Big Machines
In this loving tribute to Virginia Lee Burton, the New York Times best-selling creators Sherri Duskey Rinker and John Rocco pay homage to the storied life of one of the most beloved creators in children’s literature.  Everyone in Folly Cove knows Virginia Lee as “Jinnee.” With her magical wands she can draw whatever she imagines, but for her sons Aris and Michael, she draws the most wonderful characters of all: BIG MACHINES with friendly names like Mary Anne, Maybelle, and Katy. Her marvelous magical wands can make anything move—even a cheerful Little House.      

Big Machines Details

TitleBig Machines
Author
ReleaseSep 5th, 2017
PublisherHMH Books for Young Readers
ISBN-139780544715578
Rating
GenreBiography, Childrens, Picture Books, Nonfiction, Art, Biography Memoir

Big Machines Review

  • Kathryn
    January 1, 1970
    I really loved this book as a book. It's beautifully written and illustrated. I love that it explains why and how "Jinnee" created her books. As a mother of two boys who love things that go, I could really relate to how your children can make you pay attention to things you never would have been interested in yourself -- and how you would want to create something to delight them. I love how the characters from her books combine so beautifully with her own life in the illustrations here (her sons I really loved this book as a book. It's beautifully written and illustrated. I love that it explains why and how "Jinnee" created her books. As a mother of two boys who love things that go, I could really relate to how your children can make you pay attention to things you never would have been interested in yourself -- and how you would want to create something to delight them. I love how the characters from her books combine so beautifully with her own life in the illustrations here (her sons, reaching up to meet Mary Anne the steam shovel or riding on Maybelle the cable car). I enjoyed learning a bit more about VLB, especially that she loved to dance (again, I could so relate). Their town sounded so charming. It's a lovely, warm book and I thoroughly enjoyed reading it. That said, I do wish there had been a little bit more about VLB herself. It almost seemed more an overview of her works than a biography about her life. The author's note at the back (along with some wonderful photographs) does fill in some of the blanks, but only left me hungry to know more. Perhaps that was the point... In any case, I do recommend it to any fans of VLB's books and it's just a lovely book on it's own, too.
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  • Michael Fitzgerald
    January 1, 1970
    One of the best picture book biographies of an author that I've seen - because instead of dealing with the typical boring details of the author's life (which are pretty much of no interest to kids), this book takes special care to make things relevant to the young readers who know and love Virginia Lee Burton's books. It does this by focusing on those books! We see how many of her books are related (even The Little House) because they are about "big machines." The kid connection is also made by One of the best picture book biographies of an author that I've seen - because instead of dealing with the typical boring details of the author's life (which are pretty much of no interest to kids), this book takes special care to make things relevant to the young readers who know and love Virginia Lee Burton's books. It does this by focusing on those books! We see how many of her books are related (even The Little House) because they are about "big machines." The kid connection is also made by introducing Burton's own children and showing how they related to the creation of Burton's books. Burton is presented as a creative and captivating person. The single page of typical bio material at the end of the book is very well done - concise and readable. You want more, go to the website. And the facing page of archival photos and drawings is just enough. The author had the support of Burton's family and access to her materials. Though I have loved her books all my life, I knew very little about Burton. I am now eager to read Virginia Lee Burton: A Life in Art and to see the 2008 documentary Virginia Lee Burton - A Sense of Place.The illustrations within the book by John Rocco are great - he is able to depict Burton doing her own drawings. He gets the details right. There are also some Rocco illustrations of Burton subjects that aren't strict imitations, and they work very well. "Vintage" and "modern" colors are contrasted nicely.
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  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    The illustrations were charming, but there really wasn't very much to the story. Fine book, just wasn't what I wanted. Could have used more about Burton's own childhood/career. Didn't care as much about her sons.
  • KC
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this.
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    The origin story of everyone's favorite steam shovel, (and friends) Big Machines paints Virginia Lee Burton as a wonderful (magical, in Rinker's words) talented woman, and mother who created her best characters and stories for her sons. Recommended for moms and big kids who grew up with Mary Anne, Katy, the Little House et al. This finds its place on my I'm-not-crying-you're-crying shelf because of the millions of times I've watch Mike Mulligan with my cousins. Ah... Childhood.
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  • Laura Harrison
    January 1, 1970
    Not your typical picture book biography. I am a huge, huge fan of Virginia Lee Burton. Big Machines was more than I was even hoping for. The writing is beautiful. The illustrations however, are inspired. John Rocco captured Virginia Lee Burton's essence and greatness. Burton would definitely approve. I consider Big Machines: The Story of Virginia Lee Burton truly Caldecott worthy.
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  • Linda Quinn
    January 1, 1970
    Finally, a beautifully illustrated and written book about one of my favorite authors. I loved her books growing up, and I loved even more being able to share books like The Little House and Mike Mulligan with my kids. This picture book is a beautiful homage to Virginia Lee Burton.
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  • Becky
    January 1, 1970
    First sentence: This is Virginia Lee, but everyone in seaside Folly Cove simply calls her Jinnee. Anyone who meets Jinnee will tell you that she is quite magical.Premise/plot: Big Machines is the story of how Virginia Lee Burton--artist, dancer, wife, MOTHER--came to create "magical" children's picture books. The author's note at the back of the book gives biographical background and context. The text of the picture book focuses on the how and the why. The how and the why largely involve her two First sentence: This is Virginia Lee, but everyone in seaside Folly Cove simply calls her Jinnee. Anyone who meets Jinnee will tell you that she is quite magical.Premise/plot: Big Machines is the story of how Virginia Lee Burton--artist, dancer, wife, MOTHER--came to create "magical" children's picture books. The author's note at the back of the book gives biographical background and context. The text of the picture book focuses on the how and the why. The how and the why largely involve her two sons, Michael and Aris. But for her sons, Aris and Michael, she makes the most wonderful things of all...the things they love best: BIG MACHINES. It begins with a line: black and rough. Then a squiggle...and a rub. As little Aris watches, a puff of smoke appears, clears, and then.... WHOOOoo oo oo! a whistle cries. "Do more! Do more!" Aris shouts in return.My thoughts: I loved this one. I did. I loved the personal aspect of it. I loved seeing the process of creation. How a simple sketch of a 'big machine' becomes a character, then becomes a story, and then becomes a beloved icon. I loved how the illustrations show mother and son--or mother and sons--interacting with her illustrations. Her creations are life-size and "real."Text: 5 out of 5Illustrations: 4 out of 5Total: 9 out of 10
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    If you like Virginia Lee Burton's books and want to know more about her life, this will tell you just a bit throughout. If you are a momma--particularly of boys--and your children love big machines, then you will probably appreciate this. I wanted MORE, which the tiny little bit about the author in the back helped with, but I wish the story had answered a bit more fully. However, that wasn't the focus of this book, so I cannot fault it really.
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  • Rummanah (Books in the Spotlight)
    January 1, 1970
    This was a beautifully illustrated picture book based on the life of Virginia Lee Burton. I would have liked to know more about her background.
  • Mckinley
    January 1, 1970
    I get confused about pictures books like this. That is a biography that lacks some appeal to it's audience. As an adult, I find this interesting, not so sure about appropriateness for children.
  • Traci
    January 1, 1970
    Delightful! Powerful, magical, and full of life was the magical author/illustrator favorite, Virginia Lee Burton! Learn about her magical ways in this delightful biography written by Sherri Duskey Rinker, and illustrated by John Rocco! Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.A beautiful tribute to Virginia Lee Burton.#mustread #biography #authorillustrator #VirginiaLeeBurton
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  • Cathy Mealey
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve been crazy about Jinnee Burton’s work since my first visit to the Cape Ann Museum in 2013. You may remember reading my blog post Follow Me to Folly Cove in which I gushed about seeing her books, tools and samples of her work on display.When I learned that Sherri Duskey Rinker and John Rocco were teaming up to create a tribute book about Jinnee in preparation for the 75th anniversary of the Caldecott-winning The Little House, I was really excited to see their work. In August, Publishers Week I’ve been crazy about Jinnee Burton’s work since my first visit to the Cape Ann Museum in 2013. You may remember reading my blog post Follow Me to Folly Cove in which I gushed about seeing her books, tools and samples of her work on display.When I learned that Sherri Duskey Rinker and John Rocco were teaming up to create a tribute book about Jinnee in preparation for the 75th anniversary of the Caldecott-winning The Little House, I was really excited to see their work. In August, Publishers Weekly offered a sneak-peek into their collaboration. Sherri and John worked closely with members of Burton’s family, which including digging through the vast archives stored in her son’s garage!The Cape Ann Museum hosted one stop on the national tour for BIG MACHINES, an event I could not, would not miss. Sherri and John gave an engaging, entertaining presentation to an audience that knew, worked and lived with Jinnee in her heydays. Their loving tribute to Burton echoes throughout the book’s pages in carefully-chosen words, rhythm and iconic patterns of swirling, swooshing text and image pairings. For the adults who love Jinnee’s books and the new generation of young readers that will be introduced to them for the first time, BIG MACHINES is a big winner!Read the entire post on my blog: https://bildebok.wordpress.com/2017/0...
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  • Cindy Mitchell *Kiss the Book*
    January 1, 1970
    Rinker, Sherri Duskey Big Machines: The Story of Virginia Lee Burton, illustrated by John Rocco. PICTURE BOOK. Houghton Mifflin, 2017. $18.This is more like a tour through Burton’s most famous picture books than anything that tells you much about her life. The most informational part of the book is the supplemental information at the end. The rest is pretty impressionistic, if you can call a book such, without being helpful or charming. First rate author, first rate illustrator – I’m not sure wh Rinker, Sherri Duskey Big Machines: The Story of Virginia Lee Burton, illustrated by John Rocco. PICTURE BOOK. Houghton Mifflin, 2017. $18.This is more like a tour through Burton’s most famous picture books than anything that tells you much about her life. The most informational part of the book is the supplemental information at the end. The rest is pretty impressionistic, if you can call a book such, without being helpful or charming. First rate author, first rate illustrator – I’m not sure why this is what they created. I can only see this as being liked by diehard Burton fans.GIFT – OPTIONAL. Cindy, Library Teacherhttps://kissthebook.blogspot.com/2017...
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  • Baby Bookworm
    January 1, 1970
    This review was originally written for The Baby Bookworm. Visit us for new picture books reviews daily!Hello, friends! Today’s book is Big Machines: The Story Of Virginia Lee Burton, written by our friend Sherri Duskey Rinker and illustrated by John Rocco, a sweet picture book biography of the classic children’s author and illustrator that explores her life, work, and inspiration.Virginia Lee Burton was known by the residents in her town of Folly Cove as a beautiful, charming, and talented woman This review was originally written for The Baby Bookworm. Visit us for new picture books reviews daily!Hello, friends! Today’s book is Big Machines: The Story Of Virginia Lee Burton, written by our friend Sherri Duskey Rinker and illustrated by John Rocco, a sweet picture book biography of the classic children’s author and illustrator that explores her life, work, and inspiration.Virginia Lee Burton was known by the residents in her town of Folly Cove as a beautiful, charming, and talented woman. She could dance, grew beautiful flowers, and was a skilled artist and designer. “Jinnee,” would draw beautiful illustrations that made the seasons change, or brought heroes and horses and dinosaurs to life. But her very favorite thing to draw was that which her sons, Ari and Michael, loved best: the big machines. For them, she drew trains, diggers, cable cars, and snow plows, bringing them to life from nothingness and giving them names and personalities that filled her sons with delight. She told inspiring stories with her big machines about kindness, friendship, and loyalty, and she shared these stories with the children of the world, creating a collection of children’s books that are still beloved today.This was such a warm, sweet story, and I adored it. Burton was very ahead of her time, being a female mid-century author/illustrator who insisted on complete creative control, writing books about heavy machinery that included female protagonists. It was fun learning more about her process and sons; these, in fact, make the book as much a look at Burton herself as it is a celebration of the creative arts and a mother’s love for her children, and gives the story miles of heart. The art is gorgeous, bringing Burton and her work to life with soft, fanciful illustrations that draws the reader into Jinnee’s imagination. The length is good, and JJ enjoyed it, so this one is definitely Baby Bookworm approved!Be sure to check out The Baby Bookworm for more reviews!
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  • Stephanie Bange
    January 1, 1970
    This is an inspired picture book biography of the professional writing life of Burton and will satisfy the legion of fans of her books as it gives us a taste of what the woman behind these marvelous book was like. Readers will learn the inspiration of her five most famous books: her two sons. A page of backmatter will fill readers in with more detail about Burton. The text by Rinker (who herself has written several books about big trucks and machines) dances across the page in a format similar t This is an inspired picture book biography of the professional writing life of Burton and will satisfy the legion of fans of her books as it gives us a taste of what the woman behind these marvelous book was like. Readers will learn the inspiration of her five most famous books: her two sons. A page of backmatter will fill readers in with more detail about Burton. The text by Rinker (who herself has written several books about big trucks and machines) dances across the page in a format similar to the text in Burton's books. She has captured the essence of this amazing author/subject. Rocco has outdone himself in the lush illustrations, all done in a similar style to that of Burton. From the font and illustration on the title page, through the daisy pattern of Burton's skirts, the nearby landscapes, houses, boats, and borders, Rocco has captured the essence of her book illustrations -- its color palette, shape, design, and subject matters. I hope the 2018 Caldecott Committee take a serious look at this outstanding informational book, as the whole package is so thoughtfully done.It is the perfect introduction to Burton and her books for very young readers. Those looking for more about her early life or personal life will be better served by reading Burton's biography "Life Story" or Barbara Elleman's "Virginia Lee Burton: A Life in Art".This book captures the heart of Burton and will sit very proudly on my shelves right next to "A Poem for Peter: The Story of Ezra Jack Keats and the Creation of the Snowy Day" by Andrea Davis Pinkney!
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  • Gary Anderson
    January 1, 1970
    Big Machines: The Story of Virginia Lee Burton is a picture book biography celebrating the work of “Jinnee” Burton, the creator of such classic children’s books as Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel, Maybelle the Cable Car, and The Little House, the Caldecott Award Winner in 1943. Young Jinnee’s imagination takes many forms, but the drawings she makes to delight her children become stories and eventually books beloved by generations.Although Sherri Duskey Rinker’s narrative conveys a factual tim Big Machines: The Story of Virginia Lee Burton is a picture book biography celebrating the work of “Jinnee” Burton, the creator of such classic children’s books as Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel, Maybelle the Cable Car, and The Little House, the Caldecott Award Winner in 1943. Young Jinnee’s imagination takes many forms, but the drawings she makes to delight her children become stories and eventually books beloved by generations.Although Sherri Duskey Rinker’s narrative conveys a factual timeline, it is not exactly a straightforward biography. Big Machines is more of a salute to imagination, creativity, storytelling, and adults who inspire children. John Rocco’s warm realistic pictures, an homage to an earlier time in children’s book publishing, provide a bit of nostalgia for adult readers but will also allow young readers to experience how books looked and felt once upon a time.From the endpapers to the back matter, this loving tribute to an author who cared enough about children to create stories for them is sure to delight both children and adults.
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  • Margie
    January 1, 1970
    If you are fortunate, like I was, you grow up hearing stories. Your parents tell you of their adventures as children, teenagers and adults before you became part of their world. They speak of these things to create a familial bond with you; to give you an understanding of your heritage. These tales are also meant to help you become the best person you can be; to assist you in realizing your potential.There are other stories less truthful, born in their imaginations. These transform hours, some o If you are fortunate, like I was, you grow up hearing stories. Your parents tell you of their adventures as children, teenagers and adults before you became part of their world. They speak of these things to create a familial bond with you; to give you an understanding of your heritage. These tales are also meant to help you become the best person you can be; to assist you in realizing your potential.There are other stories less truthful, born in their imaginations. These transform hours, some of boredom and illness, into memories never forgotten. There was an extraordinary woman, a mother, whose stories still hold their original magic today. Big Machines: The Story of Virginia Lee Burton (How Mike Mulligan's Steam Shovel And Friends Came To Life) (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, September 5, 2017) written by Sherri Duskey Rinker with illustrations by John Rocco reveals how this woman used her remarkable gifts to bring joy to her two sons and other daughters and sons for generations to come.My full recommendation: http://librariansquest.blogspot.com/2...
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  • Martha
    January 1, 1970
    Big Machines will inspire a new generation of children to enjoy Virginia Lee Burton's wonderful retro picture books, The Little House, Mike Mulligan and his Steam Shovel, Katy and the Big Snow, and more. Written in lively prose young ones can easily follow, the story of Burton's life especially the part about how her sons' passion for big trucks and construction inspired her to write these stories so expressively. Rocco illustrated this with renderings of Virginia drawing trucks, trains, and hou Big Machines will inspire a new generation of children to enjoy Virginia Lee Burton's wonderful retro picture books, The Little House, Mike Mulligan and his Steam Shovel, Katy and the Big Snow, and more. Written in lively prose young ones can easily follow, the story of Burton's life especially the part about how her sons' passion for big trucks and construction inspired her to write these stories so expressively. Rocco illustrated this with renderings of Virginia drawing trucks, trains, and houses, etc. as her fascinated sons watched the process. His wondrous illustrations in water color, colored pencil, and digital media greatly resemble Virginia Lee Burton's original illustrations, except for the very realistic close up pictures of her face and hands. What a magical and hard working life she lead, and who knew she was also a serious dancer. The mini biography on the last page, accompanied by photos of both her, and her sons make this a fine resource for adults, as well as kids. A must buy for all elementary libraries.
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  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    The illustrator's style fits wonderfully with the story about Virginia Lee Burton. He did a good job of imitating Burton's artwork while differentiating from his own as the text talks about Virginia Lee Burton and highlights her books. The book though is not really the story of Virginia Lee Burton, which is the subtitle. A better subtitle would be the one at the bottom of the cover, below the author and illustrator's names: how Mike Mulligan's Steam Shovel and friends came to life. Why Burton cr The illustrator's style fits wonderfully with the story about Virginia Lee Burton. He did a good job of imitating Burton's artwork while differentiating from his own as the text talks about Virginia Lee Burton and highlights her books. The book though is not really the story of Virginia Lee Burton, which is the subtitle. A better subtitle would be the one at the bottom of the cover, below the author and illustrator's names: how Mike Mulligan's Steam Shovel and friends came to life. Why Burton created these particular stories is really what this book is about. We are told where she lives, that she dances and draws, that she has two sons, but not until the author's note do we get more details about her life. It is a great intro to where authors may find inspiration, a loving look at children and their mother who delighted in their interests and gave us picture books that have been around for a few generations.
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  • Becky B
    January 1, 1970
    A picture book biography of author/illustrator Virginia Lee Burton that primarily focuses on her inspiration for her books, her sons.I knew absolutely nothing about Virginia Lee Burton other than that she was an author/illustrator. It was enlightening to find out that she had two little boys obsessed with machines and that inspired her to make books about snow plows, trains, and steam shovels. It makes sense. Make sure you read the author's note in the back of the book to learn a little more abo A picture book biography of author/illustrator Virginia Lee Burton that primarily focuses on her inspiration for her books, her sons.I knew absolutely nothing about Virginia Lee Burton other than that she was an author/illustrator. It was enlightening to find out that she had two little boys obsessed with machines and that inspired her to make books about snow plows, trains, and steam shovels. It makes sense. Make sure you read the author's note in the back of the book to learn a little more about Burton. This would be a fantastic companion read for Mike Mulligan's Steam Shovel or Little House. And let's not fail to mention John Rocco's illustrations. He does an AMAZING job. He imitates Burton's illustration style so very well to show her illustrating, and then his own illustrations of Burton and her sons are beautiful and more life-like to make them stand out. Stunning art and informative back story.
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  • Paul
    January 1, 1970
    This is a great tribute to Virginia Lee Burton. I didn’t know her name either, but the familiarity emerges when the signature characters appear from her books: Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel, Katy and the Big Snow, The Little House, and more. Rinker’s well-structured narrative and Rocco’s perfect pitch and energetic rather than static illustrations make this engaging and enjoyable reading. Rocco’s sequencing device without using cartoon frames works very effectively. The device of having two This is a great tribute to Virginia Lee Burton. I didn’t know her name either, but the familiarity emerges when the signature characters appear from her books: Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel, Katy and the Big Snow, The Little House, and more. Rinker’s well-structured narrative and Rocco’s perfect pitch and energetic rather than static illustrations make this engaging and enjoyable reading. Rocco’s sequencing device without using cartoon frames works very effectively. The device of having two children characters who experience Jinnie’s creations as both observers and participants also works to draw the reader in. The beauty of the book is that it works on so many levels: for children, for adults who grew up with the original stories, those who love books, and those inspired by artistic expression and the creative process. Can’t wait to read it to my grandkids. The After Notes add to the value of the book.
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  • Avery Ellison
    January 1, 1970
    I love that this story includes a mother being a boy-mom for boys that like stereotyped boy things. I am starting to see a trend towards "it's okay for boys to like girly things" which I LOVE but the message that you can also be a male whole person who gets a kick out of steam engines and trucks is a good one. I feel like this story compliments the work of a woman who wanted to give her children everything and found a way to do it through something that was fulfilling for her. I personally felt I love that this story includes a mother being a boy-mom for boys that like stereotyped boy things. I am starting to see a trend towards "it's okay for boys to like girly things" which I LOVE but the message that you can also be a male whole person who gets a kick out of steam engines and trucks is a good one. I feel like this story compliments the work of a woman who wanted to give her children everything and found a way to do it through something that was fulfilling for her. I personally felt like this story also balanced the idea of what a mother "should" do for her kids well. She still had things she wanted to do in life and she lived for her kids. These things are not mutually exclusive and Virginia Lee Barton's story seems to be something I've been seeking out as a mom who mom who always considers my son in everything but also has trucks living in our dollhouse.
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  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    The illustrations on this truly drive the rating here. I thought the opening about all of "Jinnie's" magic powers could be confusing for young kids. I think the porousness of life and imagination could have been better conveyed in the text, or even just left for the ending.I was actually hoping for a little more on how Burton came to write such beautiful stories about big machines for my little girls who love construction equipment. I mean, I get it, she wrote them for her sons who loved trucks. The illustrations on this truly drive the rating here. I thought the opening about all of "Jinnie's" magic powers could be confusing for young kids. I think the porousness of life and imagination could have been better conveyed in the text, or even just left for the ending.I was actually hoping for a little more on how Burton came to write such beautiful stories about big machines for my little girls who love construction equipment. I mean, I get it, she wrote them for her sons who loved trucks. But more fleshing out would be helpful. There's not a lot out there for girls who love trucks, and I had high hopes for this book. It didn't meet them there.
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  • Earl
    January 1, 1970
    One of my reading challenges a few years ago was to read Virginia Lee Burton's books. And they were delightful and some of my more frequent recommendations as a bookseller. This picture book biography was a real treat because it talks about most of her work. I loved that it included The Little House especially since I didn't really think about how big a role machines played in that story. The creators of this book were the perfect people to work on it considering their other titles.If you can't One of my reading challenges a few years ago was to read Virginia Lee Burton's books. And they were delightful and some of my more frequent recommendations as a bookseller. This picture book biography was a real treat because it talks about most of her work. I loved that it included The Little House especially since I didn't really think about how big a role machines played in that story. The creators of this book were the perfect people to work on it considering their other titles.If you can't get enough Virginia Lee Burton, check out the documentary A Sense of Place.Oddly enough, I had just watched a Disney short of The Little House on YouTube. I didn't even know about it.
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  • Laura G
    January 1, 1970
    A beautifully illustrated story about Virginia Lee Burton, or more specifically, about how her book characters--like Mike Mulligan's steam shovel--came to life. It is a tribute to "Jinnee" and her loving relationship with her two sons. What a gifted woman she was! Readers will delight in this book more if they are familiar with Mike Mulligan, Katy and the Big Snow, Maybelle the Cable Car, and the Little House. If children have read these books, I think they would enjoy this book too; if not, the A beautifully illustrated story about Virginia Lee Burton, or more specifically, about how her book characters--like Mike Mulligan's steam shovel--came to life. It is a tribute to "Jinnee" and her loving relationship with her two sons. What a gifted woman she was! Readers will delight in this book more if they are familiar with Mike Mulligan, Katy and the Big Snow, Maybelle the Cable Car, and the Little House. If children have read these books, I think they would enjoy this book too; if not, they may still enjoy it and be inspired to want to read the other books.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    This delightful picture book biography of Virgina Lee Burton (Jinnee to her friends) tells the story of her creativity as if it is magic. Jinnee uses her magic wands to create vehicles to delight her children and turns them into stories to delight children everywhere. The illustrations have a nostalgic feeling that reflects Burton’s own work and include references to all of Burton’s books – which readers will surely want to read if they haven’t already. Endnotes with photographs and a few more b This delightful picture book biography of Virgina Lee Burton (Jinnee to her friends) tells the story of her creativity as if it is magic. Jinnee uses her magic wands to create vehicles to delight her children and turns them into stories to delight children everywhere. The illustrations have a nostalgic feeling that reflects Burton’s own work and include references to all of Burton’s books – which readers will surely want to read if they haven’t already. Endnotes with photographs and a few more biographical details round out this well-done biography.
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  • Lynn
    January 1, 1970
    Burton's books are beloved in our family! This wonderful and charming picture book is an ode to Burton's creative process with a bit of biography mixed in. It is also a wonderful introduction to some of her best known picture books.I loved John Rocco's energetic illustrations that captured Burton's style but was still his own. Wonderful humorous touches pepper the pages and warmth. Back matter provides more facts about Burton's life and there is also a page of family photographs.Don't miss this Burton's books are beloved in our family! This wonderful and charming picture book is an ode to Burton's creative process with a bit of biography mixed in. It is also a wonderful introduction to some of her best known picture books.I loved John Rocco's energetic illustrations that captured Burton's style but was still his own. Wonderful humorous touches pepper the pages and warmth. Back matter provides more facts about Burton's life and there is also a page of family photographs.Don't miss this one!
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  • Lori
    January 1, 1970
    Having raised four sons, the works of Virginia Lee Burton were a part of our reading life. Now I have a small grandson who loves big machines just as much as his father and uncles.This is a charming book about "Jinnee" who creates anything she wants, animals, trees, people, with her "magic wands." But for her sons, Aris and Michael, she creates big machines. Delightfully told and illustrated, on the same reading level as Virginia Lee Burton's books, this simple biography will appeal to anyone wh Having raised four sons, the works of Virginia Lee Burton were a part of our reading life. Now I have a small grandson who loves big machines just as much as his father and uncles.This is a charming book about "Jinnee" who creates anything she wants, animals, trees, people, with her "magic wands." But for her sons, Aris and Michael, she creates big machines. Delightfully told and illustrated, on the same reading level as Virginia Lee Burton's books, this simple biography will appeal to anyone who loves her stories and illustrations.
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  • Samantha
    January 1, 1970
    I had been putting this off because I wasn't sure I wanted to read a book about Virginia Lee Burton. However, I ended up really enjoying this one. The pictures are better than the text, in my opinion. However, I think the text in the book will be more appealing to kids. I am not sure they will always want lots of facts about the life of the character. It does seem to center men a bit in a story about a woman. I am clearly conflicted. The pictures are just great though. You can feel the movement.
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