Miles Morales
"Everyone gets mad at hustlers, especially if you're on the victim side of the hustle. And Miles knew hustling was in his veins." Miles Morales is just your average teenager. Dinner every Sunday with his parents, chilling out playing old-school video games with his best friend, Ganke, crushing on brainy, beautiful poet Alicia. He's even got a scholarship spot at the prestigious Brooklyn Visions Academy. Oh yeah, and he's Spider Man.But lately, Miles's spidey-sense has been on the fritz. When a misunderstanding leads to his suspension from school, Miles begins to question his abilities. After all, his dad and uncle were Brooklyn jack-boys with criminal records. Maybe kids like Miles aren't meant to be superheroes. Maybe Miles should take his dad's advice and focus on saving himself.As Miles tries to get his school life back on track, he can't shake the vivid nightmares that continue to haunt him. Nor can he avoid the relentless buzz of his spidey-sense every day in history class, amidst his teacher's lectures on the historical "benefits" of slavery and the importance of the modern-day prison system. But after his scholarship is threatened, Miles uncovers a chilling plot, one that puts his friends, his neighborhood, and himself at risk.It's time for Miles to suit up.

Miles Morales Details

TitleMiles Morales
Author
FormatHardcover
ReleaseAug 1st, 2017
PublisherMarvel Press
ISBN148478748X
ISBN-139781484787489
Number of pages272 pages
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Comics, Superheroes, Fantasy, Fiction, Childrens, Middle Grade, Sequential Art, Action, Graphic Novels, Marvel, Chapter Books

Miles Morales Review

  • Nic Stone
    December 13, 2016
    Before reading this novel, I thought: COOL! A Black and Puerto Rican superhero slinging webs and saving lives! After reading, I think the same thing... but MAN is there so much more to this book than that. Truthfully, I was expecting Spider-Man's regular antics, just with some brown skin beneath the spandex suit (silly me, though, right? This is a Jason Reynolds book. Obviously not going to be that cut and dry). What I HADN'T considered was that being a "superhero" would be a fundamentally diffe Before reading this novel, I thought: COOL! A Black and Puerto Rican superhero slinging webs and saving lives! After reading, I think the same thing... but MAN is there so much more to this book than that. Truthfully, I was expecting Spider-Man's regular antics, just with some brown skin beneath the spandex suit (silly me, though, right? This is a Jason Reynolds book. Obviously not going to be that cut and dry). What I HADN'T considered was that being a "superhero" would be a fundamentally different experience for a Black-Latino kid. And that's what Jason Reynolds so deftly lays out in this story. Miles Morales, in addition to the pressure of an un-ignorable spidey-sense that alerts him to people in danger (people he struggles to resist the compulsion to save), also has to deal with things like racism, relative poverty, being one of only a handful of black kids in an elite private school, keeping his grades up so he doesn't lose his scholarship, not succumbing to the pull of the streets when the financial going gets really tough, watching as people from his neighborhood DO succumb. This novel shows that every decision to save someone else is a decision to potentially wreck his own life. Because being a black superhero isn't the same as being a white one. The stakes are higher. Trying to keep this review spoiler-free but the villain here... MAN! Just immaculate. All I'll say is this: Jason has knocked it out of the park. Again.
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  • Kay
    May 29, 2017
    Thank you Netgalley and the publisher for approving my request for a free digital copy in exchange for a review.Can I have sequel, please? Please make this a series! "Miles Morales" is my first foray into the world of Jason Reynolds and I am now and will forever be a full time resident. This book is nothing short of exceptional. Despite being a fan of Peter Parker (and Spiderman in general), I never quite got around to reading about Miles. I knew of him via word of mouth, I know that this is a w Thank you Netgalley and the publisher for approving my request for a free digital copy in exchange for a review.Can I have sequel, please? Please make this a series! "Miles Morales" is my first foray into the world of Jason Reynolds and I am now and will forever be a full time resident. This book is nothing short of exceptional. Despite being a fan of Peter Parker (and Spiderman in general), I never quite got around to reading about Miles. I knew of him via word of mouth, I know that this is a well-loved character but for some reason I never got into the comics. This novel is a great way to boost interest an a great way to do so in a potentially successful manner. Let's get into what I enjoyed about this book. The characters: Miles as a protagonist is beautifully crafted. Reynolds takes a lot of time developing Morales' central character traits and these are very well detailed on the page. It's easy to love Miles, and this novel creates the character in a more multidimensional way that comics and graphic novels are able to do. The supporting characters are equally well-drawn. The family and platonic relationships are fully developed, realities and very healthy. I believe it will be easy for students to identify themselves and their families within this book. The setting: Spiderman just has to be New York. This story might work elsewhere but I like that Reynold’s kept with canon on this.The plot: This is the only downfall for me, but it’s also a plus. Some readers will feel that this novel doesn’t have much of a plot, it does. It’s just that, for me, it feels like a something that’s on a slow-cooker. You have to give it enough time to cook throughly. This is linked to the pacing, the pacing was perfect for the star that Reynold’s is trying to tell and I do believe that it complements the book well. The romance is understated and as a secondary story-line acts as a strong compliment to Miles' story. This combination works extremely well and readers do not fell burdened to keep track. Moreover, I love that there are some many POC in this book. The diversity is truly representative and is a breath of fresh air in an otherwise homogenous genre. In summary, I believe that this novel is beautifully written and is definitely one of my favourite books for the year this far. I would recommend to everyone regardless of age, and would could be easily integrated into the curriculum of a literature class (even culture/history) if the teacher wants to shake this up a bit).
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  • Allison
    June 21, 2017
    AHHHHHHH. FINALLY.FINALLY one of these Marvel or DC tie-in books that I've ENJOYED. A LOT. LOVED. I hope there are more especially w the Miles animated movie coming out next? year. It's great because it reads like a Reynolds book that just happens to be about Spider-Man.
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  • Dan
    July 23, 2017
    The best superpower is fantastic storytelling. I highly recommend Miles Morales by Jason Reynolds.
  • Shelly
    July 12, 2017
    This was phenomenal. As both a comics nerd and a YA fan, I highly recommend this one. When I heard that Jason Reynolds was hired to write the Miles book, I was so on board knowing his amazing writing. And I'm so happy that my initial instinct wasn't wrong at all, as Reynolds' writing truly brought Miles to life in a phenomenal way. The voice was spectacular and the pacing was fast-paced. This is definitely a book I'll be recommending to literally everyone.
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  • Carol
    July 13, 2017
    I received an advance copy from the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an unbiased review.Whether you're familiar with Miles Morales as Spider-Man or not, this book really does have something for everyone. Jason Reynolds really brings Miles Morales to life and I'm pleased to be able to recommend this book to patrons and colleagues alike. We are not pincushions.We are not punching bags.We are people.We are Spider-Man!
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  • Jillian Heise
    April 17, 2017
    This was deeper than I expected. Of course, I didn't know anything about the Miles Morales origin or legacy before starting the book. But it was less about Spider-Man and more about a kid trying to figure out who he really wants to be, and what kind of impact he wants to make on the world and his neighborhood. It's about finding pride (and strength) in where you come from, no matter what others think about it. This story was less about the action of being Spider-Man and more about the heart &amp This was deeper than I expected. Of course, I didn't know anything about the Miles Morales origin or legacy before starting the book. But it was less about Spider-Man and more about a kid trying to figure out who he really wants to be, and what kind of impact he wants to make on the world and his neighborhood. It's about finding pride (and strength) in where you come from, no matter what others think about it. This story was less about the action of being Spider-Man and more about the heart & spirit behind the boy behind the mask.
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  • Vernie
    July 3, 2017
    I want this now.
  • Meg
    June 14, 2017
    I'm going to attempt to be eloquent, but this book made me cry and I loved it so I had to write something on here. Something important to note, I got to read it because a friend got it at BEA/BookCon and lent it to me. ALSO IMPORTANT, I love Spider-Man, full stop. He's always been one of my favorite superheroes ever since I was a kid, so to read a book about Spider-Man and Miles Morales?? Yes?? Of course, please, thank you.Jason Reynolds has given Miles so much voice in this book and it's such a I'm going to attempt to be eloquent, but this book made me cry and I loved it so I had to write something on here. Something important to note, I got to read it because a friend got it at BEA/BookCon and lent it to me. ALSO IMPORTANT, I love Spider-Man, full stop. He's always been one of my favorite superheroes ever since I was a kid, so to read a book about Spider-Man and Miles Morales?? Yes?? Of course, please, thank you.Jason Reynolds has given Miles so much voice in this book and it's such a joy to read. Miles and Ganke have this exuberant friendship and you know that they'll be there for each other no matter what comes their way. The same goes for Miles and his parents. The villain in this book is so much bigger than one person and every time Miles learned more about why his spidey senses were going off, I had chills. I don't want to give anything major away about it, but, yeah, chills. The fight scenes were fast, fun, and Miles has some good taunts that you'd expect from Spider-Man (at least I did, haha.) Anyway, I thoroughly enjoyed this book and I highly recommend it to everyone. It's a quick read, yet full of characterization and heart and greatness (which of course comes with responsibility). Even if you're saying, "Oh I don't really like superhero books, random reviewer on GR," TRUST ME!! This book is one you won't put down. And like I said at the beginning, this book made me cry, which not many books/TV shows/movies can achieve. MILES MORALES has an emotional pull to it that no one will be able to ignore because "we are." (read it and figure that quote out.)
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  • Rachel Strolle
    May 2, 2017
    Sometimes we think that once someone develops super powers they are a superhero and stop being a human being--but there's a reason this book is called Miles Morales and not Spider-Man. This is a book about a teen with superpowers, and it never forgets that there are real life consequences to zipping through the streets, to missing school or schoolwork because you're the only one with your powers. Spider-Man is a title not a tone, and this is a welcome relief after the trillions of Peter Parker f Sometimes we think that once someone develops super powers they are a superhero and stop being a human being--but there's a reason this book is called Miles Morales and not Spider-Man. This is a book about a teen with superpowers, and it never forgets that there are real life consequences to zipping through the streets, to missing school or schoolwork because you're the only one with your powers. Spider-Man is a title not a tone, and this is a welcome relief after the trillions of Peter Parker films
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  • Amy
    July 22, 2017
    This is everything that I want a super hero story to be. Adventurous, mysterious, full of the conflict of good vs evil, and also unafraid to delve into the reality of our world. This book took the story of Spider Man and melded it with the societal and racial tensions of today's world and created a nuanced look at what it is you can be when everyone has a certain expectation of what your options are.Miles Morales is a sko-low scholarship kid at BVA, a private school. Recently he's had some troub This is everything that I want a super hero story to be. Adventurous, mysterious, full of the conflict of good vs evil, and also unafraid to delve into the reality of our world. This book took the story of Spider Man and melded it with the societal and racial tensions of today's world and created a nuanced look at what it is you can be when everyone has a certain expectation of what your options are.Miles Morales is a sko-low scholarship kid at BVA, a private school. Recently he's had some trouble and even got suspended for skipping out on class. Of course, he said he had to go the bathroom, but he was really out trying to figure out what was setting off his spidey-sense. It's been buzzing more and more in Mr. Chamberlain's class and Miles doesn't know what exactly is setting it off. As he struggles with whether or not he even wants the great responsibility that comes with his power, he is also reeling from the death of his uncle and this discovery of an unknown cousin who is in jail. Miles knows that either ending could easily be what happens to him. And he doesn't know how to stop it, especially since no matter how hard he tries, it still seems like trouble is following him. Highly recommend. This book is great for fans of Marvel and super hero stories. It is also wonderful for students who want to read about societal conflicts and tensions. Appropriate for grades 7 and up. Many thanks to NetGalley and Disney Hyperion for providing an advance copy for review. All opinions are my own.
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  • Martha
    June 24, 2017
    Though the presence of realism in a book about Spiderman might seem irrelevant at best, it's in fact the greatest strength of Miles Morales. As he showed in All American Boys (among others), Reynolds has a real gift for writing real people in real situations, having real conversations; Miles and those who surround him are no different. It must be a difficult task to seriously address socioeconomic inequality, racism, and violent crime within what is essentially a supernatural YA story, but Reyno Though the presence of realism in a book about Spiderman might seem irrelevant at best, it's in fact the greatest strength of Miles Morales. As he showed in All American Boys (among others), Reynolds has a real gift for writing real people in real situations, having real conversations; Miles and those who surround him are no different. It must be a difficult task to seriously address socioeconomic inequality, racism, and violent crime within what is essentially a supernatural YA story, but Reynolds pulls it off without a hitch, and it's great.Thanks to NetGalley and Disney Book Group for the ARC.
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  • Danielle
    July 16, 2017
    As someone who has always loved the world of spider man, this book was a pleasure to read. The writing flowed well, the plot was engaging, and the REPRESENTATION WAS SO GOOD. YES. I feel like I learned so much about a variety of different ethnic backgrounds from these 200 and some odd pages. Excellent work, Jason Reynolds!
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  • Hallie
    July 21, 2017
    This was incredible and approachable whether you're a Spider-man fan or not. Jason Reynolds can do no wrong.
  • Caitlyn
    July 6, 2017
    An absolute must read.
  • Josie
    March 27, 2017
    Meh. While I really enjoyed the southern slang, this felt more like some sort of realistic fiction overcoming racism thing. There wasn't really much Spider-Man. In fact, the whole story would almost have made sense without Spider-Man. The whole book was really just about a high school aged African American kid who's teacher is slightly fantasy discriminatory. But I was looking for Spider-Man. That's not really what I got.
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  • Katie
    January 1, 2017
    this was a great Jason Reynolds book!! aka the writing was amazing, it deals with family relationships, friendship & romance wonderfully and captures culture & setting perfectly. I love the character Miles Morales from the comics and enjoyed his story in this book BUT I felt like this was missing some spidey flare. I am really glad this wasn't an origin story (he got bit by a spider, we get it) but there was almost no scenes in his suit. and yes I know he is more than just his suit/his s this was a great Jason Reynolds book!! aka the writing was amazing, it deals with family relationships, friendship & romance wonderfully and captures culture & setting perfectly. I love the character Miles Morales from the comics and enjoyed his story in this book BUT I felt like this was missing some spidey flare. I am really glad this wasn't an origin story (he got bit by a spider, we get it) but there was almost no scenes in his suit. and yes I know he is more than just his suit/his superhero identity but also I WANT TO SEE HIM BEING BADASS OK. Overall I do recommend picking this one up and eagerly await the follow up!!
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  • ellie
    December 20, 2016
    honestly think it's hilarious how Marvel and DC keep announcing more YA superhero books. We have Catwoman, Wonder Woman: Warbringer, Batman etc from DC to look forward to, so I guess they had to announce this to keep up
  • Cheriee Weichel
    July 22, 2017
    It's Jason Reynolds! I'm such a fan I would probably pay to read his grocery list. Thank you Netgalley, for letting me read this book in exchange for an honest review. I figured it would be a snap, but at first it didn't work for me. I struggled and kept starting and stopping, starting and stopping. Jason Reynolds excels at creating genuine, true to life characters. As you read his words, they come to life seamlessly. You believe they exist beyond the pages of the book. It's this ability that fi It's Jason Reynolds! I'm such a fan I would probably pay to read his grocery list. Thank you Netgalley, for letting me read this book in exchange for an honest review. I figured it would be a snap, but at first it didn't work for me. I struggled and kept starting and stopping, starting and stopping. Jason Reynolds excels at creating genuine, true to life characters. As you read his words, they come to life seamlessly. You believe they exist beyond the pages of the book. It's this ability that finally allowed me to focus on the story and revel in his writing. So what the heck was the initial problem? I've been wondering if it had to do with reading on my device. It isn't the first book I've had trouble with there. That light is hard on my aging eyes. And truthfully, I'm easily distracted, so device reading can be deadly. Perhaps I just had too many books on the go. Of course it might be that I had a hard time in the first place because I'm not really a superhero fan. It was when I finally committed myself and sat down and finished the book that I was blown away. I went back to reread the beginning. After shuffling off my biases and letting myself embrace these characters and the story, I really fell head over tail in love.At one point I went to Wikipedia to research Spider-Man. (I told you I was easily distracted.) It helped. The last time I paid any attention to superhero comics, was when my sons were reading them. They are now 33 and 36, so that was quite some time ago. I discovered that Miles Morales came onto the scene in 2011. He is an Afro Hispanic teenager with the same abilities as the original Spider-Man. Background knowledge is important. In this novel, based on that character, Miles, an A student, attends an elite school, Brooklyn Visions Academy, on scholarship. Miles has loving parents who have his back at the same time as they take him to task for any misbehaviour. I appreciate the way Reynolds captures their neighbourhood in an array of beautiful, damaged characters who never really had a chance to fulfill their potential. He shows us that the story of a black skinned Spider-Man can't be told without understanding the context of being black in America. At school Miles rooms with his Korean American best friend, Ganke. Their relationship is brilliantly, lovingly authentic. Ganke often gets them into some kind of mischief where Miles is forced to use his super powers. Afterwards, his conscience fills him with anxiety and regret. I appreciated Miles' ambivalence and the dilemma he faces over using his special powers. He's conflicted between saving the world and saving himself. He tells Ganke, "to have the time to be a Super Hero, you got to have the rest of your life laid out. You can't be out there saving the world when your neighbourhood ain't even straight. I just got to be real about it."Miles is lucky to have mostly stellar teachers at school. The one exception is his history teacher, Mr Chamberlain. Mile's spidey-sense is triggered regularly in this class. The racist Mr. Chamberlain is truly creepy. In Ganke's words, "he keeps talking about how the Civil War was like this beautiful, romantic thing.… He was going on about how, depending on how you look at it, slavery was kind of good for the country." There are a lot of important lessons on power relationships, how to engage in activism, resist oppression, and act collectively that emerge from the time spent in that class. Part of what wowed me in this book was the integration of Sijo poetry. The examples in the book are spectacular, like the one Alicia, Mile's romantic interest, shares in their English class, on the theme of love:A romantic mountain top view of the world is love for mostBeing that close to clouds strips them of form, turns them to fogPerhaps the real beauty is on the way up, where like it is.Here's one Miles wrote while thinking about his family. What I HateI hate my father's face when he tells me my block is my burdenLike my job is to carry a family I didn't createLike my life is for fixing something I didn't even breakMiles loved his Uncle Aaron and visited him regularly against his parents' wishes. It was because of Aaron's criminal endeavours that Miles was bitten by the radioactive spider that gave him his powers. Miles' dreams are haunted with the same recurring nightmare: a battle to the death with him. He's terrified that his uncle's taunt, "You're just like me," is true.At the school's Halloween dance, Miles discovers an insidious conspiracy designed to destroy the lives of black students. He realizes that he is only one of many individuals who have been victimized across time and space. It's up to him, on his own, to stop them.This is a book I wish I could read out loud to a group of students. I envision many thoughtful conversations about how we use power, about what it means to be a person of colour, about how we can be manipulated by others based on our preconceived assumptions. Writing our own Sijo poems would have to be part of the experience. I expect students will clamour for teachers to read just one more page. I know of at least a dozen students I would hand this book over to. The release date for this book is August 1st. You are going to want to preorder a copy and read the book yourself to see how good it is. This review was first posted on my blog at http://dickenslibrary.blogspot.ca
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  • Emily Scheinman
    May 7, 2017
    Reynolds' writing hooked me into Miles Morales' Marvel world.
  • Jamie Brackell
    August 1, 2017
    Miles Morales: Spider-Man is the latest instalment of Marvel’s Young Adult range of novels, offering a prose-driven narrative of the world’s greatest superheroes. Written by Jason Reynolds, author of the critically acclaimed “When I was the Greatest”, this novel takes a more grounded view of super-heroics, looking at Miles’ school and home life as an Afro-Latino teenager growing up in Brooklyn, New York.Reynolds, an author known for his strong characterisations, drenches his narrative in authent Miles Morales: Spider-Man is the latest instalment of Marvel’s Young Adult range of novels, offering a prose-driven narrative of the world’s greatest superheroes. Written by Jason Reynolds, author of the critically acclaimed “When I was the Greatest”, this novel takes a more grounded view of super-heroics, looking at Miles’ school and home life as an Afro-Latino teenager growing up in Brooklyn, New York.Reynolds, an author known for his strong characterisations, drenches his narrative in authenticity and provides an uncompromising view of inner-city life. The passages describing Miles neighbourhood are wonderfully evocative and the words swirl off the page, conjuring up living breathing worlds in the mind’s eye. Despite never visiting Brooklyn, I felt like I could taste the gas fumes in the air, hear the subway rumble overhead and see the brownstones that line the road. Reynolds populates this world with a multitude of minor supporting characters, each of which feel vibrant and real, even though they are only glimpsed in small doses.Having leapt from the Ultimate Universe into the main Marvel Universe during the events of Secret Wars, Miles Morales is a character with some hefty continuity baggage. In the comics, it’s unclear exactly what Miles remembers from his previous universe and this novel doesn’t begin to address this topic. Chronologically, it seems that this series takes place in the main Marvel Universe as Miles’ dad is aware of his dual identity, and his mother is alive and well. However, there is no mention of any other superheroes, and nothing in the story contradicts this. Most of the continuity referenced stems from Miles’ initial story-arc in the comics, dealing with his origin and the aftermath of his uncle’s death. I can understand the decision to simplify the continuity to appeal to a wider YA demographic, but as a fan of the comics, I was disappointed that there wasn’t stronger links to the source material.As mentioned earlier, most of the story revolves around Miles’ civilian life – his time at boarding school and his weekends at home with his parents. Superheroics are seldom featured, and there’s no garishly-dressed super-villains to break up the monotony of pubescence – Reynolds focuses firmly on realism here, telling the story of Miles Morales first, and Spider-Man second. With the prose format, he is able to get deeper in Miles’ psyche than the comics can, exploring his guilt surrounding the death of his uncle and the added tension that his dual identity causes. I also loved the focus on whether he had “bad genes” in his DNA, and whether he was destined to grow up to be like his uncle and father. This is a theme that is also being explored in the current comic series, following the Civil War II storyline in which Miles saw a possible future where he murdered Captain America.Reynolds has a strong grasp on the relationships between his characters, particularly Miles and Ganke – a double-act that I’ve enjoyed in the comics and was so popular that it was appropriated for Peter Parker in Spider-Man: Homecoming. In some ways, Miles Morales: Spider-Man feels like what Spider-Man Homecoming would have been if Miles had been cast as the lead role. Both stories use school life as the backdrop for its adventure, but subjects like racism and urban poverty are woven into Miles’ tale to provide an authentic voice for the character that resonates well. There’s also a love story at the heart of both stories, as Miles attempts to overcome his shyness and relay his feelings to the cute poet activist who sits in his class.As an unconventional Spider-Man story, it won’t be surprising to discover that there is an unconventional villain behind-the-scenes, lending a supernatural tone to events. It’s left vague as to the identity of the villain, but I have my suspicions as to who it was, given some of the descriptions and the method in which they tormented Miles.Miles Morales: Spider-Man is an extremely well-written novel, and an ideal YA title for fans of Spider-Man: Homecoming and superheroes, in general. There’s some very compelling adult themes explored in the story, and depending on the reader, it can either resonate well or introduce them to a whole different side of life. Jason Reynolds does a terrific job at dragging Miles and his neighbourhood out of the comic panel and onto the novel page, fleshing out both his characterisation and his surroundings with ease. While it lacked some punch in the action sequences, I was utterly enthralled by the depth of description on display during the quieter scenes. Given the unenviable job of engaging new readers and rewarding long-time fans, Reynolds does his best to achieve the right balance and for the most part, he succeeds admirably. As an introduction into Miles Morales’ world, this novel left me wanting more, and I would love to see a sequel focus on his relationship with his mentor, Peter Parker, or working alongside other teen heroes in The Champions.
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  • Ellie
    July 21, 2017
    Pros: ~ MILES~ MILESSSSS~ In case you couldn’t tell, Miles~ Also Austin. what a GOOD PLOTLINE OMG I wanted more. Make that a con. Moretime with Austin and Miles~ The writing is so good and readable even when it’s boring omg~ Alicia existed (not all that much on page but she did)~ Okay so Ms. Blaufuss was apparently Jason Reynolds’s actual English teacherand if THAT DOESN’T MAKE YOU JUST GET A LITTLE TEARY~ BROOKLYN, NEW YORK~ ACCURATE REPRESENTATION OF BROOKLYN, NEW YORKCons:~ The pacing meander Pros: ~ MILES~ MILESSSSS~ In case you couldn’t tell, Miles~ Also Austin. what a GOOD PLOTLINE OMG I wanted more. Make that a con. Moretime with Austin and Miles~ The writing is so good and readable even when it’s boring omg~ Alicia existed (not all that much on page but she did)~ Okay so Ms. Blaufuss was apparently Jason Reynolds’s actual English teacherand if THAT DOESN’T MAKE YOU JUST GET A LITTLE TEARY~ BROOKLYN, NEW YORK~ ACCURATE REPRESENTATION OF BROOKLYN, NEW YORKCons:~ The pacing meandered sometimes~ The humor could be very ... male~ NoMoreGrossOutHumor2017~ Alicia could’ve been fleshed a teeny bit more and given more of a role~ We need more Alicia!!!~ You thought I forgot about Austin?? Well I DIDN’T~ *chanting* MORE AUSTIN~ It ended, tbh #PROTECTMILESMORALES2017 Hands up if you’re part of the Miles Morales Protection Squad. Hands up? Everybody’s hands up? GOOD. It’s a pact, right here, right now. YA BETTER PROTECT MILES MORALES WITH EVERY FIBER OF YOUR BEING.What a good boy. What a precious boy!!! Half-black, half-Puerto Rican, Miles is a Brooklyn kid at heart who juggles attending a prestigious school on scholarship and being the one and only (in my comic and movie-ignorant heart) Spider-Man. This boy is the best!!! The best boy!!!!He doesn’t have much but he kisses his mother on the cheek and uses his money to buy her dinner and flowers. (WHAT A GOOD BOY) He works so hard. He takes punishments and even after they’re over, sees them through. He tries to be good and do good even though he thinks he can’t or isn’t. He looks out for his friends, and especially his family, and he’s just. a. good. boy.See, the thing is, I am not a superhero fan. I’ve never seen the Avengers. If pressed, I like DC much more than Marvel, and honestly, if it weren’t for Miles himself and Jason Reynolds’s name attached, I never would have wished for this on NetGalley. That’s the thing about this book: for me, it balanced out much more to the heart and realism side of Miles than the superhero.That might be something others take issue with; there’s less fighting crime and more day-to-day life. Don’t get me wrong, Miles is pretty damn kickass, but the majority of this book addresses Miles’s internal and external struggles, from asking out the girl he likes, to the risk of losing his scholarship, to the blatant racism he faces on a daily basis from one of his teachers. Jason Reynolds, in my opinion, balances all of these subjects extremely well and with real grace. He writes funny conversations and emotional heart-to-hearts (spilling the salsa was the cutest thing), but if you came here for on-page action all day, all the time, you’ll probably be disappointed.Pretty much everything about this book was handled impeccably. My biggest complaint was that the story ran slow and some scenes tended to blur together. But the subjects are powerful and wow, the way the racist villainy was written was amazing. Full of finesse, impact, and infuriating realism, you are devastated for Miles, Austin, the students of the high school . . . hell, students everywhere, but you have to commend the writing. This book, especially for a book about freaking superheroes, has not only compelling words but resonance, heart, and heartbreak.If you like Spider-Man, or are into all these new superhero book adaptions coming out, definitely give this one a go. Seriously, if you read any of them, it’d better be this one... or I’ll know. (I’ll know.) Even if you’re not interested in superhero books, like me, give Miles a chance!!
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  • Heather Rochon
    July 31, 2017
    I received a free e-ARC of Miles Morales from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.Forget Peter Parker.Miles Morales is the Spider-Man that everyone should be paying attention to.In this refreshingly not another origins story (here’s looking at you movie franchise), Miles is an average Brooklyn teen navigating the pressures of keeping his school scholarship, staying out of trouble with his hilarious best friend Ganke, talking to his brilliant crush Alicia, and keeping his web-slinging secr I received a free e-ARC of Miles Morales from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.Forget Peter Parker.Miles Morales is the Spider-Man that everyone should be paying attention to.In this refreshingly not another origins story (here’s looking at you movie franchise), Miles is an average Brooklyn teen navigating the pressures of keeping his school scholarship, staying out of trouble with his hilarious best friend Ganke, talking to his brilliant crush Alicia, and keeping his web-slinging secret. But, being a teenage superhero is not as easy as it sounds– especially when Miles’ spidey-sense is not as reliable as it used to be and it ends up getting him suspended from school.I’ve always said that the Marvel-verse should give more love to Miles Morales, so I’m so glad that this book exists. I hope there are at least ten more. This book did everything that I wanted and more, yet still left me wishing that the last page wasn’t the last. As we all know, “with great power comes great responsibility,” and Jason Reynolds really handled that responsibility well.Not only was Miles Morales a great addition to the Spider-Man story and an entertaining hero vs. villain adventure, it points to some very important topics– racism, poverty, social injustice. We see Miles, a Black-Latino, deal with a teacher who thinks its okay to teach about the “benefits” of slavery. We see the failures of the prison system, especially for juveniles. We see Miles struggle to prove that he won’t fall into a life of crime, like many of the people in his neighborhood. This book sinks so deep– and it’s wonderful.The benefit of having a character from comic books transition on to the pages of a novel is that you can get more characterization and background with a few paragraphs than from a few panels. (Side note: Not that comic books can’t do that, because they can. I just sometimes find that superhero comics favor the side of action rather than development.) Miles is such a well developed character. He’s dynamic and vulnerable, intelligent and determined. He’s flawed; we see his impulses and failures, but we know that he’s good and that he tries to do good.Also, Miles Morales and Reynolds really do side characters justice– Ganke’s not just the funny best friend and Alicia’s not just the pretty crush. They have their own emotions and motivations. They struggle and they triumph and not just for the motivation of Miles. Have I mentioned that it’s wonderful?It’s true that the action and super-villainry play second fiddle and take a while to progress in the novel, but it’s worth it. There’s so much to explore with a diverse superhero like Miles and this novel was a fun way to kick it off.Plus, Spider-Man is just cool.4/5 Stars.
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  • Rich in Color
    July 29, 2017
    Review copy: Digital ARC via NetgalleyFirst off – check out the cover. The image screams intensity. Miles is having some serious doubts about being a superhero. His powers are acting up and he is wondering about who he really is deep down. With everything else going on in his life, Miles is one stressed-out kid. Alicia is a pleasant distraction who happens to love poetry. Poetry features prominently in this book which makes sense with Reynolds as the author. The poetry adds another layer to the Review copy: Digital ARC via NetgalleyFirst off – check out the cover. The image screams intensity. Miles is having some serious doubts about being a superhero. His powers are acting up and he is wondering about who he really is deep down. With everything else going on in his life, Miles is one stressed-out kid. Alicia is a pleasant distraction who happens to love poetry. Poetry features prominently in this book which makes sense with Reynolds as the author. The poetry adds another layer to the story and in some cases it adds humor – especially with Miles’s best friend Ganke.Humor shows up many times throughout the book. I appreciated some of the descriptive phrases like, “As opposed to the stench of toxic toes in the hallway, the bathroom smelled more like wet dog and corn chips.” Eew! Also, sounds about right.Much of the story takes place in and around school with poetry and history getting most attention. Miles is into math, but with Alicia in the picture, poetry becomes more important. There’s an open mic opportunity and as you might guess, Miles works on some poetry for Alicia. He is tongue tied around her most of the time, but is at least able to write something down. There is quite a contrast between his superhero abilities and his ability to speak to a girl.The story and characters are compelling and there is a lot going on besides the typical scenario of superhero attempting to foil the plot of an evil mastermind. Of course that is there, but there’s also a romance, friendship, awesome parents in the picture, and discussions about race specifically in the context of education.History class is where things get complicated. It’s in history that Miles’s spidey-sense gets wacky and it’s also in history class where some bizarre discussions happen. His teacher, Mr. Chamberlain, encourages discussion around the positives of slavery and the confederacy. The points Mr. Chamberlain makes are morally reprehensible and pretty much leave students in a dilemma. Is the teacher just playing with them or does he really believe this mess he’s spouting? Regardless, what is the proper response that won’t get a student sent to the office or even expelled? Miles is basically told to stay where he belongs and comply even in the face of racism and discrimination by his teacher.Of course, school is not the only thing going on in the story and though it’s a while before it becomes clear, there is a public enemy for Spider Man to deal with and the confrontation has plenty of action.Recommendation: Get it now especially if you are into superheroes or poetry. There’s a ton to love in this book. Miles is a character I want to see more of and I hope that’s the plan.
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  • Jamie
    July 15, 2017
    Seriously, I cannot use enough words to explain how much I loved this book. This is probably one of my favorite reads of all time. I'm so thrilled that I could get a copy to read (shoutout to Rachel). Reynolds crafted an amazing story and an amazing Miles. I haven't been this in love with a superhero character since Captain America (and for those of you who know me you know this is no small honor for me). This novel was just.... Perfect. That's the best way I can describe it. Miles is a breath o Seriously, I cannot use enough words to explain how much I loved this book. This is probably one of my favorite reads of all time. I'm so thrilled that I could get a copy to read (shoutout to Rachel). Reynolds crafted an amazing story and an amazing Miles. I haven't been this in love with a superhero character since Captain America (and for those of you who know me you know this is no small honor for me). This novel was just.... Perfect. That's the best way I can describe it. Miles is a breath of fresh air that not only all superhero fans deserve, but also every black Puerto Rican kid who deserves representation. I could cry because I know this book and this superhero is gonna mean the world to that kid.All of the aspects in this book were incredible. Miles' relationship with his parents, Miles and his best friend, and even Miles and his school (for the most part). Also, Miles' powers and all of the scenes where he used them were incredibly well written. Miles and his parents had such a great relationship I just adored. His mother was incredible and I loved the relationship they had. Miles' father got more page time than his mother, and I loved all of his scenes with Miles. He was caring and helpful and above all a great parent. I definitely think Reynolds wanted to show a positive black father figure, which has been missing from narrative for far too long. It was amazing to read because I'm so tired (as I'm sure black people are) of the trope where black fathers are dead beats. This is so stereotypical and racist and I hate it, so having Mr.Davis be as freaking amazing as he is was awesome. He knew about Miles' powers and really trusted Miles to make good decisions about using his powers and just in life in general. I loved reading all of their scenes together. Miles and his best friend Ganke also had a really great relationship, which was super fun. They had a bunch of adventures together using Spider man's powers and just hanging out talking about girls. They also had very serious talks about Ganke's parents, which was nice because often in literature men and young boys are portrayed as unemotional. Ganke cried at one point and Miles was as supportive as always; it was a beautiful moment of friendship. I also loved the progressiveness Miles, Alicia, and a lot of other students partook in this book. Especially Alicia! She was a hero we all needed. She stood up to racism and told it to fuck off. It was amazing. Reynolds created the perfect villain for this book because Miles may have been fighting a person, but really he was fighting racism in general. It was incredibly powerful and I'm excited for more of Miles and more of Jason Reynolds.★★★★★ (I wish I could give this book more stars)Preorder Miles Morales and happy reading!
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  • Rebecca Mazer
    July 26, 2017
    Miles Morales is undoubtedly one of my favorite characters, and I was thrilled when I found out he would be getting a book of his own, and Jason Reynolds did not disappoint. The book veers toward an audience that is younger than me, but it was still enjoyable to read. In my opinion, the great thing about heroes, and especially young heroes, is that it takes problems and plots that are tried and true, and puts it in a fantastical world that is accessible to all ages. Reynolds creates a complex an Miles Morales is undoubtedly one of my favorite characters, and I was thrilled when I found out he would be getting a book of his own, and Jason Reynolds did not disappoint. The book veers toward an audience that is younger than me, but it was still enjoyable to read. In my opinion, the great thing about heroes, and especially young heroes, is that it takes problems and plots that are tried and true, and puts it in a fantastical world that is accessible to all ages. Reynolds creates a complex and nuanced story that has bigger than life problems presented in a way that anyone can understand and relate to. Not everyone uses their superpowers to sneak out of their job in order to go see a girl they like, but everyone has shirked a responsibility in order to do something more desirable. No, not everyone has had a supernatural history teacher who is personally out to get you, however everyone has had a teacher who's goal, it seems, is to ruin their life.I thought the development of the antagonist was extremely well done, and it flowed from a nuisance and problem in Miles' life, to a supernatural threat in Spider-Mans seamlessly.Another great thing that Reynolds avoided was getting bogged down in the origin of Spider-Man. Yes, the bite is relatively new, and yes, Miles is still learning, but he hasn't just received the bite, he hasn't just been through this huge change. Reynolds gave it time so that it still felt like a fresh change, but the story wasn't monopolized by this huge experience. However, Miles is coming to terms with what it means to be Spider-Man, which is just as, if not more impactful.Overall, this book was a wonderfully fun read, and managed to stay true to the comic origins while still feeling as authentic and in depth as a novel.
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  • Sam Poole
    July 28, 2017
    First of all, Jason Reynolds is a STAR and I can't wait to read the rest of his books. The first Miles Morales novel is outstanding. It provides a good counterpart to "Spider-Man: Homecoming" by showing the opposite side of the script. A black & Puerto-Rican Spider-Man at a mostly white boarding school battling against systemic injustice & racism (represented here acutely by the school and prison systems) is the PERFECT superhero for 2017. Miles' difficulties coming to terms with his fam First of all, Jason Reynolds is a STAR and I can't wait to read the rest of his books. The first Miles Morales novel is outstanding. It provides a good counterpart to "Spider-Man: Homecoming" by showing the opposite side of the script. A black & Puerto-Rican Spider-Man at a mostly white boarding school battling against systemic injustice & racism (represented here acutely by the school and prison systems) is the PERFECT superhero for 2017. Miles' difficulties coming to terms with his family and place in the world are deep and profound, as the villain here is symbolic and literal racist oppression. The final fight is written amazingly and Reynolds has a knack for making action sequences come alive as if they were drawn in front of you. This is without a doubt the best YA superhero novel I've read since DC & Marvel began putting them out a few years ago. Highly recommend this year to anyone who likes Spider-Man in any form, but furthermore to anyone who cares about the structures of bigotry in the United States designed to keep people of color oppressed and locked up. I wish this was longer, then it would probably get a 5-star review. I can pretty much guarantee that any follow-up will be just as outstanding, if not even better. Everyone should read this.
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  • Ashley P
    July 18, 2017
    Received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest reviewI started reading this book because it was Spider-Man. I kept reading this book because it is awesome. Miles Morales is a good kid. A good superhero. He's got a good heart and is written out in a very human way. He isn't perfect. He's filled with guilt and teenage angst. He's not infallible which makes him better, more interesting. He is all the best parts of being a teenager, and some of the worst as well, as he fumbles in talkin Received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest reviewI started reading this book because it was Spider-Man. I kept reading this book because it is awesome. Miles Morales is a good kid. A good superhero. He's got a good heart and is written out in a very human way. He isn't perfect. He's filled with guilt and teenage angst. He's not infallible which makes him better, more interesting. He is all the best parts of being a teenager, and some of the worst as well, as he fumbles in talking to girls, sometimes doesn't communicate the best with his family and bottles everything up insideA teacher is meant to teach you, and help you become a better person, but some aren't there to do that. Some people are just not meant to teach and this novel shows you how.This novel also shows you how to stick to what you think is right, and stand up for what you believe in, in the best possible way.I would recommend this to not only any fans of Spider-Man, and Marvel, but to anyone who wants to read a YA novel filled with a lot of heart. If you want that then this is the book for you.
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  • Brittani
    August 1, 2017
    Most superhero books/movies/comics, etc. (in my, admittedly limited, experience) tend to put the superhero first, human second. Jason Reynolds' Miles Morales does the opposite, as its name suggests: Miles is a teenage kid first, superhero second and it's incredibly refreshing. From the very first scene I loved the family relationship in this book - it's a little complicated at times, but there's such obvious love and respect between Miles and his mom and dad. And obviously Ganke. I wanted a litt Most superhero books/movies/comics, etc. (in my, admittedly limited, experience) tend to put the superhero first, human second. Jason Reynolds' Miles Morales does the opposite, as its name suggests: Miles is a teenage kid first, superhero second and it's incredibly refreshing. From the very first scene I loved the family relationship in this book - it's a little complicated at times, but there's such obvious love and respect between Miles and his mom and dad. And obviously Ganke. I wanted a little bit more from his relationship with his uncle and the repercussions of it, but really, that's my only complaint and it's a small one. I haven't read anything else by Jason Reynolds, but this definitely made me want to pick his backlist up - there's an excellent mix of authentic voice and really beautiful bits of prose, especially when Miles has to write some poetry for class. Funny and heartbreaking, this is an excellent start to the DC YA crossover novels and one you won't want to miss.I was provided a free copy of this book on Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Becky
    July 11, 2017
    Another homerun for Jason Reynolds!! Miles Morales is an all-around, everyday kid trying to better himself, which should be lauded, but all his history teacher, Mr. Chamberlain, can do is set him up for disaster and cut him down every chance he gets. Even Miles's Spidey powers can't help him when it comes to his subversive history teacher or when Miles is trying to express his feelings to his love interest, Alycia. Can Miles solve his problem with Chamberlain, clear his name, and finally let Aly Another homerun for Jason Reynolds!! Miles Morales is an all-around, everyday kid trying to better himself, which should be lauded, but all his history teacher, Mr. Chamberlain, can do is set him up for disaster and cut him down every chance he gets. Even Miles's Spidey powers can't help him when it comes to his subversive history teacher or when Miles is trying to express his feelings to his love interest, Alycia. Can Miles solve his problem with Chamberlain, clear his name, and finally let Alycia know that he likes her?Jason Reynolds knows how to weave a masterful story and does so again here in the Marvel Universe. Not being a Marvel fan, I came in expecting a formulaic novel too full of Spiderman and was so pleased to read a well crafted, well-thought out novel with Spiderman as the medium. I hope there is a sequel in the future!Thanks to Net Galley for the ARC of this book in exchange for my honest review.
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