The Only Child
The #1 internationally bestselling author of The Demonologist radically reimagines the origins of gothic literature’s founding masterpieces—Frankenstein, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and Dracula—in a contemporary novel driven by relentless suspense and surprising emotion. This is the story of a man who may be the world’s one real-life monster, and the only woman who has a chance of finding him.As a forensic psychiatrist at New York’s leading institution of its kind, Dr. Lily Dominick has evaluated the mental states of some of the country’s most dangerous psychotics. But the strangely compelling client she interviewed today—a man with no name, accused of the most twisted crime—struck her as somehow different from the others, despite the two impossible claims he made.First, that he is more than two hundred years old and personally inspired Mary Shelley, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Bram Stoker in creating the three novels of the nineteenth century that define the monstrous in the modern imagination. Second, that he’s Lily’s father. To discover the truth—behind her client, her mother’s death, herself—Dr. Dominick must embark on a journey that will threaten her career, her sanity, and ultimately her life.Fusing the page-turning tension of a first-rate thriller with a provocative take on where thrillers come from, The Only Child will keep you up until its last unforgettable revelation.

The Only Child Details

TitleThe Only Child
Author
FormatHardcover
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 23rd, 2017
PublisherSimon Schuster
ISBN1476755213
ISBN-139781476755212
Number of pages304 pages
Rating
GenreHorror, Mystery, Fiction, Thriller, Suspense, Gothic

The Only Child Review

  • Navidad Thelamour
    April 25, 2017
    The Only Child started out as improbably as to mock the tradition of true Gothic fiction. The tension and “horror” seemed contrived from the very start, placed into our minds by the forced narration of the author, not by circumstance, not by the skilled hand that every reader searches for to guide them on their path.This novel was a dabbling adaptation of so many classic stories of the Gothic tradition—Frankenstein, Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and Dracula…my foot. To sample their tr The Only Child started out as improbably as to mock the tradition of true Gothic fiction. The tension and “horror” seemed contrived from the very start, placed into our minds by the forced narration of the author, not by circumstance, not by the skilled hand that every reader searches for to guide them on their path.This novel was a dabbling adaptation of so many classic stories of the Gothic tradition—Frankenstein, Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and Dracula…my foot. To sample their tradition is one thing, to recreate it, another, more awe-inspiring thing. Yet this, The Only Child, was neither. It sampled their names, their ideas, but never breathed any life into them. In fact, it read as a lifeless shell of them, if that even, that writhed with too much telling me and not enough showing me. I felt nothing while reading this, not even when Pyper tried to tell me what to feel, and was bored from the start of the first chapter.In short, The Only Child turned out to be a “fast-paced” adventure story with no soul, a play on the classic horror traditions we all love for their originality, though this novel displayed little originality of its own. I recommend it to no one, least of all lovers of classic horror or the Gothic tradition. In fact, the only surprise I found in these pages, before skipping to the end and finally putting it down, was that the renowned Simon and Schuster, whose lists I tend to love, would publish this thing in the first place. 1 star **I received an advance-read copy of this book from the publisher, Simon Schuster, via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.*To see more reviews, go to The Navi Review at www.thenavireview.com, and follow the blog on [email protected]
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  • Erin Clemence
    March 12, 2017
    Thank you to the author, who provided my school with an advanced signed copy, which allowed me to get my greedy hands on it. Andrew Pyper’s newest release, “The Only Child” is about fathers and daughters, demonic secrets, and characters from the folklore we know so well. Dr. Lily Dominick is a forensic psychologist, working with the deeply disturbed in New York City. When she is introduced to the nameless, unidentified “Client 46874-A”, who claims to be immortal and demonic in nature, she belie Thank you to the author, who provided my school with an advanced signed copy, which allowed me to get my greedy hands on it.  Andrew Pyper’s newest release, “The Only Child” is about fathers and daughters, demonic secrets, and characters from the folklore we know so well. Dr. Lily Dominick is a forensic psychologist, working with the deeply disturbed in New York City. When she is introduced to the nameless, unidentified “Client 46874-A”, who claims to be immortal and demonic in nature, she believes him to be just another “psycho” until he reveals his biggest secret- he knew her mother. Lily has a lot of questions about the way her mother was killed and why, and this client seems to have the answers. But does he really know what happened to her mother? Why has he really come to see her? Who is he, really? The client in this novel, eventually given the name Michael, claims himself to be “part Dr. Jekyll, part Frankenstein and part Dracula”, an immortal creature with many demonic powers, who in fact was single-handedly the influence behind the famous novels. Lily follows Michael throughout Eastern Europe and even Northern Canada, looking for secrets about her mother’s life and, eventually, running for her life. Pyper certainly tells quite the story with this one, combining facets of three of the greatest horror stories around to create his main character. Michael’s character provides more questions than answers- is he telling the truth or is he just genuinely insane? Is he really who he says he is in regards to Lily and her mother? And then of course, when we meet some of the other characters (i.e. Will- who claims to be “on the side of good” and offers to help Lily), we again have more questions- “is he actually on the side of good?” “Who does he work for?” “Why does he want to help Lily?” Eventually, all these questions are finally answered, but the constant questioning throughout the novel is distracting. Although there are creepy moments, this novel is not as scary as his previous works. I found it more psychologically thrilling than downright creepy. I did enjoy the character of Lily, and we were so similar that it definitely allowed me to develop a bond with her and root for her. I always enjoy Pyper’s settings and backdrops, and Lily’s travels through Eastern Europe and Canada were no different. Each novel always takes the reader on a bit of a journey- which is really the best we can hope for in a good book. Pyper ties in the works of Stevenson, Shelley and Stoker, which will speak to the hard-core literary nuts (like myself), and this adds a bit of depth to the character of Michael as well. Overall, the characters were well thought out, genuine and sort-of creepy (at least in Michael’s case). Pyper’s plot lines inundate a reader with questions; this makes the reader continue through the novel, in hopes that the questions will be answered (they are). I would’ve loved more of an original, creepy demon character as opposed to Michael (who seemed to be all the scary bits of other author’s characters) but his connection with Lily was surprising and intriguing. This novel was a good read and it definitely has a chilling vibe to it, but I think it would appeal to readers that are new to Pyper. Anyone familiar with “The Demonologist” or “The Damned” will be a little disappointed in this one. (3.5 rating, rounded up to 4 for GR).
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  • Sandy
    April 14, 2017
    3.5 starsAck!! The hardest review to write? One for a book that is well written but just not a genre you particularly enjoy reading. It’s simply a case of a slight mismatch between book & reader, for which I take full responsibility. So here’s the deal. I’ll tell you what I did like & why I think those with a taste for tales of horror with fantastical beasts should snap this up. The MC is 36 year old Dr. Lily Dominick. Lily is a psychiatrist who works with the scariest, most diseased min 3.5 starsAck!! The hardest review to write? One for a book that is well written but just not a genre you particularly enjoy reading. It’s simply a case of a slight mismatch between book & reader, for which I take full responsibility. So here’s the deal. I’ll tell you what I did like & why I think those with a taste for tales of horror with fantastical beasts should snap this up. The MC is 36 year old Dr. Lily Dominick. Lily is a psychiatrist who works with the scariest, most diseased minds incarcerated at the maximum security Kirby Forensic Psychiatric Centre in NYC. She’s a private, insular woman whose experiences as a child pretty much sealed her fate in terms of career choice. When Lily was 6, she & her mother were living in a remote cabin outside of Fairbanks when the unthinkable happened. It began with a knock at the door. Her memories of that night are hazy at best but what she does remember is the shadow of a large creature standing over her mother’s broken body. The resulting investigation ruled it a bear attack but Lily would beg to differ. Something carried her out to the nearest road where she was found. And even the most well mannered bear doesn’t usually knock before entering. Lily has a gift for connecting with the “monsters’ in her care & she’ll need all her skills for the latest arrival. He’s a man with no name who claims to be over 200 years old. He seems to know all about her, something he explains with another bombshell. He’s her father. Over the next 24 hours Lily witnesses events that cause her carefully constructed world to crash & burn. She doesn’t know it yet but it’s the end of normal & she soon sets off on a personal journey that takes her across Europe & back again. In alternate chapters, we get her father’s story from his journal. He calls himself Michael & tells how he was created in 1811. He’s led a violent & fascinating life, showing his true self to a select few along the way. In an interesting twist he describes how meeting Mary Shelley, Bram Stoker & Robert Louis Stevenson resulted in disappointing versions of himself. There are other threads to the plot including a shadowy group hunting Michael, a possible love interest for Lily & her gradual recovery of memories surrounding her mother’s death. The first 25% of the book was a bit slow. We spend a lot of time in Lily’s head & are privy to her every thought, comment, action & memory. She comes across as oddly flat & although the reason for this is explained later, it makes it difficult to connect with her initially. I much preferred the historical chapters detailing Michael’s life. They’re richly atmospheric & really put flesh on the bones of this original character. For me the book got better as it progressed although the love interest angle seemed unnecessary as the whole story revolves around the relationship between Michael & Lily. But either way, it probably won’t prepare you for the ending. It’s a humdinger that leaves the door open for a possible sequel. So just to be clear…..the rating reflects my enjoyment factor, not the author’s skills as a story teller. If you’re someone who enjoys horror with a twist of fantasy, I urge you to pick up this original tale derived from 3 classics of the genre.
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  • Bob Milne
    March 20, 2017
    The Only Child is . . . well, it's a lot of things, and I think that might be the problem. Andrew Pyper weaves what could have been an entirely satisfying gothic horror story, but then dilutes it with the trappings of a contemporary psychological thriller, drags it down with a 'hunter' subplot that's as weak as it is unwanted, and ties it all to a protagonist who loses all appeal after the first few chapters.Dr. Lily Dominick is introduced as a smart, strong, independent young woman who chooses The Only Child is . . . well, it's a lot of things, and I think that might be the problem. Andrew Pyper weaves what could have been an entirely satisfying gothic horror story, but then dilutes it with the trappings of a contemporary psychological thriller, drags it down with a 'hunter' subplot that's as weak as it is unwanted, and ties it all to a protagonist who loses all appeal after the first few chapters.Dr. Lily Dominick is introduced as a smart, strong, independent young woman who chooses to confront and catalogue the monsters around us. There's a glimmer of humanity beneath her cool, clinical exterior that engages the reader and draws us is, but it's all too quickly extinguished. Instead, she's reduced to the role of victim, an emotionless pawn who forces the story forward, but about whose fate it's really hard to care.Michael, the madman and monster at the heart of the tale, is really the only reason to keep reading, but even he wears thin after a while. His backstory is utterly fascinating, a tragic tale of gothic horror that ensnares Shelley, Stevenson, and Stoker, but it's only a small part of the story. Unfortunately, the bulk of the story involves his pursuit of Lily, and while there are some interesting questions there to drive the suspense, his threatening taunts and incestuous sexual innuendo are so over-the-top that he becomes a mockery of the genre. Even worse, their contrived cat-and-mouse game will have you mentally calculating the odds of continually being in the right place, at the right time, to see/hear/find the right thing.The whole 'gothic' thing is played very well for about the first half of the novel, before it's almost completely forgotten. There are some great set pieces, such as the Kirby Forensic Psychiatric Center and the abandoned asylum in Budapest, but too much of the story takes place in airports, hotels, and tile-floor bathrooms. Similarly, Michael's diaries and journals are utterly fascinating, and really serve to bring the story to life, but then they just disappear. As for the hunter subplot, the story could have done very well without it. Aside from introducing a lame romantic subplot and orchestrating a violent climax that feels out of place for the genre, it never really serves a purpose. It never feels as if Lily is truly threatened by the hunters; we're not given enough detail to ever question (or care) whether they are good or bad; and their pursuit of Michael adds absolutely nothing to his story.There's a really good gothic horror story buried in The Only Child - unfortunately, it's overwhelmed by a boring contemporary psychological drama and a clichéd procedural thriller. The twist ending (which should come as a surprise to absolutely no one) redeems it somewhat, but by that point it's too little too late.I won't be so crass as to suggest The Only Child should have been aborted, but it's probably for the best that it doesn't have any siblings.Originally reviewed at Beauty in Ruins Disclaimer: I received a complimentary ARC of this title from the publisher in exchange for review consideration. This does not in any way affect the honesty or sincerity of my review.
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  • Warrengent
    January 21, 2017
    This novel had me hooked from the start and could and in my opinion should,be come one of the great gothic novels of our generation,an amazing read highly recommended this,would of give ten stars if I could.
  • Toni Osborne
    February 17, 2017
    I knew before asking for this book that Mr. Pyper had a gothic taste and could deliver a darkly atmospheric thriller layered with visual scenes. “The Only Child”, is a mesmerizing journey and a brilliantly crafted intrigue into the heart of a monster and the only woman who had a chance of discovering the truth.This concocted tale fueled by relentless suspense and emotion is definitely a page turner from its first pages. Frankenstein, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and Dracula all in one book is boldly I knew before asking for this book that Mr. Pyper had a gothic taste and could deliver a darkly atmospheric thriller layered with visual scenes. “The Only Child”, is a mesmerizing journey and a brilliantly crafted intrigue into the heart of a monster and the only woman who had a chance of discovering the truth.This concocted tale fueled by relentless suspense and emotion is definitely a page turner from its first pages. Frankenstein, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and Dracula all in one book is boldly original and a clever acknowledgment to the Gothic style. I was swept from its first pages and was captivated till the very last unforgettable end. This psychological/horror thriller is populated with a creepy supernatural being and a strong female protagonist. This story is spooky and weird surely not for everyone to enjoy.The main players:Dr. Lily Dominick, is a forensic psychiatrist at New York's leading institution. Client 46874-A, a man with no name, is accused of the most twisted crime and is Lily’s study The plot: Lily needs to discover the truth—behind her client, her mother’s death, herself—and must embark on a journey t that will threaten her career, her sanity, and ultimately her life.Conclusion:Great story and an excellent read if you are into this.Review copy received via Edelweiss
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  • Magdalena aka A Bookaholic Swede
    February 15, 2017
    I loved the thought of a man who inspired Mary Shelley, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Bram Stoker to write their famous books about Frankenstein, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and Dracula. That's really the very thing that made me want to read the book. It sounded so mysterious and fascinating and I love books that incorporate real authors into the story. The Only Child is an interesting story about a woman that finds herself targeted by a man who says he is 200-years old and that h I loved the thought of a man who inspired Mary Shelley, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Bram Stoker to write their famous books about Frankenstein, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and Dracula. That's really the very thing that made me want to read the book. It sounded so mysterious and fascinating and I love books that incorporate real authors into the story. The Only Child is an interesting story about a woman that finds herself targeted by a man who says he is 200-years old and that he is her father. She doubts his story, but then something happens that makes her take off to Europe to find out the truth. Could this man really be who he says he is?I found the book, at the beginning very interesting and the clues he left for Lily throughout Europe, pieces of his history, about his beginning and how he met the famous authors was interesting reading about. However, the later part of the story, with Lily finding out that that there are people out there who wants to capture the man just didn't work for me that much. I felt that storyline was not especially surprising and frankly it was a bit boring instead of thrilling to read about how they tried to catch him. I did like the ending, but at the same time was it not an especially shocking surprise that it would end the way it did. However, at least made the book end on a high note.The Only Child is a good book, but the story was best the first half when Lily was learning more about the man who said to be her father, then when the table turned and suddenly the great organizations or whatever was after him just didn't work for me, but at least the ending was good.I want to thank the publisher for providing me with a free copy through Edelweiss for an honest review!
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  • Eli Easton
    March 19, 2017
    As soon as I read the blurb for this book, it moved to the top of my wish list and I was thrilled to get an ARC to read. I read it immediately, dismissing dozens of others in my TBR pile. Was it worth the rush? In a word: yes. Move it to the top of your 2017 "must read" pile right now.I love gothic horror, so the promise of this blurb: a retelling of the origin of Dracula, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and Frankenstein sounded intriguing. Add on the promise of a more literary appr As soon as I read the blurb for this book, it moved to the top of my wish list and I was thrilled to get an ARC to read. I read it immediately, dismissing dozens of others in my TBR pile. Was it worth the rush? In a word: yes. Move it to the top of your 2017 "must read" pile right now.I love gothic horror, so the promise of this blurb: a retelling of the origin of Dracula, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and Frankenstein sounded intriguing. Add on the promise of a more literary approach and I'm there. This book is essentially a literary horror story, similar in vibe to Let the Right One In or Interview with a Vampire--it attempts to retell old myths in a modern and realistic setting while retaining a bit of the magic and all of the dread. The main character, Lily, is a doctor at a psychiatric hospital. She's young but buttoned-up, work-focused, and feels alienated from other people. She has a horrific event in her past that has led to both her damaged psyche and her clinical interest in psychopaths--her mother was brutally murdered when Lily was young, and Lily witnessed it but managed to escape on a "magic horse". Of course, the horse was her imagination. An allegory. A mind protecting itself from true horror (or so she believes). One day, Lily is assigned a new case, a man who ripped off a stranger's ears in front of the police. This man, Michael, tells Lily he was arrested purposefully in order to be sent to her. He says he's her father and shortly thereafter he escapes the asylum. Of course, Lily doesn't believe him, but the man seems to know something about her mother and her past, and Lily is so hungry for these missing pieces of her history that she allows herself to be lured into a cat-and-mouse game, following Michael across Europe.Michael claims to have inspired the three great gothic masterpieces, Frankenstein, Dracula, and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. He leads Lily around Europe, visiting the places where these stories were born. For example, the banks of Lake Geneva, where Michael met Mary Shelley and told her his story, or Edinburgh, where Michael sought out journalist Robert Louis Stevenson in order to get him to write a more factual retelling (which didn't, in fact, end up as factual as Michael wanted). Along the way, Michael also shares details of his own true past and of Lily's and her mother's. Lily waffles between telling herself she's a psychoanalyst exploring a fascinating case and believing Michael really is more superhuman than delusional.Revisiting the original gothic tales and their writers "real lives" was like catnip to me. But besides these rather fangirl pleasures, the book maintains a strong thread of the main story line. I bought in right away to the idea that Michael was superhuman, so the tension wasn't so much "is he or isn't he", but rather, it was in watching Lily;s logical side unravel and figure out the truth. It was clear there was some secret buried in her past that was coming, and I wanted to keep reading to figure out what that was. Also, the main father-daughter relationship was interesting. We come to believe Lily really is the daughter of this creature, his only offspring. (How, you ask? Not to give too much away, but Michael's creation was Frankenstein-esque and Lily's conception unique and never to be repeated). So I was interested to learn how Lily's non-human side would pan out and how the author would resolve the father-daughter dynamic. We have father: a monster who has killed hundreds of people and is yet compelling and attractive, and daughter: a woman who has held down her true nature and has all the constraints of polite society, law and ethics ingrained. Would they walk off into the sunset together, two happy monsters? Would she reform him? Would he corrupt her? Would they kill each other?As with Frankenstein, I ended up feeling sorry for the monster and wishing for a happy ending for him despite all the horrible things he'd done. Well done, Mr. Pyper.There is creepiness and gothic murder aplenty along the way. The horror in this book is quieter than your typical slasher, but it is very reminiscent of the classics that Michael claims to have inspired, an echoing I adored. There is constant danger to Lily, from both her father (who can turn from loving to murderous in a heartbeat, like Jekyll/Hyde), the people who trail them, and even from Lily herself who may not be able to handle the truth. And there are some wonderful horror set piece scenes that really sink their teeth into you. I wouldn't be at all surprised to see this as a film.The writing is simply amazing with gorgeous descriptions and sharp dialog. It's very smart and poetic without becoming self-important purple prose. There was fear in her only a moment ago, but something more powerful has entered her, something enveloping, supple, elemental. Hidden in a London hotel room watching her parents on a recording of her first moments of life. A family divided by time, by death, now singing the same song.Finally, the ending of the book worked for me on every level. This is destined to become a horror classic, but don't postpone the pleasure of reading it. I believe I'll read it again myself and take it slower to savor it this time.
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  • Benoit Lelièvre
    May 28, 2017
    I've enjoyed this novel a lot. Perhaps not as much as its predecessor THE DAMNED but it had set a mighty high standard for Pyper to keep up with.I appreciate what he tried to do with THE ONLY CHILD. He wanted to confront myth and gauge if there was anything left scary to say about figures like Dracula and Frankenstein if you demythologize them and guess what? Sometimes it works. There are a handful of genuinely bone chilling scenes in THE ONLY CHILD. The relationship between the protagonist Lily I've enjoyed this novel a lot. Perhaps not as much as its predecessor THE DAMNED but it had set a mighty high standard for Pyper to keep up with.I appreciate what he tried to do with THE ONLY CHILD. He wanted to confront myth and gauge if there was anything left scary to say about figures like Dracula and Frankenstein if you demythologize them and guess what? Sometimes it works. There are a handful of genuinely bone chilling scenes in THE ONLY CHILD. The relationship between the protagonist Lily and the mysterious "Michael" is too bizarrely intimate to be consistently scary and the book eventually morphs into a mainstream thriller but the swing was as glorious as the hit on this one.Another original spin off a classic narrative by Andrew Pyper. This guy is a lot of fun to read.
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  • Stephen Clynes
    May 27, 2017
    Dr. Lily Dominick is a forensic psychiatrist and she has a new client number 46872 - A, a man with no name. Follow Lily as she goes on a journey to discover the identity of this strange man.I was attracted to this book because it was recommended by two of my friends on Goodreads and because I liked the title as I have no brothers or sisters. I started reading this book with an open mind when suddenly I was informed of client’s 46872 - A, age - you’ve got to be kidding me I thought! But then this Dr. Lily Dominick is a forensic psychiatrist and she has a new client number 46872 - A, a man with no name. Follow Lily as she goes on a journey to discover the identity of this strange man.I was attracted to this book because it was recommended by two of my friends on Goodreads and because I liked the title as I have no brothers or sisters. I started reading this book with an open mind when suddenly I was informed of client’s 46872 - A, age - you’ve got to be kidding me I thought! But then this novel shifts back a long time and reveals the history of client 46872 - A. It was then that I discovered what a great author and storyteller Andrew Pyper truly is. This book is NOT of a genre of novel that I normally read but Andrew skillfully draws on the knowledge of the horror tales we all enjoyed in our childhood to add a legitimacy to his story. So I sat back and escaped into a make believe world of horror with a dramatic pursuit of the truth.The quality of writing in this novel is top rate and I love the way Andrew makes the whole tale sound true. By weaving the guts of three horror stories we enjoyed from our childhood into his tale, you feel as though this story is steeped in history. The reading experience I got from this book was very high indeed. The characterization of both Lily and client 46872 - A was very deep and rewarding. The supporting characters were also sharply portrayed which simply adding to the tension running throughout the story.I found The Only Child to be a great story and although not true to life, was very easy to engage with this make believe horror. It is a book that really entertains and would make a great film for all ages to enjoy. I agree with my friends on Goodreads that The Only Child is a 5 star read, so it gets 5 stars from me too!Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher Simon & Schuster for giving me a copy of this book on the understanding that I provide an honest review.
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  • Lisazj1
    June 10, 2017
    I can appreciate what the author was trying to do, and sometimes it almost worked. But never quite enough, for me at least. Not a terrible book but it never crossed the line into "horror" and left me quite disappointed.
  • Terri
    January 28, 2017
    Having read Andrew Pyper's other novels I was super happy when i saw this offered on NetGalley. I was even more excited when I read the description . This novel grabbed me first page and did not let go. What if our greatest gothic novels, Dracula, Jekyll and Hyde and Frankenstein were all inspired by one being ? This is that story. Thrilling ,action packed and a truly gothic novel exceeded my expectations. I couldn't wait to finish but yet did not want it to end.
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  • Marie-Eve Turpin
    June 3, 2017
    Bof.. ce livre mérite un 2,5. Ca se lit bien, mais ce n'est pas le meilleur dans ce genre de livre. La fin est vraiment ordinaire. Et parfois on a l'impression que l'auteur avait trop d'idées en même temps. Je le recommande moyen. C'est pas complètement mauvais, mais j'ai déjà vu mieux.
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  • Maggie
    May 18, 2017
    Scrappymags 3-word review: "Meh". Not scared.Genre: Mystery/horror though also kinda chick-lit though written by a man.Shortest summary ever: Psychiatrist Dr. Lily Dominick works with the most psycho of the psycho so when a savage attack brings an unnamed man into her hospital, she's not shocked. Until the man starts to tell her he's her father (all very Star Wars Empire Strikes Back, but not a spoiler) and he's come there to meet HER...What’s good under the hood:I thought the pacing was well do Scrappymags 3-word review: "Meh". Not scared.Genre: Mystery/horror though also kinda chick-lit though written by a man.Shortest summary ever: Psychiatrist Dr. Lily Dominick works with the most psycho of the psycho so when a savage attack brings an unnamed man into her hospital, she's not shocked. Until the man starts to tell her he's her father (all very Star Wars Empire Strikes Back, but not a spoiler) and he's come there to meet HER...What’s good under the hood:I thought the pacing was well done and it did flow from scene to scene. Storyline had a great premise and loved having a female protagonist in what would be the "vampire hunter" role. I honestly feel this is merely an underworked book and if it had some tweeking of the narrative and some changes could have turned into a popular 4 star series. What’s bad or made me mad: when the crazy man is first brought in, Lily is sexually attracted to him. Then he claims he's her father. So dad-crazy-slasher-dude pretty much should kill her lady boner right? Um... no. Yeah. Can I get a collective "ewwwww!!!" And it's not a one time event or restricted to dad, her horniness seems to arrive at massively inappropriate times...Next irk is (sigh) yet another cliche weak supposed-to-be-intelligent female who does stupid things, creating the situation for me (reader) of a mildly annoying and unbelievable protagonist. Buffy rocked the vampire hunter gig wayyyyyy better than this lady. Don't want to provide a spoiler but the doc behaves in ways that make no sense for a professional, one who seems poor at her profession, not worried about others, and since it's mentioned - she pops some unknown pills and keeps breaking ethics. Incidence of fainting female? Really? Is it 1856? That coupled with random inappropriate times of randiness and I sort of cringed my way through.Recommend to: If you're into vampire books give it a whirl. This might be your 'thang.Thanks to NetGalley and Simon and Schuster and the author for an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review and I feel soooo bad I wasn't a big fan. Still love ya S&S!
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  • Jennifer Rayment
    March 25, 2017
    The Good StuffDark, moody, intense with plenty of twists and turnsUniqueMakes me want to go back and reread Frankenstein and Dracula again - and read Dr Jeckyll and Mr Hyde (I know, I know I haven't read that one yet) The whole time reading it I couldn't stop thinking of the movie Gothic (Thanks Demkiw, - that was one truly fucked up movie - pretty sure you had to be on Laudanum to truly get it) Pyper has a true gift for creating tales that stay with you and make you wonder - and maybe make you The Good StuffDark, moody, intense with plenty of twists and turnsUniqueMakes me want to go back and reread Frankenstein and Dracula again - and read Dr Jeckyll and Mr Hyde (I know, I know I haven't read that one yet) The whole time reading it I couldn't stop thinking of the movie Gothic (Thanks Demkiw, - that was one truly fucked up movie - pretty sure you had to be on Laudanum to truly get it) Pyper has a true gift for creating tales that stay with you and make you wonder - and maybe make you think that you never want to be alone in a dark alley with himYou become lost in the haunting descriptions and well any book that brings up Dracula is good with me (Ok and the epigraph is from Dracula)The second half of the novel had me on the edge of my seatsWill's name - thinking someone is an X-Files fanLove the coverThe Not So Good StuffPlease remember I am honest about my thoughts and feelings while reading - and while reading this I was in intense training for a new job and brain was not all thereKind of jumpy at times and the connection between Will and Lily seemed kind of thrown in at the last minute. Unlike most of this other novels this one has a weak start and it feels like too much was thrown in. It's a fabulour premise with lots of promise but it fell short for meA tad disturbing in regards to the feelings Lily has for Michael -- Umm ewwwwFavourite Quotes/Passages"It aroused something other than passion but something related nevertheless, the desire to connect, to show someone they aren't alone and in so doing, show that you aren't either.""A hole in his hear now a hole in hers.""The world doesn't have to know everything." he says. "Most of the time the world is better off not knowing."3.5 Dewey'sI received this from Simon and Schuster in exchange for an honest review
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  • Gatorman
    June 3, 2017
    Rather pedestrian thriller from Pyper, from whom I expect better, about a forensic psychiatrist who encounters a man claiming to be two hundred years old and having inspired the stories Dracula, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Frankenstein. Interesting premise that just doesn't develop into anything really interesting, despite having some moments here and there. The characters are one-dimensional and the writing is not as good as Pyper is capable of. Not a bad book but certainly not great, either. T Rather pedestrian thriller from Pyper, from whom I expect better, about a forensic psychiatrist who encounters a man claiming to be two hundred years old and having inspired the stories Dracula, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Frankenstein. Interesting premise that just doesn't develop into anything really interesting, despite having some moments here and there. The characters are one-dimensional and the writing is not as good as Pyper is capable of. Not a bad book but certainly not great, either. That's two disappointing efforts in a row from Pyper. 2.5 stars.
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  • Marjorie
    March 3, 2017
    Dr. Lily Dominick is a forensic psychologist in New York. She’s assigned a very unique patient. This patient with no name not only claims that he’s 200 years old but that he inspired the literary monsters in “Frankenstein”, “The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde” and “Dracula”. He also claims that he’s Lily’s father. Lily’s mother had been murdered when Lily was a young child and she has always longed to know more about her mother and exactly what happened to her. So Lily decides to find Dr. Lily Dominick is a forensic psychologist in New York. She’s assigned a very unique patient. This patient with no name not only claims that he’s 200 years old but that he inspired the literary monsters in “Frankenstein”, “The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde” and “Dracula”. He also claims that he’s Lily’s father. Lily’s mother had been murdered when Lily was a young child and she has always longed to know more about her mother and exactly what happened to her. So Lily decides to find out just what this patient knows about her past despite the apparent dangers that such an association would bring.I have always felt that Frankenstein’s monster is one of the most heart breaking literary characters ever created. He was so close to being a part of mankind but would always be doomed to be on the outside, alone and unloved. When I requested “The Only Child”, I had just finished binge watching the last season of “Penny Dreadful” and was still caught up in all of the emotional and suspenseful aspects of that excellent production. So I couldn’t wait to get my hands on this latest re-imagination of a similar monster.This is the first book I’ve read by this author, although I do have quite a few of his titles on my TBR list. The author has such a good reputation that I expected a more complex tale. I expected to feel great sympathy for the monster who was trying to connect with his daughter. The book starts off well and I was pulled right in. But the monster didn’t tug my heart strings at all. Lily’s character was also disappointing and seemed to jump from one feeling to another too quickly. One minute she’s fearing a man who was hunting the monster and the next she was in love with him. What held such promise at the beginning of the book basically devolved into a cat and mouse chase. The ending was not at all surprising to me. The book wasn’t a complete disappointment as there were parts that I enjoyed. I just feel like there was so much promise that never materialized. I loved the basic premise of the book and I would like to try another one of the author’s novels.This book was given to me by the publisher in return for an honest review.
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  • Lynn Williams
    May 29, 2017
    3.5 of 5 starshttps://lynns-books.com/2017/05/29/th...The only child was a good read. I enjoyed it but to an extent I can’t help but wonder how much of my enjoyment relied on my own personal reading of the classics that this is based on. In fact it’s a book that definitely had me thinking in two minds about it. My initial reactions were less favourable, I didn’t like the two characters involved and this always makes it more of a struggle for me to connect. But, with the extra time I’ve given mys 3.5 of 5 starshttps://lynns-books.com/2017/05/29/th...The only child was a good read. I enjoyed it but to an extent I can’t help but wonder how much of my enjoyment relied on my own personal reading of the classics that this is based on. In fact it’s a book that definitely had me thinking in two minds about it. My initial reactions were less favourable, I didn’t like the two characters involved and this always makes it more of a struggle for me to connect. But, with the extra time I’ve given myself for reflection, and I certainly did find myself thinking about this one quite a bit, I’ve hit upon a few revelations that could be right or wrong but that put the story in a slightly different light for me.So, Frankenstein, Dracula and Dr Jekyll and Hyde. Three books that I enjoyed, particularly the first two. Basically, imagine that the monster of The Only Child has proved the inspiration for all three books – each of the authors being inspired by his entry into their lives and the threat he posed. All three books fail to describe his character fully, they’re all flawed and yet also fundamentally contain elements of the true nature of this real monster that lives in our world. Superhuman strength coupled with a certain sadness, ruthlessly violent and craving of blood coupled with abilities to influence somebody’s thoughts, a split personality that fluctuates between reasonable, polite even, and incredibly angry and unpredictably dangerous.At the start of the story we meet Dr. Lily Dominick as she examines the latest violent patient to be committed to The Kirby, a psychiatric institution – that would probably have been known years earlier as an asylum. Lily is used to violent paiients and their threats, treating them with a calm detachment, but she is immediately disturbed by this latest inmate and the underlying current of power that he exudes. As the interview progresses the patient makes impossible claims relating to not only his date of birth that would place him at around 200 years old but also the fact that he is Lily’s father. From there onwards we have a sort of cat and mouse chase where the cat leaves a trail of breadcrumbs across Europe for the mouse to follow and come to it’s own conclusion in the process.I must say that the story hooked me fairly quickly, the only reservation being that I found Lily intriguing but difficult to like. I was certainly interested by the latest inmate and wanted to learn more about him. Within fairly short order things move on and there are certainly no complaints about the pacing of the book. Lily finds herself travelling in the footsteps of her would-be-father, quite often placing herself into dangerous situations, life threatening even and discovering not only something of her own hereditary but coming to an understanding herself of why she’s always felt so different.Basically, as a young child Lily’s mother was violently murdered. She was about six at the time and she and her mother were staying in a remote cabin in the hills. The recollections have receded over the years but of late it seems that Lily is starting to suffer bad dreams and hallucinations herself. As I said I found Lily a little difficult to connect with but, and without trying to give away too much, I think this is intentional on the part of the author. There was also some odd sexual innuendo between Lily and Michael which I found a little bit off putting given his claims and the fact that she accepted some of the things he said.For me, this wasn’t just a mystery/thriller in which we uncovered details about the monster but was also a voyage of discovery for Lily, almost a coming of age if you will. So, yes, I didn’t like her, but I’m also not entirely surprised by the revelation. She’s very cold and detached and perhaps that’s what has led her to be so successful. However, she’s always had niggles at the back of her mind about her own inability to fit in and that, for me, is why she pursues this mystery so determinedly, even if some of her choices make her seem a little like a pawn on somebody else’s chessboard.The Monster, or Michael. I was absolutely fascinated by his story, I can’t deny it – in fact it was my favourite aspect of the book and I was impatient to get back to it every time I was pulled away. In fairness I could have easily and maybe even preferably read a more linear version in which Michael related his story from the beginning bringing us to the up to date story in the present day. As it was we learnt snippets of his history as Lily ducked and dived around the place gathering information.In terms of criticisms. I think I had two issues with the story. Firstly, I didn’t find it particularly scary – but, again, going back to the classics I’m not sure that they would either be considered so in this day and age. For me, it felt like the author was paying homage to the three books and I think he did a good job in that respect not to mention bringing a different angle to all three. I think my main issue was plausibility. I couldn’t put my finger on why Michael chose to reveal himself to Lily now. It just felt a bit much to believe somehow. And added to this is the way in which he makes the revelation – having himself committed and then staging various other crimes to ensure she followed him. I didn’t really buy into that aspect of the story and in fact I think I almost put it to the back of my mind and was instead gripped by the mystery. But, I couldn’t help coming back to it. Yes, of course, I realise that Michael felt the need to allow Lily to come to her own realisations but at the same time I just don’t understand the way he went about it – particularly given that he’s already on the radar of an organisation who are seeking him relentlessly – why leave more clues for them to follow. Why not just take Lily and talk to her? Sow the seeds of doubt that will set her mind racing?? In fact, personally, I would have preferred the removal of this ‘third’ party altogether and think the story should simply have focused on Lily and Michael.Overall I enjoyed this. It was a quick read. I struggled to like the characters but I think that’s to be expected to be honest. I didn’t find it as scary as I would have liked and maybe would have liked an injection of more ‘gothic’. But, all that being said this was a quick read and a little reflection has helped me to see certain aspects from a different angle as I think my immediate impression was a little more severe due to my dislike of the main characters. – some extra space to think about it has made me see this from a slightly different angle and with a new appreciation. And I confess that reading this has made me want to go back and read those classics – which is a definite win in my opinion.I received a copy through Netgalley, courtesy of the publisher, for which my thanks. The above is my own opinion.
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  • Michelle
    January 24, 2017
    Note: Received a copy of this book from NetGalley.Andrew Pyper keeps fooling me with book descriptions that sound absolutely amazing and right up my alley, and I just end up being disappointed. This one sounded super intriguing: a creepy/maybe not so creepy supernatural being, a strong female protagonist, a mystery... it was all there! But after a promising start I found myself halfway into the book just eyerolling over everything Michael said. It just felt so cheesy and Suicide Squad Joker leve Note: Received a copy of this book from NetGalley.Andrew Pyper keeps fooling me with book descriptions that sound absolutely amazing and right up my alley, and I just end up being disappointed. This one sounded super intriguing: a creepy/maybe not so creepy supernatural being, a strong female protagonist, a mystery... it was all there! But after a promising start I found myself halfway into the book just eyerolling over everything Michael said. It just felt so cheesy and Suicide Squad Joker levels of try hard. Yes, we get it, you're a devious monster. The best villains don't ever have to say that, you just feel it. I never once felt like he was threatening, just kind of a weird creeper.Lily's introduction had a ton of promise but then she also kind of fell flat for me. We got a good look into her personality at the beginning and then all of it just disappeared. I felt like she was purely a vehicle for Michael to tell his story. It's a real shame because like I said, the premise was quite interesting but the execution was lacking.
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  • Luanne Ollivier
    May 23, 2017
    3.5 The Only Child is the newest book from Andrew Pyper.Dr. Lily Dominick is a forensic psychiatrist, specializing in the 'worst' cases and the most dangerous offenders. Much of her motivation for her chosen profession is the unsolved murder of her mother. Lily was there, but has only hazy, dream-like memories of the first six years of her life. Her latest patient, Client 46874-A, has committed a horrific crime and claims to over two hundred years old. What he also claims is knowledge of Lily's 3.5 The Only Child is the newest book from Andrew Pyper.Dr. Lily Dominick is a forensic psychiatrist, specializing in the 'worst' cases and the most dangerous offenders. Much of her motivation for her chosen profession is the unsolved murder of her mother. Lily was there, but has only hazy, dream-like memories of the first six years of her life. Her latest patient, Client 46874-A, has committed a horrific crime and claims to over two hundred years old. What he also claims is knowledge of Lily's past - and her mother. When he escapes, Lily is driven to find him - and the answers she so desperately seeks.The cover of The Only Child gives you a good idea of the story within. Gothic feel - foggy, old building, mysterious fleeing men wearing a black, somewhat capelike coat..... Uh huh, you got it. Pyper takes inspiration for his story from classic horror literature such as that from Stevenson, Stoker and Shelley. Indeed, they play a role in his tale.Lily was a complicated lead to like. I never felt drawn to her, but rather questioned her choices and motivations. But her decision to pursue Client 46874-A are akin to those horror movies where you shout at the screen....'Don't go in the basement!" We know she is heading into danger, but are curious as to where and what Pyper has planned for her. Pyper has created his own monster with a modern twist. I did find Client 46874-A to be what I expected - he wasn't an overly original creation IMO.Is Client 46874-A truly dangerous? Or are the men hunting him the danger? Lily is torn by what to believe - especially after Client 46874-A reveals more and more of his connection to Lily.The exploration of family and the need to know ourselves figure prominently into Lily's search. But, the sexual tension between the two leads is, well, just icky. Pyper's descriptions of characters and settings are dark, chilling and creepy. The tension escalates as the cat and mouse game progresses. Pyper ends The Only Child with a nice little twist that suits perfectly.For this reader, The Only Child was an okay read, but not a stand-out. Was it my love for those classic tales? My feeling that I had read this story before? Not sure, but this was only a middle of the road read for me.
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  • Debra Komar
    June 5, 2017
    I love Pyper's books and was really looking forward to this one. The premise is great and I loved the idea that he was trying to craft a new Gothic horror. While I applaud the effort and the bravery shown, the actual book is just ok. The Gothic voice comes and goes - much of the book is in fairly traditional prose, which makes the sudden return of the rococo gothic tone jarring. The shifts in tone and voice pull the reader right out of the narrative.A lot of Pyper's inspirations are evident on t I love Pyper's books and was really looking forward to this one. The premise is great and I loved the idea that he was trying to craft a new Gothic horror. While I applaud the effort and the bravery shown, the actual book is just ok. The Gothic voice comes and goes - much of the book is in fairly traditional prose, which makes the sudden return of the rococo gothic tone jarring. The shifts in tone and voice pull the reader right out of the narrative.A lot of Pyper's inspirations are evident on the page, perhaps a few too many. There are vampires and their associated hunters. There is forensic psychiatry and something of a thriller subplot. He touches on immortality, identity and even incest. That's a lot of balls to keep in the air and, while Pyper manages to keep many aloft, it can get a little frantic at times. It was not always clear what this book was trying to be. In all honesty, the manuscript feels rushed, as if Pyper stopped writing because it was due rather than because it was finished. A few more rewrites and a good hard edit would have solved a lot of the shortcomings here. I will read Pyper's next effort without question. This was a noble experiment, even if the results weren't as hoped.
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  • Jan
    June 3, 2017
    This was an interesting and surprisingly good book that often had me on the edge of my seat. I think Pyer did a nice job intertwining the gothic horror story with a psychological thriller. A completely satisfying read for me!! Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for an advanced reader copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Dianne Laheurte
    May 9, 2017
    If you are a fan of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, of Robert Louis Stevenson's Dr Jekyll & Mr Hyde, and/or of Bram Stoker's Dracula, then you must read Andrew Pyper's The Only Child. The author lays out a premise using these 3 novels from 1818, 1886 & 1897, provides us with a really smart & young psychiatrist as our protagonist, then has her travel around the world, to the past and present, in chase of monsters, only to find that the monster is sometimes much closer than we think! Whil If you are a fan of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, of Robert Louis Stevenson's Dr Jekyll & Mr Hyde, and/or of Bram Stoker's Dracula, then you must read Andrew Pyper's The Only Child. The author lays out a premise using these 3 novels from 1818, 1886 & 1897, provides us with a really smart & young psychiatrist as our protagonist, then has her travel around the world, to the past and present, in chase of monsters, only to find that the monster is sometimes much closer than we think! While Andrew Pyper's The Demonologist and The Damned both had my anxiety levels seriously elevated, The Only Child was a real page turner and I needed to know how it was going to end. Make sure to plan your day or eve for a good, long, sit down!
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  • Susan
    June 12, 2017
    This is solidly in the horror genre which I was not entirely expecting from Andrew Pyper. I've read several of his books in the past and although they all had horrific aspects none of them were quite like this. I'm a horror fan so I was interested to see what kind of character could be imagined that would have been complex enough to inspire Dracula, Frankenstein and Jekyll and Hyde. This is an interesting riff on the usual monster tales. Although the monster is pretty unique this is the second b This is solidly in the horror genre which I was not entirely expecting from Andrew Pyper. I've read several of his books in the past and although they all had horrific aspects none of them were quite like this. I'm a horror fan so I was interested to see what kind of character could be imagined that would have been complex enough to inspire Dracula, Frankenstein and Jekyll and Hyde. This is an interesting riff on the usual monster tales. Although the monster is pretty unique this is the second book I've read recently in which sharpened metal teeth are used by the killer, the other being in Jo Nesbo's Thirst. It's an unusual method of murder and it's kind of odd to see it used again! I'm always interested in seeing historical figures brought to life and the three famous authors in this story are especially interesting. Unfortunately I found the monster Michael's long monologues rather boring and I couldn't wait for the story to move back to Lily and the present. This is a shame because I was really looking forward to the historical parts but they really fell short. This may have been because I listened to the audiobook version and the narration was pretty bad. Michael's accent was atrocious and of the over the top "I vant to suck your blood" variety. It made listening to his parts painful. The narration for Lily and the other characters was also not great. The narration was very slow and I had to speed it up to make it bearable. I may have enjoyed the story more if I was reading instead of listening. I'm still giving this one 4 stars because it kept me listening and engaged and it was very creepy in parts.
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  • Ray Palen
    June 10, 2017
    The cover of the latest hardcover by Andrew Pyper --- THE ONLY CHILD --- indicates 'Pyper could be the next Stephen King.'I strongly beg to differ. Based on the success of their last decade of books --- King with a few hits and several misses and Pyper with a Best Novel of the Year by the Thriller Writer's of America with his classic THE DEMONOLOGIST --- Pyper is now BETTER than Stephen King.If you think I exaggerate or speak out of turn then I urge you to pick up THE ONLY CHILD. Without giving The cover of the latest hardcover by Andrew Pyper --- THE ONLY CHILD --- indicates 'Pyper could be the next Stephen King.'I strongly beg to differ. Based on the success of their last decade of books --- King with a few hits and several misses and Pyper with a Best Novel of the Year by the Thriller Writer's of America with his classic THE DEMONOLOGIST --- Pyper is now BETTER than Stephen King.If you think I exaggerate or speak out of turn then I urge you to pick up THE ONLY CHILD. Without giving away too much, this novel features Forensic Psychologist Lily Dominick. Her latest case involves an incarcerated man who is guilty of some brutal murders. What is more interesting is the fact that the man who refers to himself as 'Michael' claims to be hundreds of years old.During a series of sessions with Lily, Michael claims to not only be a monster but also the inspiration for three classic literary monsters --- Shelly's Frankenstein, Stoker's Dracula and Stevenson's Mr. Hyde. Bold claims indeed....but Andrew Pyper takes readers to some dark and dangerous places where fantastic claims like that become eerily plausible.When Michael claims to be Lily's father things get really crazy. Of course, there's still the mysterious circumstances in the murder of Lily's mother when she was but a child. Lily always believed it was a bear who broke into their cabin in the woods and slaughtered her mother while Lily hid in a back bedroom. But after speaking with Michael she is not sure what to believe.Readers will not believe what they are reading either, and the ending is a real jaw-dropper!
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  • Mark
    May 27, 2017
    There's an intriguing concept here that help me as effectively as the tight paced thrills throughout the book: Imagine that some of the most beloved Gothic and horror novels (Frankenstein, Dracula and Strange Case of Jekyll and Hyde) were all inspired by the same evil man/entity?This is a complex novels that combined Gothic elements with modern thriller and more mainstream introspective passages. The cover brilliantly also portrays those elements quite effectively.You don't just read this novel; There's an intriguing concept here that help me as effectively as the tight paced thrills throughout the book: Imagine that some of the most beloved Gothic and horror novels (Frankenstein, Dracula and Strange Case of Jekyll and Hyde) were all inspired by the same evil man/entity?This is a complex novels that combined Gothic elements with modern thriller and more mainstream introspective passages. The cover brilliantly also portrays those elements quite effectively.You don't just read this novel; it gets under your skin -- it infiltrates your thoughts. It both fascinates and bothers the mind. It compels you to keep turning the pages, while allowing you to simultaneously pause and reflect on concepts of good and evil. It coaxes you down a particular expected path and then spins you in a surprising direction. It draws you into higher level reflection while disturbing and shocking you.Pyper has, simply, done it again!
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  • Lolly K Dandeneau
    February 22, 2017
    via my blog https://bookstalkerblog.wordpress.com......she has learned how shaky the recollections of children can be. And she was only six when it happened. The age when certain things get stuck in the net of real memory, and other things you try to sell yourself on having happened but are in fact made up, turned into convincing bits of a dream.Dr. Lily Dominick is about to encounter a man who has committed a disturbingly strange crime. Psychotics are her specialty, but there is something arous via my blog https://bookstalkerblog.wordpress.com......she has learned how shaky the recollections of children can be. And she was only six when it happened. The age when certain things get stuck in the net of real memory, and other things you try to sell yourself on having happened but are in fact made up, turned into convincing bits of a dream.Dr. Lily Dominick is about to encounter a man who has committed a disturbingly strange crime. Psychotics are her specialty, but there is something arousing and fascinating about this man. He claims to be 200 years old, a real monster that was used as inspiration for Mary Shelley, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Bram Stoker. This is the part of the novel I loved, what a clever idea! With this, he must be mad! Crazier still, he claims he is her father! As the lone survivor in a brutal murder that took her mother's life, haunted by strange recollections of a creature coming to her rescue, she is haunted by the tangled mystery of what happened. Lily knows better than to fall into a patient's fantasy, but there is something different about this man, what if he knows what happened to her mother? The more she learns, his threatening presence becomes more real, or is she just losing her mind?From the first few pages, I was expecting a different sort of novel. Then Pyper changed direction and Lily became someone else. Or maybe Lily's professional side is much like a coping mechanism, her way of keeping her world in order, trying to understand insanity by labeling it. But this nameless being is all the Gothic monsters combined and yet no one has been able to capture his true essence. Will Lily be able to understand him? What if he really is her father, what does that mean for her? He is blurring the lines used to diagnose the insane.Not at all the twists I expected from the novel's beginning, which is usually a good thing. Admittedly, there were times I would rather see Michael's rotted evil soul in his actions, there should have been more incidents. But I think his 'creation' was fascinating, an original idea with a spit of history. It's funny, I would have loved a full story of Mary Shelley and Michael's short lived relationship, the things this author could do with that! In fact, that's what I loved most- Michael's history. Sometimes I felt Lily got in the way, and she is the main character! I thought I had her pegged as this level headed survivor and then she unravels and morphs into something strange and different herself. It works here, maybe there is a bit of her father in her after all? Or maybe it's a delusion she is falling under. You won't know until you read the story! It was good, the 'horror' didn't hit me between the eyes but I'm impressed with how Pyper worked classic authors into this strange tale. I was given an advanced copy, and my review is based on that. The novel won't be available until the summer but it's one to add to your reading list! Publication Date: June 16, 2017Simon & Schuster
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  • Stacey Bookerworm
    May 14, 2017
    The Only Child is one of the best books of its kind I have read this year and probably for several years.Read more of this here: http://www.bookerworm.com/reviews/120...
  • Milli (MiracleMilliReads)
    April 30, 2017
    I think I became emotionally insane after reading this book. I find it so hard to put this book into words that I read under 5 hours tonight. After reading this, I looked everywhere for a movie and to contact the author because this was just so real to me.the suspense, gruesome horror, the gothic scenery, and the realism in this story was just so addicting. I didn't move the whole time because my eyes were glued page by page. I played the whole story word after word in my head and I felt like I I think I became emotionally insane after reading this book. I find it so hard to put this book into words that I read under 5 hours tonight. After reading this, I looked everywhere for a movie and to contact the author because this was just so real to me.the suspense, gruesome horror, the gothic scenery, and the realism in this story was just so addicting. I didn't move the whole time because my eyes were glued page by page. I played the whole story word after word in my head and I felt like I was actually in the midst of it all. This storyline was well written, characters were developed, the scenery was so vivd, and the way the story unfolds was just no what I was expecting. I usually give a little summary, but that will give this whole story away and I want people to be surprised!https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCADH...
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  • Kim Pet
    April 23, 2017
    Chilling. Sick. Twisted. Brilliant. "Have you ever considered that the thing you seek isn't an unnatural being, isn't your long lost father, but yourself?" Pyper is a masterful storyteller, weaving together a horror story that is both intriguing, compassionate, and not exactly so horrid. In finding her father, Lily is thrown into a labyrinth of events that leads her to her own truth and self.Pyper's characters are multidimensional and fascinating, the plot is simply ingenious, grabbing you and a Chilling. Sick. Twisted. Brilliant. "Have you ever considered that the thing you seek isn't an unnatural being, isn't your long lost father, but yourself?" Pyper is a masterful storyteller, weaving together a horror story that is both intriguing, compassionate, and not exactly so horrid. In finding her father, Lily is thrown into a labyrinth of events that leads her to her own truth and self.Pyper's characters are multidimensional and fascinating, the plot is simply ingenious, grabbing you and abusing you until you don't want it to let you go. I'm breathless.* I received an arc from NetGalley for an honest review
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