Drungi (Hidden Iceland #2)
Elliðaey is an isolated island off the coast of Iceland. It is has a beautiful, unforgiving terrain and is an easy place to vanish.The Island is the second thrilling book in Ragnar Jonasson's Hidden Iceland trilogy. This time Hulda is at the peak of her career and is sent to investigate what happened on Elliðaey after a group of friends visited but one failed to return.Could this have links to the disappearance of a couple ten years previously out on the Westfjords? Is there a killer stalking these barren outposts?Written with Ragnar's haunting and suspenseful prose The Island follows Hulda's journey to uncover the island's secrets and find the truth hidden in its darkest shadows.

Drungi (Hidden Iceland #2) Details

TitleDrungi (Hidden Iceland #2)
Author
LanguageIcelandic
ReleaseOct 28th, 2016
PublisherVeröld
ISBN-139789935475411
Rating
GenreMystery, Fiction, Crime, Thriller, Scandinavian Lite..., Nordic Noir

Drungi (Hidden Iceland #2) Review

  • Diane S ☔
    January 1, 1970
    This author has become my new Scandanavian noir author. This is the second in this new series. Hulda, in her fifties has suffered greatly from personal losses. She has also been passed over, because she is a woman, for promotions, yet she has never given anything but her best in solving crimes. This case will harken back to a murder that had been closed ten years previously, costing a family an almost total collapse.This story is set in Iceland, a small island called Ellioacy, and in the Western This author has become my new Scandanavian noir author. This is the second in this new series. Hulda, in her fifties has suffered greatly from personal losses. She has also been passed over, because she is a woman, for promotions, yet she has never given anything but her best in solving crimes. This case will harken back to a murder that had been closed ten years previously, costing a family an almost total collapse.This story is set in Iceland, a small island called Ellioacy, and in the Western fjords. It is darkly atmospheric and quietly suspenseful. A ghost story passed down adds a paranormal air, adding to the atmosphere. This is not, however, a paranormal story. Hulda, is instantly relatable, likeable and will not close this case as easily as the earlier case was. That case propelled a man who was once her colleague, to rapid promotions. He is now her boss. A situation not to her liking. A good mix of story and the personal, this is a cleverly plotted, well written novel. The atmosphere and Hulda, are the things that pulled me into the story. Love when an author uses those two items rather than using blood and gore.
    more
  • Tim
    January 1, 1970
    This story is rife with deceit and sadness. 4 of 10 stars
  • Sandy
    January 1, 1970
    This series has an interesting format in that it’s written in reverse order. Book #1 (The Darkness) gave us Detective Inspector Hulda Hermannsdóttir at the end of her career with the Reykjavík police. In this outing we go back a bit to 1997 as she investigates a suspicious death on the island of Elliðaey.Ten years ago, Dagur’s family was ripped apart when his sister was murdered in a rural cabin. (Thanks to a brief prologue we know what happened…sort of.) They used to hang with Benni, Alexandra This series has an interesting format in that it’s written in reverse order. Book #1 (The Darkness) gave us Detective Inspector Hulda Hermannsdóttir at the end of her career with the Reykjavík police. In this outing we go back a bit to 1997 as she investigates a suspicious death on the island of Elliðaey.Ten years ago, Dagur’s family was ripped apart when his sister was murdered in a rural cabin. (Thanks to a brief prologue we know what happened…sort of.) They used to hang with Benni, Alexandra & Klara, 3 other school mates who have since become estranged. So when Benni gets in touch it’s a bit of a surprise. He want to get the gang together & spend the weekend on an island to honour the anniversary of the death. Hmmm….remote island, just the four of them, no way to leave. Sure, sounds good. It’s not long before Reykjavík police get a call. Seems a young woman has fallen to her death on Elliðaey. Hulda has been going through a tough spell & jumps at the chance to leave the city behind. Her subsequent interviews with the remaining friends only lead to more questions & the sneaking suspicion she’s not getting the whole story from any of them.This is not a flashy fast paced thriller. It’s a quiet, reflective mystery that is almost more about the characters than the crimes. Not to say there aren’t any twists in the plot because there are. Secrets from the past & present are revealed. But it’s the background & relationships of these people that form the bulk of the story & help us understand how they ended up where they are. At the centre of it all is Hulda. Her mother recently died & the death of the young woman has reminded her of the loss of her own daughter 10 years ago. She’s never known who her father was other than he was an American GI stationed in Reykjavík during the war. One side story deals with her search for him & I really enjoyed this part. You desperately want her to find some happiness in her small, colourless life. I love it when a book opens with a creepy prologue. It’s always tucked in the back of my mind as I read, keeping an eye out for how/who it’s related to in the story. Here we get 2 that occur in the late 1980’s & you’ll have to pay attention as there are shifting time lines. Because of the pace & content, this one didn’t grab me as much as The Darkness. But I do enjoy spending time with Hulda. Books that feature a mature female detective are rare. Her life experience & dedication give her a different take on events & enable her to think outside the box (unlike Lýdur, her lazy pompous boss).This hushed, atmospheric read perfectly mirrors the Icelandic landscape & serves as a reminder that wherever you go, your past travels with you. 3.5 stars
    more
  • Louise Wilson
    January 1, 1970
    3.5⭐ rounded up to 4Hidden Island Series Book 2Ellioaey is an isolated island off the coast of Iceland. It has a beautiful, unforgiving terrain and it's an easy place to vanish. This is the second book in the Hidden Island Series.This book is set ten years before the first instalment. DI Hulda is fast approaching fifty. She has lost her husband, daughter and her mother. Hulda is on the isolated island of Ellioaey to investigate the unexplained death of a young woman. She was one of four friends 3.5⭐️ rounded up to 4Hidden Island Series Book 2Ellioaey is an isolated island off the coast of Iceland. It has a beautiful, unforgiving terrain and it's an easy place to vanish. This is the second book in the Hidden Island Series.This book is set ten years before the first instalment. DI Hulda is fast approaching fifty. She has lost her husband, daughter and her mother. Hulda is on the isolated island of Ellioaey to investigate the unexplained death of a young woman. She was one of four friends who had visited the island. There are similarities to this case to another case that happened ten years ago. This trilogy is written in reverse order. It's well written and thought out. I would have liked to have read the first book in this trilogy, but it can be read as a standalone.I would like to thank NetGalley, Penguin UK - Michael Joseph and the author Ragnar Jonasson for my ARC in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Crime by the Book
    January 1, 1970
    5/5 stars for another stellar book from Ragnar Jonasson! This author's work just consistently works for me, and THE ISLAND is my favorite book of his yet. This is the 2nd book in his Hulda Hermannsdottir series - and it's definitely worth reading the series from the beginning. THE ISLAND blends the atmosphere of Nordic Noir with a layered mystery (involving a "locked room" style plot!). It's stylish and addictive, and I absolutely loved it! Catch my full review on the CBTB blog! http://crimeby 5/5 stars for another stellar book from Ragnar Jonasson! This author's work just consistently works for me, and THE ISLAND is my favorite book of his yet. This is the 2nd book in his Hulda Hermannsdottir series - and it's definitely worth reading the series from the beginning. THE ISLAND blends the atmosphere of Nordic Noir with a layered mystery (involving a "locked room" style plot!). It's stylish and addictive, and I absolutely loved it! Catch my full review on the CBTB blog! http://crimebythebook.com/blog/2019/4...
    more
  • Stephanie (Stephanie's Novel Fiction)
    January 1, 1970
    rounded up to 4.5 StarsLast fall I read The Darkness, book one in Ragnar Jónasson’s Hidden Iceland trilogy, and I loved it, so I knew I had to get my hands on The Island as soon as I could. Not only is Jónasson’s writing simply superb, but he’s masterfully created a character in Detective Inspector Hulda Hermansdóttir who I thought after reading book one, and believe even more now after reading The Island, is one of the best fictional detectives I’ve encountered; she’s high-spirited, gruff, driv rounded up to 4.5 StarsLast fall I read The Darkness, book one in Ragnar Jónasson’s Hidden Iceland trilogy, and I loved it, so I knew I had to get my hands on The Island as soon as I could. Not only is Jónasson’s writing simply superb, but he’s masterfully created a character in Detective Inspector Hulda Hermansdóttir who I thought after reading book one, and believe even more now after reading The Island, is one of the best fictional detectives I’ve encountered; she’s high-spirited, gruff, driven to succeed and we find out more of why she is that way!The Island, like his previous book, is hauntingly atmospheric and bone-chillingly suspenseful. The novel starts out slowly but is perfectly paced. It’s obvious that Jónasson is a master at pacing, atmosphere, plots, and his characters as he writes this story.The novel begins in 1987, in the past, when a romantic getaway goes horribly wrong leaving a young woman murdered. Ten years later in the present day, four old friends travel together on the anniversary of her death to a cabin on a remote island off the coast of Iceland called Ellidaey. It can only be reached by boat—no phones, no escape.Nothing about the trip seems like a good idea as the desolate scene provides the setting for a tragedy—of the four friends, only three come home alive. Was it an accident? Was it murder? How is the death ten years ago tied to the one in the present day?Jónasson expertly ties together the plot from the past and the present with Hulda investigating both the tragedy that happened on Ellidaey and what happened a decade ago. The story is multilayered, rich, and complex, and any lover of mysteries, suspense, and nordic noir will be sure to love this one. The reveal is slow, teasing, and not given away early; in fact, I was shocked, pleasantly, since I always figure out early the whodunit!As far as nordic noir goes, Jonasson is a master of the genre; if you haven’t dipped into nordic noir yet, then I highly recommend starting with this series. Although you can read The Island first, I would recommend reading them in order as they are extraordinarily and brilliantly structured in reverse chronological order. The Darkness takes place at Hulda’s retirement while The Island picks up 15 years earlier in the middle of her career.It seems like a challenging structure for a trilogy, but Jonasson has pulled it off fabulously. I can’t wait to read book 3 in the series and learn more about Hulda and finally know all the missing pieces of her life.The Island was unputdownable. It is cleverly written and original without being overly dramatic like some thrillers, which I LOVED!**Thank you, Joseph Brosnan, at Minotaur Books for my gifted review copy to read in exchange for my fair and honest review.**
    more
  • Liz Barnsley
    January 1, 1970
    This was my chosen Christmas Eve read (an Icelandic tradition) and I read it cover to cover in just over two hours, an utterly compelling and beautifully descriptive story that is impossible to put down.This is the second in the Hidden Iceland series, the story of Hulga, but in reverse order so in The Island not only do we get a new and intriguing mystery, but also more hints about what leads Hulga to her ultimate fate in The Darkness.It’s an interesting way of telling a story and in this case i This was my chosen Christmas Eve read (an Icelandic tradition) and I read it cover to cover in just over two hours, an utterly compelling and beautifully descriptive story that is impossible to put down.This is the second in the Hidden Iceland series, the story of Hulga, but in reverse order so in The Island not only do we get a new and intriguing mystery, but also more hints about what leads Hulga to her ultimate fate in The Darkness.It’s an interesting way of telling a story and in this case it is working brilliantly. Knowing what happens to Hulga in the future really informs how you read about her past.The mystery element is clever and as usual the author layers his characters beautifully. This is one of those books you sink into and was the perfect, chilly, winter read on the night before Christmas. Or at any time.Highly Recommended.
    more
  • Magdalena aka A Bookaholic Swede
    January 1, 1970
    The Island is my introduction to Ragnar Jónasson books and I will definitely read more books by him. The book isn't especially thick, which was very nice for a change. Also, I felt that the size was perfect for the story. There was no need to fill it out with unnecessary dialogue or descriptions. The pacing is very good and I partly read and partly listened to the audiobook version (which I recommend). Storywise was the book interesting, especially since there aren't that many suspects in the ca The Island is my introduction to Ragnar Jónasson books and I will definitely read more books by him. The book isn't especially thick, which was very nice for a change. Also, I felt that the size was perfect for the story. There was no need to fill it out with unnecessary dialogue or descriptions. The pacing is very good and I partly read and partly listened to the audiobook version (which I recommend). Storywise was the book interesting, especially since there aren't that many suspects in the case since there were only three people on the island. It's the connections to the case of the brutal murder of a girl ten years ago that makes this story extra interesting to read. Also, I love reading a book set in Iceland, need to read more books set in Iceland. Especially since I love books set on islands.Detective Inspector Hulda Hermannsdóttir is a great character and her family story is very tragic with the death of her husband and daughter years ago. In this book, is she trying to locate her father who she has never met since her mother never wanted to talk about him. I'm looking forward to reading the first book to find out more about Hulda. The island is a great thriller and I recommend the book warmly!I want to thank the publisher for providing me with a free copy through NetGalley for an honest review!
    more
  • Adrian Dooley
    January 1, 1970
    Wow really loved this one. Read in a day(which is unheard for this snail pace reader) it’s atmospheric, very well written, well structured, easy to keep track of all the characters and most importantly of all, a hell of a lot of fun to read. Our main character is Detective Hulda. The story is told in the narratives present day(the 90s) and a decade earlier, jumping back and forth between the two as she investigates the rather seemingly mundane accidental death of one of a group of four friends o Wow really loved this one. Read in a day(which is unheard for this snail pace reader) it’s atmospheric, very well written, well structured, easy to keep track of all the characters and most importantly of all, a hell of a lot of fun to read. Our main character is Detective Hulda. The story is told in the narratives present day(the 90s) and a decade earlier, jumping back and forth between the two as she investigates the rather seemingly mundane accidental death of one of a group of four friends on a weekend away on an island off the coast of where this story is set - Iceland. Of course not all is as it seems and and as Hulda investigates more she realizes that the group may be connected to the murder of a girl 10 years previous and that maybe she is not looking at an accidental death but another murder, a murder with its embers born 10 years earlier. I absolutely loved this one. The second in a trilogy that runs backwards, I haven’t read the first one that I think is set 10 years later but intend to get my hands on it somehow. I literally couldn’t put this book down. Loved the setting, loved the descriptive writing and the story and characters as a whole. I went in totally blind and felt the read was all the better for it. I read this in no time, one day, which is unheard of for me. I was totally engrossed in it. As easy a five star review as they come. I really want to read the first in the series now straight away and look forward to the final in the series due next year. Highly recommended. Many thanks to Netgalley, Penguin and Ragnar Jónasson for an ARC in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Zoe Mann
    January 1, 1970
    ‘The Island’ also known as ‘Drungi’ by international best seller Ragnar Jonasson is the second instalment in the Hidden Iceland series. It is set 10 years before the first instalment ‘The darkness’ also known as ‘Dimma’. This is one of the things I find so compelling about the series. You are told the story in reverse. The main character, Detective Inspector Hulda (literally meaning, hidden woman) is nearing 50 years of age at this point in her life, she has lost her husband, daughter and most r ‘The Island’ also known as ‘Drungi’ by international best seller Ragnar Jonasson is the second instalment in the Hidden Iceland series. It is set 10 years before the first instalment ‘The darkness’ also known as ‘Dimma’. This is one of the things I find so compelling about the series. You are told the story in reverse. The main character, Detective Inspector Hulda (literally meaning, hidden woman) is nearing 50 years of age at this point in her life, she has lost her husband, daughter and most recently her mother. We hear about these tragic loses - some more tragic than others - throughout the series. We learn more about Hulda’s grief this time around and as a female her need to fight and prove herself to be respected and taken seriously in a male driven profession. She has watched her fellow male colleagues work their way through the ranks while she has had 2 insignificant promotions in spite of having more experience than them all. She is still living in a box flat and driving the same car she’s had for 10 years whilst the men spend the weekends at their holiday homes. We don’t only learn more about Hulda though, of course there is a gripping double homocide investigation going on throughout. The homocides, like the novels, are set 10 years apart, but involve the same group of friends. Hulda is determined to uncover the truth and may even expose a few snakes along the way. The Hidden Island series is one of my favourites and there is many a reason why Ragnar Jonasson is a best selling author. His character development and world building is second to none, the detail and research which goes into each case is exceptional and most importantly for me, it is full of twists and turns but stays believable and sincere. I cannot wait to read the third and final instalment to finally put all the pieces together. This is a series I can see myself reading over and over again but each novel also holds its own as a stand alone novel. Thank you to netgalley and the publisher for a free ARC in return for an honest review. The hidden Iceland series once again exceeded my expectations.
    more
  • Lou
    January 1, 1970
    The Island is the second novel in the Scandinavian noir series Hidden Iceland, set in the stunning, isolated Icelandic landscape. The descriptions are evocative and really set the scene with the scenery being beautiful but very unforgiving, and it's intelligently plotted, however, it takes a while to adapt to the ever-changing timeline and perspective, but once you have this is a gripping, immersive reading experience. Our protagonist Hulda is rather enigmatic and we know little about her. She c The Island is the second novel in the Scandinavian noir series Hidden Iceland, set in the stunning, isolated Icelandic landscape. The descriptions are evocative and really set the scene with the scenery being beautiful but very unforgiving, and it's intelligently plotted, however, it takes a while to adapt to the ever-changing timeline and perspective, but once you have this is a gripping, immersive reading experience. Our protagonist Hulda is rather enigmatic and we know little about her. She can be quite spiky but her stubbornness comes in handy in the investigative pursuit of justice.There are a good few twists in the tale and the continuing plot line exploring the police wrongdoing is an interesting additive. Hulda will need her wits about her as the three friends who survived their remote island adventure are clearly lying through their teeth about their friend's untimely demise, but Hulda must get to the bottom of what happened to achieve justice for the victims family. The author creates an oppressive, claustrophobic atmosphere continued from book one, which was probably my favourite aspect of this story and once again was impressive. Because of the lack of character development, this reads perfectly as a standalone. I look forward to the third instalment.Many thanks to Michael Joseph for an ARC.
    more
  • Carolyn
    January 1, 1970
    I have read all 5 of the Dark Iceland series which featured young policeman, Ari Thor in his first posting in an isolated village at the Northern tip of Iceland. The stories were set in a small fishing village and its gorgeous, breathtaking surrounding landscape. The mysteries were intriguing and atmospheric, but I must admit I was finding his on-again, off-again love life starting to become tiresome. I liked the first book in the new Hidden Iceland series. Here we met 64-year-old detective, Hu I have read all 5 of the Dark Iceland series which featured young policeman, Ari Thor in his first posting in an isolated village at the Northern tip of Iceland. The stories were set in a small fishing village and its gorgeous, breathtaking surrounding landscape. The mysteries were intriguing and atmospheric, but I must admit I was finding his on-again, off-again love life starting to become tiresome. I liked the first book in the new Hidden Iceland series. Here we met 64-year-old detective, Hulda, just before her retirement. She is a dedicated policewoman and her work fills her life. She has no hobbies and few outside interests and is worried about a lonely and impoverished future upon retirement. Despite the misogyny of her workplace, she is relentless in closing a couple of related cases. The Island is the second book in the Hidden Iceland series and goes back some 15 years in time when Hulda is nearing 50 years of age. Her mother has recently died, and she previously lost her young daughter and husband and is without family, alone in the world. Her father was an American GI stationed in Reykjavik and her mother never talked about him. She goes to the USA in a futile attempt to connect with him. She is stressed about her retirement 15 years in the future and resents how less experienced and dedicated younger men have been promoted to higher positions over her. She feels her competence has never been recognized nor rewarded in this all-male workforce. One is now her ambitious boss who gained the position through deceit and blackmail. The crime she is investigating doesn’t occur until halfway through the book. Four young adults, ages 29 to 30 years in age, visit a desolate island on the 10th anniversary of a friend’s death. Attending are 2 men and 2 women who had been friends with a girl who had been killed 10 years previously in another remote spot. Her father was charged with her murder and died in prison. Her mother never recovered from the mental anguish, and her brother, now a stockbroker was filled with anger, never believing his father guilty. The brother is now one of the group of 4. On the morning following their first night on the island the body of one of the two women attending is found at the bottom of a steep cliff. As only 3 individuals remain on the island they all become suspects. It is up to Hulda to determine if the young woman’s death was an accident, suicide or murder. As she interviews them she realizes that they are not telling everything which occurred the previous night, and that have long kept secrets. I found the characters not well developed, and the names of the two dead women were so similar that it was confusing. One would understand Hulda’s gruff but withdrawn lifestyle and her effectiveness as an interviewer but found it difficult to elicit much empathy. I did come to admire her work ethic. There were great descriptions of the remote, bleak landscapes, fjords, hot springs, volcanic fields, jutting cliffs facing the sea, puffins and other birds, treeless fields, volcanic soil. I often paused in reading to google photos of the places mentioned. I regret that I did not find this as interesting as previous mysteries by Ragnar Jonasson, but will still read the 3rd book in the Hidden Iceland series.
    more
  • Kirsty ❤️
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a little bit confused by this book. I've read the first in the series and it covers Hulda's retirement from the police force. She now seems to have lost 15 years in age and is now 50 and an Inspector. I've gone back over the reviews of the first book and found someone mention that this is a trilogy and would cover her earlier life. So I guess we are doing her history in reverse. Not sure how I feel about that and I did find it off-putting knowing how some of the information on her husband an I'm a little bit confused by this book. I've read the first in the series and it covers Hulda's retirement from the police force. She now seems to have lost 15 years in age and is now 50 and an Inspector. I've gone back over the reviews of the first book and found someone mention that this is a trilogy and would cover her earlier life. So I guess we are doing her history in reverse. Not sure how I feel about that and I did find it off-putting knowing how some of the information on her husband and daughter plays out in the first book. The story itself I enjoyed. As before I like the idea of an older female protagonist and like many women in certain occupations Hulda has been overlooked in her job simply for being female so it's an interesting viewpoint to follow. I gave the first book 5 stars but while this is also a fast read and an interesting premise the modern day murder (there's a decade old murder as a prologue) doesn't happen until 60% into the book and the first suspect isn't arrested until after 70%. Then it's a really fast pace rush to the conclusion. The book isn't long so that first 60% really flies by. I do like Hulda but this time I was left feeling like I needed a little bit more.
    more
  • Dennis
    January 1, 1970
    If you enjoy anything by Lars Kepler, you'll totally dig into Ragnar Jónasson's The Island ! Set in Iceland (well technically, Elliðaey, which is an island off the coast of Iceland), Hulda Hermannsdottir is investigating the mysterious disappearances of two women that have been possibly linked together for the past ten years. Iceland is a very peaceful country, where the homicide rate is nearly non-existent. How are these cases linked together? Who's the culprit and are they still thirsty for m If you enjoy anything by Lars Kepler, you'll totally dig into Ragnar Jónasson's The Island ! Set in Iceland (well technically, Elliðaey, which is an island off the coast of Iceland), Hulda Hermannsdottir is investigating the mysterious disappearances of two women that have been possibly linked together for the past ten years. Iceland is a very peaceful country, where the homicide rate is nearly non-existent. How are these cases linked together? Who's the culprit and are they still thirsty for more? I don't want to say too much about this story, because 1) I think that it develops into a strong police procedural and if I give too much more away, you'll be disappointed in my blabbermouth, 2) it's a slower paced story, and if I tell you anything else, you'll find yourself waiting impatiently until the conflict hits its stride. I really enjoyed how the plot unfolded, but at times I felt a little confused at the story's direction. I think redirecting the plot several times, without throwing in unnecessary red herrings, was a smart tactic because I really couldn't figure out what was going to happen—like I always do. I really felt connected with Hulda, and her character development in this story definitely sparked my interest for follow-up titles featuring here. I really enjoyed the English translation of The Island a lot—it's very difficult to create a new narrative, and have it resonate well into another language. I am curious to see how this series will develop, and I'll be watching this author's next steps.
    more
  • Aristotle
    January 1, 1970
    Hulda's life is wrapped in melancholyDipped in depression with chunks of dark secrets in her core.Book two of a trilogy. A trilogy told in revers order. It is creepy reading about Hulda's family knowing what happened to her daughter, what she did to her husband, and how her life ended. Read book one to better understand the life of Hulda. The police procedural part of the story was ok. A father is charged with the murder of his daughter. They charged him with murder based on what evidence? Not s Hulda's life is wrapped in melancholyDipped in depression with chunks of dark secrets in her core.Book two of a trilogy. A trilogy told in revers order. It is creepy reading about Hulda's family knowing what happened to her daughter, what she did to her husband, and how her life ended. Read book one to better understand the life of Hulda. The police procedural part of the story was ok. A father is charged with the murder of his daughter. They charged him with murder based on what evidence? Not sure about the why or who or what or when. While awaiting trial he commits suicide. Ten years later the daughters best friend is murdered. What do they have in common? Was the father not guilty?The short chapters make it a very fast, easy read. Still not sure how i feel about the story being told in reverse chronological order.
    more
  • Marjorie
    January 1, 1970
    Four longtime friends decide to have a reunion at an old hunting lodge. They haven’t been in touch for a long time but this is the tenth anniversary of the murder of one of their friends and they agree to get together in her honor and to re-connect. When death re-visits this group of friends, Detective Inspector Hulda Hermannsdottir is determined to find out the truth.This is Book 2 in the Hulda Series by this author. Interestingly, this series is told in reverse order so this second book takes Four longtime friends decide to have a reunion at an old hunting lodge. They haven’t been in touch for a long time but this is the tenth anniversary of the murder of one of their friends and they agree to get together in her honor and to re-connect. When death re-visits this group of friends, Detective Inspector Hulda Hermannsdottir is determined to find out the truth.This is Book 2 in the Hulda Series by this author. Interestingly, this series is told in reverse order so this second book takes place many years before the events in the first book, “The Darkness”. I enjoyed this book, but wasn’t quite as impressed as I was with “The Darkness”. I became very emotionally involved with “The Darkness”, possibly because Hulda was close to my age and approaching retirement so I related more with her in that book. But regardless of that, I really liked the mystery in “The Island” and had trouble putting the book down. I liked all of the suspects and felt the author did a great job detailing how good people’s lives can be derailed. And I loved the additional insight into Hulda’s life. I’m very much looking forward to the next book in this series, “The Mist”, which is to be published next year. I expect it to cover the period of Hulda’s life with her husband and daughter and believe if that’s the case, I will become once more emotionally involved in the life of this character.Recommended.
    more
  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    The Island is the second in the Hidden Island series by Ragnar Jonasson and precedes the first in time. The first part of this novel is super atmospheric and spooky. I was immediately hooked and could not stop reading. It takes awhile for Hulda to get involved investigating this crime. We learned a little bit more about her life, but I'm still waiting to find out more. This is definitely a series that I will continue reading.
    more
  • Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    This is the second book in Jonasson’s Hidden Iceland series, set 10 years before the first book. Like the first book, this Scandi Noir is a slow burner. This time, two mysterious murders, 10 years apart, involve the same group of friends. Hulda gets called in to work on the new case, and, as in the first book, she faces sexist and patronising fellow detectives at the police department. Again, she perseveres, and solves two cases with her unfettered dedication to her job. I liked the unwavering c This is the second book in Jonasson’s Hidden Iceland series, set 10 years before the first book. Like the first book, this Scandi Noir is a slow burner. This time, two mysterious murders, 10 years apart, involve the same group of friends. Hulda gets called in to work on the new case, and, as in the first book, she faces sexist and patronising fellow detectives at the police department. Again, she perseveres, and solves two cases with her unfettered dedication to her job. I liked the unwavering commitment Hulda shows to her job and to finding out the truth about two cases while constantly met with arrogant and unfair behaviour by others on the police force. While other members of the police force have been with the force for less time or have solved fewer cases, they rise through the ranks and get paid enough to afford holiday houses. Hulda, on the other hand, gets overlooked for major promotions and raises. Jonasson again proves to be a master of describing Iceland’s beautiful and atmospheric landscape. Reading about the lovely island of Ellidaey, which is inhabited by sheep and puffins, had me desperate to book a holiday. I also enjoyed finding out more about Hulda’s family life. The first book of the series revealed the tragic details of Hulda’s upbringing, her daughter’s fate and her husband’s problems. Now, after her mother’s death, Hulda decides to look for her father, an American soldier who had been briefly stationed in Iceland. Again, she is met with disappointment. I can’t wait to read the last instalment of the Hidden Iceland series, out next year (2020), to see Hulda solve more cases and find out more about her difficult personal life. Thank you to NetGalley, Ragnar Jonasson and Michael Joseph for providing me with an ARC of this book in an exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Sid Nuncius
    January 1, 1970
    I couldn’t get on at all with The Island. It sounded intriguing and I like the idea of a mystery set in “Hidden Iceland” but I found it very hard going indeed.The story is OK, but I found it swamped by plodding descriptions and rather unconvincing characterisation. Hulda is a potentially interesting protagonist, but beset by cliché and overdone Personal Issues. My main problem, though, is the writing, which I found turgid, ridiculously padded with unnecessary detail and plagued by insultingly un I couldn’t get on at all with The Island. It sounded intriguing and I like the idea of a mystery set in “Hidden Iceland” but I found it very hard going indeed.The story is OK, but I found it swamped by plodding descriptions and rather unconvincing characterisation. Hulda is a potentially interesting protagonist, but beset by cliché and overdone Personal Issues. My main problem, though, is the writing, which I found turgid, ridiculously padded with unnecessary detail and plagued by insultingly unnecessary explanation the whole time. The tone is set by a tediously and unnecessarily over-described little incident as a prelude which just felt...well, amateurish to me. Or take this little exchange, early on:“ ‘I don’t believe in...” He didn’t finish.‘That’s because you don’t know the whole story, Benni,’ she said softly, her tone hinting at something chilling left unsaid.‘The whole story?’ he repeated helplessly. “Every time someone speaks we have to be told more; really good dialogue speaks for itself without incessant explanation. The internal monologues didn’t convince me at all… Enough. I didn’t like it. I’m sorry to be critical, but The Island didn’t engage or convince me at all and I can’t recommend it.(My thanks to Penguin Books for an ARC via NetGalley.)
    more
  • Eva
    January 1, 1970
    After having really enjoyed The Darkness a while back, I couldn’t wait to see what Ragnar Jónasson had in store with The Island.Four friends come together to spend a weekend on an isolated island for a reunion, marking the tenth anniversary of the death of one of their other friends. It soon becomes apparent their friendship isn’t as solid as it used to be. There’s a lot of tension, awkward silences, the conversation doesn’t flow like it did all those years ago and dark secrets are struggling to After having really enjoyed The Darkness a while back, I couldn’t wait to see what Ragnar Jónasson had in store with The Island.Four friends come together to spend a weekend on an isolated island for a reunion, marking the tenth anniversary of the death of one of their other friends. It soon becomes apparent their friendship isn’t as solid as it used to be. There’s a lot of tension, awkward silences, the conversation doesn’t flow like it did all those years ago and dark secrets are struggling to stay hidden. Then, one of the remaining four friends is found dead. DI Hulda Hermannsdóttir is sent to the island to investigate this death. Could there possibly be a connection to what happened all those years ago?Reading The Darkness had me immensely intrigued as to where Ragnar Jónasson would take this series. After all, book one was the end and we’re going back in time. From the start, I thought that was a really interesting premise. However, now that I’ve read the second book, I’m not sure I quite understand the point of going in reverse. I found it quite hard to care about Hulda because I already know what happens to her. It’s a bit like watching a film when the biggest spoiler or twist has already been revealed to you and you’re left to wonder why you’re wasting your time on something you already know the conclusion of. I can’t help but feel I’m missing something that would enlighten me about this premise and make me appreciate it more.Saving grace in this instance, though, is Ragnar Jónasson’s writing. Always absorbing and beautifully descriptive, it paints the most magical picture of Iceland. The Island is dark, sometimes somewhat chilling, with a sense of foreboding and the investigation kept me guessing until the end. I couldn’t at all figure out whodunnit or why and needing to know the answers to those questions is what kept me reading.Overall though, I am mostly left with sense of disappointment. I expected more, I suppose, and in that respect The Island didn’t really deliver. It’s a good book on its own but as the middle book in a trilogy, I feel it needed something more to really keep me gripped. That said, I will be reading the final instalment when it’s published as I am still intrigued enough to see what Ragnar Jónasson’s end game is.
    more
  • Thebooktrail
    January 1, 1970
    visit the locations in the novelThis is the second in the Hidden Iceland series and looks at the story of Hulga. The clever and rather unusual thing about this however, is the fact that this story lets you see why the events in The Darkness are the way they are. Reverse storytelling if you like. Unusual but the books do read as standalones too. However, once you discover more about Hulga and what happens to her in the future , this shapes how you read about her past.This mystery was creepy and visit the locations in the novelThis is the second in the Hidden Iceland series and looks at the story of Hulga. The clever and rather unusual thing about this however, is the fact that this story lets you see why the events in The Darkness are the way they are. Reverse storytelling if you like. Unusual but the books do read as standalones too. However, once you discover more about Hulga and what happens to her in the future , this shapes how you read about her past.This mystery was creepy and multilayered. The idea of having a reunion on this island was creepy. This is the reunion that reunites a group of friends involved in a terrible secret. A murder of a girl years earlier. But in the present day, a body of another girl has been found. Are the two cases related?The sense of claustrophobia is on every page. The police investigation is difficult and you can only imagine how hard it would be to find and investigate a cold case on the island. The present case is equally as chilling. There is a couple having a romantic stay in the only house on the island.One leaves and the scenes of them alone in the cabin freaked me out. That was even before anything happened.!The investigation is multilayered and there are many twists and turns along the way. You got a good sense of the characters, motivations and there’s a strong sense of friendship, responsibility, human relationships and the tangled web we weave.You might not want to go to Elliðaey any time soon though!
    more
  • Nicole (Read Eat Sleep Repeat)
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve been eagerly anticipating the release of The Island ever since thoroughly enjoying the first book in Jónasson’s Hidden Iceland series, The Darkness. So I was thrilled to find a copy available from my library so soon after its publication and requested it immediately. And this thriller wound up really working for me.After an eerie prologue that sets the tone for the entire book, The Island uses alternating perspectives in a couple different timelines to build tension and unease that grows st I’ve been eagerly anticipating the release of The Island ever since thoroughly enjoying the first book in Jónasson’s Hidden Iceland series, The Darkness. So I was thrilled to find a copy available from my library so soon after its publication and requested it immediately. And this thriller wound up really working for me.After an eerie prologue that sets the tone for the entire book, The Island uses alternating perspectives in a couple different timelines to build tension and unease that grows steadily with each page. Detective Hulda, at the peak of her career in this installment, investigates a death on an isolated island off the coast of Iceland and begins to believe that it’s linked to a crime that happened a decade prior. Her backstory also continues to unfold amidst her investigation and is woven effortlessly between the perspectives of the other characters.As intriguing as the plot and characters are, I particularly love the way Jónasson sets this story. Descriptions of the landscape are so clear to evoke both its beauty and its bleakness, adding atmosphere to further set the tone. And the inclusion of some real historical reference to the area was a nice touch to help ground the story.In the end, I thoroughly enjoyed The Island and can’t wait to see where the series goes next! Recommended.
    more
  • Rob Twinem
    January 1, 1970
    "The Island" falls into a category of books loosely referred to as Scandinavian noir. Set in Iceland the volcanic landscape and frozen polar conditions adds an eerie silent and unpredictable element to the events as they unfold...."What the scenery lacked in drama it made up for in its all encompassing tranquility, its sense of space and emptiness. The only accents of colour in the treeless landscape were provided by patches of bilberry and crowberry plants and the calm blue waters of the fjord "The Island" falls into a category of books loosely referred to as Scandinavian noir. Set in Iceland the volcanic landscape and frozen polar conditions adds an eerie silent and unpredictable element to the events as they unfold...."What the scenery lacked in drama it made up for in its all encompassing tranquility, its sense of space and emptiness. The only accents of colour in the treeless landscape were provided by patches of bilberry and crowberry plants and the calm blue waters of the fjord below....."Some 10 years ago a young girl was murdered in Ellidaey, a small island located south of Iceland. A culprit is identified, apprehended and the case is seemingly closed. Moving forward to the present and four young friends are holidaying on the same desolate location. Before the vacation concludes one of the four lies dead at the bottom of a steep cliff and murder is suspected. Is there a connection between the two brutal acts? Detective Inspector Hulda Hermannsdóttir is assigned the case. Hindered by the interference of a previous superior Lydur and struggling with her own personal tragedies she must use all her skills to navigate both the past and the present incidents in an attempt to identify the killer/s The character of Hulda Hermannsdóttir is a tough and resilient antihero. Living alone in this isolated barren part of the world she demands the structure and discipline that comes with her job as a police inspector. She presents a picture of a loner, there to be pitied by a sympathetic reader and for the most part this is successfulUnderneath the main crime investigation a secondary mystery unfolds. Hulda is trying to trace the whereabouts of her real father. She knows he was an American GI and on impulse travels to the US only to be faced with disappointment. Ragnar Jonasson uses this opportunity to tease the reader and in the closing pages an unexpected detail is revealed adding a delightful ending that is sure to be explored in future books. The stark and bare landscape is used to great affect by the author to add tension and unpredictability to his writing. Hulda Hermannsdóttir is a sad highly intelligent police officer performing her daily workload to the best of her undoubted ability. I felt however that the story itself was somewhat unoriginal (four friends camping, one is killed, who is the murderer amongst them) yet having said that The Island was a fine example of Scandi noir. Many thanks to the good people at netgalley for a gratis copy of The Island in exchange for an honest review and that is what I have written.
    more
  • Laura Rash
    January 1, 1970
    A great follow up to The Darkness! I’m a huge fan of Ragnar and can’t wait to see what he’ll come up with next. This Hulda series always leaves me wanting more. Very atmospheric.
  • Sonica
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you Minotaur Books for my copy of The Island by Ragnar Jonasson, in exchange for my honest review.  This title released May 21, 2019.This is the second instalment in Jonasson's Detective Hulda Hermannsdottir series.  I highly recommend you read the first book, The Darkness, for character development.  They're told in reverse chronological order; the first book takes place during Hulda's entry into retirement from detective work and this book takes place in the middle of her career.Jonasson Thank you Minotaur Books for my copy of The Island by Ragnar Jonasson, in exchange for my honest review.  This title released May 21, 2019.This is the second instalment in Jonasson's Detective Hulda Hermannsdottir series.  I highly recommend you read the first book, The Darkness, for character development.  They're told in reverse chronological order; the first book takes place during Hulda's entry into retirement from detective work and this book takes place in the middle of her career.Jonasson has truly mastered the nordic noir genre and his books were my first introduction to this genre and I am so glad I started!  With a hint of police procedural, this book was perfectly paced and had enough mystery to keep you engaged cover to cover.I enjoyed Jonasson's emphasis on the atmosphere of the storyline and its characters.  He has mastered the ability to make you feel like you have been transported into the story while reading. I can’t wait to read book 3 in the series and learn more about Hulda and finally know all about the missing pieces of her life, which we have only been given sneak peeks of in Books 1 and 2.I highly recommend this read to fans of suspense and thrillers looking for an unexpected, but entertaining twist in these genres!  And pick up a copy of The Darkness while you are at it!
    more
  • Kris - My Novelesque Life
    January 1, 1970
    RATING: 3 STARS(Review Not on Blog)This is my second book in the Hidden Iceland series, and third book by Ragnar Jonasson. I enjoyed his first two novels, and thought this one was okay. I wanted to love them, but I seem to be in the minority in saying I did not feel a connection with the characters, plot or writing. They are okay but I want to read books that transform me in some way. I will part ways with the series and author as life is too short for books I don't love.
    more
  • Mara
    January 1, 1970
    Perfectly fine, but nothing extraordinary. It didn't quite hit my favorite mystery trope (the isolated closed circle when no one can leave) but it was close, and it did have a nice atmosphere built up throughout
  • Ludwig
    January 1, 1970
    "Now that she was here, there seemed nothing particularly safe about being ashore on this unbelievably uninhabited island. How she wished she'd never let herself be tricked into coming here. How on earth would it all end?"The Island is the second installment in the Hidden Iceland series, following Book 1 - The Darkness. In this second book, it's evident that Ragnar hasn't lost his skill to keep the reader invested in a story. On the contrary, The Island surpasses the gripping effect that The Dar "Now that she was here, there seemed nothing particularly safe about being ashore on this unbelievably uninhabited island. How she wished she'd never let herself be tricked into coming here. How on earth would it all end?"The Island is the second installment in the Hidden Iceland series, following Book 1 - The Darkness. In this second book, it's evident that Ragnar hasn't lost his skill to keep the reader invested in a story. On the contrary, The Island surpasses the gripping effect that The Darkness has by thrusting the creep factor in the early pages, which was enough to get me hooked and leave me anticipating how the story evolves. Only Ragnar Jónasson could make the beautiful Icelandic landscape look so sinister, and the fact that murder in Iceland is rare successfully adds to the suspense. The book contains short chapters, which I always appreciate considering it helps me fly through a book in a very entertaining way. By far, Hidden Iceland is my favorite launch from the author and I'm very anxious to see where he takes Detective Hulda next.
    more
  • Rob Twinem
    January 1, 1970
    Cold atmospheric scandi noir The Island" falls into a category of books loosely referred to as Scandinavian noir. Set in Iceland the volcanic landscape and frozen polar conditions adds an eerie silent and unpredictable element to the events as they unfold...."What the scenery lacked in drama it made up for in its all encompassing tranquility, its sense of space and emptiness. The only accents of colour in the treeless landscape were provided by patches of bilberry and crowberry plants and the ca Cold atmospheric scandi noir The Island" falls into a category of books loosely referred to as Scandinavian noir. Set in Iceland the volcanic landscape and frozen polar conditions adds an eerie silent and unpredictable element to the events as they unfold...."What the scenery lacked in drama it made up for in its all encompassing tranquility, its sense of space and emptiness. The only accents of colour in the treeless landscape were provided by patches of bilberry and crowberry plants and the calm blue waters of the fjord below....." Some 10 years ago a young girl was murdered in Ellidaey, a small island located south of Iceland. A culprit is identified, apprehended and the case is seemingly closed. Moving forward to the present and four young friends are holidaying on the same desolate location. Before the vacation concludes one of the four lies dead at the bottom of a steep cliff and murder is suspected. Is there a connection between the two brutal acts? Detective Inspector Hulda Hermannsdóttir is assigned the case. Hindered by the interference of a previous superior Lydur and struggling with her own personal tragedies she must use all her skills to navigate both the past and the present incidents in an attempt to identify the killer/s The character of Hulda Hermannsdóttir is a tough and resilient antihero. Living alone in this isolated barren part of the world she demands the structure and discipline that comes with her job as a police inspector. She presents a picture of a loner, there to be pitied by a sympathetic reader and for the most part this is successful Underneath the main crime investigation a secondary mystery unfolds. Hulda is trying to trace the whereabouts of her real father. She knows he was an American GI and on impulse travels to the US only to be faced with disappointment. Ragnar Jonasson uses this opportunity to tease the reader and in the closing pages an unexpected detail is revealed adding a delightful ending that is sure to be explored in future books. The stark and bare landscape is used to great affect by the author to add tension and unpredictability to his writing. Hulda Hermannsdóttir is a sad highly intelligent police officer performing her daily workload to the best of her undoubted ability. I felt however that the story itself was somewhat unoriginal (four friends camping, one is killed, who is the murderer amongst them) yet having said that The Island was a fine example of Scandi noir. Many thanks to the good people at netgalley for a gratis copy of The Island in exchange for an honest review and that is what I have written.
    more
  • Rowena Hoseason
    January 1, 1970
    In a minor masterstroke, Icelandic author Ragnar Jónasson is telling his ‘Hidden Iceland’ series in reverse order. That’s not obvious when you read the first book, The Darkness, which gets the ball rolling in the twilight of Hulda's career.The Island is set fifteen years earlier when Hulda is fifty-something and feeling it. She’s already survived the worst imaginable personal circumstances, and is a long way down her slide into bitter emotional isolation. This version of Hulda is flinty and stub In a minor masterstroke, Icelandic author Ragnar Jónasson is telling his ‘Hidden Iceland’ series in reverse order. That’s not obvious when you read the first book, The Darkness, which gets the ball rolling in the twilight of Hulda's career.The Island is set fifteen years earlier when Hulda is fifty-something and feeling it. She’s already survived the worst imaginable personal circumstances, and is a long way down her slide into bitter emotional isolation. This version of Hulda is flinty and stubborn, still determined to succeed in the police department. Hulda’s opportunity arises with a sudden death on a remote island – possibly linked to a murder case from a decade ago. When the suspect committed suicide, the case was closed. Still haunted by those events, the victim’s closest friends gather for a remembrance reunion ten years later… and another of them dies in suspicious circumstances.In many ways this book is like Iceland itself; slow to reveal its secrets, a place where the barren becomes the beautiful. Jónasson portrays the remote region around Ísafjörður and the storm-lashed island perfectly, evoking the genuine wonder of the wilderness and the powerful pull of natural seclusion.I can’t say I like Hulda, however, even though she clings on grimly despite monstrous emotional upheaval and a stagnant career. She’s a significant literary creation who feels completely credible, but not someone who inspires empathy.I was also frustrated by the mystery in this book, the actual whodunit. The revelations come thick and fast in the closing stages but there’s little scope to solve the puzzle as you go along. Perhaps that’s because the real story is all about Hulda and, in effect, this is her ‘difficult middle’ episode. I was far more intrigued by the references to her past – knowing what’s to come in her future – than I was by the main murder-mystery plot.The Island, then, is a solid morality tale, in which various sins of the past demand recompense in the present. You could read it as a standalone, but you’ll understand far more about the central character if you read The Darkness first. This book felt like a stepping stone along the way – and I await The Mist with considerable anticipation.7/10There are more recommendations of crime / thrillers over at http://www.murdermayhemandmore.net
    more
Write a review