Dear Fahrenheit 451
A Gen-X librarian's snarky, laugh-out-loud funny, deeply moving collection of love letters and break-up notes to the books in her life.Librarians spend their lives weeding--not weeds but books! Books that have reached the end of their shelf life, both literally and figuratively. They remove the books that patrons no longer check out. And they put back the books they treasure. Annie Spence, who has a decade of experience as a Midwestern librarian, does this not only at her Michigan library but also at home, for her neighbors, at cocktail parties—everywhere. In Dear Fahrenheit 451, she addresses those books directly. We read her love letters to The Goldfinch and Matilda, as well as her snarky break-ups with Fifty Shades of Grey and Dear John. Her notes to The Virgin Suicides and The Time Traveler’s Wife feel like classics, sure to strike a powerful chord with readers. Through the lens of the books in her life, Annie comments on everything from women’s psychology to gay culture to health to poverty to childhood aspirations. Hilarious, compassionate, and wise, Dear Fahrenheit 451 is the consummate book-lover's birthday present, stocking stuffer, holiday gift, and all-purpose humor book.

Dear Fahrenheit 451 Details

TitleDear Fahrenheit 451
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 26th, 2017
PublisherFlatiron Books
ISBN-139781250106490
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Writing, Books About Books, Humor

Dear Fahrenheit 451 Review

  • Jenny (Reading Envy)
    January 1, 1970
    I am a huge fan of books on books. I even have a shelf for them in Goodreads! This was a great one, completely without the pretentiousness that can sometimes be a problem from well-intentioned readers, but that is little surprise - Annie Spence is a librarian! The first two thirds of the book are letters to her favorites (or break-up letters to books she can't see anymore), in different formats and approaches so the reader doesn't get bored. The last third, my favorite, are annotated book recomm I am a huge fan of books on books. I even have a shelf for them in Goodreads! This was a great one, completely without the pretentiousness that can sometimes be a problem from well-intentioned readers, but that is little surprise - Annie Spence is a librarian! The first two thirds of the book are letters to her favorites (or break-up letters to books she can't see anymore), in different formats and approaches so the reader doesn't get bored. The last third, my favorite, are annotated book recommendation lists with fun themes. I added a bunch of books to my to-read list, and you will too. It's Book Lust TNG, with a more casual tone.Thanks to the publisher for providing an early copy through Edelweiss. The expected publication date is 26 September 2017.
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  • Cindy (Thoughts From a Page) Burnett
    January 1, 1970
    5++++++I. LOVED. THIS. BOOK. The entire time I was reading it those words were running through my head over and over and over. Most of the book is letters written by Annie Spence to various books, many on the shelves of libraries where she has worked, or book-related items she has encountered. The last fifth or so of Dear Fahrenheit 451 contains books recommendations, excuses for staying home so you can read, books about librarians, and her all-time favorite reads. Upon finishing the book, my fi 5++++++I. LOVED. THIS. BOOK. The entire time I was reading it those words were running through my head over and over and over. Most of the book is letters written by Annie Spence to various books, many on the shelves of libraries where she has worked, or book-related items she has encountered. The last fifth or so of Dear Fahrenheit 451 contains books recommendations, excuses for staying home so you can read, books about librarians, and her all-time favorite reads. Upon finishing the book, my first impression was how well-read Spence is. It’s truly impressive the range of books she covers in this gem. My second thought is that I wish she was my local librarian. Her humor, quality of character, thoughts on various books, open-mindedness, and her absolute love of reading shone through on each and every page. In addition, she references things like The Cutting Edge (one of my all-time favorite movies), loves Frog and Toad and does not like Nicholas Sparks or Twilight. There are places we diverge: I love To Kill a Mockingbird (she does not), and I am not sure her all-time favorite book, The Virgin Suicides, would be for me. But those are minor details.Dear Fahrenheit 451 is clever in so many ways. First and foremost, the format is of the book is ingenious. Next, Spence signs each letter to her respective subject with a closing word or more frequently phrase that directly ties in with her letter. Writing to a book on popcorn that was written in 1976 and is headed to the library book sale, she signs off with “Stay A-Maize-ing”. Ending a letter to a book from the 1980’s about finding your color palette, she ends with “Stay Golden (unless you’re supposed to wear silver tones)”. Last, the top of each new letter contains the broad subject matter and author of the book (if the letter is written to a book) and then includes a witty reference or two for the more specific subject matter. In the letter written to the Twilight Series, the second description says “Me, Bite” and in her letter to a Cathy Cartoon Collection, the description is “Chocolate and Feminism, Aack!”. I didn’t pick up on how clever those were originally, and I had to go back and re-read the ones that I missed. Dear Fahrenheit 451 ranks at the top of my list for 2017 reads, and I plan to re-read it again very soon. When I do so, I am sure I will pick up on references that I missed the first time around. The beauty of the format is that it is easy to go back and re-read certain letters when there is not time to read the entire book. I cannot recommend this book highly enough; it is a sheer joy to read. Thanks Flatiron Books for providing me with a copy of Dear Fahrenheit 451. All opinions are my own.
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  • Rebecca Foster
    January 1, 1970
    Dear Annie Spence,You’re well on your way to being the next Nancy Pearl, girlie. Your book recommendations are amazeballs!* How have you read so many books that I’ve never even heard of?! (And I read 300 books a year.) Thanks to you I’ve instantly added 13 books to my TBR at a time when I’m desperately trying to cull it. Argh![*Here’s proof: I finished your book this morning; this afternoon I walked to the library to borrow one of your recommended novels, Deborah Moggach’s Tulip Fever, to take o Dear Annie Spence,You’re well on your way to being the next Nancy Pearl, girlie. Your book recommendations are amazeballs!* How have you read so many books that I’ve never even heard of?! (And I read 300 books a year.) Thanks to you I’ve instantly added 13 books to my TBR at a time when I’m desperately trying to cull it. Argh![*Here’s proof: I finished your book this morning; this afternoon I walked to the library to borrow one of your recommended novels, Deborah Moggach’s Tulip Fever, to take on a short break to Amsterdam later in the month.]Anyway, gotta be honest here: I wasn’t digging the snarky, sweary style of the letter section of your book. True, I thought it was super clever how you used the epistolary format to do so many different things – say sayonara to books you were weeding from your public library’s stock, declare undying love for The Virgin Suicides and other faves, express mixed feelings about books you abandoned or didn’t get the appeal of, and so on – but, I dunno, the chatty, between-girlfriends style was irking me. And that was before you slated a book written by my high school crush’s father. Awkward. Not gonna lie, I was heading towards a 2-star rating. But then I got to Part II, where you really start to channel Ms. Pearl and the authors of The Novel Cure with these terrifically original suggestions for themed and paired reading. Here’s books to read after making various excuses for not joining a social event, recommended otherworldly reads, tailored picks for hooking in a non-reading partner, novellas vs. chunksters, aka “Worth the Weight,” etc. I freakin’ loved it all. (And the article I wrote for Bookmarks magazine last month on books featuring libraries only mentioned two of your picks – Whew!) I’ll be holding on to your book for when I next need to locate a cozy “recovery read,” a sci-fi novel I think I can handle, a couple of books on Jonestown, or whatever, really.When’s your full-length Book Lust-style thematic book recommendations guide coming out??Happy reading until then!Love,Bookish Beck(3.5 stars, rounded up)
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  • Kelsey
    January 1, 1970
    All hail Annie Spence! This book is perfect for bibliophiles who love to laugh, and these recommendations are on point. I've already gone out and purchased six books based on the recommendations of this one, and they have not disappointed! I wish Annie Spence worked at a library near me!
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  • Lesa
    January 1, 1970
    If every public librarian, working and retired, buys a copy of Annie Spence's Dear Fahrenheit 451, she'll have a hit on her hands. It has a long subtitle, "Love and Heartbreak in the Stacks, A Librarian's Love Letters and Breakup Notes to the Books in Her Life." How do you get rid of books, in the library, or in your personal collection, when they meant something to you at one time? Spence explains why she keeps certain books, and which books haven't stood the test of time, and are heading elsew If every public librarian, working and retired, buys a copy of Annie Spence's Dear Fahrenheit 451, she'll have a hit on her hands. It has a long subtitle, "Love and Heartbreak in the Stacks, A Librarian's Love Letters and Breakup Notes to the Books in Her Life." How do you get rid of books, in the library, or in your personal collection, when they meant something to you at one time? Spence explains why she keeps certain books, and which books haven't stood the test of time, and are heading elsewhere.Spence's book is a fun collection of letters to the books themselves. And, she classifies each book. For example, Fiction - Tolstoy, Leo. Classic Russian Literature. The Bachelor. Choices. In other words, she just couldn't get into Anna Karenina, and addresses, "Dear Anna Karenina". I watched "The Bachelor" instead of reading the book. It's going back; it's not for her. Do you remember Color Me Beautiful in the '80s? If so, you probably know your season, and what you should wear. As a librarian, Spence admits she purposefully gave the wrong book to a reader once when asked for historical romances set in South America. She knew the reader didn't really want Gabriel Garcia Marquez' Of Love and Other Demons, but she couldn't help herself.But, my favorite letter, and I'm sure that of many librarians out there, was the letter "Dear Magnificent Library featured in Beauty and the Beast Movie". Like Spence, that's my favorite Disney movie. I'd love to quote the entire letter to you, but I'll just mention this. "Belle is my favorite Disney heroine....She's just trying to finish her book. In my opinion, the premise of the film is: people constantly interrupt Belle while she's tryna read."Everything about this book is for an avid reader to love. There are "Books That Lead to More Books", "Good Books with Bad Covers", lists of "Books I'll Never Break Up With". If you enjoy this book, you'll probably find yourself making your own lists. Or, you'll nod your head, and remember you loved or want to read that book. Or, you'll disagree with a selection. No matter what you do, readers will have an opinion about the selections in Spence's Dear Fahrenheit 451.
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  • Billie
    January 1, 1970
    I liked it even though she and I disagree on a number of books and I didn't feel the need to rush out and read any of the books over which she rhapsodized. It probably should have been a paperback original, though or maybe a simultaneous hardcover/paperback release. It's the sort of cute, gifty concept book that a few people will buy in hardcover, but that would be an easy handsell in paperback.
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  • Kate Olson
    January 1, 1970
    The perfect read for any book lover, but an incredibly special book for all librarians! Buy this one for a librarian in your life TODAY. Thanks to Flatiron for the review copy - all opinions are my own Another gushing review from me ~ this is one of those books I just want to hug and keep on my forever bookshelf with all of my other books about books. My librarian and book nerd books. Spence has infused this book just the right amount of sass and profanity to prevent it from being preachy, and The perfect read for any book lover, but an incredibly special book for all librarians! Buy this one for a librarian in your life TODAY. Thanks to Flatiron for the review copy - all opinions are my own Another gushing review from me ~ this is one of those books I just want to hug and keep on my forever bookshelf with all of my other books about books. My librarian and book nerd books. Spence has infused this book just the right amount of sass and profanity to prevent it from being preachy, and even when I'm gasping at her judgements of some books (how DARE you speak like that of TWILIGHT?? I mean....?!?) I'm laughing at the same time. I will be starting a journey of attempting to read all of her recommendations because she speaks so passionately about them - just like I tend to when talking about my favorite titles. The library and weeding references are amazing and will resonate with librarians of all types. And honestly, I just want to ask Annie to join my book club and be my best friend. LOVE.
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  • Darcysmom
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC of this book from Netgalley for free in exchange for an honest review. I am writing this with happy tears in my eyes. Yes, Dear Fahrenheit 451 made me so happy that I cried. And I want to hug my librarian friends and every librarian on shift at my local library. Annie Spence is totally my new author bestie. I want to drink wine and read books with her. Dear Fahrenheit 451 is a wonderful, irreverent, and heartfelt book about books. The first part of the book is the letters menti I received an ARC of this book from Netgalley for free in exchange for an honest review. I am writing this with happy tears in my eyes. Yes, Dear Fahrenheit 451 made me so happy that I cried. And I want to hug my librarian friends and every librarian on shift at my local library. Annie Spence is totally my new author bestie. I want to drink wine and read books with her. Dear Fahrenheit 451 is a wonderful, irreverent, and heartfelt book about books. The first part of the book is the letters mentioned in the title - they are great! The rest of the book is filled with book recommendations for every mood and type of reader. If I hadn't started this book at bedtime, I would have read it in one sitting. It is definitely a book I will come back to over and over. I will not be weeding it from my shelves.
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  • Ginger
    January 1, 1970
    So fun... like a younger Nancy Pearl (in fact, this might have gotten five stars from me if it weren't for all the language... I can handle a little, but sheesh, that much isn't even shocking anymore, just exhausting).I loved the first 3/4 the most, with the "Dear" letter format. The last section added a bunch of titles to my TBR, but I kinda wish the editor had just insisted that was a separate book, later, when Spence was an established writer-librarian with a following, because she's gonna be So fun... like a younger Nancy Pearl (in fact, this might have gotten five stars from me if it weren't for all the language... I can handle a little, but sheesh, that much isn't even shocking anymore, just exhausting).I loved the first 3/4 the most, with the "Dear" letter format. The last section added a bunch of titles to my TBR, but I kinda wish the editor had just insisted that was a separate book, later, when Spence was an established writer-librarian with a following, because she's gonna be.
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  • Brandee
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this! It was funny, sweet and relatable. You'll find books you recognize and more to add to your neverending TBR pile. A quick and satisfying read!
  • E. Ce Miller
    January 1, 1970
    Oh my God, I love this woman. This book is so good. The fellow book-lover in me has found her soul mate.
  • Christina
    January 1, 1970
    I don't even know how to begin. First, though I have not read many, I really like a good book about other books. My first was probably 84, Charing Cross Road, which I immediately adored. I have also read Howards End Is on the Landing: A Year of Reading from Home (which got me through staying at my mom's house just after the death of her mother). Other than that, I've mainly got a longer list of to-read books about books than what I've read.So, seeing this book—and I cannot remember where I spott I don't even know how to begin. First, though I have not read many, I really like a good book about other books. My first was probably 84, Charing Cross Road, which I immediately adored. I have also read Howards End Is on the Landing: A Year of Reading from Home (which got me through staying at my mom's house just after the death of her mother). Other than that, I've mainly got a longer list of to-read books about books than what I've read.So, seeing this book—and I cannot remember where I spotted it...probably just somewhere on Goodreads?—made me add it immediately to my to-read list. What really spoke to me, even before cracking open the cover, was the title. I fell in love with Fahrenheit 451 in middle school and have reread it several times (something I typically do not do) since then. The idea Spence explores here of writing directly to the book, really should hit home with many, many self-proclaimed bibliophiles out there. This is the same level of devotion and connection we feel with books that makes us, upon finishing certain books, go through the dreaded book withdrawal. Please, just give me back my characters! Don't let it be over.Spence's insight and humor was spectacular and so, so relatable. I was literally laughing out loud and slapping my leg. Some of my responses were brought on by sweet, dear nostalgia with things Spence would mention, and some was just the sheer hilarity her words created.The summary touts Spence as a Gen-Xer, and in most instances, I am as well. But I have, honest to God, been snapped at and argued with about my place at the end of the Gen-X line. The angst, the hopelessness, the Punk Rock,...none of that really resonated with me, but I'm too old to be a Millennial/Gen-Y. I happen to fall into this micro-generation that has apparently been dubbed Xennials (which, I'm not even sure how to say properly). Regardless, I got almost every reference Spence made and I loved her all the more for it. I don't think this is necessary to enjoy this book at all, but it only improved its face value. Her biting wit is just damned funny. She's this generation's Erma Bombeck (extra points to me, because I have read a Bombeck, and Spence mentions Bombeck in this book). She's topical, insightful and (did I mention this?) hilarious.This one I could read again and keep on hand just to have book recommendations ready to go. I received this book for free from the publisher via a Goodreads Giveaway. This in no way affected my opinion of the book, nor the content of my review.
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  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC of this title from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Dear Fahrenheit 451 starts off so strong. The beginning of the book starts out with such an accurate explanation of librarianship that I felt like I could have written it myself. And I enjoyed it for the first few letters. Unfortunately, after a while, it became a bit repetitive and the letters were hard to differentiate. I also wondered if there would be much appeal for the book beyond librarians and truly avid (and I received an ARC of this title from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Dear Fahrenheit 451 starts off so strong. The beginning of the book starts out with such an accurate explanation of librarianship that I felt like I could have written it myself. And I enjoyed it for the first few letters. Unfortunately, after a while, it became a bit repetitive and the letters were hard to differentiate. I also wondered if there would be much appeal for the book beyond librarians and truly avid (and nonjudgmental) book lovers, because it feels like most people wouldn't understand the appeal of discussing so many different books. I say that the readers would have to be nonjudgmental because of the varied opinions, and how easily someone could be turned off by the views on certain books they may or may not have liked. In that vein, I wish that Spence had been a bit less predictably judgmental at times. Bashing Nicholas Sparks and Twilight is hardly a radical move, and it feels like a no-risk opinion to have. Other quibbles: Spence's use of a derogatory term made me frown, but I pointed it out in my review on NetGalley and I'm hoping it will be addressed before final publishing. Also, it would have been nice to see Spence address more radical titles than the standard ones found in most English classes. I understand that the book needs to be accessible, but it could have been an excellent opportunity to introduce readers to other titles.
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  • Diana Iozzia
    January 1, 1970
    "Dear Fahrenheit 451"Written by Annie SpenceReview written by Diana Iozzia “Dear Fahrenheit 451” is a book of love letters written by Annie Spence to the books she loves and the ones she is no longer keeping in her collection. The list of books span to beloved and nostalgic childhood books to ridiculous books like “Grey” and “Yertle the Turtle”. I had wanted to read and review this, because my hobby is to review books! I was interested to read the author’s perspectives and opinions on books I’d "Dear Fahrenheit 451"Written by Annie SpenceReview written by Diana Iozzia “Dear Fahrenheit 451” is a book of love letters written by Annie Spence to the books she loves and the ones she is no longer keeping in her collection. The list of books span to beloved and nostalgic childhood books to ridiculous books like “Grey” and “Yertle the Turtle”. I had wanted to read and review this, because my hobby is to review books! I was interested to read the author’s perspectives and opinions on books I’d read in the past. The first and second third of the book are dedicated to the love and goodbye letters. The last third is dedicated to games, book recommendations, and little quips. I enjoyed this last section most, I think. I half enjoyed this book, so I would really grate it as a two and a half out of five, but please take that with a grain of salt. I think that this book could be enjoyed by many people, but I personally do not enjoy it that much. I think it borders on comedy, but I don’t particularly pick up books for their comedic factor. With all of my reviews, I type up the notes I take while reading. I use page markers and post-it-notes for this. Be prepared, I am about to absolutely dissect and annihilate this book.1. The introduction is very startling with profanity. The whole book is? It’s just jarring and unnecessary. I think this book is a fun book to read on the beach, in the library, or in bed. When I read in these fashions, I don’t see the need to read something laced with tacky and rude language. Maybe I’m just a prude.2. There are many books in here I haven’t read, which I understand. Some of them I skipped to avoid spoilers (i.e. “The Goldfinch”). A lot of these letters are not insightful, they’re just childish. I don’t think that reading goodbye letters to “Yertle the Turtle” or “Fifty Shades of Grey” is a pastime for me.3. I really enjoyed her insight and letter about “The Virgin Suicides”. It was probably the letter I enjoyed most and did not feel uncomfortable reading.4. Why would you write a letter to a book you didn’t read? 5. I understand this is a kitschy, unique book, but this is Buzzfeed-cringe-worthy mixed with manic pixie dream girl vibes. No, I don’t need to read another person who personifies the cringe of “500 Days of Summer”). Please stop trying to be “relatable” and “funny”.6. “It’s hard not to sound like a dick when you say it like that”. Honey, this whole book makes you sound like one.7. Mentions Bobby Kennedy. My love.8. She writes a fake script and it’s horrendously unfunny. Is this just the author’s persona, or is she actually just that annoying?9. Absolutely no actual intellectual insight into most of these books. 10. Girl, I understand how heartbreaking and sad “The Diary of Anne Frank”, but she makes a list of what she wishes Anne could have accomplished if she lived. She didn’t, it’s haunting, but stop. It’s the Justin Bieber / Anne Frank / Belieber stupidity all over again.11. Don’t mess with “The Giving Tree”. I don’t want your rude opinions. Nope. Bye.12. Okay, babe, I can tell you’ve read Twilight and loved it. Everyone secretly loves it. Deniiiiiiiial.13. Hi, if you haven’t read a book in 20 years, don’t waste your rude opinions, when you say you’d give it a second chance. This book is maddening.14. It just seems to happen she dislikes every book everyone else on the planet likes. Why do you have to try so hard to be a character Michael Cera would date?15. The section “Turning Your Lover into a Reader”. Yes, let’s talk for 200 paragraphs and mention feminism and self-independence and autonomy, but try to get people who don’t want to read involved in reading. It’s an entire section dedicated to why men don’t read because they like football and television too much. Men are so uncultured and primitive. Right? Ugh. So relatable.*I received a complementary finished copy from Flatiron Books.*
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  • Amy Layton
    January 1, 1970
    Dear Dear Fahrenheit 451,This is the opposite of a break-up letter.  This is a love letter.  I have spent the past two days falling in love with you, from when I opened up your packaging to when I set you down for the last time.  You are an endearing book that made me place my hand over my heart, and a hilarious book that made me place my hand over my mouth as some people asked whether I was okay (because apparently you made me laugh a few laughs that didn't sound like laughs--that Infinite Jest Dear Dear Fahrenheit 451,This is the opposite of a break-up letter.  This is a love letter.  I have spent the past two days falling in love with you, from when I opened up your packaging to when I set you down for the last time.  You are an endearing book that made me place my hand over my heart, and a hilarious book that made me place my hand over my mouth as some people asked whether I was okay (because apparently you made me laugh a few laughs that didn't sound like laughs--that Infinite Jest joke though).  There were quite a few books that I've read in between your pages, and even more that I recognized.  Dear Fahrenheit 451, you make me proud to be a reader, proud to be reading on the bus and in bed and on the couch and on my breaks at work.  I loved your snarky humor and I loved the fact that you were written by a librarian (it just makes library school way more fun knowing that).  I wish that there were more books like you, with fun book recommendations at the end and the all-too-familiar library-patron drama.  I mean, you're totally right about people asking the strangest things and placing holds for books that would throw you for a loop.  But most importantly, I love your love and respect for books, even the ones that aren't your cup of tea and even the ones that used to be your cup of tea.  Books speak to us at the most random points in our lives, and I think it was you who quoted somebody else (who maybe quoted somebody else--who knows??) and said that no book is read by the same person twice.  So maybe I'll see you again in a few years, and I'll have a few more books under my belt.  Then we'll share even more inside jokes and make even more recommendations for patrons and book buyers alike.  You ultimately give me hope for the future, hope for love and humor and a career and all of the things a person might want out of life.  You have it all, and for that, I think I'll always turn to you.Yours truly,AmyReview cross-posted here!
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  • Tonstant Weader
    January 1, 1970
    Dear Fahrenheit 451 has a clever conceit. One I wish I had thought of myself. One I am tempted to steal.Dear Dear Fahrenheit 451,You made me laugh out loud, dearest Dear Fahrenheit. Your author Annie Spence is a funny writer with a breezy style that is enjoyable in small doses. Thankfully, there was no law that I had to read you straight through from cover to cover. I gave myself permission to read a few of your author’s letters to books at a time and then reading something else. Otherwise, it w Dear Fahrenheit 451 has a clever conceit. One I wish I had thought of myself. One I am tempted to steal.Dear Dear Fahrenheit 451,You made me laugh out loud, dearest Dear Fahrenheit. Your author Annie Spence is a funny writer with a breezy style that is enjoyable in small doses. Thankfully, there was no law that I had to read you straight through from cover to cover. I gave myself permission to read a few of your author’s letters to books at a time and then reading something else. Otherwise, it would be like eating an entire box of chocolates at once, I would have a sugar coma and a stomach ache. Actually, it would probably be more like eating peeps, there’s very little substance in those letters.Your author, Annie, writes to books as though she is writing to a friend, confessional and casual. I guess working in a library leads to having opinions on all sorts of books which is why the selection of books is so very esoteric. Some might say strange. Nonetheless, it was a fun read in small bites.So I will give high marks for the clever conceit. The idea of letters to books is so clever. Sadly, the letters were not half as clever as the concept. It’s probably just me, but if I were going to write dozens of letters to books, I might try to write the sort of letters that people used to write when people actually wrote letters. Most of these letters sound like breezy, effort-free e-mails sent on a whim. I never got the sense that your writer paused to gather her thoughts, but wrote right off the top of her head. Perhaps that is her intent and she artfully succeeds at seeming as though she put next to no effort into the book. I don’t know, so I am giving her bonus points for creating the impression that she didn’t really try.Cheers,Your constant Tonstant.p.s. Where’s the “Love and Heartbreak” promised in the subtitle?Dear Fahrenheit 451 will be released on September 26th. I received an e-galley from NetGalley for advance review.Dear Fahrenheit 451 at Flatiron Books | MacmillanAnnie Spence author sitehttps://tonstantweaderreviews.wordpre...
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  • Alyssa
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks, first of all, to Netgalley and Flatiron Books for the ARC in exchange for an honest review!Annie Spence sounds like a fun person to grab coffee (or tea) with and wander around a library or bookstore giving commentary on everything (basically an average Saturday for me--when I can't convince friends to come I just talk to strangers or myself out loud). I loved how by turns the letters in this book were hilarious, poignant, beautiful, and occasionally a high PG-13. Her letter to kidlit wri Thanks, first of all, to Netgalley and Flatiron Books for the ARC in exchange for an honest review!Annie Spence sounds like a fun person to grab coffee (or tea) with and wander around a library or bookstore giving commentary on everything (basically an average Saturday for me--when I can't convince friends to come I just talk to strangers or myself out loud). I loved how by turns the letters in this book were hilarious, poignant, beautiful, and occasionally a high PG-13. Her letter to kidlit writers and librarians was particularly appreciated, as I'm the former, and I copied it down to look at on dreary days. This book reads like a collection of blog entries, in the best ways. It's easy to flip through, find something you like, and then browse for more. I'd recommend it to avid readers, writers, and people who have ever had to interact with the public and books (professors, librarians (obv), booksellers...).
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  • Rachael
    January 1, 1970
    I think every reader can relate to that moment when you finish a book and you LOVE it or when you finish a book and you HATE it. This book is written completely in letter form and I adored the format. I would be sitting on my couch reading this book and laughing out loud. This is so out of character for me because it takes quite a bit to get me to laugh out loud while reading a book. I could not help but giggle my way through this book. Spence has the funniest voice I have ever read. I honestly I think every reader can relate to that moment when you finish a book and you LOVE it or when you finish a book and you HATE it. This book is written completely in letter form and I adored the format. I would be sitting on my couch reading this book and laughing out loud. This is so out of character for me because it takes quite a bit to get me to laugh out loud while reading a book. I could not help but giggle my way through this book. Spence has the funniest voice I have ever read. I honestly felt like she was on my couch sharing all her feelings with me about each book she wrote a letter to. Spence has read very diversely, especially since she is a librarian, and many of the book recommendations at the end of the book I had not even heard of. This was awesome and also completely frustrating because my TBR is already out of control and I added so many more from her list.I recommend this book for any reader who loves books about books. I think this would make a fantastic Christmas gift for any reader in your life. I already know several people I plan on gifting this book to.
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  • Kalie
    January 1, 1970
    I imagine this book will probably be the most appreciated by librarians and booksellers in particular. Told through a series of letters, Spence's tone is funny, pithy, and an overall delight to read even when I disagreed with her opinions on several of the titles she highlighted inside. It has such a niche appeal towards a specific group of people that I'm not sure will resonate as much with anyone outside of it, but as someone who is a bookseller, I enjoyed this one quite a bit!
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  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    A sweet and tongue-firmly-in-cheek book about books loved and books lost by a book lover (librarian, in this instance). The first half is a series of letters to books the author has loved, reviled, or merrily weeded from the library collection. The second half is a collection of readers' advisory essays of book suggestion. This is out at the end of September (and would be good to keep in mind as stocking stuffers for your book-loving giftees).
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  • Angie Shere
    January 1, 1970
    Loved, loved, loved this ARC I received courtesy of netgalley. As a fellow librarian and lover of books, I especially enjoyed her stories about reader's advisory. And her letters to the books she is weeding are hilarious! I found myself compelled to read bits out loud to my husband. This book had me laughing out loud and in tears at some points. I highly, highly recommend this to librarians and or book lovers. Unfortunately for me, I have even more books to add to my to read piles. On the top? T Loved, loved, loved this ARC I received courtesy of netgalley. As a fellow librarian and lover of books, I especially enjoyed her stories about reader's advisory. And her letters to the books she is weeding are hilarious! I found myself compelled to read bits out loud to my husband. This book had me laughing out loud and in tears at some points. I highly, highly recommend this to librarians and or book lovers. Unfortunately for me, I have even more books to add to my to read piles. On the top? The Virgin Suicides.......
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  • Sharyn Berg
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to NetGalley for an advance copy. As the author gives her honest opinion of the books she has read, so must I give my honest opinion of her book. I love the concept of this book and eagerly looked forward to reading it. What could be better than a book about, or should I say, TO books from a librarian's perspective? However, I did not feel that the book delivered what it promised, as I found the descriptions of the books she read were lacking in detail and depth, sharing little to make me Thanks to NetGalley for an advance copy. As the author gives her honest opinion of the books she has read, so must I give my honest opinion of her book. I love the concept of this book and eagerly looked forward to reading it. What could be better than a book about, or should I say, TO books from a librarian's perspective? However, I did not feel that the book delivered what it promised, as I found the descriptions of the books she read were lacking in detail and depth, sharing little to make me want to go out and read them myself. This is what I thought the intent of the book was, to enlighten me and whet my appetite for future reading. Even books that I had previously read were not made plain or appealing to me and the verbal descriptions of covers that I can't see, on books that I never heard of, did nothing for me. At the end of the book she references her readers making lists of the books that she wrote letters to for future reading. Sadly to say, not a book that she covered jumped off the page to say, "Read me, read me." The frequent use of off-color language and sexual references certainly did nothing to paint this book in a favorable light, though they alone would not prevent me from giving a positive review, if I felt it was warranted. Needless to say, I was disappointed in this book that I was very eager to read and enjoy.
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  • Melanie
    January 1, 1970
    Annoying.
  • Sydney♛booksofkings ♚
    January 1, 1970
    r2c
  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    This book is HILARIOUS. Esp for librarians. Are you a librarian? Read this book! You only might pee your pants but you will definitely cry out your eyes. I promise.
  • Rosann
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! Slip into the world of the public librarian; funny, ironic, frustrated, informative, defensive, combative, inventive, enthusiastic, and generous. I enjoyed this book, period.
  • Tawnee Isner
    January 1, 1970
    I will own this book. it was light and amazing.
  • Jessica White
    January 1, 1970
    It's official, I love this book.Dear Fahrenheit 451: A Librarian's Love Letters and Break-Up Notes to the Books in Her Life is such a cute idea and Annie Spence definitely delivered!! This book consists of letters Annie has written to books, whether they be happy or sad letters, each book she picks up is getting one. Some of them are life long favorites but have to retire because their spine is obliterated. Some of them hadn't been checked out, or even picked up, in over five years. Some of them It's official, I love this book.Dear Fahrenheit 451: A Librarian's Love Letters and Break-Up Notes to the Books in Her Life is such a cute idea and Annie Spence definitely delivered!! This book consists of letters Annie has written to books, whether they be happy or sad letters, each book she picks up is getting one. Some of them are life long favorites but have to retire because their spine is obliterated. Some of them hadn't been checked out, or even picked up, in over five years. Some of them may help improve your life. Some books are instant hits and some are total flops. But one thing is certain, Annie knows what she's talking about. I loved that she has spent so much time around books and she understands working with books is HARD. Many people are only looking for the book because the movie trailer just came out, um newsflash THE BOOK IS ALWAYS BETTER.But honestly, I found myself laughing throughout this entire book.Some of the funniest parts to me:-One in three men will say their favorite book is Hatchet by Gary Paulsen-Going to a party and making The Great Gatsby references to the bookshelf you're talking to-Running to the kids section when life gets too realUtmost respect from me to you Annie, you wrote a great great book and I will highly recommend this to everyone I know! Big shout out to NetGalley and Flatiron Books for granting my wish and providing me with this wonderful read!Mark your calendars, Dear Fahrenheit 451 hits shelves September 26! This review and more can be found at A Reader's Diary!
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    This was a really sweet book with a narrow appeal, mostly to veteran librarians or booksellers. I had read many of the books she discussed, but I confess that I skipped most of the parts about books I wasn't familiar with. I loved her asides about library patrons.
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  • Joslyn Allen
    January 1, 1970
    Review published: https://chronicbibliophilia.wordpress...As a bibliophile and book blogger, I have a not-surprising weak spot for books about books, especially those that surrender to the madness that is an all-consuming love of reading and surrounding oneself with paper worlds. I have had the good fortune of receiving advance copies of two new releases of this kind recently.First, let's take a moment with "Dear Fahrenheit 451: Love and Heartbreak in the Stacks" by Annie Spence, which I found t Review published: https://chronicbibliophilia.wordpress...As a bibliophile and book blogger, I have a not-surprising weak spot for books about books, especially those that surrender to the madness that is an all-consuming love of reading and surrounding oneself with paper worlds. I have had the good fortune of receiving advance copies of two new releases of this kind recently.First, let's take a moment with "Dear Fahrenheit 451: Love and Heartbreak in the Stacks" by Annie Spence, which I found to be an epistolary gem. With delicious wit and cunning, Spence has written letters - some love, some hate - to books that have impacted her life. Spence is a public librarian and life-long reader, so the scope of the books to which she is exposed and to which she addresses her missives is expansive and extremely smart. There is something in here for everyone. Whether it is her love letter to Roald Dahl's "Matilda" to "tell you how much I loved your dark humor, [and] thank you for making a bookish girl with DIY bangs like me the hero of a story"; her rubber-gloved dismissal of a library copy of "The One-Hour Orgasm"; or her rebellious perusal of "The Fancy Bookshelf at a Party I Wasn't Technically Invited To", the letters in this book had me snorting with laughter and feeling very smug at the 'in' jokes of the bookish.In her gushing letter to Jeffrey Eugenides' "The Virgin Suicides", Spence goes delightfully gaga and fan girls out, telling the book:"I love every one of your fucking golden sentences. They are slam-you-shut-and-clutch-you-against-my-chest sublime. ... I love that after I read you, every time, my own everyday movements and the quotidian moments of my life feel more beautiful. ... It's more than that, though, I feel like you get me. Like, get me. I don't feel like you were written for me. I feel like you were written FROM INSIDE OF my psyche."That's pure, unfiltered and poetic love.Annie Spence isn't afraid to be dismissive of the pulp that comes across her path, either. In her 'Dear John' letter to Nicholas Sparks' "Dear John", she slays."It sounds kind of obvious to say this because you're a book, but I want to be moved by your words. In the prologue you say, 'Our story has three parts: a beginning, a middle, and an end.' No shit, John. That's how that works. Give me something that I've never heard. Describe something I'm familiar with but never thought of as beautiful before. Or at least throw in some more equestrian scenes.          Anyway, not to beat an underutilized horse, but I'm donating you to my doctor's office. I don't know what I'm going to make up to say to my relative when she asks if I read you. I'm just guessing, given your author, that one character turns out to be an angel? I'm gonna hedge my bets and lead with that at the Christmas party."Two thirds of "Dear Fahrenheit 451" is made up of such letters, which are true to the book's premise and singly and collectively endearing. The final third of the book consists of recommendations and some inventive reading lists. Now, I love a good list, but this section feels like filler. It neither kept my attention nor maintained the witty repartee that made the rest of the book such a success. I wish Spence and her editors had simply been satisfied with leaving well enough alone without tacking on this incongruous, appendix-like section. In spite of that small criticism, however, I thought this book was a brilliant concept that was brilliantly executed. I felt immediately compelled to press my copy into the hands of my local librarians to share my joy.In a very different concept, Elissa Brent Weissman has brought together a collection of some 25 children's book authors and illustrators in "Our Story Begins". Alongside very short memoirs focused on 'how I realized I needed to make children's books' appear childhood writings and illustrations that warm the heart and inspire. This collection not only features creators of children's books, it is targeted towards children's literature readers. That is, it is meant for children, for future authors and illustrators. The artists in these pages share their experience and their wisdom, allow for the fact that we all have to start somewhere and for the possibility that not everything we create has to be gold, and remind us that sometimes childhood dreams become dream jobs. They are normalizing the creative process, offering tips and tricks of the trade, and encouraging kids to follow their passion.Tom Angleberger opens up the door to the editorial process:"Whether you're talking or writing, you can't just blah blah blah all the time. You've got to think about who is listening and figure out how to keep them listening and how to make what you're saying sensible to them."Eric Rohmann beautifully incapsulates the creative process:"I have always made pictures. I drew what was around me, what I liked, and what I cared about. Drawing was how I found my way in the world. That's because drawing requires looking closely, so closely that you begin to see details you'd never see in a glance. You begin to see variations in color and shadow. You begin to see patterns and connections. But as I drew more and more, I discovered something else. Drawing isn't just about seeing. It's about feeling. A picture is not just a description, but a doorway into my thoughts and emotions." This passage, at least in my mind, translates for visual arts AND writing, pinpointing why creating and consuming books can be such an emotional, formative experience. "Our Story Begins" is for the creator in all of us. In picture book form, it is warm and welcoming to children of all ages and gives hope for the untold masterpieces that are yet to come."'Books erase bias, they make the uncommon everyday, and the mundane exotic. A book makes all cultures universal.'" - Grace LinThank you to Flatiron Books for providing a complimentary advance copy of "Dear Fahrenheit 451" (published in the US on 9/26/17) and to Simon & Schuster: Atheneum Books for Young Readers for "Our Story Begins" (published in the on US 7/4/17).
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