Hannibal
One of the greatest commanders of the ancient world brought vividly to life: Hannibal, the brilliant general who successfully crossed the Alps with his war elephants and brought Rome to its knees.Hannibal Barca of Carthage, born 247 BC, was one of the great generals of the ancient world. His father, Hamilcar, was also a great strategist and master tactician who imposed Carthaginian rule over much of present-day Spain. After Hamilcar led the Carthaginian forces against Rome in the First Punic War, Hannibal followed in his father’s footsteps, leading Carthage in the Second Punic War.From the time he was a teenager, Hannibal fought against Rome. He is famed for leading Carthage’s army across north Africa, into Spain, along the Mediterranean coast, and then crossing the Alps with his army and war elephants. Hannibal won victories in northern Italy by outmaneuvering his Roman adversaries and defeated a larger Roman army at the battle of Cannae in 216 BC. Unable to force Rome to capitulate, he was eventually forced to leave Italy and return to Carthage when a savvy Roman general named Scipio invaded north Africa. Hannibal and Scipio fought an epic battle at Zama, which Hannibal lost. The terms of surrender were harsh and many Carthaginians blamed Hannibal, eventually forcing him into exile until his death.To this day Hannibal is still regarded as a military genius. Napoleon, George Patton, and Norman Schwarzkopf, Jr. are only some of the generals who studied and admired him. His strategy and tactics are still taught in military academies. He is one of the figures of the ancient world whose life and exploits never fail to impress. Historian Patrick N. Hunt has led archeological expeditions in the Alps and elsewhere to study Hannibal’s exploits. Now he brings Hannibal’s incredible story to life in this riveting and dramatic book.

Hannibal Details

TitleHannibal
Author
FormatHardcover
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 11th, 2017
PublisherSimon Schuster
ISBN1439102171
ISBN-139781439102176
Number of pages416 pages
Rating
GenreHistory, Biography, Nonfiction, War, Ancient History

Hannibal Review

  • Sherwood Smith
    June 8, 2017
    The thing about biographies of people in ancient times is that unless it's a translation (thus second-hand) anything we read now is going to be third, maybe fourth-hand, if the ancient source is relying on other sources. With that as a given, I still think it worthwhile to read books such as Hunt's since I don't know Greek or Latin.It's especially worthwhile when the author, as Hunt does, tries to find all the sources, comparing and contrasting them, and also travels to the various sites to give The thing about biographies of people in ancient times is that unless it's a translation (thus second-hand) anything we read now is going to be third, maybe fourth-hand, if the ancient source is relying on other sources. With that as a given, I still think it worthwhile to read books such as Hunt's since I don't know Greek or Latin.It's especially worthwhile when the author, as Hunt does, tries to find all the sources, comparing and contrasting them, and also travels to the various sites to give a first-hand account of the terrain.So here's Hannibal Barca, who is still a somewhat mysterious figure, as he left no writings behind. From an early age, it appears he was meant to be a soldier. His father was involved in government, and took Hannibal along when he was sent to Iberia (Spain) to manage Carthage's silver mines in order to send the heavy tribute Rome required at the end of the First Punic War.Hunt scrupulously (though cumulatively it can get tiresome) casts pretty much everything about Hannibal's early life in the conditional. "He might have observed . . ." "He would have seen . . ."But once Hannibal's life catches up with his two main biographers (both Roman), Polybius and Livy, Hunt shifts into reportage mode.The book is highly readable, as Hunt does his best to present the figures in Hannibal's life with as much individual characteristic as can be gleaned from ancient sources. He paints in terrain, seasons, and the difficulties of supply and logistics.The brief outline of Hannibal's life is fairly well known: he was a Carthaginian who marched from Spain over the Alps with war elephants (the heavy tank of the time) into Italy to take on Rome, and not just won but utterly smashed the powerful Romans in battle on their own turf. After ten years he went back home when Rome attacked behind Hannibal. He lost, lived for a while as a politician organizing Carthage so as to pay the new stiff tribute Rome demanded, and finally had to leave Carthage altogether when he became too unpopular. Betrayed by a supposedly friendly king, he took the poison he always carried with him and died rather than be marched in manacles to Rome.Hunt does a good job with the parallels with Scipio Africanus, who defeated him, after surviving the slaughter at Cannae. The two commanders met twice, and seem to have respected one another. Before that last battle at Zama, Scipio let Hannibal's spies come and inspect his preparations, and both commanders knew that Hannibal was unlikely to win.Ironically, Scipio used his influence to get Rome to leave Hannibal alone toward the end of the latter's life, as he was strong enough to keep Carthage stable (and sending that tribute) but after Scipio himself found himself on the outs with Rome, he no longer could keep Rome from going after Hannibal. The two great commanders lost influence around the same time, and died the same year.Hannibal's "legacy" is difficult to evaluate, as Hunt shows. The man was a brilliant leader, who inspired great loyalty as he led his men himself, slept on the ground with them, and of course put together winning battle plans--but at horrible cost, not just to their enemies, but to themselves.The famous Alp crossing killed over half of Hannibal's army. Another swamp crossing in Italy killed a lot more. The Roman death toll at the battle at Cannae, according to Hunt, accounted for 20% of all Roman males between the ages of fifteen and fifty. And for what? Hannibal kept on the move the entire time he was in Italy, so these battles ended up gaining nothing; the Romans learned to turn his tactics against him, and instituted a successful war of attrition as they chased him around and around, avoiding confrontation.And yet his strategic and especially his tactical innovation has inspired war leaders for centuries. I guess it's safe to say as long as humans insist on having wars, Hannibal will be an important figure. He did inspire loyalty, and his original motivation was to strike back at Rome for the misery and slaughter perpetrated on Carthage after the First Punic War, but he contributed nothing to beauty or to our long, difficult road toward civilization. The material legacy is uncountable bones of men who died far from home.Copy courtesy of NetGalley
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  • L.P. Logan
    April 19, 2017
    Awesome book if Hannibal is your thing. I found the writing style to be easy to read, yet not dumbed down so far that it becomes uncreditable. In truth, I enjoyed it. History fills me with joy.
  • Donna Davis
    June 14, 2017
    Hannibal was the first general to defeat the forces of Rome, and Hunt is the man qualified to tell us about it. I read my copy free and early thanks to Net Galley and Simon and Schuster. This book becomes available to the public July 11, 2017.Early history has never been my area of concentration, but since retirement, I push myself out of my usual comfort zone, often to excellent result. This time it proved to be a mixed blessing. On the one hand, Hunt is unquestionably qualified to discuss this Hannibal was the first general to defeat the forces of Rome, and Hunt is the man qualified to tell us about it. I read my copy free and early thanks to Net Galley and Simon and Schuster. This book becomes available to the public July 11, 2017.Early history has never been my area of concentration, but since retirement, I push myself out of my usual comfort zone, often to excellent result. This time it proved to be a mixed blessing. On the one hand, Hunt is unquestionably qualified to discuss this topic. He is an historian of renown and has dedicated years to the study of Hannibal, even embarking on an expedition across the Alps in order to see what Hannibal experienced—or the closest proximity to it in modern times. On the other hand, I confess I was in it for two things: military strategy and history, which does interest me, and of course, the elephants. Imagine riding into battle on the back of an elephant. Not only is an elephant massive, it is also impervious to most of the weaponry available at this time. Spears and javelins would just bounce off its hide. War elephants had their tusks sharpened, and being charged by such a force had to be terrifying. And in reading this history it occurred to me that Hannibal’s men would have been bemused indeed if they had known that elephants would be regarded by many of us, in future days, with great sentimentality. They would never have believed the elephant might become endangered. Who could kill elephants? But these are my musings, not Hunt’s. Hunt is meticulous in demonstrating what Hannibal did and why he did it. He starts with his family background, in particular that he was the son of the great general Hamilcar, who took him to a temple, made him stand at the altar where the live sacrifice had been made, and swear lifelong hatred of Rome, whose government and military made war against Carthage and caused a lot of suffering. Hunt carefully separates what actually happened, from what probably happened, from what maybe happened, but the speculative language—may have, would have, almost certainly—slows me down, because each time the narrative picks up and I immerse myself in the text, I see the modifiers and draw back. I go back and reread in order to find out what is actually known, mentally removing all of the guesses and educated guesses, and then I am left with what is known. And although I appreciate that there are not vast treasure-troves of primary documents sitting around for Hunt to access, given the antiquity of the subject, I wish there were some way to read only the known facts. At the 70% mark I became frustrated and bailed. Hunt quotes often from Livy and Polybius, both of whom I read many years ago as an undergraduate, and which still grace my shelves. My initial impression was that it might be more useful to go dig up those books, reread them, and give this one a miss. However, what Hunt does is sift through their information and provide an analysis that is deeper and more objective than theirs. Livy was, after all, a Roman; he is renowned as a scholar, but not necessarily objective. And so those that have a serious interest in the history of Northern Africa and/or Southern Europe, or an interest in military history, can count this as a strong title to add to their historical libraries. To put it another way, what it lacks in terms of easy flowing narrative, it makes up for in accuracy and analysis. Recommended to those that have a serious interest in world history or military history.
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  • Mark Noce
    July 28, 2017
    A fantastic read for anyone interested in history, Hannibal, and the Punic Wars. I particularly enjoyed the attention to detail regarding topography, the numbers and background of the troops involved in various campaigns, and the overarching social history as Punic and Roman civilizations clashed throughout the narrative. This book does an excellent job of peeling back some of the hidden layers on Hannibal himself, a truly enigmatic character who would’ve stood out as an extraordinary individual A fantastic read for anyone interested in history, Hannibal, and the Punic Wars. I particularly enjoyed the attention to detail regarding topography, the numbers and background of the troops involved in various campaigns, and the overarching social history as Punic and Roman civilizations clashed throughout the narrative. This book does an excellent job of peeling back some of the hidden layers on Hannibal himself, a truly enigmatic character who would’ve stood out as an extraordinary individual in any era. The author’s use of sources such as Polybius and Livy is particularly fascinating when used in conjunction with known facts from the actual battle sites, such as the terrain and climate conditions. I would strongly recommend this book to anyone interested in ancient history or someone who simply loves a good factual story that is well told.
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  • David
    July 8, 2017
    This is a good history for people who don't know a lot about the topic already. I feel I can say this from a position of authority because, when I started this book, my knowledge began and ended with the fact that this was that guy who brought elephants with this army over the Alps in the far distant past. I couldn't even have made a decent guess about when Hannibal lived.Now I know that he arrived at a time when, in retrospect, Carthage's decline seemed irreversible. Although Hannibal had shaky This is a good history for people who don't know a lot about the topic already. I feel I can say this from a position of authority because, when I started this book, my knowledge began and ended with the fact that this was that guy who brought elephants with this army over the Alps in the far distant past. I couldn't even have made a decent guess about when Hannibal lived.Now I know that he arrived at a time when, in retrospect, Carthage's decline seemed irreversible. Although Hannibal had shaky support from short-sighted politicians, he managed to go off to Carthage's colonies in today's Spain as a very young man and – after the early death of his father – raise, organize, and lead a ragtag army (and elephants) to the Italian peninsula. There, he spooked the hell out of Rome for a long time before he fell victim to Rome's ability to learn from its own mistakes. Rome tried attacking him head on and got whipped. A Roman leader named Fabius said, “Hey, let's try not attacking him head on – let's avoid contact and weaken his supply lines.” Hannibal stomped around rural Italy for more than a decade, trying to provoke the Romans into a conventional attack. He failed. His allies, denied plunder, abandoned him. He hung on for a long time as things got worse, but eventually abandoned the effort and headed home, where Rome smashed his homeland. Hannibal had an especially interesting post-Roman life as a high-profile refugee/outlaw. That's a lot of knowledge to get out of a book.This book gets a solid B+ for using language which does not drive the non-expert to the Kindle dictionary function. Still, there were occasions when terminology could have used some explaining, specifically, montane (Kindle location 517), missif (l. 865), debouch (l. 959), quinquiremes (l. 1373), equites (l. 2406), suffete (used first at l. 2407 but not explained until l. 3962), berms (l. 2617), impertum (l. 2657, no adequate definition available online for this usage), and grisaille (l. 3470).When those nice publishers send me and others like me a free electronic copy of books, they often tell us NOT to mention errors of spelling, punctuation, and so forth. The publishers say they will be dealt with before publication. OK, but please indulge me when I point out that the author, who has written a good book and also seems to lead a completely cool and enviable life (try Googling him), has twice (l. 1200 and 1221), in a portion of the book sub-headed “A Grim Object Lesson”, referred to “abject lessons”, which is just wrong. This may be a “damn-you-autocorrect” sort of mistake, but it's also not a mistake an electronic spell-checker will catch. You need a human being. Do you have one? If so, my apologies for hectoring you needlessly.Thanks to Netgalley and Simon and Schuster for a free electronic advance review copy of this book.
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  • Mark
    July 7, 2017
    Hannibal Barca is regarded as one of the great military commanders of the Western world, a status which is a little surprising considering that he never actually defeated his great opponent Rome in a war. Part of this honor is undoubtedly due to his success in battle, as in a succession of victories his outnumbered forces defeated the Roman legions sent out to destroy them. Yet Patrick Hunt's new biography of the Carthaginian general points to another reason why he holds such an exalted status, Hannibal Barca is regarded as one of the great military commanders of the Western world, a status which is a little surprising considering that he never actually defeated his great opponent Rome in a war. Part of this honor is undoubtedly due to his success in battle, as in a succession of victories his outnumbered forces defeated the Roman legions sent out to destroy them. Yet Patrick Hunt's new biography of the Carthaginian general points to another reason why he holds such an exalted status, as his success ironically helped the Romans to become the dominant empire we remember it as today.This, of course, was not Hannibal's goal when he set out to destroy Rome in 218. The son of a Carthaginian statesman who led his country's forces in the First Punic War, Hannibal made revenge the main focus of his life. His achievements in this regard were nothing short of remarkable, as he led his men on a grueling march through the Alps into often hostile territory, where through brilliant generalship and a shrewd exploitation of Celtic grievances he repeatedly bested the troops sent by Rome to defeat them. Yet rather than surrender, Rome adapted by adjusting their leadership structure and adopting a strategy of attrition, trapping Hannibal in a war he couldn't bring to a resolution, The culmination came in the battle of Zama in 202, when Hannibal found the situation neatly reversed, as his untrained army was defeated by the better-managed legions of Scipio Africanus, who used some of Hannibal's own tactics against him in order to win.Hunt's book offers a knowledgeable overview of Hannibal's life and times. This is no small achievement considering the paucity of sources and their bias -- the only historical sources on Hannibal are Roman ones, with all of the problems that this entails. Often this has the effect of turning his book into more of a history of the Second Punic War than a biography, but the advantage of this is that it highlights what is Hannibal's greatest contribution to history. For while he may not have succeeded in defeating Rome, he became its greatest teacher of the military arts and helped to make them into the empire that would endure for seven centuries and more. This alone makes Hannibal well worth reading about.
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  • David Andrews
    June 13, 2017
    Patrick N. Hunt’s recounting of the life and campaigns of Hannibal is the most comprehensive I’ve read to date. Hunt does well with consolidating various accounts into one main through-line of narrative, without sacrificing accuracy or detail. Hannibal is one of the ancient world’s most compelling figures, easily in the same class as figures like Alexander, Caesar, and his opponent Scipio. However, most tellings of the story of Hannibal view him strictly as a force of nature against which Rome w Patrick N. Hunt’s recounting of the life and campaigns of Hannibal is the most comprehensive I’ve read to date. Hunt does well with consolidating various accounts into one main through-line of narrative, without sacrificing accuracy or detail. Hannibal is one of the ancient world’s most compelling figures, easily in the same class as figures like Alexander, Caesar, and his opponent Scipio. However, most tellings of the story of Hannibal view him strictly as a force of nature against which Rome was pitted. In Hannibal, Hunt attempts to portray the events of Hannibal’s life from Hannibal’s own viewpoint, though it can be hard as all the history relating to the man was written by Romans. Still, it is an admirable effort to try and understand the great general’s actions through the Carthaginian lens, rather than the Roman. If I had one major gripe with Hannibal, it would come in the author’s insistence that ancient place names be provided their modern counterparts for reference. I know this probably works for some people, but I dislike the practice, as these places were likely very different from what they are today - so different as to be misleading if you refer to them by their modern name. It’s a small complaint, absolutely, but it really stuck out to me. Otherwise, Hannibal appears to be a competent and thorough telling of Hannibal’s story that I’m sure both casual observers and the more invested amateur historians out there will get something out of.
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  • Andrew Dockrill
    July 12, 2017
    Hannibal Barca This was an extremely easy, casual and accessible read. I adore Hannibal, he is probably one of my favorite historical figures. I had recently wrote two uni papers on Hannibal as a tactician and really enjoyed reliving his more prominent battles of Ticino, Trebia, Lake Trasimene and Cannae. In all three of his last victorious battles I really enjoyed the authors take on them, explaining just how smart Hannibal really was and how the Romans came to see him as using environmental wa Hannibal Barca This was an extremely easy, casual and accessible read. I adore Hannibal, he is probably one of my favorite historical figures. I had recently wrote two uni papers on Hannibal as a tactician and really enjoyed reliving his more prominent battles of Ticino, Trebia, Lake Trasimene and Cannae. In all three of his last victorious battles I really enjoyed the authors take on them, explaining just how smart Hannibal really was and how the Romans came to see him as using environmental warfare and in their eyes not being a man of military honor as they believed that wars should be conducted in a specific way -the phalanx and going head to head until the other side is destroyed (which of course suited them). While Hannibal in their eyes at least, would use trickery. In the end you can look at Hannibal from two different lenses I personally think; either that Hannibal was simply a brilliant tactician who had devoted his life to the profession of a military commander who and his father Hamilar (arguably Carthages best General) had raised him from infancy to be a general, to hate rome, to work spy networks, use topography and be charismatic. While on the other hand, the argument could be made that the Roman generals that he faced against were simply rash, ill prepared and really stupid which would naturally just make Hannibal look all the more brilliant. Many of them were new men looking to prove themselves and were often cocky. Often times there were two generals who worked in pairs during the campaigns and while one commanded one day, the other took control the next. the soldiers themselves were also very different - many of the romans were brand new soldiers who were not necessarily used to the weight of their gear or of fight in the hot conditions, while Hannibal and his men were seasoned soldiers were. I think the argument can be made either way. Certainly in all battles Hannibal was very smart and creative in the way he faught his battles, but the Roman generals can definitely take the blame for being hasty and more interested in their own glory and fame then for the greater good of Rome. What is certain is that during the years that Hannibal was in Italy, he woke Rome up to the fact that they needed to conduct a huge overhaul on their military system which they would begin under Scipio Africanus and would not stop for centuries. I also quite liked how the author would even make small comparions to todays military where he would say that "with the amount of men Hannibal lost when crossing the Alps he would have been almost immediately sacked as a general by todays army" which is something I had never considered. I also enjoyed the small story added in of Hannibal and his engineers splitting the rock on the alps. It is also quite interesting to think that had Carthage been more supportive of Hannibal and continued to feed him more resources (money, men etc.) it is possible that he would have continued onto the city of Rome and from there who knows. Many historians make the argument that Hannibal was a great commander but perhaps not great enough while others compare him with the likes of Julius Caesar in saying that while Julius Caesar was too ambitious, Hannibal was not ambitious enough, while others speculate that while Hannibal was devestating Italy he believed that the Romans were give up which would definitely not be the case. All in all the book was pretty good, for myself personally this was not my first Hannibal book so it did not break any new ground but it was fun and I could turn my brain off and just enjoy.
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  • Philip Bailey
    June 11, 2017
    Barca not Lecter. 56 years ago, I was in high school Latin class. Along with the language came a dose of history. One mention was of Hannibal, who crossed the Alps with a herd of elephants and his army to invade Italy. Much more was made of the powerful Roman armies in these classes, their conquests, their victories. This book provides a fascinating account of Hannibal Barca, from Carthage, who did indeed invade Italy. As I had an advanced copy there were a few editorial slips but nothing to det Barca not Lecter. 56 years ago, I was in high school Latin class. Along with the language came a dose of history. One mention was of Hannibal, who crossed the Alps with a herd of elephants and his army to invade Italy. Much more was made of the powerful Roman armies in these classes, their conquests, their victories. This book provides a fascinating account of Hannibal Barca, from Carthage, who did indeed invade Italy. As I had an advanced copy there were a few editorial slips but nothing to detract from the account. I was impressed by the tactics of Hannibal. Apparently so were the Romans, for after Hannibal decimated their armies, killing tens of thousands in battle, the Romans began to copy his strategy. At that point, the Romans began to win some decisive battles. This is not a war story, although the chronology provides for a rich historical accounting of the Barca family, including Hannibal’s father and brothers, their conquest of Spain with the riches of the silver mines on the Iberian Peninsula, the thinking and reason behind Hannibal’s decision to invade Italy. Details of the Punic wars are outlined, the cause and the casualties. Small wonder that many noted Generals from recent history study Hannibal’s tactics. Even to this very day he is studied by our nation’s top military leaders, and no doubt other nations’ militaries. This is not a book for a casual reading experience, but rather a comprehensive outline of perhaps one of the greatest military leaders of all time, certainly in the same category as Alexander the Great or Genghis Kahn, and others come to mind. The book is full of strange places, though they exist today by different names. An abundance of unfamiliar individual names and even tribes from the time. Celtiberian was a new (to me) group of people, as just one example. I think at times the book was overly detailed with the numerous Roman names becoming a mental jumble. I can’t speak for everyone with an interest in this type of history, but I consider this book a gem presenting a wealth of knowledge. Considering the lack of written and recorded documents the research put into and the resultant book is in my opinion outstanding, and easily a five-star historical tome.
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  • Casey Wheeler
    July 3, 2017
    I received a free Kindle copy of Hannibal by Patrick N. Hunt courtesy of Net Galley and Simon & Schuster, the publisher. It was with the understanding that I would post a review to Net Galley, Goodreads, Amazon, Barnes and Noble and my history book review blog. I also posted it to my Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Google Plus pages.I requested this book as I heard a great deal about Hannibal Barca and saw the movie from several years ago, but had not really read anything about him. It is th I received a free Kindle copy of Hannibal by Patrick N. Hunt courtesy of Net Galley and Simon & Schuster, the publisher. It was with the understanding that I would post a review to Net Galley, Goodreads, Amazon, Barnes and Noble and my history book review blog. I also posted it to my Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Google Plus pages.I requested this book as I heard a great deal about Hannibal Barca and saw the movie from several years ago, but had not really read anything about him. It is the first book by Patrick N. Hunt that I have read.This book is well researched and written. My limited exposure to Hannibal revolved around his getting battle Elephants over the Alps and into Italy as part of invasion. As it turns out, this was a great achievement, but the elephants did not really play that big a role in the subsequent years and battles.Hannibal was a great military strategist who continually won battles against superior numbers, but over a period of years the lack of support from his home country eventually led to his downfall. After semi-retiring, he ended up taking his own life instead of being arrested and put on trial as a result of Romans seeking revenge. The author does a good job of presenting the facts in chronological order and with great detail. I recommend this book to anyone who has an interest in learning more about Hannibal Barca.
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  • Daniel Ligon
    July 12, 2017
    An excellent biography of a fascinating man! Hannibal's life has always interested me, but I've read very little about him. This book does a great job in bringing the ancient military titan to life. One of the difficulties in studying ancient history is the fact that sources are both limited and contradictory. Author Patrick Hunt does a great job of piecing together the ancient source materials to construct his narrative. Hunt had to fill in many of the gaps himself when discussing Hannibal's pe An excellent biography of a fascinating man! Hannibal's life has always interested me, but I've read very little about him. This book does a great job in bringing the ancient military titan to life. One of the difficulties in studying ancient history is the fact that sources are both limited and contradictory. Author Patrick Hunt does a great job of piecing together the ancient source materials to construct his narrative. Hunt had to fill in many of the gaps himself when discussing Hannibal's personality and the way his mind worked. I appreciate the fact that Hunt was willing to make these conjectures while at the same time making it clear to the readers what was in the history books and what was an educated guess. Hunt also did a good job of adequately explaining the military strategies used without making this merely a book on tactics. I would recommend this book to anyone with an interest in ancient history.I received a digital copy of this book for free from the publisher and was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I express in this review are entirely my own.
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  • Darcysmom
    May 4, 2017
    I received an ARC of this book from Netgalley for free in exchange for an honest review. I wanted to love this book. Instead, I liked it. Patrick N. Hunt is extremely knowledgeable and his expertise shines through. There were moments that were brilliant, particularly early on in the chapters about Hannibal's youth and crossing the Alps. He also did an excellent job illustrating the scope of the violence between Hannibal and the Romans.Where I had a more difficult time was with the long period of I received an ARC of this book from Netgalley for free in exchange for an honest review. I wanted to love this book. Instead, I liked it. Patrick N. Hunt is extremely knowledgeable and his expertise shines through. There were moments that were brilliant, particularly early on in the chapters about Hannibal's youth and crossing the Alps. He also did an excellent job illustrating the scope of the violence between Hannibal and the Romans.Where I had a more difficult time was with the long period of time after his initial victory. The narrative flow was not as intense. The book picked up again for me once Hannibal was called back to Carthage.The breadth of sources that Patrick N. Hunt used were well documented in the end notes and bibliography. I appreciate that there was no skimping on source documentation in a book that is geared for the general public.I would recommend this book to anyone who is interested in learning more about Ancient history.
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  • Tiffany
    July 24, 2017
    As I have read and studied numerous works about Hannibal, I would consider this book better suited for someone wanting an introduction to the topic. That being said, I did learn a few things from the book, and I felt that Hunt's enthusiasm and extensive knowledge about Hannibal sprang from the pages. I also think the language and composition of the book made for an enjoyable read for both amateur and professional historians.
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  • Doug Bright
    July 22, 2017
    I have read Livy, " The war with Hannibal." One of my favorite stories is: After defeating every Roman army sent against him Hannibal was finally camped before the very gates of Rome. An enterprising Roman bought the very ground that Hannibal's army was camped on. He paid next to nothing for it. When Hannibal's army finally moved off the Roman sold the land for a very tidy profit. Patrick Hunt has certainly staked out the ground for his story of Hannibal.Excellent.
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  • Drew Martin
    May 7, 2017
    https://drewmartinwrites.wordpress.co...
  • Alyson Stone
    May 2, 2017
    Book: Hannibal Author: Patrick N. Hunt Rating: 4 Out of 5 StarsI would like to thank Netgalley and Simon Schuster for providing me with this galley in exchange for an honest review. As many of you know, I love ancient and medieval history. When I saw this book on Netgalley, I decided to give it a try. I had never heard of Patrick Hunt until now and I must say that I found his writing enjoyable. This is a nonfiction book, but it is really easy to read and is not at all written in a textbook styl Book: Hannibal Author: Patrick N. Hunt Rating: 4 Out of 5 StarsI would like to thank Netgalley and Simon Schuster for providing me with this galley in exchange for an honest review. As many of you know, I love ancient and medieval history. When I saw this book on Netgalley, I decided to give it a try. I had never heard of Patrick Hunt until now and I must say that I found his writing enjoyable. This is a nonfiction book, but it is really easy to read and is not at all written in a textbook style. I know a number of you just read fiction, but this does not read like your normal nonfiction. The writing style is not at all dry and is full of emotion and power. I feel that people who are not familiar with Hannibal's story will be able to dive right in. We get to see the true legacy of Hannibal come to life on these pages. This book starts out when Hannibal is very young and follows him right up until his death. We get to read about some of the greatest military campaigns to ever exist on earth and we get to experience and understand why Hannibal wanted to bring Rome to its knees. There are not a lot of people who Rome was afraid of; after reading this book, it is very clear as to why Rome was so afraid of him. The facts are really well done here. Everything is laid out in a manner that makes sense. There is really no sources that aren't creditable nor is there the normal "beat around the bush" that so many other books on ancient and medieval history seem to have. It's very clear that Patrick did his homework before writing this book. In the end, we have a very solid and well crafted book. To be honest, this was just a well crafted book. The language is perfect for the everyday reader, while Hannibal just comes to life. I think that fans of Dan Jones will enjoy this book. It's a must read to anyone who is interested in Hannibal! This book will be available July 11, 2017.
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