy me again
  • Alexander
    January 1, 1970
    As with all of her books, profoundly humane and deeply affecting.
  • Anouk
    January 1, 1970
    THIS IS AMAZING I CANT WAIT TO SHARE IT WITH EVERYONE!!!!!!!
  • Antonio Diaz
    January 1, 1970
    Aviso a navegantes: si te gustaron las dos primeras, posiblemente te guste también la tercera. He de reconocer que es una historia con una localización y cast de personajes muy distintos de las novelas anteriores y con una trama central más tenue (por no decir floja). Sin embargo, es Becky Chambers 100% y te hace pensar y sentir a partes iguales. Esta mujer me acierta siempre en todo el kokoro lo pretenda o no.Reseña pendiente
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  • Peter Tillman
    January 1, 1970
    Progress report: 18 days since I picked this one up, so you can correctly surmise it's not a gripping start. A surprise, since I liked her first two a lot.Anyway, I picked it up again yesterday, struggled through another chapter or two -- then picked up a 1995 Tony Hillerman, "Finding Moon" -- which I bought a copy of, for 25c., at the library booksale -- & next thing I knew, I'm a third of the way thru it! So we can safely say, Chambers is WAY behind the Old Master in the "grab 'em by the s Progress report: 18 days since I picked this one up, so you can correctly surmise it's not a gripping start. A surprise, since I liked her first two a lot.Anyway, I picked it up again yesterday, struggled through another chapter or two -- then picked up a 1995 Tony Hillerman, "Finding Moon" -- which I bought a copy of, for 25c., at the library booksale -- & next thing I knew, I'm a third of the way thru it! So we can safely say, Chambers is WAY behind the Old Master in the "grab 'em by the short & curlies" from Chapter 1 on!So, I dunno....My copy is an ARC from a GR/publisher's giveaway. Thanks!
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  • Katherine Fabian
    January 1, 1970
    Fantastic, beautiful, engrossing book. I struggled to put it down, and finished it much quicker than I’d meant to. Becky Chambers is SO GOOD at building entire worlds and showing the multiplicity of perspectives that entails. I loved this.
  • Darran Stobbart
    January 1, 1970
    💖
  • Alpacapanache
    January 1, 1970
    So, I'm torn on giving this 4 or 5 stars and I'll probably sit on it a bit and adjust later as needed.I really enjoyed this book but it was really not what I was expecting. It felt different than the previous two books - more spread out and less obviously tied together, though it was. Everything was weaved together so nicely. The cast of characters was a little larger and their stories barely overlapped, but the end result was something wonderful and very, very hopeful.Don't go into this book ex So, I'm torn on giving this 4 or 5 stars and I'll probably sit on it a bit and adjust later as needed.I really enjoyed this book but it was really not what I was expecting. It felt different than the previous two books - more spread out and less obviously tied together, though it was. Everything was weaved together so nicely. The cast of characters was a little larger and their stories barely overlapped, but the end result was something wonderful and very, very hopeful.Don't go into this book expecting an action-packed sci-fi thriller with intrigue and laser fights (though, let's be real, this is the third book in this series and we should know that by now) but DO go into this book if you're interested in exploring a fascinating cast of characters, their relationships, and their struggle with what it means to be part of a post-Earth human society that was started with the goal of looking for a new home planet-side, and ended up founding something else on the old and carefully recycled spaceships built from the ruined cities of Earth.I'm rambling. This was wonderful, and I absolutely entreat you to read any of the books in this series. The heart of Chambers stories are always the hearts of the characters (and not just in the romantic sense.. Every aspect).
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  • Nara
    January 1, 1970
    One of the things I find incredible about Becky Chambers' writing is how effortlessly her world building unfolds. You start off knowing nothing about the alien worlds and species in the novel, and there's a point while you're reading where you suddenly realise you have a very clear picture of the fictional universe and its inhabitants. I think one of the factors that helps this is that her writing has an accessibility which is often found lacking in science fiction novels.Despite the many points One of the things I find incredible about Becky Chambers' writing is how effortlessly her world building unfolds. You start off knowing nothing about the alien worlds and species in the novel, and there's a point while you're reading where you suddenly realise you have a very clear picture of the fictional universe and its inhabitants. I think one of the factors that helps this is that her writing has an accessibility which is often found lacking in science fiction novels.Despite the many points of view, it's very easy to keep track of the characters and stories that eventually intertwine. I'm not sure I'd say any of them were particularly stand-out to me, I thought that they just weaved together very well and I enjoyed them all equally.I would highly recommend reading all three novels in this series both if you're a scifi lover and if you're new to the genre and looking for somewhere to start.RatingsOverall: 8/10Plot: 4/5Writing: 4/5World Building: 5/5Characters: 4/5Cover: 4/5
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