Hellboy and the B.P.R.D., Vol. 3 (Hellboy and the B.P.R.D #3)
Collects: Hellboy 1954: The Mirror, Black Sun #1–2, The Unreasoning Beast, Ghost Moon #1–2

Hellboy and the B.P.R.D., Vol. 3 (Hellboy and the B.P.R.D #3) Details

TitleHellboy and the B.P.R.D., Vol. 3 (Hellboy and the B.P.R.D #3)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 1st, 2018
PublisherDark Horse
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Fantasy, Horror, Comix

Hellboy and the B.P.R.D., Vol. 3 (Hellboy and the B.P.R.D #3) Review

  • Paul
    January 1, 1970
    Another nice little collection of stories from Hellboy's past. Anthologies like this tend to be a bit patchy, so I'm happy to report this one's pretty solid throughout. There's nothing amazing in here but it was enjoyable and certainly scratched my Hellboy itch in the absence of anything new from Mike Mignola himself.
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  • Tom Ewing
    January 1, 1970
    In these difficult times it's heartening to know that at least one comics hero who got his start punching Nazis is still upholding that grand tradition. In most other respects, sadly, this is a lacklustre Hellboy collection. Three stories, the first of which starts promisingly but abandons its cast and setting halfway through for genetic Hellboy brawling. The second is a done-in-one ghost story, with decent visuals but a flat script. The third is sub-par, one issue of heavy exposition about 50s In these difficult times it's heartening to know that at least one comics hero who got his start punching Nazis is still upholding that grand tradition. In most other respects, sadly, this is a lacklustre Hellboy collection. Three stories, the first of which starts promisingly but abandons its cast and setting halfway through for genetic Hellboy brawling. The second is a done-in-one ghost story, with decent visuals but a flat script. The third is sub-par, one issue of heavy exposition about 50s Hong Kong, one issue dealing with a moustache-twirling villain. When your baddie admits on the page he doesn't really have a motive or goal it's probably a sign things need a little work. After some promising early volumes this series is spinning its wheels and becoming less worthwhile by the issue.
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  • Andrew
    January 1, 1970
    I've been enjoying these short stories of Hellboy's early days at BPRD. It's a smart way to keep capitalizing on Hellboy's popularity without forcing the story to continue past Hellboy in Hell. I wish they were of a higher quality though. As it is most of the stories are enjoyable but forgettable. Richard Corben has a short story featured in this volume. It's nice - Corben is one of my favourite artists - but again, pretty forgettable. I feel like the story has already been told in other Hellboy I've been enjoying these short stories of Hellboy's early days at BPRD. It's a smart way to keep capitalizing on Hellboy's popularity without forcing the story to continue past Hellboy in Hell. I wish they were of a higher quality though. As it is most of the stories are enjoyable but forgettable. Richard Corben has a short story featured in this volume. It's nice - Corben is one of my favourite artists - but again, pretty forgettable. I feel like the story has already been told in other Hellboy books. All of these stories are feeling too familiar at this point. Hellboy goes to investigate a mystery, stumbles into some crazy ghost/nazi/demon and punches them a bunch. Fans only, for sure. --Check out the original run of Hellboy instead if you're new to this and only read Hellboy and the B.P.R.D. if you're desperate for more Hellboy (like me I guess haha)
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  • Rick
    January 1, 1970
    Mike Mignola's Hellboy remains one of the most entertaining comics year after year and incarnation after incarnation. This latest series has been going back and revealing untold tales of the early days of the B.P.R.D. and Hellboy's youth. The stories are fun, light and reminiscent of Mignola's early work with the character. Good stuff! 
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  • Pop Bop
    January 1, 1970
    Mmmm, That's Some Good HellboyThis is the third "Hellboy and the B.P.R.D." collection, following on the 1952 and 1953 editions. I favor the 1953 collection out of the three but this one is a close second.We get three longer tales and one mini-tale. There is "Black Sun #1-2", "The Unreasoning Beast", "Ghost Moon #1-2", and a very short "Mirror". SOME MILD GENERAL PREMISE/PLOT SPOILERS follow."Black Sun" is a Nazi nutsy tale that consists mostly of Hellboy making wisecracks while the villain engag Mmmm, That's Some Good HellboyThis is the third "Hellboy and the B.P.R.D." collection, following on the 1952 and 1953 editions. I favor the 1953 collection out of the three but this one is a close second.We get three longer tales and one mini-tale. There is "Black Sun #1-2", "The Unreasoning Beast", "Ghost Moon #1-2", and a very short "Mirror". SOME MILD GENERAL PREMISE/PLOT SPOILERS follow."Black Sun" is a Nazi nutsy tale that consists mostly of Hellboy making wisecracks while the villain engages in the longest monologue I've read in a while. Since the monologue is interesting in a classic nutsy Nazi way and the wisecracks were amusing enough I was happy. The drawing had some nice "big" scenes loaded with detail and atmosphere, and that actually supported and backed up the villain speech quite well."The Unreasoning Beast" is a domestic haunting story that has Hellboy pretty much never leaving a suburban living room. It's character and dialogue driven and is one of the few Hellboys I've read in which the drawing, which is restrained and realistic, actually sort of upstages Hellboy. (That said, the drawing is technically very accomplished but might strike some as too understated.)My favorite tale was "Ghost Moon", which mixed in Chinese mythology, demons, a powerful artifact, shadowy operatives, and action, although Hellboy was almost on the sidelines for chunks of the story. This adventure had the best mix, I thought, of dialogue, plot, action, backstory, exotic setting, and demon creepiness and struck me as the most satisfying and complete of the tales.The final story, which is only a few pages, is an atmospheric and suggestive mood piece, which I always like to find sprinkled into these collections.This isn't Hellboy in Hell or Hellboy in Mexico but the 1950's throwback stories are fun and if you like early Hellboy and the B.P.R.D. team and are willing to just wander around with them punching stuff then I imagine this collection will go down just fine.(Please note that I received a free advance will-self-destruct-in-x-days Adobe Digital copy of this book without a review requirement, or any influence regarding review content should I choose to post a review. Apart from that I have no connection at all to either the author or the publisher of this book.)
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  • Adam Stone
    January 1, 1970
    One of the frustrating things about reading Hellboy is that most of the main collections are not organized chronologically or thematically. It's just that the writers decided to tell a particular story or set of stories, and in order to release them to the trade paperback/hardcover market, they package them as the five or six issues that came out around the same time, whether or not they make sense as a single story.With the Hellboy & The BPRD stuff, everything is arranged chronologically, e One of the frustrating things about reading Hellboy is that most of the main collections are not organized chronologically or thematically. It's just that the writers decided to tell a particular story or set of stories, and in order to release them to the trade paperback/hardcover market, they package them as the five or six issues that came out around the same time, whether or not they make sense as a single story.With the Hellboy & The BPRD stuff, everything is arranged chronologically, even giving the year the stories took place on the cover, which is a nice change of pace. Because I didn't invest myself in the Hellboy universe when it started, and I read more traditionally narrative comic series, I'm not used to the "Now we're over here! Now we're over here!" nature of some of these collections. I tend to find some of the short stories paced strangely. And that's very true for this volume. Until I got to the main story, I thought this was going to be a two star review. Ben Stenbeck, and Paolo Rivera's art is top of the line Hellboy, and Michael Walsh's art is less detailed than I enjoy but not distractingly so, but I just wasn't invested in any of the first five stories.The sixth story, "Beyond The Fences" brings it up to three stars by having the story take a little more time to breathe, and tying it into BPRD 1948. It also has some fun misdirects.I would recommend this to Hellboy enthusiasts, Mike Mignola fanboys, people who enjoy incredibly short stories about haunted dismembered limbs, people who never trusted Mr. Ed, people who think Bojack Horseman should commit more murder, and people who like snappy action movie patter to go with their demon hunting.
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  • Adan
    January 1, 1970
    A handful of Hellboy shorts that take place in 1954. My favorite story was probably "Ghost Moon", the one set in Hong Kong, though "Black Sun" was pretty good too, and was the most classic of Hellboy stories.
  • Benjamin Barham
    January 1, 1970
    Roberson really takes the conventional "show don't tell" method of comic storytelling and flips it on it's head. Here we have a whole lot of "tell don't show", and I'm really not feeling it for something so dear to my heart.
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