The Library of Fates
A romantic coming-of-age fantasy tale steeped in Indian folklore, perfect for fans of The Star-Touched Queen and The Wrath and the DawnNo one is entirely certain what brings the Emperor Sikander to Shalingar. Until now, the idyllic kingdom has been immune to his many violent conquests. To keep the visit friendly, Princess Amrita has offered herself as his bride, sacrificing everything—family, her childhood love, and her freedom—to save her people. But her offer isn't enough.The unthinkable happens, and Amrita finds herself a fugitive, utterly alone but for an oracle named Thala, who was kept by Sikander as a slave and managed to escape amid the chaos of a palace under siege. With nothing and no one else to turn to, Amrita and Thala are forced to rely on each other. But while Amrita feels responsible for her kingdom and sets out to warn her people, the newly free Thala has no such ties. She encourages Amrita to go on a quest to find the fabled Library of All Things, where it is possible for each of them to reverse their fates. To go back to before Sikander took everything from them.Stripped of all that she loves, caught between her rosy past and an unknown future, will Amrita be able to restore what was lost, or does another life—and another love—await?

The Library of Fates Details

TitleThe Library of Fates
Author
FormatHardcover
ReleaseJul 18th, 2017
PublisherRazorbill
ISBN1595148582
ISBN-139781595148582
Number of pages354 pages
Rating
GenreFantasy, Young Adult

The Library of Fates Review

  • Cait • A Page with a View
    June 20, 2017
    The last 25% of this book deserves 5 stars on its own because that was amazing. I had expected the plot to be yet another variation of a princess who's betrothed to an evil guy, feels powerless to change her fate, and is in love with her childhood best friend. But then it ended up going in a totally different direction and I LOVED it. Amrita doesn't know who her mother is or much about her own identity... and ok there's really no way to sum this up without spoiling anything. If you like symbolis The last 25% of this book deserves 5 stars on its own because that was amazing. I had expected the plot to be yet another variation of a princess who's betrothed to an evil guy, feels powerless to change her fate, and is in love with her childhood best friend. But then it ended up going in a totally different direction and I LOVED it. Amrita doesn't know who her mother is or much about her own identity... and ok there's really no way to sum this up without spoiling anything. If you like symbolism and mythology then you'll probably like this! I also loved how there were familiar elements from different religions woven into an absolutely gorgeous world. It's fun to see a new take on those ideas. The writing & execution could have been stronger in parts, but the creative plot more than made up for that. I'd recommend it if you were a fan of The Star-Touched Queen!!Thank you to the publisher for sending me an ARC.
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  • Aila
    May 9, 2017
    This review can be found on Happy Indulgence.Thank you Penguin for the review copy!With a lush, opulent world, breathtaking plot, and endearing heroine, The Library of Fates was a wonderful read. I think the mention of The Star-Touched Queen in the blurb is very apt for this one - I can see aspects reminiscent of the former, and not just because of the foundation of Indian folklore for both worlds. No doubt, fantasy readers will adore The Library of Fates and the journey that Amrita embarks on. This review can be found on Happy Indulgence.Thank you Penguin for the review copy!With a lush, opulent world, breathtaking plot, and endearing heroine, The Library of Fates was a wonderful read. I think the mention of The Star-Touched Queen in the blurb is very apt for this one - I can see aspects reminiscent of the former, and not just because of the foundation of Indian folklore for both worlds. No doubt, fantasy readers will adore The Library of Fates and the journey that Amrita embarks on. I could also gush on and on about the ending, and the smile I had after I read the last page. I haven't heard much about this book until recently and I think it deserves much more attention!The story starts with the introduction of Princess Amrita of Shalingar, a quiet kingdom based on Indian culture. She’s preparing for the arrival of the guest Emperor Sikander, the ruler who expanded the Macedonian empire, and her arranged marriage to him. Upon arriving, however, Sikander’s cruel machinations lead to the downfall of Shalingar and Amrita suddenly becomes a fugitive in the nation she grew up in.Raised in a heavily sheltered life, Amrita was really easy to like as a character. She’s quite selfless and definitely cares for the people of her kingdom. Amrita is a flawed character as well, as readers can see that her cautious attitude makes her hesitant on actions. This caution stems from fear, whether it’s for the consequences her actions would instill or how it would affect the people she loves. Amrita is also biracial, being half Shalingar (the Indian-inspired kingdom) and half Macedonian. Reading in her first person POV narrative was really enjoyable. However, Amrita is also quite ignorant on the world outside her home and quite clueless when she finds herself on the run. Luckily, she creates a bond with Thala, an oracle who was enslaved by Sikander for her prophetic abilities. The two girls work together towards the Library of All Things, where Thala tells Amrita that it holds the power to change their fates.I wanted to choose my own future.I didn’t want to be Sikander’s bride.What I wanted was too impossible to say aloud, too dangerous, too fraught.Amrita is a bit unbelieving at first. The grandiose world of The Library of Fates has a historic backdrop, with references to ancient civilizations such as Anatolia and the Silk Road. Although the creation of the world is rife with magic and folklore, the closest to “magic” that she has encountered is the prophetic abilities of oracles such as Thala. However, as Amrita meets new people in her adventure towards the Library of All Things and discovers secrets hidden in her past and kingdom, she may just start believing in the myths that she grew up hearing.I wanted to believe that there was magic woven into the world in which we lived; something underneath the surface of what we could see, an entire universe we didn’t quite understand, but that didn’t mean that it didn’t exist.The journey that Amrita takes physically is a fun adventure with gorgeous settings and unveiled mysteries, but the internal journey Amrita’s character takes was also extremely phenomenal, and one of the stand-out points of the story. She starts the book off with everything: doting father, peaceful kingdom, loving court who are basically like her family, and even a developing crush. After Sikander’s invasion, however, she starts losing each of these, one by one. But on her journey towards the Library of All Things, Amrita may also discover her gaining others things, even as the loss heals into a scar.I might have been ready for death but if I wasn’t Amrita, who was I? If I wasn’t the collection of my experiences, then what was left of me?I really adored her friendship with Thala, the oracle that escapes with her. While Amrita is cautious and wary, Thala has no regrets with her actions. We see her pain when she recalls being taken away from her family by Sikander, and her support for Amrita as the princess without a kingdom deals with her own losses. There is a romance that occurs, but it’s very light and not expanded on. It’s a romance that deals with two souls finding each other again, against all odds. It’s a romance rich with history and love and loss and sacrifice. Although there is quite little development in the pages-wise (I felt like it was put aside for the plot progression), there is no doubt that the romance has layer and depth that makes it compelling despite the page time.The story really packs a punch in the 300-pages that The Library of Fates encompasses. There’s a physical journey, a mental journey, and a steady plot and pace ready to make readers gasp at surprising twists. The writing was melodic and easy to follow; no purple prose too, for readers that are wary of that! I finished this book quickly, but no doubt have plans to turn back to it - especially with how the story will linger in my mind for months to come.The Library of Fates was stunning. I’m trapped in between a 4 and 4.5 for a rating because I feel like some aspects of it could have been expanded, thus giving me more of a connection while reading. One of the biggest things is Amrita’s relationship to others; for example, the love for the people who work with her father was there, but fleetingly. I do think that the non-stop plot got in the way of such development. Another would be the romance, which I feel could have had more expansion while the two characters were together. However, Amrita’s gradual character growth and learning journey was great to see, even as the plot itself kept me surprised and captivated. Fantasy readers will love this one, and I highly recommend it to readers looking for an introspective, strong heroine who is ready to change the world she lives in.--------EDIT: yay! I emailed the author about fixing a historically derogatory term for Romani in a description in the book, and she managed to change it before first printing! Woohoos all around :)--------With a lush, opulent world, breathtaking plot, and endearing heroine, The Library of Fates was a wonderful read. I think the mention of The Star-Touched Queen in the blurb is very apt for this one. No doubt, fantasy readers will adore The Library of Fates and the journey that Amrita embarks on.Quick point: one thing that hindered my enjoyment was the use of a derogatory term for Romani, briefly in a description. I've emailed the author about fixing it so I'll keep updates! It's still a while away from publication so here's hoping it gets changed.
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  • Shauna (b00kstorebabe)
    January 17, 2017
    Actual rating 3.5—This book was absolutely gorgeous, with a richly imagined world and an epic, bloody, magical journey. However, the writing was clunky at times and a lot of the plot points weren't fleshed out as well as I would have liked. I'll write a full review soon.
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  • Cindy ✩☽ Savage Queen ♔
    February 1, 2017
    I mean this sounds like something I would like...and the cover is lovely. So sure, added to my never-ending list lol
  • Danielle
    June 25, 2017
    4.5/5review to follow
  • Heidi Heilig
    December 27, 2016
    A troubled kingdom--an inescapable fate--ancient mythology--that's basically everything I ever wanted in a book.Open LIBRARY OF FATES and be transported to the mythical, magical country of Shalingar, where mystical vetalas, troubled oracles, irreverent goddesses, and megalomaniacal kings battle for control of love, fate, and an addictive substance called chamack. Amrita must unravel the mysteries of her past to save her kingdom, but in doing so, she herself might come unraveled. The twists and t A troubled kingdom--an inescapable fate--ancient mythology--that's basically everything I ever wanted in a book.Open LIBRARY OF FATES and be transported to the mythical, magical country of Shalingar, where mystical vetalas, troubled oracles, irreverent goddesses, and megalomaniacal kings battle for control of love, fate, and an addictive substance called chamack. Amrita must unravel the mysteries of her past to save her kingdom, but in doing so, she herself might come unraveled. The twists and turns of the story are heartbreaking in this gorgeous, sweeping fantasy so rich in myth, you can practically taste it.
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  • Patty (Bookish Wanderlove)
    October 28, 2016
    10/28/2016: HELLO BEAUTIFUL!!!!
  • Atlas
    May 15, 2017
    Super excited for this onehttp://atlasrisingbooks.blogspot.com/...
  • Eliza (silverbookshelf)
    October 28, 2016
    GUYS OKAY HI. THE COVER FOR THIS JUST DROPPED (IT'S BEAUTIFUL) AND THE SYNOPSIS IS JUST??? EVERYTHING I WANT? FROM A BOOK?
  • Dahlia
    June 2, 2017
    Honestly expected to just read a few chapters of this because it's so not my thing genre-wise, but I reallllly liked it, even though it wrenched my heart out multiple times. Definitely felt lots of shades of its comp titles but I found the writing style a smidge more straightforward (though still richly and beautifully descriptive), which I liked a lot. Very much looking forward to going back and reading her first book now.
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  • Julie
    January 20, 2017
    I loved it, but also had issues with it? Mixed feelings.
  • The Bookavid
    December 28, 2016
    yes.that cover + indian folkloresold sold sold sold sold
  • Christaaay - Christy Luis Reviews
    May 24, 2017
    There are some interesting Indian releases coming out, lately. I like this trend! 🤞 that it's as good as it looks!
  • Kritika
    October 29, 2016
    not sure how I feel about "romantic coming-of-age" but "steeped in Indian folklore" hell yes! Excited to see a new take on my culture
  • Chayse Sundt
    June 10, 2017
    I have to admit that I am a person who judges a book by its cover but for this particular book that wasn't the only deciding factor on why I picked it up. The cover was the main factor but I was just intrigued by the synopsis. I am not at all familiar with Indian Folklore but the idea of learning about another culture through reading always fascinates me. I was somewhat surprised at how fast I read through this book. With fantasy novels, I feel like I have more of a tendency to pace myself for t I have to admit that I am a person who judges a book by its cover but for this particular book that wasn't the only deciding factor on why I picked it up. The cover was the main factor but I was just intrigued by the synopsis. I am not at all familiar with Indian Folklore but the idea of learning about another culture through reading always fascinates me. I was somewhat surprised at how fast I read through this book. With fantasy novels, I feel like I have more of a tendency to pace myself for the reason being of how much is going on throughout the novel. The amount of characters, the places they travel, the tidbits of information thrown here and there but this novel everything clicked for me. I do feel that this is going to be a novel that some people may really like or really dislike. For me I liked it. I do have to say that my favorite character was Thala. I thought her character was so well written that there were some tears shed at the end when she made her decision to go back. Also, there were moments where I did wish she was the main character but then I thought, nah I love where she was in the story. Amrita had her ups and downs for me. I couldn't quite connect with her as much as I would want to for a main character but I was overall pleased. Arjun, I was glad he got dropped from the story. Yes I understand you have to keep your family safe but come on dude. The story pulled me from the very beginning with the parable and I liked how all these stories soon became a reality for the characters and everything fell together in place. I do wish I could have had more of the "Library of All Things" but I wonder if the novel would have dragged on then. I am surprise, though, that this is a stand alone novel even though it did on a good note. Curious to see if there could be a possible novella. Overall I was throughly pleased with this novel as a whole. I am interested in checking out Khorana's debut novel. If you are looking for a different type of fantasy with a fast paced plot, emotionally driven characters and a tear jerking ending then check this out. I give this book 4 souls!
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  • Nia
    June 1, 2017
    You can find this review and others on my blog http://www.shades0fpaper.wordpress.com “And you’ll hear it, the voice of one of those trees, calling you back to you, telling you that the world is alive with mysteries, and that in order to understand them, one must first learn to be still, to listen, and the world will unveil itself to you, as though it was waiting to do so all along." I was super excited when I got an ARC of this book because it was one of my most anticipated reads for this year You can find this review and others on my blog http://www.shades0fpaper.wordpress.com “And you’ll hear it, the voice of one of those trees, calling you back to you, telling you that the world is alive with mysteries, and that in order to understand them, one must first learn to be still, to listen, and the world will unveil itself to you, as though it was waiting to do so all along." I was super excited when I got an ARC of this book because it was one of my most anticipated reads for this year and the reviews on Goodreads were pretty good but… I’m quite disappointed to be honest. I thought I would love this book, but it was a bit “meh” to me. And I’m so sad because LOOK AT THAT COVER!! I WANT IT ON MY SHELF.There were some things I really liked about it and I appreciate the diversity in it and all the mythology the author created, but there were some things I couldn’t help but cringe and it felt a little sour to me. “What awaited me out in that vast world I had barely seen a fraction of? It was the great Unknown, and it both frightened and thrilled me.” As I previously said, I loved the diversity and that it was set in India, but we also got to see Rome and other interesting places. All of the characters are POC and I loved it! Also, even though it wasn’t a main focus, I got to read more about budism and reincarnation, which I’ve found so intriguing since I was younger.However, the characters were forgettable to me. I had very mixed feelings with them. I found them quite annoying sometimes. I know this was supossed to be a coming of age story, but the protagonist wasn’t what I expected and she appeared to me a bit childish sometimes. I did enjoy the side character Thara. She was quite powerful and I liked her back story and development throughout the book.AND BOY OH BOY WASN’T THE ROMANCE SO INSTA LOVE-ISH! I think that was the part I rolled my eyes at the most. I sometimes enjoy insta love romances, but this one, I really couldn’t help myself. It felt like it was a love triangle, but suddenly she completely (AND I MEAN COMPLETELY) forgets about one of the love interests and falls in love with the other boy (which by the way SHE ONLY SAW TWICE). I was laughing and rolling my eyes by then. Like, I understand WHY, but please at least let them interactuate a little bit more. “One can’t resist the world forever. And if you resist now, you on’t have the choice later.” The ending was what I enjoyed the most, but there were some things that happened that made me cringe so hard because it had no sense if you compared them with the rest of the story.Overall I think it had a lot of potential but there were a lot of plot holes and the writing wasn’t mindblowing. And I’m sad because I wanted to love it but… I guess I didn’t so much.Thank you to the publisher for providing me with and ARC of this book. This however doesn’t affect by any means to my opinipon of it.
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  • Julianna
    May 27, 2017
    AHHHHHHH.So many thoughts.So...at first, when I was reading this book, I didn't like this as much. But there is a reason that I gave this book a SOLID four stars.THE ENDING.--I have changed my mind. Thinking about it, this only deserves three stars. After all, I was very annoyed with this book for the first 85%Things I Liked• The ending• The ending was fantastic- it gave me feels of magic and I loved how the main character grows and develops into who she is at the end of the book• The ending. It AHHHHHHH.So many thoughts.So...at first, when I was reading this book, I didn't like this as much. But there is a reason that I gave this book a SOLID four stars.THE ENDING.--I have changed my mind. Thinking about it, this only deserves three stars. After all, I was very annoyed with this book for the first 85%Things I Liked• The ending• The ending was fantastic- it gave me feels of magic and I loved how the main character grows and develops into who she is at the end of the book• The ending. It was so weird and twisty and weird and nostalgic.• The world! The world was so fantastic and cool and I really really wish that the book went into those aspects more. (I feel like I say this about every book but I LOVE THE MAGIC)Things I Didn't Lie (Get Ready For A Small Rant)• The romance was hardly developed. • Seriously.• When they first meet each other, she's like, "He seems familiar..." And he's all like "But I want to talk to you. BUT HE'S A STRANGER WHEN YOU'RE RUNNING AWAY FROM THE EVIL GOVERNMENT #HOW #DOES #THIS #WORK• And they turn out to be true loves (I don't count this as a spoiler) They have met each other like 3 times???• Because of #FATE, apparently, therefore YOU DON'T NEED DEVELOPMENT.• *wails*• Anyways,• There is a (separate) romance in the first book, and... honestly? I was really rooting for him. SASDFGHJ but it ends like in the beginning super abruptly and randomly AFTER THEY AGREED TO RUN AWAY TOGETHER AND LOVE EACH OTHER FOREVER?? Like how?? #GiveMeTheConfusion• UGH. This was less of a journey and adventure than I remembered (because I was so excited for her to meet her mom or something and discover herself or something but NOOOO) because basically what happens is:Person #1: Do (insert thing)Amrita: But I CANNNN'TPerson #1: YES YOU CAN. JUST FIND THE POWER WITHIN YOURSELF.Amrita: Ok lol.Amrita: Oh shoot, I CAN. WHOOOOO.[repeat 2x]Hmm, this book gives its premise as "Wrath of the Dawn meets The Star Touched Queen"It's not like Wrath of the Dawn.BUT it IS like The Star Touched Queen.ZILCH PLOT.~end rantConcluding Thoughts ~Altogether, that ending was really good. So good that I was like "This book is good!" after I finished it. But then again, during the first 70% I was like UGH I HATE THIS BOOK so #WhoKnows
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  • Sarah K
    June 26, 2017
    DNF at 200 pages in. I wanted to love this. The cover is amazing and it's Indian fantasy! I keep reading Indian fantasies but many of them have let me down.This book is about Amrita who is the daughter of the ruler of her land. There's a bad guy Sikander that basically wants to rule everything and is by force taking nations. His plan is to take Amrita as his bride. He has been friends with Amrita's dad many years in the past.Things really fall apart and she escapes with an oracle, Thala. The wri DNF at 200 pages in. I wanted to love this. The cover is amazing and it's Indian fantasy! I keep reading Indian fantasies but many of them have let me down.This book is about Amrita who is the daughter of the ruler of her land. There's a bad guy Sikander that basically wants to rule everything and is by force taking nations. His plan is to take Amrita as his bride. He has been friends with Amrita's dad many years in the past.Things really fall apart and she escapes with an oracle, Thala. The writing started off beautiful but then got cheesy. Amrita was in love with Arjun, her childhood best friend but immediately felt sparks of attraction to Varun the first time she met him.I tried so hard to keep reading this book. The writing style is super easy to read but I dreaded picking it up.The back of the book says ages 12 and up or grade 7 and up. I think this reads on that low end. My 11 year old daughter probably would like it.I just couldn't finish. Thanks to Penguin for sending me an early review copy.
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  • Jennifer Michelle Allabastro
    June 10, 2017
    I received a borrowed ARC copy ood This book to read and give an honest review. This was a beautiful story of love and sacrifice. As she grows and learns through tragedy exactly who she is, in a world she never dreamed, she finds the strength to do what is right. Oracles, magic, goddesses, time travel, and a huge library who could ask for more. If I had one cratic it would be the lack of knowledge about the rituals and the ways of life and beliefs of this world. I had to look some things up to u I received a borrowed ARC copy ood This book to read and give an honest review. This was a beautiful story of love and sacrifice. As she grows and learns through tragedy exactly who she is, in a world she never dreamed, she finds the strength to do what is right. Oracles, magic, goddesses, time travel, and a huge library who could ask for more. If I had one cratic it would be the lack of knowledge about the rituals and the ways of life and beliefs of this world. I had to look some things up to understand in some places. But all and all its a beautiful young adult coming of age story with just a bit of magic thrown in.
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  • alice (arctic books)
    June 25, 2017
    That was, well, unexpected. It was full of twists and turns, fate and love. RTC.
  • Tori
    June 21, 2017
    This review was first published on The Book & Music Talkers.I would like to thank the publisher for sending me a digital ARC through NetGalley. 4.5/5 stars. The Library of Fates is a fantasy tale inspired by ancient Indian mythology that is set in the kingdom of Shalingar and told from the perspective of Amrita, daughter of King Chandradev and sole heir to the throne. Amrita is betrothed to Sikander, the ruthless ruler of Macedon, in hopes of establishing an allyship between the two kingdoms This review was first published on The Book & Music Talkers.I would like to thank the publisher for sending me a digital ARC through NetGalley. 4.5/5 stars. The Library of Fates is a fantasy tale inspired by ancient Indian mythology that is set in the kingdom of Shalingar and told from the perspective of Amrita, daughter of King Chandradev and sole heir to the throne. Amrita is betrothed to Sikander, the ruthless ruler of Macedon, in hopes of establishing an allyship between the two kingdoms. But Sikander means no good–upon his arrival in the palace of Shalingar, the king brings a gift with him: an oracle who has been kept prisoner in Macedon for years. Sikander announces to Chandradev and his daughter that he strives to further his influence and, most of all, gain access to the rare drug of chamak that can be found solely in Shalingar, guarded and spread by the Sybillines, a secretive folk operating from a place nobody knows. Sikander seeks to use chamak on those who possess the gift to foresee the future and enhance their power.Before Amrita and her father can establish a plan to stop Sikander’s plot, his soldiers strike the palace and cause Amrita to flee her home and leave everyone behind. The only one she takes with her is Thala, the oracle the king had brought from his kingdom as a gift. Claiming she knows the only way out of the palace, Amrita is forced to take the former prisoner with her and embark on a journey across all of Shalingar–first to bring as much distance as possible in between herself and Sikander’s men chasing her, but soon also to discover her own fate and change her father’s. With the help of Thala, Amrita finds her way to places that tell more about her history than she ever knew, the final destination being the so-called Library of All Things, a place supposedly existing only in myth, said to inhabit a book of every person’s life. In hopes of rewriting Thala’s book and her own, Amrita faces her worst fears and her greatest enemies in order to defeat her fate.- - -As already mentioned above and on pretty much every social media account I own, I was mad excited for this book ever since the cover and synopsis were first released–as soon as I read the words for fans of The Wrath & The Dawn, I knew this book would be right up my alley. I’m a sucker for any sort of mythology, especially when it’s woven into a complex and intriguing story. But quite frankly, the YA Fantasy genre is dominated by mostly Greek and sometimes Roman mythology, which gets boring after a while, even for a native Greek like me. Thus, The Library of Fates is a refreshing tale inspired by Indian mythology that sticks out of the crowd of YA retellings, and I am happy to see it was written by an author who can obviously identify with the myths and legends used in the story–I have read quite a few tragic attempts at Greek mythology-inspired books written by non-Greek authors before, so I wouldn’t want a retelling to fall into the hands of anyone who clearly has no clue about it. Frankly, I’m no expert on Indian mythology so there is no way I could judge whether the content used in the book is accurate–I’ll make sure to link a review by an Indian blogger to this post as soon as I find one–, but I’m a firm believer in the fact that books about a certain culture and its beliefs should only be written by people from said culture in order to avoid inaccurate and harmful representation. Thus, I felt assured that The Library of Fates was in good hands with Khorana, and judging from the author’s flowing and fast-paced storytelling, she knows very well the myths she wrote about. There were no plot holes that sometimes occur in poorly researched retellings, and the novel’s storyline and its connection to the mythology was very well-thought out.Being fully honest, I can hardly find any aspects I disliked about The Library of Fates, which hardly ever occurs with any book I read. Diving into this book head-first with close to no clue about what it was about, I was afraid this would turn out like another Red Queen à la teenage girl is betrothed to the royal guy with bad intentions and somehow has to find her way out of it without driving a whole country to ruin, but thankfully, the plot took a whole other turn and never ceased its mind-boggling pace. But trust me when I say this book has it all: oracles who can predict the future, a badass narrator with a secret identity, lots of magic and mythology and a journey to the past. One is being thrown into full action of the story almost immediately, and even for those who have no knowledge on the mythology that fuels the plot, the story is easy to follow and understand. Sometimes, I had to pause reading for a second and think about whether the thing that was currently happening could actually happen, and sometimes I seriously wondered about how out-of-context certain plot twists were (alas the love interest), but I loved how in the end, everything fully added up and all question marks looming above my head were swept away. As far as I’m concerned, no sequel for this book has been announced as of now, but with that ending, the novel would work perfectly fine as a standalone as well–except I need MORE about those characters, so don’t disappoint me!Speaking of characters: I admit, Amrita’s narrative was quite a pain at first–for the first fifty-something pages, I was a bit annoyed at how she portrayed a damsel of distress of sorts, which is a trope I hate. But the main characters all undergo an impressive character development that makes them confront their worst fears and outdo them-selves in truly inspirational ways. Amrita’s point of view is brutally honest and perfectly captures her inner struggles and conflicts that twist their way through the entire novel and make up a major part of the last third of the story–I don’t doubt that Khorana has managed to create a narrator many readers will see themselves reflected in and look up to. The friendship between Amrita and Thala is the priceless sort that goes beyond borders and hardships with both willing to sacrifice anything for the other–in fact, the relationship between the two is so precious I might as well stop believing I’ll ever find one that even comes close to what they have. I don’t want to sound like the stereotypical book fangirl here, but I literally laughed, cried and feared with them. Those are the authentic and raw characters with their flaws and struggles that bring a story alive and connect with the reader in ways only a really great book can, and I look forward to any content that will be published about them in the future (and I’m side-eyeing the author REAL HARD right now because I am in desperate need for some).Now, if I’m being really itty-bitty, I guess the only aspect that would make me derive half a star from my rating is the writing style. You know I love the poetic and lyrical sort of writers, and Khorana is rather focused on honesty and clarity–but then, it’s exactly what fits the novel as one and makes it a quick and yet intense read. All in one, I can wholeheartedly recommend this book to any fan of mythology and epic fantasy, so make sure to pick up this one when it hits shelves next month!
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  • Daisy
    October 28, 2016
    oh gosh, this looks amazing!
  • Tallulah Cook
    June 23, 2017
    This book was a mess. And I say that as nicely as possible... I don't think I can even describe a synopsis of this book because it had a thousand different ideas going on. But here goes nothing:This book centers around Amrita, who is the princess to this small country called Shangilar. And basically there is this guy, Sikander, who is kind of like a fictional version of Alexander the Great (he literally is called Sikander the Great). And so this guy has expanded his Macedonian Empire into all th This book was a mess. And I say that as nicely as possible... I don't think I can even describe a synopsis of this book because it had a thousand different ideas going on. But here goes nothing:This book centers around Amrita, who is the princess to this small country called Shangilar. And basically there is this guy, Sikander, who is kind of like a fictional version of Alexander the Great (he literally is called Sikander the Great). And so this guy has expanded his Macedonian Empire into all these other countries through force, and in an effort to avoid that the King (who was an old buddy of Sik), says he's gonna have his daughter marry him. Long story short, he captures the palace, but Amrita gets away with this oracle who used to be a slave. And somehow go on this really long mythical/magical journey. Maybe I'm biased because I hate fantasy. But this book was not good. The summary on the back is about the more forced marriage aspect and the fugitive aspect. And then you're reading it and BAM! There's magic showing up everywhere, like what the heck?!? And it has some mythology in the beginning, but Amrita doesn't believe in any of it, and then one little thing happens and she is the poster child for magic? There is no development of characters, they miraculously change perspectives. And then it talks about historical stuff like the Silk Road, and Alexander the Great who isn't really Alexander. But there is really no way to tell when this story would fall. In some ways it's renaissance and others it's like dark ages... Pick a time and stick to it! The last 70 pages I was thinking to myself, "take it 10 pages at a time..." And FINALLY something interesting happened. It was going good there at the end... for about 3 pages. And then it became really terrible again. And I couldn't stand it again. But I persevered, and I finished the book. It was hard and difficult, but I got through this book. And it sucks that I didn't like it because I love reading, and the author looks so nice, and I wish I liked it, but it didn't do anything for me.
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  • Cookies And {I'm Back! Kind of...}
    June 7, 2017
    Rating: 1.75 stars*deep breath* This book. Lemme tell ya about this book. This was one of the most frustrating reads of my life. I could barely get through it but I pushed through to the very end because i would not let this book defeat me.Surroundings were over described when unnecessary and under described when it was important to the events in the book.The book really interested me because it was set in India and it involved interesting folklore and mythology.I was just so disappointed when I Rating: 1.75 stars*deep breath* This book. Lemme tell ya about this book. This was one of the most frustrating reads of my life. I could barely get through it but I pushed through to the very end because i would not let this book defeat me.Surroundings were over described when unnecessary and under described when it was important to the events in the book.The book really interested me because it was set in India and it involved interesting folklore and mythology.I was just so disappointed when I read this book, some of the descriptions really took me into the setting, but the narrative and dialogue just completely took me out of it.Honestly, this book just felt a little incomplete, I feel like the author could've went through a couple more drafts and came out with a great book.The first hundred or so pages of this book is slow and a bit boring but showed a lot of potential in the beautiful writing style. However, for a lot of it I found myself rewriting the passages in my head. I found many problems and distinct words that were too close together.The next hundred page were AWFUL! I wanted to quit so so bad! But I kept going because I had to, it was just too many events smushed into a small about of pages, the writing was sacrificed in favour of the "plot" which was all over the place. I was so upset, and frustrated, and I didn't want to read.And then there was the last hundred pages of the book, AKA: the salvation of this book, this part of the book was actually pretty good, and at some points it was really good, but I can't get over the rest of the book, it would have been 1 star had the last hundred pages not been so good.The only thing that kept me sustained through this book was Thala, I love Thala so much I would read a book that was just all about her, she was so great I love her.In conclusion, I really don't think this was worth the read but I am still grateful for being able to read this book before it's release.
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  • Mariah
    June 29, 2017
    I've been anxiously awaiting this book and was so excited to receive an ARC of it. Sadly, it totally did not live up to my expectations. First of all, Amrita is one of the most naive and frustrating protagonists ever. She spends her whole life locked in a castle with a group of people who are so obviously keeping secrets from her, and she never questions them. Talk about unrealistic. Then, she spends half of the book whining about the predicaments that she's in. And I get that this is a teenage I've been anxiously awaiting this book and was so excited to receive an ARC of it. Sadly, it totally did not live up to my expectations. First of all, Amrita is one of the most naive and frustrating protagonists ever. She spends her whole life locked in a castle with a group of people who are so obviously keeping secrets from her, and she never questions them. Talk about unrealistic. Then, she spends half of the book whining about the predicaments that she's in. And I get that this is a teenage girl, so some whining is realistic, but it seems like every other sentence out of her mouth is a complaint about one thing or another. Without giving away any major plot points, I will say that this story is a typical "quest" narrative- the protagonist, Amrita, sets off to fulfill her destiny and along the way runs into trouble and is supposed to grow as a character. However, I don't feel that Amrita ever really learns from her mistakes and the trials that she faces. The character that you meet at the beginning of the book is the same one who finishes the story. (view spoiler)[ For someone who is supposed to be a goddess, she doesn't act like one, at all. Also, the first fourth of the book seems so disjointed from the last three-fourths, and because this is a narrative about changing fate, that should work... but it just doesn't. (hide spoiler)]I feel like the book could've done with a little more editing because it does feel like there's so much crammed into the end that there isn't enough time to explore everything. I feel like I've been very critical of The Library of Fates, but I just got so frustrated with the book that I wanted to chuck it across the room. I don't think I'll be recommending it to anyone.Disclaimer: I received an ARC of this book from Penguin First to Read in exchange for my honest opinion.
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  • Amy
    June 28, 2017
    I'm very torn about this book. I really liked some aspects of it, but others not as much. I really loved the message of this novel, which, as the author's note details, is about the good that comes from acting for the benefit of others rather than yourself. It's a beautiful message, and the story illustrates it well. I also loved the Indian mythology of the story. The world, the parables, and the myths were beautiful and enchanting.My main problem with this book was Amrita. She was so naive that I'm very torn about this book. I really liked some aspects of it, but others not as much. I really loved the message of this novel, which, as the author's note details, is about the good that comes from acting for the benefit of others rather than yourself. It's a beautiful message, and the story illustrates it well. I also loved the Indian mythology of the story. The world, the parables, and the myths were beautiful and enchanting.My main problem with this book was Amrita. She was so naive that it bordered on ridiculous. There were so many things that were extremely obvious to the reader that took Amrita ages to figure out. The urge to break into this book somehow just so I could explain things her got exhausting after a while. Also, this book is pitched as being perfect for people who liked The Star-Touched Queen, which makes sense because they have extremely similar plots. I was honestly kind of shocked at all of the similarities between the two.Overall, I enjoyed some, but not all of this book.*thank you Penguin for the free eARC*
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  • Utena
    June 6, 2017
    Real Rating: 2.75I would like to take a moment to thank Penguin Random House for allowing me the chance to read this book with the intention of giving honest feedback.This book was interesting. I love the world building and the weaving of Indian mythology into the story. Unfortunately I found the dialogue and narrative choppy. It made the story a bit hard to follow. There were times I had become so frustrated by this, I would end up putting the book down and walking away from it. I almost had th Real Rating: 2.75I would like to take a moment to thank Penguin Random House for allowing me the chance to read this book with the intention of giving honest feedback.This book was interesting. I love the world building and the weaving of Indian mythology into the story. Unfortunately I found the dialogue and narrative choppy. It made the story a bit hard to follow. There were times I had become so frustrated by this, I would end up putting the book down and walking away from it. I almost had this book DNF'ed. I hate having to do that to a book I had been waiting so much for and became so disappointed in it. :/There were times of boredom and times I simply skimmed over pages. I understand that there is always a need to build a plot but I felt this one just dragged its feet. I loved the author's ideas for this but not the execution of it. Since this was simply the ARC, I hope there will be changes to the final copy and I will be picking it up to see if there have been any changes.
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  • Cambear
    June 10, 2017
    A fantasy adventure inspired by Indian myths and folklore with a side of romance.There's a big adventure with fantastical creatures in Amrita's quest for safety and justice for her family. There's a lot to enjoy here but a couple of things threw me off a bit:* The beginning is filled with really, really florid descriptions. The author is trying so hard to establish the story and the ideal kingdom of Shalingar, that it's a bit overwritten.* The foreshadowing is heavy handed and telegraphs a lot o A fantasy adventure inspired by Indian myths and folklore with a side of romance.There's a big adventure with fantastical creatures in Amrita's quest for safety and justice for her family. There's a lot to enjoy here but a couple of things threw me off a bit:* The beginning is filled with really, really florid descriptions. The author is trying so hard to establish the story and the ideal kingdom of Shalingar, that it's a bit overwritten.* The foreshadowing is heavy handed and telegraphs a lot of the twists. The ending was a bit unexpected, but otherwise, the major beats are pretty obvious.This is similar to Roshani Chokshi's The Star-Touched Queen books, but I wasn't as emotionally engaged with the story. But if you are craving something in a similar vein, this is a good candidate.Thanks to Penguin Teen for providing a copy of the book for review.
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  • Lauren
    June 30, 2017
    3.5 stars total. I'm not a huge fan of Khorana's writing style. Her dialogue is awkward, her scenes don't flow well into one another and everything, from plot to characters feels stunted. Despite this, THE LIBRARY OF FATES is a really interesting story. Had it been done by a more detail oriented author, it could have been a 5 star book. I love the pseudo ancient world timeline, the mythology of the vetalas and the Sybillines, and the quest itself. But like I said, there was so much missing. This 3.5 stars total. I'm not a huge fan of Khorana's writing style. Her dialogue is awkward, her scenes don't flow well into one another and everything, from plot to characters feels stunted. Despite this, THE LIBRARY OF FATES is a really interesting story. Had it been done by a more detail oriented author, it could have been a 5 star book. I love the pseudo ancient world timeline, the mythology of the vetalas and the Sybillines, and the quest itself. But like I said, there was so much missing. This plot could have easily been a duology had more detail been applied within scenes, characters, and dialogue. But the main thing was that thy entire second half of the book (the quest) felt so hurried.
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  • Tucker
    June 10, 2017
    Khorana begins by explaining that selfishness leads to a lose-lose outcome while service to others, "even if it costs us a lot," leads to a win-win that transforms oneself and the world. In a voice innocent and bell-clear, she weaves this complex moral into a story about making choices that do not always feel like real choices, about knowing what pieces of fate can and cannot be changed, about being willing to feel pain and joy through it all. There are also flying, immortal beings that possess Khorana begins by explaining that selfishness leads to a lose-lose outcome while service to others, "even if it costs us a lot," leads to a win-win that transforms oneself and the world. In a voice innocent and bell-clear, she weaves this complex moral into a story about making choices that do not always feel like real choices, about knowing what pieces of fate can and cannot be changed, about being willing to feel pain and joy through it all. There are also flying, immortal beings that possess human bodies, but that is a bonus.I received a free advance copy from "First to Read."
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