Heretics and Believers
Centuries on, what the Reformation was and what it accomplished remain deeply contentious. Peter Marshall’s sweeping new history—the first major overview for general readers in a generation—argues that sixteenth-century England was a society neither desperate for nor allergic to change, but one open to ideas of “reform” in various competing guises. King Henry VIII wanted an orderly, uniform Reformation, but his actions opened a Pandora’s Box from which pluralism and diversity flowed and rooted themselves in English life.With sensitivity to individual experience as well as masterfully synthesizing historical and institutional developments, Marshall frames the perceptions and actions of people great and small, from monarchs and bishops to ordinary families and ecclesiastics, against a backdrop of profound change that altered the meanings of “religion” itself. This engaging history reveals what was really at stake in the overthrow of Catholic culture and the reshaping of the English

Heretics and Believers Details

TitleHeretics and Believers
Author
FormatHardcover
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 27th, 2017
PublisherYale University Press
ISBN0300170629
ISBN-139780300170627
Number of pages672 pages
Rating
GenreHistory, Nonfiction, Religion

Heretics and Believers Review

  • Victoria Brown
    April 17, 2017
    'To virtually all the people making use of the word, "Reformation" suggested a lineal process of betterment and change - of an agent acting progressively upon object to produce one perfected, or at least improved, bastion of faith. The experience of the English Reformation, for those who have lived through it, could scarcely have been less like that.'I have been deeply impressed with the depth of understanding and analysis in Heretics and Believers. Peter Marshall has expertly handled the crowd 'To virtually all the people making use of the word, "Reformation" suggested a lineal process of betterment and change - of an agent acting progressively upon object to produce one perfected, or at least improved, bastion of faith. The experience of the English Reformation, for those who have lived through it, could scarcely have been less like that.'I have been deeply impressed with the depth of understanding and analysis in Heretics and Believers. Peter Marshall has expertly handled the crowd of competing contemporary voices to demonstrate - better than any historian I have ever read - the true extent to which the English Reformation rested on debate, argument and compromise.Moving away from his Long Reformation thesis, he delves into the 'key century' of 1490-1590, demonstrating how even pre-Lutheran dissidence was defined by a divergence of opinions. His analysis into pre-Reformation evangelicalism is incrediblyinsightful, and demonstrates part of the social context which allowed Protestantism to take root in England in the 16th century.What is truly remarkable is that, despite embracing widely divergent opinions and vehement debate, Marshall's 579-page assessment does not feel overwhelming. He carved a clear path for the reader to follow, to see the arguments around us, but not become embroiled or confused by the noise. I wholeheartedly recommend this book to anyone seeking the true nature of the Reformation.
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  • !Tæmbuŝu
    June 14, 2017
    Recommended by Open Letters Monthly
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