The City of Brass (The Daevabad Trilogy, #1)
Step into The City of Brass, the spellbinding debut from S. A. Chakraborty—an imaginative alchemy of The Golem and the Jinni, The Grace of Kings, and One Thousand and One Nights, in which the future of a magical Middle Eastern kingdom rests in the hands of a clever and defiant young con artist with miraculous healing giftsNahri has never believed in magic. Certainly, she has power; on the streets of 18th century Cairo, she’s a con woman of unsurpassed talent. But she knows better than anyone that the trade she uses to get by—palm readings, zars, healings—are all tricks, sleights of hand, learned skills; a means to the delightful end of swindling Ottoman nobles. But when Nahri accidentally summons an equally sly, darkly mysterious djinn warrior to her side during one of her cons, she’s forced to accept that the magical world she thought only existed in childhood stories is real. For the warrior tells her a new tale: across hot, windswept sands teeming with creatures of fire, and rivers where the mythical marid sleep; past ruins of once-magnificent human metropolises, and mountains where the circling hawks are not what they seem, lies Daevabad, the legendary city of brass--a city to which Nahri is irrevocably bound. In that city, behind gilded brass walls laced with enchantments, behind the six gates of the six djinn tribes, old resentments are simmering. And when Nahri decides to enter this world, she learns that true power is fierce and brutal. That magic cannot shield her from the dangerous web of court politics. That even the cleverest of schemes can have deadly consequences. After all, there is a reason they say be careful what you wish for . . .

The City of Brass (The Daevabad Trilogy, #1) Details

TitleThe City of Brass (The Daevabad Trilogy, #1)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 14th, 2017
PublisherHarper Voyager
ISBN-139780062678102
Rating
GenreFantasy, Young Adult, Historical, Historical Fiction, Adult

The City of Brass (The Daevabad Trilogy, #1) Review

  • Melanie
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided by Harper Voyager in exchange for an honest review.The City of Brass was unlike any Fantasy novel I’ve read before, and I completely adored it. This debut novel is easily one of the best books I’ve read in 2017, and I will sing its praises even after its release on November 14th, 2017. Please guys, don’t sleep on this story, because it has not received the hype it deserves. This is the first book in an own voices Muslim Fantasy series, that walks the line between Young Adult and Adu ARC provided by Harper Voyager in exchange for an honest review.The City of Brass was unlike any Fantasy novel I’ve read before, and I completely adored it. This debut novel is easily one of the best books I’ve read in 2017, and I will sing its praises even after its release on November 14th, 2017. Please guys, don’t sleep on this story, because it has not received the hype it deserves. This is the first book in an own voices Muslim Fantasy series, that walks the line between Young Adult and Adult, and switches between two very different points of view. One point of view is a girl in her early twenties, who remembers nothing of her childhood, and is living near Cairo, Egypt. Her name is Nahri and she is a street healer by day, and a con-woman and thief by night. Nahri has a natural affinity for healing people, and can magically see what the problem is. Sometimes she can wish it away, other times it is not so easy. Many people realize Nahri’s talents and believe her magic to also work spiritually, which is why she gets hired a lot to cleanse and heal people at Zar Ceremonies, where she leads dances and prayers to be rid of demons/ifrits, which she doesn't believe in.Our story truly starts at a Zar Ceremony where Nahri is doing the steps she normally does while really just putting on a show to get paid at the end of the night, except this time she actually does feel something after an old song is sung. After a turn of events, Nahri ends up in a cemetery where she begins to pray and accidentally summons a djinn daeva warrior.And Dara isn’t just any daeva warrior. He is the best warrior to have ever lived, and he has a very tormented past, because, let’s be real, what brooding male protagonist doesn’t? Dara soon realizes that Nahri isn’t completely human, and that ifrits will soon be after both of them. He then tells her about a city that is hidden behind brass walls, that will completely keep them safe from said ifrits.We get to see our second point of view, which is from a young djinn prince named Ali, who lives in the magical hidden city of Daevabad. In Daevabad Ali’s brother, Muntadhir, is the promised king, even though their father, Ghassan, currently rules, and Ali is training to become what his brother needs him to be once he takes the throne. I loved Ali’s selflessness and his unconditional love for his family, because in this world, Ali will never marry or have children, but will be groomed to serve and protect Muntadhir with his life. Ali is completely okay with what is promised of his life, and he completely dedicates his life to God. Yet, with devoting his life to God, he starts to see the unfair treatment among the citizens. People in this world can use magic, including humans, even though there are different ways, kinds, and extremes. This is a historical novel set in our time in the early 1800s, which barely touches upon the Ottoman Empire. Yet, we do get to briefly see how some of the Turkish people treated the Egyptians, and we even get to see some French Soldiers. I’m getting off topic, but basically what I’m trying to say is that even though this is for sure a fantasy novel, it ties in with our real world, and this makes humans a key part of this story.➽Beings of Earth - Humans.➽Beings of Water - Marid (water elementals). ➽Beings of Air - Peri, Rukh, Shedu (all flying creatures).➽Beings of Fire - Daevas, Djinns, Ifrit.With all these beings, come different powers and abilities. I loved this fantastical element and it truly made this story feel so whimsical. Also, Dijnns and daevas are the same, but “daeva” is an ancient term that means fire elementals, and after a war was over, everyone started calling themselves the human word for “daeva” which is “djinn”. But many people hold on to their daeva roots, since they have very different roles in Daevabad. Also, there are six tribes. But our dear Nahri though, is something completely different, very rare, and very sought after.But ultimately this is a story about oppression, and what it means to believe that your blood is more pure than someone else. The mixed bloods in this world, shafits, are treated horribly and without a second thought. They are killed for crimes they didn’t commit, just to make the pure bloods feel safer. They aren’t allowed even close to the same luxuries pure bloods are, but they aren’t even allowed significant food or any medical treatment. Their children are stolen and sold away, most the time time as working slaves or pleasure slaves. This story can feel so very real at times and, in my opinion, S.A. Chakraborty writes this systemic oppression beautifully to mirror our world today. “It’s not just a word […] That slur has been used to demonize our tribe for centuries. It’s what people spit when they rip off our women’s veils and beat our men. It’s what the authorities charge us with whenever they want to raid our homes and seize our property.” Yeah, this is a pretty powerful book for many reasons. The only negative thing I can really say about it is that I felt somewhat like I was being queerbaited. Like, I was very unsure of Ali’s sexuality, because a few of his observations made me feel like he wasn’t straight by any means. I thought this was going to be addressed, but it just lead to a very anticlimactic and saddening death of a very minor side character, who had the promise for so much more. And then, once I got to the epilogue I was surprised to see something else that I would also borderline call queerbaiting, but hopefully she will address that in the next book in this series. Plus, maybe it’s just me reading things through my queer-tinted-glasses, and/or maybe we will get some awesome bisexual representation in book two! Besides that, this is such a beautiful Middle Eastern story, that ties in so much of the culture’s folklore in an absolutely beautiful and seamless way. I completely recommend with my whole heart. I loved it and I couldn’t put it down. And the cover? Goosebumps. This is the diverse fantasy novel I’ve been searching for. The fantasy world needs more diverse stories like this, and the world needs to see the diverse stories can be easily consumed and loved and, most importantly, worth buying. Everyone in this story is beautifully brown, we get to see some of these characters interact in mosques, we get to see our main character wearing a headscarf. I mean, I don’t think I’ve ever read a fantasy novel with these minor elements that are real life for so many readers. And this story is so amazing and so very beautifully written, too. I cannot wait to get my hands on The Kingdom of Copper in 2018!I loved The City of Brass and it is one of the best author debuts I’ve ever read in my entire life. But I will say, the ending of this book ripped my heart out three times, so be prepared for that. This story was amazing, the characters are beyond words, the prose is exceptional, and the messages and representation are so very important. This book is heartfelt and powerful. Please give this a try come November 14th, 2017. Trigger Warnings for graphic violence, human trafficking, rape, slavery, and war.Blog | Twitter | Tumblr | Instagram | Youtube | Twitch The quote above was taken from an ARC and is subject to change upon publication.
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  • Will Byrnes
    January 1, 1970
    It’s time to polish that special lamp gathering webs in the attic, put a fine edge on your bladed weaponry, remind yourself of ancient tribal insults and outrages, dust off that list of wishes that is around here somewhere and vacuum your magic carpet. You are about to be transported. “The Magic Carpet” (detail), 1880, by Apollinary Mikhaylovich Vasnetsov © State Art Museum, Nizhny Novgorod, Russia/Bridgeman Art LibraryNahri, our Aladdin here, is a twenty-year-old thief and con artist, working m It’s time to polish that special lamp gathering webs in the attic, put a fine edge on your bladed weaponry, remind yourself of ancient tribal insults and outrages, dust off that list of wishes that is around here somewhere and vacuum your magic carpet. You are about to be transported. “The Magic Carpet” (detail), 1880, by Apollinary Mikhaylovich Vasnetsov © State Art Museum, Nizhny Novgorod, Russia/Bridgeman Art LibraryNahri, our Aladdin here, is a twenty-year-old thief and con artist, working marks in 18th Century French-occupied Cairo. She has a gift for discerning medical maladies and another for treating them. She is adept at languages and at parting the unwary from their money. When she is called in to help deal with a 12-year-old girl who is possessed, she rolls her eyes and opts to have a bit of fun trotting out an old spell that has never worked before. The difference here is that she tries it in a language she seems to have known forever, but which no one else has ever heard. Turns out the girl really was possessed, by a particularly nasty entity, and turns out that Nahri’s little experiment summoned a very scary djinn. In a flash, the evil possessor spirit and a large number of its dead minions are on her like decay on a corpse. Thankfully, the djinn is there to save the day, with extreme prejudice. This is the beginning of a beautiful friendship. Image from deviantart.netThe frustrated pursuers have made Cairo a no-go zone for Nahri, so she and the djinn, Dara (which is a small portion of his entire name) head for the place where people of his sort reside, the world capital of the magical races, Daevabad, the Brass City of the title. From Bensozia - Illustration by Edmund Dulac for Stories from the Arabian NightsTo call Dara a hottie would be a bit of an understatement. Handsome? For sure. Incredibly powerful? Fierce in battle? Be afraid, be very afraid. Able to leap tall minarets in a single flying carpet? You betcha. As if that were not enough, he is literally a creature of fire, and emits actual smoke. You never had a friend like him. Cairo may present imminent threats of death, but Daevabad is no prize either. Ancient tribal hatreds are kept at bay by a strong, and ruthless ruler. King Ghassan ibn Khader al Qahtani must contend not only with inter-tribal tensions, he must cope with a growing insurgency. (Think sundry Middle East rulers with tribally diverse populations.) There are many who feel that laws favoring purebloods are unjust, and want those of mixed Djinn-human blood, shafit, (think mudbloods) to be treated fairly. One of those happens to be the king’s number two son. Ali is a very devout young (18) man. As second in line, he is destined to help his older brother, Muntadhir, rule, as, basically, the head of security. He is extremely adept at sword-fighting and has gained a good reputation among the other student-warriors at the Citadel, a military training school (not in South Carolina) where he has been living and training for some years. Dad would not be pleased were he to learn that junior was giving money to an organization that purports to offer civilian-only aid to shafit, but is also rumored to be involved in a more military form of activity. (Think Hamas) S.A. Chakraborty - image from her siteRevolutionary tensions are on the rise, palace intrigues as well, as trust is something one could only wish for. One key question is where Nahri really came from, who is she, really? It matters. And what happened to the ancient tribe that was chosen by Suleiman himself to rule, way back when. There are magic rings, flaming swords, strange beings of diverse sorts, plots, battles, large scale and small, plenty of awful ways to die, without that being done too graphically. And there is even a bit of interpersonal attraction. Did I mention Dara being smokin’? There is also some romantic tension between Nahri and Ali. Add in a nifty core bit of history centered on Suleiman. One of the great strengths of City of Brass is the lode of historical knowledge the author brings to bear. It actually started not as a novel, but as sort of a passion project/exercise in world-building that I never intended to show a soul! I’m a big history buff and with The City of Brass I wanted to recreate some of the stunning worlds I’d read about while also exploring traditional beliefs about djinn. A bit contrary to Western lore, djinn are said to be intelligent beings similar to humans, created from smokeless fire and living unseen in our midst—a fascinating, albeit slightly frightening concept, this idea of creatures living silently among us, dispassionately watching the rise and fall of our various civilizations. - from the Twinning for Books interviewZulfiqar - image from mere-vision.comChakraborty, our Sheherezade here, fills us in on much of the history of how the djinn came to build their human-parallel world, offering not just what is, but how what is arose from what was. there’s a djinn version of Baghdad’s great library, filled with the ancient books humans have lost alongside powerful texts of magic; they battle with weapons from Achaemenid Persia (enhanced by fire of course); the medical traditions of famed scholars like Ibn Sina have been adapted to treat magical maladies; dancers conjure flowers while singing Mughal love songs; a court system based on the Zanzibar Sultanate deals justice to merchants who bewitch their competitors… not to mention a cityscape featuring everything from ziggurats and pyramids to minarets and stupas. - from the Twinning for Books interviewThere are a lot of names to remember, words to learn, tribes to keep straight, and allegiances to keep track of. I found myself wishing there was a list somewhere that helped keep it all straight, and “Poof!” there it appeared at the back of the book, a glossary, rich with useful information. It could have been a bit larger though. I would have liked for it to include a list of the djinn tribes, with information about each, their geographical bases, proclivities, languages, you know, stuff. The information can be found in the book itself, but it would have been nice to have had a handy short reference.image from upstaged entertainmentThe City of Brass is both very smart and very entertaining. The richness of the world we see here gives added heft to a wonderful story. The world Chakraborty has created hums with humanity, well, whatever the djinn equivalent might be for humanity (djinnity?). You will smell the incense, want to keep a damp cloth at hand to wipe the dust and sand from your face, and a cool drink nearby to help with the heat. It probably wouldn’t hurt to post a lookout in case someone decides to try spiking your drink or inserting a long blade into your back. This is a wonderful, engaging, and fun read. It will not take you a thousand and one nights to read, but you might prefer that it did. The only wish you will need when you finish reading The City of Brass is for Volume 2 of this trilogy, The Kingdom of Copper, to appear, NOW!!! Review posted – July 28, 2017Publication date – November 14, 2017=============================EXTRA STUFFLinks to the author’s personal and Twitter pagesInterview - Twinning For Books The M Word: Muslin Americans Take the Mic - a panel discussion including the Chakraboty and two other Islamic women writers – hosted by Hussein RashidThe City of Brass - from Arabian Nights, on Gutenberg
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  • Roshani Chokshi
    January 1, 1970
    I just finished reading this by the dying light of my cellphone while small, devious looking insects clamored towards the light and attacked my face. I HAVE NO REGRETS. That is how spellbinding this book is...I could not put it down. I haven't had that kind of visceral "No one touch this book, it is actually a clever extension of my hand, and I will BITE you if you come between me and these characters" reaction in awhile. Chakraborty has some truly dazzling workdbuilding skills, but beyond that, I just finished reading this by the dying light of my cellphone while small, devious looking insects clamored towards the light and attacked my face. I HAVE NO REGRETS. That is how spellbinding this book is...I could not put it down. I haven't had that kind of visceral "No one touch this book, it is actually a clever extension of my hand, and I will BITE you if you come between me and these characters" reaction in awhile. Chakraborty has some truly dazzling workdbuilding skills, but beyond that, she crafts remarkable characters who are achingly real and complex. I loved their interactions. The writing was just nonstop intoxicating atmosphere, and the plot was riveting. This is the UPROOTED, EMBER IN THE ASHES, WRATH AND THE DAWN mashup of my FREAKING DREAMS. I am going to be throwing this book at people when it releases in November!!!!
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  • Ben Alderson
    January 1, 1970
    Got loads of thoughts on this book so wait for the video! I loved the start... the entire middle was slow and boring to me...but the end was ok! I am not SURE if i am going to read book two.. we shall see
  • Alex (Alex Can Read)
    January 1, 1970
    5 starsI received an eARC of this book from Edelweiss in exchange for my review. This review was first posted to my blog at https://alexcanread.wordpress.com/201... The City of Brass is S.A. Chakraborty’s absolutely spellbinding debut novel, an epic fantasy set in Cairo and the Middle East.I came across Chakraborty’s Twitter feed about a month ago and found her tweet-thread about just how much she nerded out over ancient Egyptian and Middle Eastern history and mythology while she wrote The City 5 starsI received an eARC of this book from Edelweiss in exchange for my review. This review was first posted to my blog at https://alexcanread.wordpress.com/201... The City of Brass is S.A. Chakraborty’s absolutely spellbinding debut novel, an epic fantasy set in Cairo and the Middle East.I came across Chakraborty’s Twitter feed about a month ago and found her tweet-thread about just how much she nerded out over ancient Egyptian and Middle Eastern history and mythology while she wrote The City of Brass and her enthusiasm just oozed out of my screen. I had seen a mention of the book earlier in the day, but after seeing her tweets, I just had to read it. I’m sad to say I couldn’t find the thread again (if I do, I’ll edit a link in here.)I was absolutely transported by Chakraborty’s descriptive storytelling. She sets the scene so completely that I could hear the noises of bazaars and mobs. I could feel the heat of Cairo on my skin – quite the feat since Seattle has been chilly and damp lately. I could clearly picture the scenes she set and in those scenes, she brings Nahri, Ali, and Dara to life.Nahri is the magical, unbelieving thief at the center of City of Brass though she doesn’t know it at the start. She’s motivated not by greed, but by a necessary selfishness that comes from scraping out a living on the streets from a very young age. Nahri is Nahri’s number one, and she’s not going to apologize for who and what she is. She felt believable and even when her actions surprised me, ultimately they make sense for her character.Dara is a broken Daeva man from a broken clan, broken past, and broken family. Just about the only thing unbroken about him is his fierce spirit – but even that fierce spirit is tested. He is untamed fire, a hero and a horror. But Dara is driven by loyalty and duty, which is where he finds his strength.Ali is the second son of the king in Daevabad, raised in The Citadel in order to become his brother’s security minister when his brother ascends the throne. Ali finds himself at the center of a tangled web he helped others weave around him by playing upon his good intentions, naivete, and religious zeal. Ali was the character I had the hardest time with. For someone raised from childhood in a military setting, he was surprisingly soft-hearted. As someone to be a fixture at court he was surprisingly naive.Nahri, Dara, and Ali are at the center of the war for the soul of Daevabad, the City of Brass. Battles are fought in a swirling, fast-paced plot that kept me turning the pages until I reached the dreaded end of the novel. Thankfully, The City of Brass is the first book in the Daevabad trilogy, so I have two more novels packed full of their adventures to look forward to. I can only hope Chakraborty takes us to new locations. I’m just aching for new places for her to describe.
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  • Cody
    January 1, 1970
    Where do I start with this book? Well you better prepare for some late nights because once I started this book I couldn’t stop, it took me a few days because this book is a tome but I finally finished at around 2am, completely mesmerized trying to let everything sink in.The City of Brass is about Nahri a trickster living in Cairo making money by preying on superstitious fools. Nahri has many abilities, there isn’t a language around that she can’t understand and speak, she heals rapidly and can d Where do I start with this book? Well you better prepare for some late nights because once I started this book I couldn’t stop, it took me a few days because this book is a tome but I finally finished at around 2am, completely mesmerized trying to let everything sink in.The City of Brass is about Nahri a trickster living in Cairo making money by preying on superstitious fools. Nahri has many abilities, there isn’t a language around that she can’t understand and speak, she heals rapidly and can detect sickness and disease my merely looking at people. Nahri uses her powers to her advantage she will tell her clients that in order to cure their non-existent ailments they must follow some rather theatrical steps and they will be cured. There opening scene starts with Nahri swindling a poor fool in order to survive his ‘heart condition’ and in order to live he must follow her instructions, which will take him on a journey outside of Cairo. What clever Nahri is actually doing is making him gather ingredients for an ointment to get rid of his bad breath and getting him and his family out of his house so she can rob him. Do you see why I am in awe of her? So mischievous and always ten steps ahead.It’s during one of Nahri’s hoaxes that she accidently summons Dara, a enigmatic djinn warrior who tells Nahri about a magical world called Daevabad. Daevabad is the legendary City of Brass, a city with mythical creatures, enchantments and magic that Nahri has no choice but to visit if she wants to learn about whom she truly is. Upon arriving Nahri is quickly drawn into a deadly game of court politics, a city broken because of a devastating history and it's people djinn divided and on the brink of war due to old prejudices.At court Nahri is introduced to Prince Alizayd the second son to the Djinn King. As his older brother Muntadhir is the emir to the Qahtani throne, Ali has had a relatively easy life, his appearance at court is not required so he lives away from the palace spending the majority of his time reading and delving deeper into his love of economics. However due to his upbringing Ali has an incredibly naïve view on the world and will certainly voice his opinions believing them to be fact. However Ali does have his better qualities, he adamantly believes that the shafit, people with mixed djinn and human blood, are mistreated by the full-blooded djinn. He's steadfast in his belief and I couldn't agree more as in Daevabad the shafit are treated poorly, their children are taken away from them and they have little to no rights. Ali voices this to the King time and time again but which a city on the brink of war the King cannot be seen taking sides. The City of Brass will immerse you from the very beginning with its magnificent world building and stunning prose. Readers will follow Nahri trying to uncover her past, discover magic and unravel the darkest secrets of Daevabad. I was gripped from page one and read the last hundred pages with a racing heart. The characters are multifaceted, complex and completely relatable. The plot was well paced and had many twists and turns, secrets were slowly revealed but just enough to keep you hooked and an explosive ending that will leave you desperate for more.Overall Chakraborty created a breathtakingly magical world that will ensnare readers and have them reading long after the lights have gone out. I am so excited for people to read this book; it was easily one of the most enjoyable reads of this year and I cannot wait for book two!Literary-ly Obsessed (Blog) | Twitter | Instagram
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Soo.... This book. If you've been following my updates you probably already know I wasn't a huge fan. There are a lot of things The City of Brass does right, and one very important thing it doesn't. I'm also going to cover this review with a disclaimer in saying that I think plenty of readers will enjoy this book. It might just be me.I really loved Nahri's character from the beginning. She's a thief and a con artist. She has a smart mouth and doesn't really take crap from anyone. If you give her Soo.... This book. If you've been following my updates you probably already know I wasn't a huge fan. There are a lot of things The City of Brass does right, and one very important thing it doesn't. I'm also going to cover this review with a disclaimer in saying that I think plenty of readers will enjoy this book. It might just be me.I really loved Nahri's character from the beginning. She's a thief and a con artist. She has a smart mouth and doesn't really take crap from anyone. If you give her a hard time, she'll probably rob you blind. She is one of two main characters in this book. The second main character was Prince Alizayd. He is a Qahtani prince of the djinn. It took me a long, long time to enjoy his character. It was at least fifty percent over (in a 500+ page book) by the time his story line became enjoyable, and I think most of the reason for that was because he finally meets with Nahri. By the end though, I was quite fond of him. He experiences the most character development out of any of them.The setting is imaginative and beautifully told. The lore and history are intricate and detailed and filled with Arabic mythology. I imagine Chakraborty had a book length prologue to accompany all of it and keep it all straight. The plot is action filled, which is why it is so very difficult for me to say that overall- I was bored. There is no over arching plot arc. Nahri narrowly escapes death. Nahri learns where she comes from. Nahri travels to Daevabad. Nahri moves into the palace. Nahri learns to heal.... There was no end goal here. No definitive destination the plot was moving toward. In a mystery plot, the end goal is solving the mystery. In a romance, it's a HEA ending. In a fantasy, it's completing a quest, or defeating the enemy or saving the kingdom. Here- I'm sure there is one eventually, but you don't know what it is. In the end, if I had to pick one of the above, I guess I'd go with romance. The case for this is thin because honestly, the two love interests seemed to just randomly be in love with each other after a couple months riding in the desert. I had no idea either character was even interested in the other romantically until it happened and then BAM. They are confessing they're undying love for each other. But I can't make a case for any other end goal so I guess that's it?There were times the dialogue felt stiff and cliched, predictable even. The history in the book is so complex it becomes confusing. I can't tell you why the Geziri (I've probably spelled this wrong) and the Daeva tribes dislike each other. I can't tell you why the Qahtani's rebelled against the revered Nahid. (I mean I have a vague understanding, but it is very vague.)In the end I think this book could have used some significant trimming, some clarification, and significantly less ambiguous plot structure. The characters and world building were great, but just not enough to carry the entire novel.Thank you to Edelweiss and Harper Voyager for providing an eARC for me to review.
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  • Fadwa (Word Wonders)
    January 1, 1970
    Actual rating: 4.5 stars GUYS GUYS GUYS I FINALLY FINISHED A BOOK. And what book it was. wow. An excellent, mind blowing tale I assure you.The world is SO detailed and rich, the characters selfish and flawed and all around awesome. The conflicts so complicated, ancient and deeply rooted that I STILL don't know where I stand. I'm just. speechless at how brilliant and meticulous the world-building and the politics are. RTC !!
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  • Nafiza
    January 1, 1970
    Well that was glorious.
  • Hadeer
    January 1, 1970
    Y'all.  READ THIS BOOK.  I'm gonna be recommending this to literally every single person I know because holy hell.I don't even know where to begin; I just finished this last night and I was an incoherent mess. I still am.  It's been such a long time since I've been so hooked by an epic fantasy.  More than hooked, it's been a while since I've felt so comfortable within a fantasy world.  Not that S.A. Chakraborty's world is all warm and fuzzy (on the contrary), but she builds it up in such a way a Y'all.  READ THIS BOOK.  I'm gonna be recommending this to literally every single person I know because holy hell.I don't even know where to begin; I just finished this last night and I was an incoherent mess. I still am.  It's been such a long time since I've been so hooked by an epic fantasy.  More than hooked, it's been a while since I've felt so comfortable within a fantasy world.  Not that S.A. Chakraborty's world is all warm and fuzzy (on the contrary), but she builds it up in such a way as to make it seem so sturdy and real that I feel like it has always existed, like if I return to Cairo and peek behind some kind of veil I will find the djinn. Actually, that's an appropriate place to start, isn't it? The personal.  Because this book is deeply important to me on a personal level, as an Egyptian.  Besides building upon the myth of the djinn, stories which I grew up on, part of it takes place in 18th century Cairo, and the protagonist, Nahri, is Egyptian.  It's hard to articulate just how amazing it was to see Cairo illustrated so beautifully and to hear Nahri speaking Egyptian Arabic.  Though only a single chapter takes place in Cairo, its influence is felt throughout the rest of the book in Nahri.  And in Daevabad, the city of the djinn, the Middle Eastern influence is strong. But honestly, the main reason this book left me sobbing is because I developed such a deep love for the characters.  Within the first few paragraphs Chakraborty was able to make me fall in love with Nahri, a clever, pragmatic, and snarky con artist thrown into an unfamiliar world.  Nahri is the sort of person to make the best out of what she's got; she's level-headed and intelligent and she feels so utterly real. And, perhaps this is more personal, but Nahri's decisions and thought processes all made so much sense to me; never did I throw up my hands in frustration at her. Like I said, sensible and pragmatic. She certainly balances out the two other main characters, who are much more intense.There's Ali, the other POV character, a second son and prince, a devoutly religious young man and trained soldier, with a fiercely formulated opinion on what's right and wrong.  Ali gets caught up in the plight of the shafit (mixed human and djinn) in Daevabad, giving money and resources to a grassroots organization called the Tanzeem dedicated to helping the shafit (sometimes in increasingly desperate, violent ways).  Since Ali's father the king is directly in opposition to this, Ali toes the line between loyalty to his family and loyalty to his own sense of right and wrong.  Ali is rigid and taciturn and self-righteous, but it is difficult not to like him because he tries so hard to do the right thing.And then there's Dara.  Oh my God, Dara. A seriously flawed person and an incredible character, Dara is arrogant, mercurial, prejudiced, stubborn, and dishonest.  While he's had to endure some horrific suffering in all the centuries he's been alive, he's also caused horrific suffering: he is essentially a war criminal, with a fearsome reputation.  He's the type of person you should hate on sight.  And yet.  As Nahri grows to care for him, so did I.  His fierce loyalty and protectiveness of her, his intense regret, his devotion to his tribe, his tenderness with Nahri and Nahri alone...all of these things made me fall utterly and completely in love with him even as some of his stupidly thought out decisions made me despise him.Chakraborty brought these characters to life so well it was painful.  I could feel everything the characters did; their joy, their grief, their frustration, it was all my own, which meant that by the time I finished the book my chest ached and I felt like I myself was the one going through the characters' adventures.  It takes a seriously talented writer to achieve this. Then there's the worldbuilding. Like I said, Chakraborty makes it seem as though Daevabad has been there forever and ever, almost as though she is describing a place that truly exists. Her unique, creative spin on the djinn resulted in a complex world with its own culture and history. There is definitely a learning curve to this book; I referred to the glossary multiple times and it was a while before I knew what everything was. The politics in this book are complex, to the point where I sometimes had trouble understanding where all the various factions stood. This complexity is indicative of how morally grey this world is; no one faction is ever truly in the right. Every side has committed atrocities, every side has dirtied their hands, and it makes for a deliciously engaging and realistic read. There are no heroes or villains here, only people trying to do what they each think is right.I also have to mention the high quality of prose. I'm so glad I have a physical copy of this book so I can refer back to Chakraborty's writing. It's absolutely beautiful; she weaves vivid, colorful descriptions without falling into the trap of purple prose. Her dialogue is quick and engaging and she deftly sprinkles important information throughout without it turning into a history lecture. This is writing you can learn from.There's not much else I can say without giving away the excellent plot, so I will simply end by saying: this is an objectively good book. A great book. Even if fantasy isn't your thing, it's worth picking this up. Trust me. It left me in tatters. I read nearly all 528 pages of it in a single day, eight straight hours of reading, because I just could not stop. These characters are incredible. I read a lot of fantasy books, but I'm rarely this affected by any single one. Like, this is me gushing; it took everything in my power not to write this entire review in capslock, even though that's what my thought process looks like at the moment. The City of Brass comes out November 14th of this year. Thank you so much to S.A. Chakraborty and HarperCollins' Library Love Fest for providing me with an ARC of this book!
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  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    I have no words but y'all. THAT ENDING THOUGH.
  • Lexie
    January 1, 1970
    All right kids sit your butts in a chair and get ready for this entirely vague but very enthusiastic preliminary review. (look the book doesn't come out til the Fall, we all must deal with that fact ok?) Oh but this is behind a spoiler cut almost entirely JUST IN CASE.(view spoiler)[Our Cast -Nahri: a clever, adaptable young woman (early 20s?) living in Cairo where we set the beginnings of our story. She makes her living reading tea leaves, creating medicines and essentially swindling folk out o All right kids sit your butts in a chair and get ready for this entirely vague but very enthusiastic preliminary review. (look the book doesn't come out til the Fall, we all must deal with that fact ok?) Oh but this is behind a spoiler cut almost entirely JUST IN CASE.(view spoiler)[Our Cast -Nahri: a clever, adaptable young woman (early 20s?) living in Cairo where we set the beginnings of our story. She makes her living reading tea leaves, creating medicines and essentially swindling folk out of their money. She does have supernatural gifts (she can sense a person's illness, heal awful quick and is a stunning linguist), but largely she just wants to save enough money to go to Istanbul and study.Dara: Surly, short-tempered, and awfully mercurial in his moods his appearance is unwanted and the burden he feels dealing with Nahri is evident. He's haunted by past horrors and largely doesn't like telling Nahri anything unless absolutely necessary (it's almost never necessary until she pushes him). Ali: Youngest son of the king, Ghassen, he's uncertain exactly how he feels about everything and everyone. He thinks how the shafrit (half bloods born of daeva (djinn) and human relations) are treated is unfair and downright wrong, but he's also a scholar who's lacking world sense basically. He wants to do good, but is rather prone to choosing the wrong way to do that.They're the important ones basically with various others playing large roles in the story these three weave. Note the book is separated between Nahri and Ali, following their lives before/during/after Nahri comes to Daevabad.To say this book is steeped in a well defined setting is an understatement. Chakraborty does such a good job invoking the sounds, feel and smells of her various locations (largely Cairo, the desert and Daevabad). You can FEEL the love and effort she put into the getting the setting right so that as Nahri came into "the city of brass" my eyes widened in wonder, wishing I could see it, but having a beautiful image in my head based on her writing.Nahri and Ali make for interesting contrasting characters to follow. Nahri isn't certain of her background or future, but she is certain of her ability to adapt. Time and again she tries to find her path with minimal help. Ali is just uncertain about everything. His family and the best way to remain loyal while doing what his heart feels is right, who he could trust and how far he should trust them, what is good for the city and his people vs. what is good in general. He looks at everything, but has trouble understanding a larger scope.And that's it. Wait for the Fall and snatch this up quickly. (hide spoiler)]
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  • Aimal (Bookshelves & Paperbacks)
    January 1, 1970
    I crave death.
  • Kelsey
    January 1, 1970
    Yaaaaasss! Easily the best book I've read this year. And this is the author's FIRST NOVEL?! Unbelievable. I suggest you all run to your local bookstores and pick this up on November 14th! I promise you'll not be disappointed! (But I also suggest that you don't begin until you have a good chunk of time to read, because this book will not leave your hands until you're finished.) Now begins my anguishing wait for the second book...
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  • Jessie (Ageless Pages Reviews)
    January 1, 1970
    4.5/5A rich, detailed, and engaging world that stumbles just a bit when it comes to the worldbuilding. Some clarity issues about history and supernatural nomenclature can make it hard to initially grasp the many sides developing in the central conflict. Still, that is my one small quibble amid a very solid and memorable fantasy debut. Looking forward to the continuation of the story with that gamechanger ending.
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  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    This may be my favorite book of 2017 - watch for it in November!! I'm always on the watch for new fantasy series (especially trilogies!) with female leads. THE CITY OF BRASS not only delivers a strong female lead but also a wonderfully refreshing and exciting world. Daevabad is an excellent example of fantasy world-building done well; the city and its cultures are completely believable. Chakraborty draws heavily on Islamic mythology in this book, and I loved learning about the djinn, ifrit, and This may be my favorite book of 2017 - watch for it in November!! I'm always on the watch for new fantasy series (especially trilogies!) with female leads. THE CITY OF BRASS not only delivers a strong female lead but also a wonderfully refreshing and exciting world. Daevabad is an excellent example of fantasy world-building done well; the city and its cultures are completely believable. Chakraborty draws heavily on Islamic mythology in this book, and I loved learning about the djinn, ifrit, and other mythical creatures. I can't wait to see her continued exploration of this mythology in the next book.As far as the characters and the plot, I can't remember ever reading a fantasy story as nuanced as this one as regards who the "good guys" and "bad guys" are. Even the character nicknamed the "Scourge" is likeable, and Chakraborty's history of Daevabad and its peoples is so layered that it is difficult to determine who is on the right side of the centuries-long conflict. Much like real life! Both of the main characters whose perspective we see are easy to identify with even though their flaws are obvious. I can't wait to see what happens to these two and how their beliefs evolve over the next two books. I am so excited for Book 2, and Book 1 isn't even out yet! This will be a long wait!
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  • Ayah Assem
    January 1, 1970
    Omg dhdhehdhdjejwkzjsbs!!! I need the sequel right now.......
  • Ceillie
    January 1, 1970
    Well, shiiiit. Read my full review here!
  • Fatima Khan
    January 1, 1970
    I AM SPEECHLESS AND IM TRYING REALLY HARD NOT TO BE CAUSE THIS BOOK DESERVES SO MANY WORDS 😍I don't even know where to start! I want to literally sing its praises from my bedroom window- which is where I've spent the last few minutes finishing up this awesome story. Without a doubt this is my favorite book and I will not have another favorite until it's sequel is published. I was lucky enough to snag an ARC from BookCon 2017 and it has been the greatest gift 😍😭FOR FANS OF: - AN EMBER IN THE ASHE I AM SPEECHLESS AND IM TRYING REALLY HARD NOT TO BE CAUSE THIS BOOK DESERVES SO MANY WORDS 😍I don't even know where to start! I want to literally sing its praises from my bedroom window- which is where I've spent the last few minutes finishing up this awesome story. Without a doubt this is my favorite book and I will not have another favorite until it's sequel is published. I was lucky enough to snag an ARC from BookCon 2017 and it has been the greatest gift 😍😭FOR FANS OF: - AN EMBER IN THE ASHES- THE WRATH AND THE DAWN- THE STAR TOUCHED QUEEN- THRONE OF GLASS (Nahri reminded me a LOT of Celaena and Dara reminded me of Chaol. And Chakraborty's ruthlessness is reminiscent of Sarah J. Maas 😭😭😭😭 #ithurtssogood) So here's my honest review- 11/10 BECAUSE:- THE CHARACTERS Nahri is the main character and a savvy thief living in ancient Cairo. She's trying to save some money to pursue her lifelong dream of studying medicine. So she hustles people, posing as an expert in the supernatural, doing palm readings and fortunes, that sort of thing. But the trouble begins when she accidentally summons a warrior djinn during a hustle. Suddenly Nahri is forced to flee the only life she's ever known, ghouls, and monstrous ifrit (think evil zombie-types who can talk) with the reluctant Dara, a handsome djinn warrior who is less than pleased to have been summoned to the human world. - THE WORLD BUILDING ALONE is something you need to read if you enjoy that sort of thing which I very very much do. I think Ms. Chakraborty is an extremely imaginative and talented writer because I was easily able to comprehend this mystical new world. I've grown up with the mythology used in this book, but even if you are brand new to it (which I basically am) you'll have no trouble with it!- THE MYTHOLOGY is all about djinn- supernatural creatures hailing from the lands of the Middle East stretching all the way to South Asia. I don't know as much about the mythology behind djinn as I'd like, but I was happy to be educated! The book is enhanced because of it, and brings a unique blend of culture to the table. That's something readers in the YA community desperately need more of because diversity & representation in YA is fairly new (but so wonderful I'm in love). - DIVERSITY & REPRESENTATION IN YA yup you already knew this was coming, but I cannot stress how amazing it feels (as a South Asian-American Muslim woman) to see not only a protagonist, but a whole WORLD full of people like me in actual, printed book. And I'm pretty grown so imagine how great the teens reading this book will feel? - WRITING Comparing this book to The Wrath and the Dawn had something to do with genre and setting but a large part of drawing that comparison was the prose. Me. Chakraborty fits right in with writers like Renee Ahdieh and Roshani Chokshi. I'm absolutely addicted to their poetic writing and if you are too, you'll fall in love with Ms. Chakraborty's just as fast!Honestly, this was just the best book I've read in a while. It was something different, something original in a genre where a lot of tropes feel used up. So please, please, please support this book in November 2017! I need people to love it as much as I do so I have more people to discuss it with!Asalaam Alaykum (idk if I spelled that right lol),Fatima Khan 😘
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  • Beatrice (beatriceinbookland)
    January 1, 1970
    I just got the arc
  • Iryna Khymych
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free e-copy of this book via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. Thank you Publisher!5/5 StarsI honestly wanted to cry after I finished this beautiful, amazing, incredible, outstanding and engrossing novel. I now have to wait at least a year for the next book and I honestly don’t know how I will be able to do this. I think I’ll re-read this book about 6 more times before the next one is out, or I am lucky enough to get an ARC of it.This book is 1000 Arabian Nights mixed with I received a free e-copy of this book via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. Thank you Publisher!5/5 StarsI honestly wanted to cry after I finished this beautiful, amazing, incredible, outstanding and engrossing novel. I now have to wait at least a year for the next book and I honestly don’t know how I will be able to do this. I think I’ll re-read this book about 6 more times before the next one is out, or I am lucky enough to get an ARC of it.This book is 1000 Arabian Nights mixed with A Court of Thorns and Roses rolled into one, with extremely diverse characters, beautifully portrayed religion, incredibly complex and unique world and flawless writing. I honestly cannot believe that this is Miss Chakraborty’s first novel. SLIGHT SPOILERSThe story is told from two main POV’s. We begin the tale in 18th century Cairo with Nahri, a young orphaned woman who has the affinity to heal and languages, who grew up on the streets, is tough, funny and yet kind. She has one wish – to make enough money to pay someone to teach her to read and study medicine. One night, while healing a sick girl of a demon (something Nahri never believed is possible since no magic or daemons exist), she gets herself in trouble by singing in a tongue that has never been heard in the human world. Her mistake costs her, as her chant wakes the infrit sleeping inside the human child who goes after Nahri. In desperation, Nahri calls on Dara, an incredibly powerful djinn slave who saves her and takes Nahri to Daevabad – the home of all djinn. Here, Nahri learns that she is the last surviving member of her tribe, a shafit or a halfblood, and her ability to heal is something that Daevabad has been waiting for for a very long time. Did I mention that Dara is hot? Like REALLY HOT, and even Nahri cannot keep her head straight around him. Our other MC is the 2nd in line to the throne of Daevabad – Ali. Prince Ali is extremely intelligent, a great swordsman and has an enormous heart. His enormous heart is what leads him into trouble. Ali believes that Daeva’s treatment of the shafit is wrong and that they deserve to be treated just like any other djinn in Daevabad. We, the readers, first meet Ali as he is trying to rescue slave shafit children from and if this doesn’t endear him to your heart – I do not know what will. Ali’s character is extremely complex. While I admire and love his principles, I think he is very hot headed a lot of the time. He gets multiple chances to calm down and think about his actions, yet his righteousness prevents him from seeing all sides of the situation. BUT this is part of his character! He is young, he is naïve, he thinks he is all knowing and of course he has to fail to grow. His character development in this novel is astounding! Did I mention he’s hot? Like REALLY HOT too? I mean what else do you want?! Both Nahri and Ali are incredible characters and you really cannot help but fall in love with both. They are complex, well written and most importantly real. My other favorite aspect of the book is the way that Miss Chakraborty speaks of Islam. It is with respect, deep understanding, compassion, love and honor. Reading this gorgeous book you get a deeper understanding of what Islam is about – sure it is not the complete picture, but you do get the feeling that there is much more to the religion than just what you see and hear on TV. Miss Chakraborty does this very skillfully, showing you that religion is not responsible for creating monsters; people are responsible for creating monsters. The interchange of the real and the fantasy is so well done that you will believe every word Miss Chakraborty wrote. This book is everything that I have ever wanted in fantasy.And now, I sigh, sit down and wait for book 2…is it November 2018 yet?P.S. I would like to request that Miss Chakraborty writes a book with all the recipes mentioned in this book because everything sounded DELICIOUS!
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  • MsArdychan
    January 1, 1970
    Please Note: I received an advance copy of this book from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. This did not influence the opinions of my review in any way.I have a confession to make: I didn't know much about this book when I requested it. I was solely attracted to it's lovely cover! But, to my utter delight, I found this book to be full of surprises. With a fun, self-reliant heroine, an intricate world based on Arabic mythology, and a wonderful look into Arabic culture, this book was ver Please Note: I received an advance copy of this book from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. This did not influence the opinions of my review in any way.I have a confession to make: I didn't know much about this book when I requested it. I was solely attracted to it's lovely cover! But, to my utter delight, I found this book to be full of surprises. With a fun, self-reliant heroine, an intricate world based on Arabic mythology, and a wonderful look into Arabic culture, this book was very entertaining. What I Liked:Characters:Nahri is a resourceful thief and con artist, making her own way on the tough streets of 18th century Cairo. She has always been able to heal others, and uses her gift of knowing what's wrong with someone's health to swindle them out of their money! Not exactly an angel, is she?But, one night when she is performing a fake exorcism, she unwittingly calls upon a Djinn warrior, and unleashes a chain of events that reveal her true identity.I loved how self-reliant Nahri was. She was not a damsel in distress waiting to be rescued. But she did have a lot to learn about looking past her own needs and being there for others. Her story arc is fun to follow, and I loved how she matured as the novel progresses.Most of the other characters were men, such as the warrior, Afshin, and the two princes Ali and Muntadhir. Each had their own private demons to slay. Ali, in particular, was very young and inexperienced in the ways of palace politics. He learns the hard way about whom to trust, and lend his support to. The only other significant female characters were the cranky servant Nisreen, and the spoiled princess Zaynab. Both characters seem, at first, to be two-denominational, but later show depth as their situations begin to be understood by Nahri.World-Building:Except for some exposure to the stories of Aladdin, the mythology of Arabic culture is not something I am familiar with. I found the intricate world of the Djinn to be exciting and fun to discover. And there is a lot for the reader to learn! There are six tribes of Djinn, each with different traditions and beliefs. And there is another group of half human/ half djinn people called Shafit. They are treated with contempt and used as slaves by some of the tribes. I loved the tension between the different groups as they try to live with each other.There are also a wide range of creatures to encounter such as Ifrit (creatures who are the enemies of the Djinn), Simurgh (firebirds), Zahhak (fire-breathing lizards), Peri (air elementals), and Ghouls (zombies). It is exciting to read how the main characters work with (or clash with) each creature. This aspect kind of reminded me of Rick Riordan's Lightning Thief books! Arabic Culture:Oh, the food! I am a person who tends to explore different cultures through culinary experiences. The descriptions of curries, pastries, and teas will make your mouth water! Along with food, many of the characters follow various practices of the Muslim faith, including traditional attire, customs about men and women interacting, and daily prayer. These details enriched my understanding of the culture and I loved them.What I Was Mixed About:As a reader, I was really excited by the intricate world-building and complex society of the city of Daevabad. But I was also really confused, at times. Thankfully, there was a glossary of terms at the end of the book to explain some of the language. But there needed to be much more in the glossary, along with an explanation of the six tribes of Djinn. I kept getting them all mixed up! Hopefully the finished copy will have a nice chart to help the reader keep everything clear.
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  • Kristen
    January 1, 1970
    Thinking 4.5Really gorgeous book but it was a long book and slower read. Beautifully executed and I’m eager for the follow up!
  • Rachel Strolle
    January 1, 1970
    PURE MAGIC
  • Maha Haggouch
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsMIND. FUCKED.review to come.
  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    I put this on hold. There are two different POVs, one I loved and one I continually skipped over.For such a dense book, I think I am missing a lot using this method. May revisit later.
  • abbicus rex
    January 1, 1970
    After flying through this, I will attempt to pull some cohesive thoughts together other that "IT WAS EXCELLENT". The basic structure of this story is familiar: girl in our world discovers a stranger, more magical world and is pulled into it. She discovers that she is connected to the larger workings of the new world - magically, politically, etc. BUT! Chakraborty does this all in a way that feels incredibly fresh. THE WORLDBUILDING! THE MAGIC! Everything about this world felt like it had been th After flying through this, I will attempt to pull some cohesive thoughts together other that "IT WAS EXCELLENT". The basic structure of this story is familiar: girl in our world discovers a stranger, more magical world and is pulled into it. She discovers that she is connected to the larger workings of the new world - magically, politically, etc. BUT! Chakraborty does this all in a way that feels incredibly fresh. THE WORLDBUILDING! THE MAGIC! Everything about this world felt like it had been there forever, and I was just stepping into it for the first time. History was explained without overly burdening the reader with exposition. This world is dark and whimsical and brutal and beautiful, and I loved living in it for a little while.Nahri is a new fave: a thief who, despite being given immense luxury, will still steal valuable trinkets and stash them away like a squirrel just in case of emergencies. (My one complaint is that I wish she had played a more active role in the action that went down at the book's climax, but her cleverness, toughness, and snark were a huge highlight of the book as a whole.)The other POV, Ali, is also wonderful. He perfectly shows the complexity of this world, which (just like ours) has people on both sides of a conflict thinking they are in the right for their own deeply personal reasons. No one is 100% right, and no one is 100% wrong. I had some...Questions at the end about the way in which some of the things that went down...but will still absolutely be waiting anxiously for book two. (There will be a book two, right?!)
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  • Sharon
    January 1, 1970
    After reading just the first few pages of this absorbing fantasy novel, readers will swear that the authors has magical powers of her own. The action, the characters, the mythology, the setting- every element of this tale shimmers off the page. Street smart con artist Nahri will steal you heart just like she eventually enchants Dara, the djinn that she accidentally summons. These reluctant partners must work together to escape foes from Dara's past, discover the full potential of Nahri's talents After reading just the first few pages of this absorbing fantasy novel, readers will swear that the authors has magical powers of her own. The action, the characters, the mythology, the setting- every element of this tale shimmers off the page. Street smart con artist Nahri will steal you heart just like she eventually enchants Dara, the djinn that she accidentally summons. These reluctant partners must work together to escape foes from Dara's past, discover the full potential of Nahri's talents, and learn their roles in a kingdom fraught with a tangled history and dark betrayals.The next book in the trilogy cannot come soon enough!This ARC was provided by HarperCollins, in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Erica (From Left To Write)
    January 1, 1970
    Wow oh wow oh wow. Beautifully written and such a well thought out premise! As many of my book friends know, I struggled with this book when I first started reading it. I just couldn't connect with Nahri and some of the other characters but I definitely did by the end of the book, which means I'm giving Chakraborty a huge round of applause. This book had such a wonderful setting and an awesome politics heavy plot which I fell in love with. Can't wait for the next one! May peace be upon those who Wow oh wow oh wow. Beautifully written and such a well thought out premise! As many of my book friends know, I struggled with this book when I first started reading it. I just couldn't connect with Nahri and some of the other characters but I definitely did by the end of the book, which means I'm giving Chakraborty a huge round of applause. This book had such a wonderful setting and an awesome politics heavy plot which I fell in love with. Can't wait for the next one! May peace be upon those who are waiting with me (that was a reference to the book wink wink). // ARC ACQUIRED THROUGH A GOODREADS GIVEAWAY // (yes people actually win those things)
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  • London Shah
    January 1, 1970
    Just finished reading my arc. I absolutely loved every, single detail of this story. The writing is so beautiful, so detailed and authentic, and so much care has gone into the research of djinn––something I'm especially grateful and pleased about. Reading a muslim author's careful and authentic portrayal of djinn only highlights the massive problem with non-muslims portraying djinn in their stories. The MC is intriguing, you never really know what she's going to do next, and as for the love inte Just finished reading my arc. I absolutely loved every, single detail of this story. The writing is so beautiful, so detailed and authentic, and so much care has gone into the research of djinn––something I'm especially grateful and pleased about. Reading a muslim author's careful and authentic portrayal of djinn only highlights the massive problem with non-muslims portraying djinn in their stories. The MC is intriguing, you never really know what she's going to do next, and as for the love interest....Dara is unforgettable, and took the whole story to another level. I adore him. I adore a certain scene in a cave during a storm :-X The author's imagination is glorious, the stunning and intricate details are vivid and beautifully done, and the characterisation is skilful. I recommend pre-ordering this with all my heart. Unforgettable, and I cannot wait to see where the trilogy takes Nahira and Dara <3 <3 <3
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