Made for Love
Hazel has just moved into a trailer park of senior citizens, with her father and Diane—his extremely lifelike sex doll—as her roommates. Life with Hazel’s father is strained at best, but her only alternative seems even bleaker. She’s just run out on her marriage to Byron Gogol, CEO and founder of Gogol Industries, a monolithic corporation hell-bent on making its products and technologies indispensable in daily life. For over a decade, Hazel put up with being veritably quarantined by Byron in the family compound, her every movement and vital sign tracked. But when he demands to wirelessly connect the two of them via brain chips in a first-ever human “mind-meld,” Hazel decides what was once merely irritating has become unbearable. The world she escapes into is a far cry from the dry and clinical bubble she’s been living in, a world populated with a whole host of deviant oddballs.As Hazel tries to carve out a new life for herself in this uncharted territory, Byron is using the most sophisticated tools at his disposal to find her and bring her home. His threats become more and more sinister, and Hazel is forced to take drastic measures in order to find a home of her own and free herself from Byron’s virtual clutches once and for all.

Made for Love Details

TitleMade for Love
Author
FormatHardcover
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 4th, 2017
PublisherEcco
ISBN0062280554
ISBN-139780062280558
Number of pages320 pages
Rating
GenreFiction, Contemporary, Literary Fiction, Adult

Made for Love Review

  • karen
    February 18, 2017
    "A robot officiated at my wedding," said Hazel. "Let me start there."this is one of those books where if i try to summarize the plot, it will sound like the opium dreams of a maniac. which i'm fine with for myself, but then you might dismiss this book as the opium dreams of a maniac and steer clear of it. hence, i will try to keep any content-related remarks pretty general, so no one runs off in fright. this is indeed pure crazytown in concept, but she wrangles the crazy into a well-executed and "A robot officiated at my wedding," said Hazel. "Let me start there."this is one of those books where if i try to summarize the plot, it will sound like the opium dreams of a maniac. which i'm fine with for myself, but then you might dismiss this book as the opium dreams of a maniac and steer clear of it. hence, i will try to keep any content-related remarks pretty general, so no one runs off in fright. this is indeed pure crazytown in concept, but she wrangles the crazy into a well-executed and structured story that, for all its flashy weirdness, is oddly moving. at its widest-angle view, it's about love. love for family, romantic love, self-love, love of power and legacy, the confusing love for another species, the practical and efficient love between a man and a sex doll. it's also about technology. and the effect of unchecked technology on human connection when it is fetishized over more "natural" experiences; in a cultish corporate community where reliance upon technology was perceived as a personal strength and the degree of one's reliance measured that person's value.it's about one character removing herself from the world of robots and mocrochips and (literally) embracing the ugly, rugged, scarred essence of human existence, embodied by a man whose handshake was an exfoliant, and who is as far away from the sleek singularity as it gets:If there was one person in the world who could make someone better at chopping things down with an ax just by having sex with him, this was the guy.and it's about another character whose sexual preferences take a sudden and unexpected turn, leaving him with a longing for a connection impossible to satisfy. compared to his needs, hazel's father's relationships with sex dolls seems commonplace and simply practical. so, yeah - love, technology, the loneliness of people who never learned how to experience healthy human connections either through the nature of a sociopathic-tinged brain, the nurture of an unemotional upbringing:"Are you sad Mom's dying?" she asked.Her father nodded. "You know I don't like change."or a clinical approach to life that prioritizes machinelike efficiency over messy humanity. it's also pretty damn funny:Liver had a lot of smells that seemed automotive in nature, so being on her back beneath him, Hazel thought about the flat rolling carts mechanics lie down on to slide beneath cars, and the sex became a little fun the way it might be fun to roll out from below a vehicle and then roll back under again, and again.that's all i feel i should say about this - it's a weird little book, but weird in a very appealing way.and that cover…. that's something else.airbrushed majesty.
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  • Roxane
    December 14, 2016
    There is no one who negotiates the absurd as vigorously yet poignantly as Alissa Nutting. In her second novel, Made For Love, Nutting explores the loneliness of a future overly mediated by technology through a tremendous romp involving Hazel, trying to leave her tech mogul husband Byron even though his reach knows no bounds. There are sex dolls and a senior citizen trailer park and brain chips and a con man who loves dolphins and still, the story makes sense like a motherfucker. Brilliant, dense There is no one who negotiates the absurd as vigorously yet poignantly as Alissa Nutting. In her second novel, Made For Love, Nutting explores the loneliness of a future overly mediated by technology through a tremendous romp involving Hazel, trying to leave her tech mogul husband Byron even though his reach knows no bounds. There are sex dolls and a senior citizen trailer park and brain chips and a con man who loves dolphins and still, the story makes sense like a motherfucker. Brilliant, dense, hilarious writing that hurtles toward an ending that is both satisfying and unexpected.
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  • Kelly (and the Book Boar)
    January 24, 2017
    I just told a friend to use this tactic to score a freebie, but here's the time when I'm willing to do anything myself for an ARC. AN.Y.THING. . . . . . .
  • Rachel León
    June 8, 2017
    (3 to 4 stars, I'm completely undecided) I picked up this one because of a nice blurb from Roxane Gay as I'll basically read anything that she recommends. This novel is strange and entertaining, to be sure. Hazel is married to Byron, tech genius/ giant. She leaves him when she becomes afraid he has plans to put a computer chip in her head to be able to monitor her thoughts. Hazel has nowhere to go and ends up with her father and his new sex doll. Meanwhile, a man named Jasper is only sexually at (3 to 4 stars, I'm completely undecided) I picked up this one because of a nice blurb from Roxane Gay as I'll basically read anything that she recommends. This novel is strange and entertaining, to be sure. Hazel is married to Byron, tech genius/ giant. She leaves him when she becomes afraid he has plans to put a computer chip in her head to be able to monitor her thoughts. Hazel has nowhere to go and ends up with her father and his new sex doll. Meanwhile, a man named Jasper is only sexually attracted to dolphins... And I'll leave the synopsis right there. Nutting is a compelling writer and this book is a literary beach read dealing with love and technology. It's interesting, if at times over the top.
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  • Adrienne
    March 13, 2017
    No one makes me more uncomfortable to be a participant in human sexuality than Alissa Nutting, and I mean that as an enormous compliment. She commits to ideas with fervor and wit, and even though those ideas are funny & wild, they still feel true to her cast of characters. I doubt it's even possible for her to write something boring, and god knows this book never is. It is a delight.
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  • Emilie
    December 16, 2016
    This book is BANANAS but I couldn't put it down.
  • Christopher
    March 22, 2017
    Wow. I suspect I'll be thinking about this book for a long time.
  • Kimberly
    January 14, 2017
    This book is weird AF, in the best way possible! Hazel is both hilarious and disarming, and will be a little too relatable for many readers. As always, Alissa Nutting makes the most poignant observations of our current culture--obsessed with sex, technology, love, wealth, and praise. Somehow she blends everything perfectly, so that the more fantastical elements are true to life and not unnecessarily strange or pretentious. With a memorable main character and side characters that are equally as i This book is weird AF, in the best way possible! Hazel is both hilarious and disarming, and will be a little too relatable for many readers. As always, Alissa Nutting makes the most poignant observations of our current culture--obsessed with sex, technology, love, wealth, and praise. Somehow she blends everything perfectly, so that the more fantastical elements are true to life and not unnecessarily strange or pretentious. With a memorable main character and side characters that are equally as important/fucked up/wonderful, Made for Love is one to watch out for this year!(Thanks to the publisher for providing an ARC.)
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  • Ashley
    April 18, 2017
    This book sounds absolutely insane and I have to read it.
  • Lillian
    January 7, 2017
    Is there such a thing as literary humor? If so Alissa Nutting is a master at it. Never have I laughed out loud so often. My laughter continued even after I'd finished the book when certain scenes came to mind, which they did often. Her writing is both witty and humorous yet Made For Love is not a light or fluffy book. The author explores many provocative themes; relationships both familial and romantic, how we chose to live our life and key is the fact that no matter what our life goals are we a Is there such a thing as literary humor? If so Alissa Nutting is a master at it. Never have I laughed out loud so often. My laughter continued even after I'd finished the book when certain scenes came to mind, which they did often. Her writing is both witty and humorous yet Made For Love is not a light or fluffy book. The author explores many provocative themes; relationships both familial and romantic, how we chose to live our life and key is the fact that no matter what our life goals are we are at the core all looking for love. Life is a lot of trial and error and sometimes what we seek is not what we find. According to the author we can consider ourselves fortunate if the two collide even slightly. Her characters the primary ones and most importantly the secondary characters are so vibrant and essential. You long to know everyone intimately and she offers the opportunity. Our heroine's voice is so very unique. The author's skill at blending humor and deep philosophical questions is both seamless and effortless. Her super power is the ability to craft deceptively simple sentences that say so much. Her prose is propulsive and exciting and profound. How DOES she accomplish that?Made For Love is truly wonderful on all levels. This quotation by Stephen Hawking perfectly sums up Made For Love:"Life would be tragic if it wasn't funny."Please do yourself a favor and read it. You won't regret it.Thank you HarperCollins for the advance!!!
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  • Teresa
    February 12, 2017
    ****4.5 Stars****Where do I begin?! This book made me laugh, cringe, almost cry, grimace and just about everything in between. Technology that knows no boundaries, a con man, sex dolls and dolphins are just the tip of the iceberg in this funny, but poignant, book that exposes our obsession for said technology and human interaction. I don't even want to say more because I want everyone to experience this book without any clue as to what to expect. Thanks to HarperCollins for the ARC!
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  • Ashley Holstrom
    April 21, 2017
    Raise your hand if this is the most bananas book you've read in a long time.
  • Vincent Scarpa
    May 23, 2017
    For this dwelled-in-a-scuzzy-trailer-park-for-most-of-his-adolescence reader, Made for Love was practically designed to be a thrilling and moving and hysterical and frightening read. I can't imagine anyone who didn't have my background feeling any differently, though. I'm glad to be reading at the same time Nutting is putting books out into this strange, uncaring, intermittently beautiful beyond belief world.
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  • Downward
    June 10, 2017
    this book lands pretty hard on a powerful metaphor that cuts both ways: our protagonist leaves her tech mogul husband and lives in fear of him using technology to find her and either kill her or force her to move back home with him. it looks at an abusive relationship and explores it via society's relationship to technology; it looks at society's relationship to technology and explores it via an abusive relationship. this stuff is strong, and the suffocating nature of the villain Byron functions this book lands pretty hard on a powerful metaphor that cuts both ways: our protagonist leaves her tech mogul husband and lives in fear of him using technology to find her and either kill her or force her to move back home with him. it looks at an abusive relationship and explores it via society's relationship to technology; it looks at society's relationship to technology and explores it via an abusive relationship. this stuff is strong, and the suffocating nature of the villain Byron functions as terrifying in both of these ways.if only the book stuck with this premise. it veers wildly off course to explore a conman who erotically fantasizes about dolphins and a sickly father who wants to spend his final days in threesomes with sex dolls. both of these relate to objectification and deviant sexual behavior, but neither can connect thematically to the central metaphore in a meaningful narrative way. add an eleventh hour deus ex machina to render the whole thing meaningless and you've got something that is occasionally funny and commentary that hints at more, but ultimately what feels very first drafty. i like nutting's other two books quite a bit, but this one feels like a real misfire.
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  • Suzanne
    June 18, 2017
    Almost great, science fiction book of the near future with hyper-realistic tech invasion in all aspects of daily life, especially desire and sexuality. If only humans understood their own and others' desire and sexuality before they designed technology to overtake these fields. Our unwitting protagonist married the chief tech titan in the world without giving it much thought. Fifteen years or so later, he wants to embed a chip in her brain to prototype invasive technology; she decides it's time Almost great, science fiction book of the near future with hyper-realistic tech invasion in all aspects of daily life, especially desire and sexuality. If only humans understood their own and others' desire and sexuality before they designed technology to overtake these fields. Our unwitting protagonist married the chief tech titan in the world without giving it much thought. Fifteen years or so later, he wants to embed a chip in her brain to prototype invasive technology; she decides it's time to leave the marriage. This is a great set-up for a story since husband controls all aspects of global technology so she must go off the grid to survive. Instead, the author creates two subsidiary tales that are far less engaging and serve primarily to fill up pages. Very creative central plot but the book itself dragged in parts. I received my copy from the publisher through edelweiss.
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  • Stephanie Driscoll
    June 1, 2017
    I wanted to like this book. I knew after reading Tampa, that I should be expecting something strange, something a little off the wall, and in that regard this definitely didn't disappoint. But I was bored - I kept putting the book down and I had to make myself finish it. There were some parts with fantastic writing, but it got too lost in the story.
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  • Dianah
    May 24, 2017
    Well, this was weird AF! Still mulling this one over...
  • Lauren Horvath
    March 2, 2017
    If you haven't read anything by Alissa Nutting yet, it's time. I read Tampa and Made for Love a few months apart, and I'm already itching for her future books. The most refreshing thing about Nutting's writing is that she GOES for it. She fully commits to the strangest and most absurd plot lines, but it just works. Made for Love is somewhat lighter than Tampa in my opinion, but it is even more fun and fantastical. Somehow Nutting makes a book about technology, blow-up sex dolls, and dolphins not If you haven't read anything by Alissa Nutting yet, it's time. I read Tampa and Made for Love a few months apart, and I'm already itching for her future books. The most refreshing thing about Nutting's writing is that she GOES for it. She fully commits to the strangest and most absurd plot lines, but it just works. Made for Love is somewhat lighter than Tampa in my opinion, but it is even more fun and fantastical. Somehow Nutting makes a book about technology, blow-up sex dolls, and dolphins not only possible, but highly engaging and enjoyable.
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  • Melissa Smith
    April 3, 2017
    This book i read as ARC , it was the weirdest book , i have ever read. It had themes that were very uncomfortable.I had hard time getting through it. I don't if the themes were symbols. I don't know but ick . I can't recommend it . The writing was good . I don't see it having a main stream audience .
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