Rickety Stitch and the Gelatinous Goo
Meet Rickety Stitch . . . a walking, talking, singing skeleton minstrel. He's the one skeleton in the dungeon who seems to have retained his soul, and he has no idea why. His only clue to his former identity is a song he hears snippets of in his dreams, an epic bard's tale about the Road to Epoli and the land of Eem.His sidekick and sole friend is the gelatinous Goo, who Rickety alone can understand. Together they set out in search of Rickety's past, with abundant humor and danger galore.

Rickety Stitch and the Gelatinous Goo Details

TitleRickety Stitch and the Gelatinous Goo
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 6th, 2017
PublisherAlfred A. Knopf Books for Young Readers
ISBN0399556133
ISBN-139780399556135
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Fantasy, Young Adult, Mystery, Music, Childrens, Middle Grade, Graphic Novels Comics, Fiction, Comics, Humor

Rickety Stitch and the Gelatinous Goo Review

  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    Gooey is my new favourite sidekick.
  • Bookish
    January 1, 1970
    You know when you finish a book and your first thought is that more people need to know about this story? That’s how I felt finishing Rickety Stitch. It’s a weird and wonderful tale about a skeleton bard searching for clues about the man he used to be. The humor is punny and irreverent, and the art is bold and gorgeous. There’s also an accompanying song, which has been stuck in my head for days. This book is just my brand of weird. —Kelly (https://www.bookish.com/articles/staf...)
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  • Trin
    January 1, 1970
    Eerie, funny, intriguing, touching -- everything you could want in a graphic novel. But it's barely suitable for kids, so I think the decision to market it for children instead of adults is bizarre.Nevertheless, grown-up peeps: this is really really good.
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  • Anne
    January 1, 1970
    Don't get me wrong. Mr. Jelly and the Skellytones is an excellent band name.This is such a weird and wonderful graphic novel. It tells the tale of a skeleton bard on a quest to discover who he was before he died. He's guided by a song that he only remembers in his dreams, and he's joined on his journey by his best friend, a blob of goo who speaks in punctuation marks that only Rickety can understand.The plot is great for fantasy fans who like to see familiar quest tropes played with in new ways. Don't get me wrong. Mr. Jelly and the Skellytones is an excellent band name.This is such a weird and wonderful graphic novel. It tells the tale of a skeleton bard on a quest to discover who he was before he died. He's guided by a song that he only remembers in his dreams, and he's joined on his journey by his best friend, a blob of goo who speaks in punctuation marks that only Rickety can understand.The plot is great for fantasy fans who like to see familiar quest tropes played with in new ways. The humor is punny, irreverent, and very tongue-in-cheek. And there's also plenty of heart and a nice focus on friendship and finding out who you are.The art is gorgeous. Rickety's dreams are told in black and white, while his waking days are in full color. The color choices are bold (we have a unicorn with a hot pink mane), and the characters' facial expressions are on point. Who knew a skull and blob of goo could be so expressive?I had hoped that the badass female knight with the shaved head on the cover would make a longer appearance, and my fingers are crossed that she plays a larger role in the sequel.This was a really fun read, and I'm already excited for the sequel. It's the kind of story that I enjoy the more I think about it.Also, the creators put together wonderful recording of Rickety's song for anyone (like me) who was curious about what it truly sounded like: https://ricketystitch.com/songI've seen outlets recommend this for readers of Nimona and I completely agree, but would say this is a completely different type of story. But if you're up for a funny, strange, fantasy adventure, this is a great one.
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  • Carina Olsen
    January 1, 1970
    I don't usually read graphic novels, but when I got this one for review, I was pretty curious about it. Because that cover is pretty awesome. And I thought the story sounded pretty interesting too. I just read this one, and sadly, I didn't like it all that much. Aw. But there were parts that I enjoyed a bit.Like the gorgeous illustrations. I found all the images to be stunning. The skeleton looks pretty awesome. And I liked looking at the pictures, haha. I just didn't think the story was very go I don't usually read graphic novels, but when I got this one for review, I was pretty curious about it. Because that cover is pretty awesome. And I thought the story sounded pretty interesting too. I just read this one, and sadly, I didn't like it all that much. Aw. But there were parts that I enjoyed a bit.Like the gorgeous illustrations. I found all the images to be stunning. The skeleton looks pretty awesome. And I liked looking at the pictures, haha. I just didn't think the story was very good. I'm not sure what age group this is for, but it says above twelve. At times it felt very adult, yet also so childish.And so I'm not sure who to recommend this to. But I sure do know that I do not think children should read it, because it isn't for kids at all. But still, nothing too adult about it either. Sigh. Anyway. I had a lot of issues with this one, sadly. And I think that the only thing I enjoyed about this book was the artwork. Aw. And that it was a fast read, lol. I'm glad I gave it a try, though. I do wish to read more graphic novels. I just wish this one had been a lot better. I also don't get the title, The Road to Epoli. As they spent this whole first book in a forest. Hmph. There will be other books, I think, that will be on the road to Epoli. But I won't be reading those. Though I am sort of curious to know what happens next. I am just not curious enough.This book tells the story of Rickety Stitch. He's a living skeleton. He also sings. Though he sings rather terribly, and no one likes listening to him. We learn a little bit about him in this book, though I didn't really care at all. Aw. But I really liked seeing the pages from his dreams. Those were interesting. And I wanted to know more about that. This whole book is in color, which I loved, except for all his dreams, which are black and white. So pretty. This skeleton is sort of interesting to read about, yet I didn't really care for him.He has one friend, the Gelatinous Goo. Aka some jelly thingy. Seemed sort of cute. Except, well, they both go drinking in this book, and I didn't really care for that scene at all. It was a bit disturbing. Aw. Oh, well. There are a bunch of characters in this book. Some of them kind of interesting. Like the gnome. But some just really annoying, like the imp. I didn't like his character at all. Lying creature. Though he did look cute, sometimes. There are jokes in this book, I suppose, but they were a bit too adult for this age group.I'm not sure what else I wish to say about this book. There isn't really that much to mention. It was just over two hundred pages, I think, and it was a quick read. The story was interesting at times, but I found most of it to be boring. At least the drawings were pretty. I wish I had liked this book more, but that just wasn't the case. Still, I'm glad I gave it a try. Huge thank you to the publisher for sending me this ARC to review while I was in Chicago. Means the most. It sure is gorgeous. Curious to know what others think.---This review was first posted on my blog, Carina's Books, here: http://carinabooks.blogspot.no/2017/0...
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  • Christina
    January 1, 1970
    This is a fun graphic novel that puts a satirical spin on medieval fantasy yarns. At first I thought it might be a ripoff of one of my favorite book series from a few years ago, "Skullduggery Pleasant," because that too has a walking, talking, witty and clothed skeleton for a main character, and how often do you see *that* in books for teens?! But this is entirely different, aside from those initial similarities. Our friend Rickety is a troubadour (or minstrel), lives in a vaguely medieval time This is a fun graphic novel that puts a satirical spin on medieval fantasy yarns. At first I thought it might be a ripoff of one of my favorite book series from a few years ago, "Skullduggery Pleasant," because that too has a walking, talking, witty and clothed skeleton for a main character, and how often do you see *that* in books for teens?! But this is entirely different, aside from those initial similarities. Our friend Rickety is a troubadour (or minstrel), lives in a vaguely medieval time period, and has weird dreams/nightmares of surviving a horrible battle, all underlaid with the strains of an epic ballad that he can not *quite* remember when he wakes up. (I loved that the book is in color but those dreams/memories are in black and white.) Rickety has a weird little friend, The Gelatinous Goo, a cube of, well, goo, whose incomprehensible noises only Rickety can understand. The Goo is quite funny and pretty expressive for a blue glob of Jell-O, it's really hilarious as a sidekick! The two get fired from their job haunting a dungeon, and, all alone in the world, Rickety decides to try to figure out where he's from, what he was like as a living human, and what IS that song all about, "The Road to Epoli"? Along their journey through "Grimly Wood" they encounter an imp, they get mixed up with a nasty giant ogre, and there's a cute gnome named "L. Nerman Fuddle" (really, the names in this book are hilarious! At one point the imp disguises himself as "Chet Whistlefeet"), and then there comes the heart of the story, the evil of course, and more fantasy tropes twisted around a bit. OH! Did I mention the unicorn?! Because it's not your normal shy unicorn! I won't go on, but I do hope this series goes on for quite a bit, because I had a terrific time reading it. Rickety is snide and witty and yet also mournful--he has a soul. There are some innuendo jokes for older readers and plenty of gross-out humor for younger readers. The expressive bold art is great, too. Amazing how many expressions you can put on a cartoon skeleton's skull face!I read an advance reader copy of this book, due for publication in June 2017.
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  • Megan
    January 1, 1970
    Rickety Stitch is a wonderful experience. The story is compelling and very well presented, the art is absolutely charming, and the humor is all there.I highly recommend reading through it, I enjoyed every page, and can't wait for more.
  • Sydney Syphus
    January 1, 1970
    To be honest, I thought that this book was boring. It was almost painful to read and I couldn't even finish it. It would be better for younger kids.
  • Stephen
    January 1, 1970
    Reading this comic was a surreal experience. Despite the ghastly elements of Rickety's world that are hinted at throughout, it gave me a warm and whimsical feeling. The artwork is simple but memorable.
  • Nate C.
    January 1, 1970
    Rickety Stitch is a cool dude. Yeah.Gelatinous Goo is a cool dude. Yeah.Their adventures together are funny and fun. I love them.
  • Audrey B.
    January 1, 1970
    Actual rating 8/10"Rickety Stitch and the Gelatinous Goo: the Road to Epoli" is a funny and whimsical former webcomic adapted to print. It's about a skeleton named Rickety Stitch, a lute skeleton bard. Unlike other skeletons, which are mindless drones, he retains a human soul, but lacks any memory of his life. The only indication is the song that he dreams about. After being kicked out of a job working in a dungeon, he and is friend the Gelatinous Goo, set out to find out who he really is. It's Actual rating 8/10"Rickety Stitch and the Gelatinous Goo: the Road to Epoli" is a funny and whimsical former webcomic adapted to print. It's about a skeleton named Rickety Stitch, a lute skeleton bard. Unlike other skeletons, which are mindless drones, he retains a human soul, but lacks any memory of his life. The only indication is the song that he dreams about. After being kicked out of a job working in a dungeon, he and is friend the Gelatinous Goo, set out to find out who he really is. It's the first book in a trilogy.It used to be a webcomic, but like Noelle Stevenson's "Nimona" it stopped updating after getting released in print. Unlike "Nimona" however, "Rickety Stitch" took it a step further and took down all the pages, while adding info about the book. It's a little disappointing, but on the upside a rendition of the ballad in the dream sequences can be found on the website, and it's actually really good!'I really liked the art in this one, as it's very colorful and the character are overall well designed. The facial expressions and body language are well done too. It takes a lot to make a boney skeleton and a faceless blob of goo so emotive!The characters are fun and likable, especially the titular ones, who are just precious lil' cinnamon rolls! Rickety Stitch is a sympathetic and likable protagonist right off the bat. Because he's a skeleton with a soul, monsters think he's a freak while human's think he's dark magic (here called "gloom magic") Searching for his past and the reason he's the way he is makes for good motivation and a sympathetic character. The Gelatinous Goo is exactly what the name implies: a blob of goo. He speaks exclusively in punctuation, and only Rickety Stitch can tell what he's saying.It's the kind of comic that's funny, lighthearted, and maybe a little weird and low brow at times, but still has an intriguing narrative and is all around pleasant. In the back is a whole section of lore that goes into detail about the history, creatures, and culture of the world. With the dream sequences, lore, and unexplained comments characters make, the story raises enough questions to keep the audience interested enough to look at the next book. I do have some criticism. One plot point has the Gelatinous Goo being held hostage by and ogre, and Rickety has to kidnap an old gnome for him to eat, with the help of the ogre's imp minion Ziggy. Rickety didn't mesh as well with Ziggy as Goo, and the story lags a bit as they try to trick the gnome into going to the ogre's castle. Theres also lady knight on both the front and back cover, but she was only there for two very short scenes. On the bright side she'll likely play a bigger role later on. Fingers crossed! "Rickety Stitch and the Gelatinous Goo: the Road to Epoli" is whimsical and fun, has likable heroes, and an intriguing world and narrative. If your a fan of comics and webcomics like "Nimona", "Bone" and "Snarlbear" you'll probably like this one too.Favorite Quote:Rickety Stitch: Was that a flippin' unicorn?!Gelatinous Goo:??!!Rickety Stitch: Okay-stay calm! It's a well-known fact that unicorns only eat virgins!Gelatinous Goo:!!!Rickety Stitch: You are?! W-wait-what if I'm a virgin too?? I can't remember!
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  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    Copy provided by Young Adult Books CentralIn this lengthy graphic novel, we meet Rickety Stitch, who is an undying, animated skeleton who is unclear about his own origins. His constant companion is The Gelatinous Goo, and he is the only one who can communicate with it. Rickety keeps having a dream about a city named Epoli, but can't remember all the lyrics to the song he sings about it when he is awake. Fired from his job cleaning dungeons, he sets out on a quest to find himself. He comes across Copy provided by Young Adult Books CentralIn this lengthy graphic novel, we meet Rickety Stitch, who is an undying, animated skeleton who is unclear about his own origins. His constant companion is The Gelatinous Goo, and he is the only one who can communicate with it. Rickety keeps having a dream about a city named Epoli, but can't remember all the lyrics to the song he sings about it when he is awake. Fired from his job cleaning dungeons, he sets out on a quest to find himself. He comes across an imp called Ziggly in the Grimly woods, and starts to travel with him. When the three approach the caslte of Golo the Gargantuan, it becomes clear that Ziggly is delivering his new friends as dinner! Rickety makes a deal to retrieve the Faerie Man for Golo to eat instead, but the Goo must be left behind. Ziggly then takes Rickety to meet with Nerman, a gnome, and they trick him into helping them. in their travels, they come across Xor the unicorn and find additional information about Epoli, as well as a way to get the Goo back from Golo.Readers who enjoy longer graphic novels such as Stevenson's Nimona, Hick's The Nameless City or Siegel's The Sand Warrior will enjoy this quirky and goofy medieval quest. Rickety's lack of knowledge about his past makes for an intriguing mystery, and the traditional medieval characters all have a unique twist to them.The art is slightly different from many graphic novels, and this is a larger format book (7.2 x 0.5 x 9.8 inches), which sets it apart from other titles. I liked the fact that Rickety's dreams were in black and white, while the rest of the story had full color. This certainly had some odd moments (the Gelatinous Goo?), but there are a few pages in the back of the book that give more explanation of some the places and people involved in Rickety's world. There's almost more information in these few pages than in the rest of the entire book, since the rough sketches of the characters are accompanied by tiny text. This is billed as book one, so we'll see if book two brings more information about Rickety and the Goo's origins. To hear the ballad that appears in Rickety's dream, go to https://ricketystitch.com/home.The authors have gotten a lot of praise for this one, but it's very much like The Glorikian Warrior Eats Adventure Pie to me. All I can think the entire time I'm reading it is "What were these guys smoking when they came up with this idea?"
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  • Destiny
    January 1, 1970
    What's up, guys! This was a delightful read. More than ever it makes me really want to publish my first book. This one's going to be pretty short, almost like a mini review.STORY:"You are someone, Rickety Stitch. That much I know."Rickety Stitch and the Gelatinous Goo: The Road to Epoli by Ben Costa & James Parks (208 pages) is about Rickety, a free-thinking skeleton who comically misses the point and has some disturbing dreams. Recently through a haunting song that stirs up memories in Rick What's up, guys! This was a delightful read. More than ever it makes me really want to publish my first book. This one's going to be pretty short, almost like a mini review.STORY:"You are someone, Rickety Stitch. That much I know."Rickety Stitch and the Gelatinous Goo: The Road to Epoli by Ben Costa & James Parks (208 pages) is about Rickety, a free-thinking skeleton who comically misses the point and has some disturbing dreams. Recently through a haunting song that stirs up memories in Rickety's head and after being fired from a dungeon-keeper job, he decides to go on a journey to discover who/what he was before a singing skeleton.I hadn't expected too much out of this story besides some awesome art, but I found the story kind of heartwarming. To be honest not too much happens in this book. I will say it's a great set up because I am eager for the second book.CHARACTERS:Rickety Stitch— had a lovely cast of characters. The female knight only made a cameo this book, but I am certain we will see more of her come the next one. Rickety seems pretty sweet. He really doesn't understand much about the world or himself, but he knows he loves his friends and his hilariously bad music gigs.Goo! Not much to say about him, but he was very clever.I enjoyed Ziggy, the friendless imp, the most. He had some pretty quick but good character development.ART:I loved the art. It had such a whimsical, storybook feel. The color direction as well was great too. The lighting in this story can go from deep browns and blues to bright grays and yellows. I just love how varied it is and how rich the colors are in this book. Great job to the colorists!OVERALL:You should read this story. I think it started a bit slow, but once I got involved into the story I liked it. It's sort of heartwarming at times. Read more of my reviews here
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    A traveling bard makes his way from one bad job situation to another while drowning his sorrows in a variety of pub scenes with this friend, Goo. The illustrations remind me a bit of Raina Telgemeier's style, or Ben Hatke: they are phenomenal. Bright and round and bold and clear. The story is less clear. I'm not the biggest fan of musical interludes, but that's a personal problem. The mystery of who Rickety Stitch is (or rather, who he was in life) persists throughout the book, which is heavy wi A traveling bard makes his way from one bad job situation to another while drowning his sorrows in a variety of pub scenes with this friend, Goo. The illustrations remind me a bit of Raina Telgemeier's style, or Ben Hatke: they are phenomenal. Bright and round and bold and clear. The story is less clear. I'm not the biggest fan of musical interludes, but that's a personal problem. The mystery of who Rickety Stitch is (or rather, who he was in life) persists throughout the book, which is heavy with a fair amount of humor. Overall, I enjoyed the story and look forward to more. Even less clear, however, is the intended audience. While the illustrations might be very attractive to tweens, there are multiple references to "getting hammered" and vague allusions to other more grown up activities. So I would just know your audience if you recommend this one.Favorite characters: The Goo (which works surprisingly well), the Unicorn Xorgana (oh my goodness, her HAIR!), and the gnome Fuddle (sensible and cheerful and all things noble and good).
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  • Stephanie Tournas
    January 1, 1970
    A fast paced adventure in a world of fairy tale menace is undertaken by a lute-playing skeleton and his beloved companion, a bag of slime. Rickety Stitch and Gooey undertake a quest, for lack of other options, and to discover who Rickety was before he died. Along the way they meet boggarts, fiends, unicorns, ogres and gnomes, who invariably defy stereotype. Rickety himself sings a half-remembered song of the road to Epoli, which may offer a clue to his beginnings. A link to a free download of th A fast paced adventure in a world of fairy tale menace is undertaken by a lute-playing skeleton and his beloved companion, a bag of slime. Rickety Stitch and Gooey undertake a quest, for lack of other options, and to discover who Rickety was before he died. Along the way they meet boggarts, fiends, unicorns, ogres and gnomes, who invariably defy stereotype. Rickety himself sings a half-remembered song of the road to Epoli, which may offer a clue to his beginnings. A link to a free download of the song is available, and is a rich accompaniment to this world of horror and unexpected friendship. The expressive and colorful illustrations, creative takes on classic characters, and whimsical writing make this a great addition to graphic novel collections.Upper elementary school and older lovers of graphic novel horror and fantasy, and especially fans of Jeff Smith's Bone series will love this.
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  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    Rickety Stitch is a highly unlikely protagonist for a graphic novel for the younger set. After all, he's a skeleton who was once a traveling minstrel. While all the other skeletons seem to be merely bones, he still has his soul for reasons that he doesn't know. He and his best friend Goo, a gelatinous life form, set off to find what led to Rickety's demise and why he keeps hearing a song about the road to Epoli when he rests. I'm not sure what will happen next as the book ends on a cliffhanger, Rickety Stitch is a highly unlikely protagonist for a graphic novel for the younger set. After all, he's a skeleton who was once a traveling minstrel. While all the other skeletons seem to be merely bones, he still has his soul for reasons that he doesn't know. He and his best friend Goo, a gelatinous life form, set off to find what led to Rickety's demise and why he keeps hearing a song about the road to Epoli when he rests. I'm not sure what will happen next as the book ends on a cliffhanger, but I did enjoy the various creatures the two friends encounter on their travels, including Oomek the Sea Drinker, Ziggy the imp, and Nerman the Gnome. I liked how some pages are illustrated in full color while others are in black and white, but it's hard to decide how everything fits together until I read the subsequent titles. Those readers who enjoy quests, magic, and characters that turn out to be far more important and less gullible than originally thought will enjoy this title, for sure.
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  • Waleni Moon
    January 1, 1970
    Strong female lea...No! Kickass Skeleton Bard!One word: Epic. The first volume shows the true potential of what is yet to come. Full of smart humor. It's a great story. The characters are strong and well built visually and emotionally. The variance of style makes great shifts and what a perfect way to start the story. Many moments took me back to my youth where I surrounded myself with lots of D&D, games, movies and books that are still part of my main influences. I can't wait for the next v Strong female lea...No! Kickass Skeleton Bard!One word: Epic. The first volume shows the true potential of what is yet to come. Full of smart humor. It's a great story. The characters are strong and well built visually and emotionally. The variance of style makes great shifts and what a perfect way to start the story. Many moments took me back to my youth where I surrounded myself with lots of D&D, games, movies and books that are still part of my main influences. I can't wait for the next volume.
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  • Jenny H.
    January 1, 1970
    Such a fun fantasy quest graphic novel for upper tween and teen readers! The best hero and sidekick ever--a singing skeleton named Rickety Stitch & his gelatinous goo companion that only Rickety can understand. Goo joins Rickety in the quest for his origins and along the way they cross paths with a wise gnome, a mischevious imp, a stoic unicorn, & work together to survive the dangers that befall them. I highly recommend this book for graphic novel readers looking for a quick, fun read th Such a fun fantasy quest graphic novel for upper tween and teen readers! The best hero and sidekick ever--a singing skeleton named Rickety Stitch & his gelatinous goo companion that only Rickety can understand. Goo joins Rickety in the quest for his origins and along the way they cross paths with a wise gnome, a mischevious imp, a stoic unicorn, & work together to survive the dangers that befall them. I highly recommend this book for graphic novel readers looking for a quick, fun read that will leave you looking forward to the next installment.
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  • Christa
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 out of 5 stars. I did like this graphic novel. The characters were heart warming and the art style was vibrant and bold. Really pretty. I understand the point of the story is to focus on the journey and not the end... but I felt like it needed an end? I just was so fascinated by the storyline that I wanted more. I wantes more time in the world, learn about Rickety Stitch, and spend time with the characters. I thought that we would finally learn about Rickety Stitch's background and we didn't 3.5 out of 5 stars. I did like this graphic novel. The characters were heart warming and the art style was vibrant and bold. Really pretty. I understand the point of the story is to focus on the journey and not the end... but I felt like it needed an end? I just was so fascinated by the storyline that I wanted more. I wantes more time in the world, learn about Rickety Stitch, and spend time with the characters. I thought that we would finally learn about Rickety Stitch's background and we didn't. It was... unsatisfying. While enjoyed the story a lot, I just wanted more!
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  • Kathleen
    January 1, 1970
    A very clever book about a skeleton bard trying to find his place in the world...or his former place, maybe? I loved the unicorn with the bowl haircut mullet. The art is cartoony and the dialogue zany. I'm glad I picked it up!
  • Vi
    January 1, 1970
    I love Goo. People do talk too much.
  • Kristin El
    January 1, 1970
    Not necessarily for kids who won't understand the humor. A cross between Shrek and Monsters Inc. Something I'd like to re-read to get all of it. Beautiful art.
  • Holly
    January 1, 1970
    I'm hooked! Can't wait for the next volume!!!
  • Jamie (Becoming Bookish)
    January 1, 1970
    So epic in a very adorable way! I am addicted and totally in love! the Goo is so precious!
  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    Sooooo laugh out loud adorable and hilarious and great <3
  • Kristina Romero
    January 1, 1970
    This was quite silly but still pretty fun. I was bummed the really badass looking woman on the cover wasn't in it barely at all but maybe in a sequel she will return.
  • Paula
    January 1, 1970
    I made it to the snot locker and then I conceded I am not the audience for this book.
  • Charlottek18
    January 1, 1970
    The cover looks really compelling and the art is good but the story is really lacking and flat. It has the option of a sequel but it really is not set up that way. A pretty disappointing read.
  • Lizzy
    January 1, 1970
    Beautiful art with a fun, fantastical story! Rickety Stitch is a hoot and I love Gelatinous Goo! Impatiently awaiting volume 2!
  • Kristy
    January 1, 1970
    This is so not a middle grade graphic novel. I would probably give this to teens.
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