Rebellion
A luminous cross-generational story that recalls the works of Jane Smiley and Isabel Allende, this sweeping debut novel tells the stories of four women who dare to challenge the boundaries of their circumscribed livesIt’s 1958, and Hazel’s peaceful world has been upended by the tragic death of her husband. It’s harvest time and with two small children and a farm to manage on her own, this young mother is determined to keep her land and family intact. As she grows closer to the neighboring Hughes family, she realizes the tradeoff for some freedoms is more precious than she expected. In 1890, we see Hazel’s young mother, Louisa, recently married and relocated to Illinois to what will become her family’s farm. Life in the country is dictated by seasons, so too is Louisa ruled by her “weathers” of good and bad spells. What keeps her grounded is corresponding with her sister, Addie, a Christian missionary in China. The same adventurous spirit that brought Addie to China with her new husband now compels her to leave again. However, with the Boxer Rebellion underway, and violence erupting between Chinese and their unwelcome Christian intruders, Addie’s life takes a mysterious and haunting turn strongly felt by her sister, Louisa, back home. At the end of the twentieth century, Juanlan returns to her parents’ home in Heng’an after college. With her father falling ill, a new highway being built, and her sister-in-law soon to give birth, Juanlan feels frozen in place, though everyone and everything seems to be rapidly changing. In the search for an outlet for the live wire, a little burning blue coil she feels buried inside, she starts up a love affair with a high-ranking government official. From rural Illinois to the far reaches of China, these four women are interconnected by actions, consequence, and spirit, each brilliantly displaying the fleeting intensity of youth, the obligation of family, and the dramatic consequence of charting their own destiny. A vibrant story of compassion and discovery set against a century of complicated relations between China and America, Rebellion celebrates those who fight against expectation in pursuit of their own thrilling fate and introduces a rising literary star.

Rebellion Details

TitleRebellion
Author
ReleaseAug 8th, 2017
PublisherHarper
ISBN-139780062574046
Rating
GenreFiction, Historical, Historical Fiction, Cultural, China, Adult, Literary Fiction

Rebellion Review

  • Angela M
    January 1, 1970
    I had a hard time rating this book. There are so many things that I liked about it - exceptional writing in many places, characters who I care about in spite of their flaws and lives that drew me in. I also learned interesting things about China during the Boxer Rebellion and in a more modern day changing China in the late 1990's. It is comprised of alternating narratives of four women in multiple time frames. The novel begins in 1999 with 84 year old Hazel who has to leave her farmhouse for an I had a hard time rating this book. There are so many things that I liked about it - exceptional writing in many places, characters who I care about in spite of their flaws and lives that drew me in. I also learned interesting things about China during the Boxer Rebellion and in a more modern day changing China in the late 1990's. It is comprised of alternating narratives of four women in multiple time frames. The novel begins in 1999 with 84 year old Hazel who has to leave her farmhouse for an assisted living facility. Then we are taken back in time to the early 1890's to her mother Louisa, who at 16 marries and leaves her home in Ohio for farm life in Illinois. Louisa's sister Addie has gone to China with her husband as missionaries around the same time in the years before the Boxer Rebellion. The fourth narrative is that of a young Chinese woman, Juanlan, a recent university graduate who returns home to help her family run their hotel when her father has a stroke. I found it difficult to rate because it almost felt like I was reading four separate novels at the same time. Three of the characters are connected because they are family but the connection to Juanlan, who lives in China where Addie served a missionary was a thin connection at best, although a character from Hazel's story does appear here . The other issue I had is that this was just way too long at 560 pages. But in spite of these reservations, I continued because there was something about each of these women that made me want to know their fate .Four women living on their own terms making choices for themselves sometimes not within acceptable norms and each rebelling in their own way to their own circumstances. Whether or not I agreed with the choices they make, I couldn't help but admire each of them in some way. There wasn't enough of a connection between the stories in my view. There are some common things that I can point to - each of them make decisions, about leaving home or staying home, returning home . Addie in a letter to her sister, Louisa, "I take comfort, Louisa, from imagining you snug in your farmhouse now, out there under the great open Illinois skies. You will stay there forever- or I hope you do anyway. I understand that after a certain point, staying is the bravest and virtuous act, whereas leaving is the cowardly one and selfish." I don't necessarily agree or disagree with this . It seemed to me that these women were at the same time brave and cowardly. Another thing that was common to three of the narratives was the illicit love affairs that they engaged in - two of them with married men and one of them with a woman. So while there were some commonalities, the links between narratives felt disjointed. I very seldom reread books and won't read this one again but if I did, I would read the narratives of each of the characters consecutively to see if I felt any differently. So there were pros and cons for me, but I would read another book by Patterson.I received an advanced copy of this book from HarperCollins through Edelweiss.
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  • switterbug (Betsey)
    January 1, 1970
    A distance of time and place, spanning 100 years between the late 1890s to the late 1990s, from the rural American heartland to rural China, REBELLION explores themes of personal rebellion and women with similar passions beyond their circumscribed roles. Molly Patterson brings to life women who rebel against societal and family expectations to follow love and personal desires beyond their circumscribed roles. Although the Boxer Rebellion in China is a central event in the story that ties several A distance of time and place, spanning 100 years between the late 1890s to the late 1990s, from the rural American heartland to rural China, REBELLION explores themes of personal rebellion and women with similar passions beyond their circumscribed roles. Molly Patterson brings to life women who rebel against societal and family expectations to follow love and personal desires beyond their circumscribed roles. Although the Boxer Rebellion in China is a central event in the story that ties several characters together East and West, it is a different kind of rebellion that Patterson taps. She mines the rebellions of the heart and of woman during the eras that preceded modern feminism.Louisa leaves her comfortable Illinois trappings in order to follow her new husband to a rural farm to toil in hardship and raise her children on the farmstead. She accepts subservience to her husband and rarely questions this life. However, her sister, Addie, who follows her husband to rural China to practice missionary work, breaks through her oppression in surprising ways when she meets a fiery, independent missionary. Juanlan, a recent college graduate in 1999 China, sacrifices her independence to help manage her parents’ struggling hotel in a rural China town. Hazel, a young farm widow in Illinois in the 1950s, is Louisa’s daughter. Raising her children alone on the prairie, she battles against the bank to keep her farm. As Hazel grows closer to her neighbors, George and Lydie, she enters into a reckless season that defies her upbringing.Juanlan feels “a live wire inside her, a little burning blue coil,” which applies to Addie and Hazel, also. Even Edith, Hazel’s sister, who doesn’t get enough stage time, itches to break out of the box she was raised in. Unfortunately, she was offstage most of the book, although I thought her story had more meat and sizzle than Juanlan’s, whose story fizzled and felt more jejune and frustrating to me as a reader after the first half of her narrative.This is a densely populated and lengthy novel that takes its time pulling the related threads together, and the theme of rebellion, which crosses time and geography, is the standout trope. Patterson is a fine writer who establishes the setting and period with such clarity that I was immediately invested in her story. Her female characters were intricately portrayed, including a surprise turn of the century feminist named Poppy, whose charisma was threatening to the status quo. The men, lacking much definition, were mainly furniture in these cruel surroundings, locales whose manifestations by the author are intimately felt as I turned the pages.There is copious stark beauty in these pages, with dialogue and character to match. My biggest issue was it could have used some condensing; it would not have reduced impact or character, as Patterson’s style is so thoughtful that there was no peril of reductionism—(leave that to authors like Kristin Hannah and that ilk). Patterson is a classy writer who shapes and contours her women so that they could easily walk off the pages. But I did get weary at the minutia and, had it been more compressed, would have added some of the missing tension. I speculate, though, that her next novel will be brilliant.
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  • Laurie
    January 1, 1970
    Four women in four eras are at the center of this book. A Christian missionary, Addie, in China in the years leading up to the Boxer Rebellion; Louisa, Addie’s sister who left a middle class family to homestead in the middle of nowhere; Hazel, Louisa’s granddaughter who is suddenly left a widow with a farm to run; and Juanlan, a young Chinese woman who as just graduated college but has to return home to help care for her father. Each of these women steps outside the life that is expected of them Four women in four eras are at the center of this book. A Christian missionary, Addie, in China in the years leading up to the Boxer Rebellion; Louisa, Addie’s sister who left a middle class family to homestead in the middle of nowhere; Hazel, Louisa’s granddaughter who is suddenly left a widow with a farm to run; and Juanlan, a young Chinese woman who as just graduated college but has to return home to help care for her father. Each of these women steps outside the life that is expected of them, and of course has to live with the consequences of those quiet rebellions. The book moves at a pretty slow pace. The minutia of daily life is related- when the rebellions are quiet, one has to look at the ordinary to see it contrast with the extraordinary. The descriptions are brilliant; they bring the scenes to life. But… pretty slow. It rather reminds me of a novel from the late 18th century, actually, with its pacing and long descriptions. Which is fine; just be forewarned. What I didn’t like was that I figured the four strands of narrative would come together in the end. It was obvious what the relationships between Addie, Louisa, and Hazel were, but the relationship that Juanlan has with the three of them is quite nebulous- only that she lives in roughly the same area of China that Addie lived in. I expected that at some point some long hidden letters would appear or something that meshed them all. No such luck. The ended was quite a letdown.
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  • Jamie
    January 1, 1970
    When you're reading a book and you're liking it a lot but it's 600 pages and all you can think about is how it better come together because otherwise what's the point and then you get to page 612 and you realize that's all there is and it doesn't hold together and yet it's very readable and 3/4 of it is interesting but there's no THERE there... that's this book.
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  • Brett Beach
    January 1, 1970
    Beautifully written, immersive, and compelling. The novel weaves together the stories of a missionary in China and her lonely sister back home, a widowed farm wife in the 1950s, and a restless young woman returned to her small Chinese town after college. In their own ways, each of the women makes space for herself in the world, by pushing back against expectations and circumscribed roles--a perfect novel for our present day. And it's also compulsively readable. A real treasure. (view spoiler)[ I Beautifully written, immersive, and compelling. The novel weaves together the stories of a missionary in China and her lonely sister back home, a widowed farm wife in the 1950s, and a restless young woman returned to her small Chinese town after college. In their own ways, each of the women makes space for herself in the world, by pushing back against expectations and circumscribed roles--a perfect novel for our present day. And it's also compulsively readable. A real treasure. (view spoiler)[ I am the author's husband, by the way, so I am biased. But seriously: this novel is amazing. (hide spoiler)]
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  • Rebe
    January 1, 1970
    This is a beautiful book--stunningly layered and sensuous, simultaneously sweeping and intimate in its scope, Molly Patterson's Rebellion examines the ways women across culture and time find ways, large and small, to rebel against the roles and expectations that might otherwise box them in. Addie, a Christian missionary in nineteenth century China, who leaves her family to follow the woman she loves across China; Hazel, a mid-century farm widow in Illinois who falls in love with her best friend’ This is a beautiful book--stunningly layered and sensuous, simultaneously sweeping and intimate in its scope, Molly Patterson's Rebellion examines the ways women across culture and time find ways, large and small, to rebel against the roles and expectations that might otherwise box them in. Addie, a Christian missionary in nineteenth century China, who leaves her family to follow the woman she loves across China; Hazel, a mid-century farm widow in Illinois who falls in love with her best friend’s husband; and Juanlan, a college graduate in contemporary rural China who struggles to define her life on her own terms. Patterson brings the threads of these women’s lives together in a way that positively shimmers. I found myself touching the final pages, hoping some of their beauty might stay with me a while longer.
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  • Brittney
    January 1, 1970
    Loved every minute of reading this novel and didn’t expect to be pulled in and finish it in such a short time. The author brought each of the characters to life with her intricate detail of the time, characters and landscape. I found myself invested in each of the characters and couldn’t help but hold my place and reference some of the earliest chapters in order to make sure I was absorbing all of the details that added color to each of them (and to be able to extend reading the book for as long Loved every minute of reading this novel and didn’t expect to be pulled in and finish it in such a short time. The author brought each of the characters to life with her intricate detail of the time, characters and landscape. I found myself invested in each of the characters and couldn’t help but hold my place and reference some of the earliest chapters in order to make sure I was absorbing all of the details that added color to each of them (and to be able to extend reading the book for as long as possible because I didn't want it to end). The author's knowledge and understanding (and obvious research) into China’s history and culture was fascinating and really helped to draw me into Juanlan’s character which I didn’t expect. I can’t wait to see what's next for Molly Patterson.
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  • David Leaman
    January 1, 1970
    As I neared the end of this excellent novel, it occurred to me that Rebellion reads like an Alice Munro short story that slows down and keeps on going, telling and integrating stories that end up as one big beautiful book. Where Munro short fiction has density and intensity, this Molly Patterson novel has patience and cautious revelation. Still, like Munro, all the details matter, the women are large and very interesting, and there are precious moments of clarity. I loved the subtlety and indire As I neared the end of this excellent novel, it occurred to me that Rebellion reads like an Alice Munro short story that slows down and keeps on going, telling and integrating stories that end up as one big beautiful book. Where Munro short fiction has density and intensity, this Molly Patterson novel has patience and cautious revelation. Still, like Munro, all the details matter, the women are large and very interesting, and there are precious moments of clarity. I loved the subtlety and indirection of the ending, Patterson's choice to let minor characters bring the narrative home. For me, it fit one of the novel's themes: the interconnectedness of our lives over distances of time and place and in ways we don't even know.
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  • Joyce Salih
    January 1, 1970
    A captivating story of four women who's lives intersect over two continents spanning 100 years. Well written with beautiful imagery and keen insight into human desires and needs. With great poignancy Molly Patterson brings to life the never-ending conflict between tradition and personal choice.
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  • Danny
    January 1, 1970
    This is a fantastic read, one I could barely put down. The characters are gorgeously constructed, as are the subtle but poignant connections between them. The landscapes, both in time and terrain, feel carefully and respectfully sketched. Though all four of the women in this novel are complex, Juanlan and Louisa stand out to me, in particular, as characters destined to stay with the reader long after they've left this epic story. I definitely recommend REBELLION for lovers of literary fiction, h This is a fantastic read, one I could barely put down. The characters are gorgeously constructed, as are the subtle but poignant connections between them. The landscapes, both in time and terrain, feel carefully and respectfully sketched. Though all four of the women in this novel are complex, Juanlan and Louisa stand out to me, in particular, as characters destined to stay with the reader long after they've left this epic story. I definitely recommend REBELLION for lovers of literary fiction, historical writing, and novels carried by strong female characters.
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  • David Patterson
    January 1, 1970
    As a history and politics buff who grew up in one of the U.S. locations in this novel and who spent two weeks in less urban China as a bewildered American, the novel rings true. Some reviewers thought this may be a "women's" book. While I see their point, must say that never crossed my mind while reading. Tossing away your upbringing and choosing what to keep and what to replace seems rather universally human. And in no way easy. Dealing with this in a believable way, which IMHO Rebellion does, As a history and politics buff who grew up in one of the U.S. locations in this novel and who spent two weeks in less urban China as a bewildered American, the novel rings true. Some reviewers thought this may be a "women's" book. While I see their point, must say that never crossed my mind while reading. Tossing away your upbringing and choosing what to keep and what to replace seems rather universally human. And in no way easy. Dealing with this in a believable way, which IMHO Rebellion does, is rare.
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  • Tonstant Weader
    January 1, 1970
    Rebellion is one of those stories combining several narratives separated by time and distance. In China, we have the stories of Addie and Juanlan. In Ohio, we have Louisa and Hazel. Louisa and Addie are sisters. Hazel is Louisa’s daughter. The connection for three of them is quite obvious, though the connection to Juanlan is tenuous and revealed only to the reader.The real connection is revealed by the title of the book. These are women who rebel at least once, always motivated by love. Louisa g Rebellion is one of those stories combining several narratives separated by time and distance. In China, we have the stories of Addie and Juanlan. In Ohio, we have Louisa and Hazel. Louisa and Addie are sisters. Hazel is Louisa’s daughter. The connection for three of them is quite obvious, though the connection to Juanlan is tenuous and revealed only to the reader.The real connection is revealed by the title of the book. These are women who rebel at least once, always motivated by love. Louisa gives up her middle-class comfort to marry a farmer and settle into the hard, backbreaking life of an Ohio farmwife. Addie rebels by leaving her husband and her children in China for an affair. Hazel rebels by having an affair with her neighbor. Juanlan also rebels by having an affair with an influential married man.I liked Rebellion. Patterson is an excellent writer who knows how to control her narrative. Most of the women are interesting and Patterson makes us care about them. I wanted them to be happy. I appreciated the shifting narrative as a way to build interest, emphasize their parallel rebellions and withhold information in parallel timelines. There was a powerful sense of time and place. The women were complex and interesting people, though the men in their lives were much less interesting. I did not think Juanlan was effectively connected to the other women and did not understand her purpose. The small connection was too small a payoff for such a long narrative in quite a long book.I might have liked to see more with Edith, Hazel’s sister. She was another rebel, but got short shrift while Juanlan, a rather dull woman whose rebellion was so unworthy of her, got too much time. Perhaps in her own book with a story not formed around a rebellion that feels unlikely and unworthy of her intellect and aspirations, she would be a more fully realized woman. Instead, she feels like a character in service to the story of the other women. That’s unhappy.I will note one thing that bothered me a lot. During the small narrative about Edith and her own rebellion, Edith is attracted to an African American woman who is very light-skinned and wonders why she does not make an effort to pass, particularly in Mississippi.She then introduces an unimportant, unnamed two-sentence character, a racist WAC colleague from Mississippi who used a racist epithet. It is a word that hurts people. It should not be used without a considering the harm inflicted on African Americans reading a book about decent women coming across that word out of nowhere. Yes, the word can be used in literature, but it better have a more important purpose than pointing out some folks in Mississippi are racist as hell. Instead, it feels like showboating, like staking the right as a white writer to use the word, even though it has no place in the story and does nothing to move the story. It brought my reading to a complete halt while I stopped and thought “What the hell?” and tried to understand what possible justification there could be for inflicting that on her Black readers.This leaves me conflicted. Yeah, Patterson has the right to write what she likes. I just think any writer who cares about her readers would not use epithets that reinforce bigotry and remind people of their “otherness” in society unless they served the story in important ways.Rebellion will be released on August 8th. I received an e-galley from the publisher through Edelweiss.https://tonstantweaderreviews.wordpre...
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  • Sarah Beth
    January 1, 1970
    I received an uncorrected proof copy of this novel from HarperCollins. This cross-generational novel follows four women interconnected by their actions and families. In 1890, Louisa is a newlywed living on a farm in Illinois with her new husband, far from her family and home. She finds comfort in the letters she writes and receives from her sister Addie, who is a Christian missionary in China. In China, Addie is increasingly caught up in her own choices and by the eruption of the Boxer Rebellion I received an uncorrected proof copy of this novel from HarperCollins. This cross-generational novel follows four women interconnected by their actions and families. In 1890, Louisa is a newlywed living on a farm in Illinois with her new husband, far from her family and home. She finds comfort in the letters she writes and receives from her sister Addie, who is a Christian missionary in China. In China, Addie is increasingly caught up in her own choices and by the eruption of the Boxer Rebellion. Flash forward to 1958, and the reader follows Hazel, Louisa's daughter, who is a recent widow living on her family's farm and trying to care for her two young children on her own. Finally, at the close of the twentieth century, the novel follows Juanlan, a young Chinese college graduate returning to her family home after graduation and struggling to find her place in life. This was a beautiful novel that had passages that were particularly poignant and well written. For instance: "It was that time between night and morning, the time you start calling early rather than late, and the sky was that particular shade of dark turquoise that comes a half hour before the sun starts its slow climb over the horizon. It gives lie to the old saying, 'It's always darkest before the dawn'" (122). And later, "But the hope rests on Juanlan; she feels it teetering on her skull like the elaborate headpiece of a Sichuan opera singer" (171). Yet despite enjoying the writing style and liking most of the characters, this novel failed to come together as I had hoped. It is excessively long (nearly six hundred pages) and for the last several hundred, I was increasingly curious to see how the disparate characters would come together. Yet other than their family ties, the separate parts remained distinct. In particular, the Juanalan character's inclusion seems particularly baffling as she is only tangentially connected to the other three main female characters, who are at least related and share a family. The only other connections seem thematic; like Hazel she becomes entangled with a man she shouldn't be. It was also interesting that the author chose to make Hazel's sections first person and the other women's third person. Perhaps this is to indicate she is the primary narrator, but I'm not sure why that would be the case. In sum, I felt as if I was reading several novels whose chapters had gotten shuffled together and whose characters just happened to be distantly related.This novel explores family loyalties, charting one's own course, and risk taking. In particular, the four women who are at the heart of this novel all struggle with pursuing their own goals and desires while keeping a balance with the needs of their family and other loved ones. There is so much about this novel to like and compliment, I only wish the links between the four narrators felt more clearly defined. Despite its length, in many ways the characters' stories felt as if they were only beginning to unfold with this novel's conclusion. 3.5 Stars
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  • Mica
    January 1, 1970
    "That's what I'm saying to you, Hazel. It's like this woman (from a Life magazine photo) -she was me, but she was living a different life. Like if I'd been born somewhere else, grown up some other place. I kept looking at that light, and thinking it looked better than it does here, and I'm telling you it made me feel...angry, I guess, because I won't ever see it shining down that way, hitting at just that particular angle." Rebellion-Molly PattersonFour woman connected in small ways, across gen "That's what I'm saying to you, Hazel. It's like this woman (from a Life magazine photo) -she was me, but she was living a different life. Like if I'd been born somewhere else, grown up some other place. I kept looking at that light, and thinking it looked better than it does here, and I'm telling you it made me feel...angry, I guess, because I won't ever see it shining down that way, hitting at just that particular angle." Rebellion-Molly PattersonFour woman connected in small ways, across generations, choosing their own large and small rebellions and living with the consequences. It's the story of every woman at some point in their life, when we felt we were meant for more, something different, someone different, or just to escape the life we didn't choose. I love, love, love this book! Easy to read. Hard to put down.
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  • Annie
    January 1, 1970
    Thoreau was only half right when he said that “The mass of men live lives of quiet desperation.” He left out the other half of the gender spectrum—but then he was living it up in the woods when he wrote that. If he’d been around to read books like Molly Patterson’s Rebellion, I’m sure he’d issue a revised statement. This novel contains the stories of a series of women over the course of a century, in two countries, who rebel against their social expectations and end up paying the price for it... Thoreau was only half right when he said that “The mass of men live lives of quiet desperation.” He left out the other half of the gender spectrum—but then he was living it up in the woods when he wrote that. If he’d been around to read books like Molly Patterson’s Rebellion, I’m sure he’d issue a revised statement. This novel contains the stories of a series of women over the course of a century, in two countries, who rebel against their social expectations and end up paying the price for it...Read the rest of my review at A Bookish Type. I received a free copy of this book from Edelweiss for review consideration.
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  • Heather Butterfield
    January 1, 1970
    The main feeling I had reading this book was that we have no idea what our grandmothers and great grandmothers were up to. Rebellion follows the lives of 4 women from 3 different generations, all living lives of duty. These women's obligations - to their children, husbands, sick parents, religion - dictate almost everything about their lives. These are the grandmothers and great grandmothers we know. Except at some point, each of the women, each in her own way, basically gives the middle finger The main feeling I had reading this book was that we have no idea what our grandmothers and great grandmothers were up to. Rebellion follows the lives of 4 women from 3 different generations, all living lives of duty. These women's obligations - to their children, husbands, sick parents, religion - dictate almost everything about their lives. These are the grandmothers and great grandmothers we know. Except at some point, each of the women, each in her own way, basically gives the middle finger to what is expected of her and secretly - sometimes recklessly - chooses something else. Molly Patterson's beautiful writing carries you into the heart of their rebellions and reminds you that women are not - and probably have never been - as selfless as we imagine.
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  • Asha Falcon
    January 1, 1970
    I really liked this novel. The author deftly weaves the stories of 4 women, each voice distinct and interesting. The narrative moves across history, recording births, deaths, loves, betrayals, adventure- these women all step out of their comfort zone to pursue their passions and stand for what they believe in. They are also very human, written with great compassion and insight. I found myself eager to read the next chapter and see what they were up to. I would recommend this lovely and engrossin I really liked this novel. The author deftly weaves the stories of 4 women, each voice distinct and interesting. The narrative moves across history, recording births, deaths, loves, betrayals, adventure- these women all step out of their comfort zone to pursue their passions and stand for what they believe in. They are also very human, written with great compassion and insight. I found myself eager to read the next chapter and see what they were up to. I would recommend this lovely and engrossing book. It is wise, beautifully written, and often moving.
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  • Erin Quinney
    January 1, 1970
    This was the book that wouldn't end. Usually, that's a bad thing, but there were some good things here. It was just too long and lacked cohesiveness in its parts. The last section felt like the beginning of another book and probably wasn't necessary. I mean, I get how the story fit together, or, at least, how it was supposed to fit together, but I don't think it really worked. That being said, the story was told beautifully, and I'm not sorry I read it.
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  • Lynn
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you for making this title available. Unfortunately, the further I read, the more I was convinced that this was not the kind of book that I would enjoy. This is no criticism whatsoever of the plot, characters, writing style, setting, or the author. Merely a statement of my own preferences.
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  • Cheryl
    January 1, 1970
    While this could be confusing -- flashbacks, disparate settings, times, cultures -- it was still a striking portrayal of women who did not settle for traditional roles.
  • Lauren
    January 1, 1970
    My review for BookPage https://bookpage.com/reviews/21627-mo...
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