The Taste of Blue Light
An incandescent, soul-searching story about a broken young woman's search for a truth buried so deep it threatens to consume her, body and mind.'Since I blacked out, the slightest thing seems to aggravate my brain and fill it with fire'These are the things Lux knows:She is an Artist. She is lucky. She is broken.These are the things she doesn't know:What happened over the summer.Why she ended up in hospital.Why her memories are etched in red.'The nightmares tend to linger long after your screams have woken you up ...'Desperate to uncover the truth, Lux's time is running out. If she cannot piece together the events of the summer and regain control of her fractured mind, she will be taken away from everything and everyone she holds dear.If her dreams don't swallow her first.

The Taste of Blue Light Details

TitleThe Taste of Blue Light
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 7th, 2017
PublisherHodder Children's Books
ISBN-139781444936735
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Contemporary, Mystery

The Taste of Blue Light Review

  • Emer
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. I am blown away by this read. It's rare that a contemporary YA book leaves me feeling so breathless. I absolutely did not see any of that coming. The Taste of Blue Light follows the story of young art student Lux and her attempt to discover what happened to her one fateful summer night. She can't remember. She has nightmares, she has physical manifestations of pain but according to all her doctors she is physically fine. But emotionally she is bereft. She is struggling. As the reader you ar Wow. I am blown away by this read. It's rare that a contemporary YA book leaves me feeling so breathless. I absolutely did not see any of that coming. The Taste of Blue Light follows the story of young art student Lux and her attempt to discover what happened to her one fateful summer night. She can't remember. She has nightmares, she has physical manifestations of pain but according to all her doctors she is physically fine. But emotionally she is bereft. She is struggling. As the reader you are in the dark as much as Lux is about the event that changed her whole sense of being as much as she is and you live each of her struggles with her. You see her fight her parents, act out with friends, get panic attacks, suffer from anxiety, paranoia, see her fixate on unexplained things... Her senses are all acutely heightened but to an almost manic degree. It's clear that she must be suffering from some sort of PTSD but neither the reader nor Lux knows until eventually things begin to fit into place. But trust me. When you find out it won't be what you expected. At least I was completely floored by it. And what's brilliant about this book is that it feels honest. It doesn't feel like a cheap or tacky attempt to be relevant. Because this book is incredibly relevant. Lux is such a brilliantly written character. She is both likeable and unlikeable at different times. I found myself caring deeply about her even though I feel I have very little in common with her. THAT to me is a sign of great writing. To write beautifully flawed human characters. The supporting characters were all veiled in this wonderful air of mystery and confusion as Lux was attempting to figure out the mystery behind that night and even though this probably meant that I didn't connect with these characters as much, it actually somehow added to the tension in the book. All my senses were as heightened as Lux's were. If I were to find any flaws with this book (and these are purely quibbles) it's that the pacing was not entirely perfect. The book dragged a little between the 30% and 50% mark and I would actually have liked the last 15% to have been a little more detailed. But these are minor issues. The ending was actually very beautiful and I did finish the book with my eyes glistening with tears. A thoroughly original and incredibly emotional YA read that feels truly authentic. Highly recommended four and a half stars*A copy of this book was kindly provided to me by the publisher, Hachette Children's Group / Hodder Children's Books, via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.*As I read an ARC please be advised that the following may not be the exact quotes in the published work but I really wanted to share these passages as I found them to be rather beautiful and to me they really encapsulate the feeling and tone of this novel:-"I will find the old Lux and when I do I will climb back inside her and sew myself into her skin so I never get lost again. The last time I saw her, me, properly was at the Leavers’ Ball. I was wearing the shortest, reddest dress I could find. This was before colours meant what they do now. And before I got lost."----"'I know this is difficult, Lux. Perhaps you could just tell me the main things that are bothering you, just so I can make sure I have it all noted down correctly,’ the doctor said. So I told her what I’d eventually told my mother after weeks of saying it was just the headaches while thinking I was losing my mind. That since I blacked out I feel like my head is not connected to my body, that I panic about weird things and that my senses get confused sometimes. And, if I get really strung out, colours get brighter and more intense, and it’s almost as if words and sound have colour. I didn’t tell her that I sometimes see words in the air, sometimes even punctuation, which makes it hard to follow what people are saying. ‘I feel like I’m in a video game or a play,’ I said."----"My thoughts are starting to get mean; I remind myself that villains are just victims whose stories haven’t yet been told. A professional told me that, like he was conveying something super meaningful and all I could think was how much Lux sounded like a villain’s name."----"Vanilla is an insult to some people, but some days I would give up every flavour in my body to be just vanilla."----"These tropes of troubled and rescued teens should embarrass me. I should cringe at the clichés. But words are the most powerful drug, someone famous said that once, I think, and I find myself buzzing."----"A constellation of bright young things, we delight in pre-show banter and buy moonshine from an illicit vendor. But, ten minutes into the actual performance, the nostalgia party ends. Without the narration of the book, all that remains is beautiful, two-dimensional people doing vile things."----
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    (I received an advance copy of this book for free. Thanks to Hachette Children's Group and NetGalley.)This was a YA story about a girl who couldn’t remember one night of her life after ending up in hospital.Lux was an okay character, but I found it quite hard to connect with her.The storyline was about Lux not knowing what had happened at a party, after waking up in hospital with no memory of the night before. We then got Lux struggling at school a bit, and struggling with her daily life, but I (I received an advance copy of this book for free. Thanks to Hachette Children's Group and NetGalley.)This was a YA story about a girl who couldn’t remember one night of her life after ending up in hospital.Lux was an okay character, but I found it quite hard to connect with her.The storyline was about Lux not knowing what had happened at a party, after waking up in hospital with no memory of the night before. We then got Lux struggling at school a bit, and struggling with her daily life, but I lost interest. I thought that the story would focus more on Lux’s synaesthesia, but it didn’t, and although I was interested to find out what exactly did happen (and it wasn’t what I expected) it didn’t really save the book for me.The ending to this was okay, but I had really lost interest by then.6 out of 10
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  • Kate (GirlReading)
    January 1, 1970
    I'm really not sure how I felt about this to be honest. To me, it definitely wasn't the psychological thriller it was marketed as. Yes, is had a mystery and delved into mental health but a thriller? I'm not so sure. Although I know she was having to deal with a lot, I unfortunately didn't warm to the main character and the way she talked/acted towards others. I also wasn't the biggest fan of some of the content and descriptions from the author, which felt a little iffy in terms of mental illness I'm really not sure how I felt about this to be honest. To me, it definitely wasn't the psychological thriller it was marketed as. Yes, is had a mystery and delved into mental health but a thriller? I'm not so sure. Although I know she was having to deal with a lot, I unfortunately didn't warm to the main character and the way she talked/acted towards others. I also wasn't the biggest fan of some of the content and descriptions from the author, which felt a little iffy in terms of mental illness at times. Having said that, the authors writing style I really enjoyed. It flowed brilliantly and very a quick and easy read. I just wasn't too much of a fan of certain phrases etc. I'm still not sure about how I felt about this, so I think I might have to come back to this review a bit later but for now, I can't say I loved it, nor did I hate it. I just don't think it was really for me personally.
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  • bsbookbuzz
    January 1, 1970
    I was strapped on an emotional roller coaster that didn't stop till the words were nothing but a full stop, halting me. That is what the book was like. I feel so drained and not quite complete. I want to start this review by saying it was a long draining book and I feel like I was lost in the motion for the first few chapters and in the next few I found my pace. The plot was quiet like We Were Liars by E.Lockhart, if you haven't read that book yet then I suggest you go check that book out.So we I was strapped on an emotional roller coaster that didn't stop till the words were nothing but a full stop, halting me. That is what the book was like. I feel so drained and not quite complete. I want to start this review by saying it was a long draining book and I feel like I was lost in the motion for the first few chapters and in the next few I found my pace. The plot was quiet like We Were Liars by E.Lockhart, if you haven't read that book yet then I suggest you go check that book out.
So we follow a girl who has been through some hefty trauma and her brain is like a computer who is denying her entry and from there we unfold how her friends and family deal with it then to goes on to speak about her recovery. Now I want to point out that the sentence you just read is NOT a spoiler because most book have a resolution or a slither of hope that in the end it will get better and that was the novel's lesson to the readers.

I found the plot a bit jumpy and the character at times annoying but overall I enjoyed the book because it was set in the world of today with a problem that may occur or has occurred to people and I find that this hit's closer to home because it's almost scary how real it could be. I recommend this book for 16+ because you deal with heavy issues and it was a long bumpy ride. The ending was quite calm and it was like a semicolon, where it was finished but you as a reader created some sort of end for the character.
4.5/5
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  • Emily Ross
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to the publishers for providing an ARC of this book through NetGalley.I don’t even have the words to describe this book. It started off promising; Lux, the main character, suffers from amnesia after a traumatic event. Lux is probably the hardest character to connect with. She treats her friends and family awfully, nothing she does makes sense and the trauma that occurs doesn’t even fit with the book. As a heavy partier, hard drinker and recreational drug user, you’d expect the twist to Thank you to the publishers for providing an ARC of this book through NetGalley.I don’t even have the words to describe this book. It started off promising; Lux, the main character, suffers from amnesia after a traumatic event. Lux is probably the hardest character to connect with. She treats her friends and family awfully, nothing she does makes sense and the trauma that occurs doesn’t even fit with the book. As a heavy partier, hard drinker and recreational drug user, you’d expect the twist to be something along the lines of what happened at a party, but the trauma is completely removed from everything in the novel, and it comes straight out of the blue. I just don’t think that this book made much sense.And Richdeane, being set in the UK, just wouldn’t work. They literally just teach art. Even at the most artistic of secondary schools, they still have to be taught English and Maths. None of this book made sense.
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  • Trisha
    January 1, 1970
    Intense and unsettling.
  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this book. It was raw and deep and so passionately real. I can't wait to see what Lydia Ruffles comes up with next.
  • Lucy-May
    January 1, 1970
    Beautiful is a strange word for this book, but that is what I will call it. It's rare that I see mental health written so well & messily, but when I do it means so much to me. So much care & consideration has been flooded into the words of this book & the story they tell is an important & memorable one.Read my full review here: https://writingwolves.wordpress.com/2...
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  • Karen Whittard
    January 1, 1970
    I would like to start by saying thank you to Netgalley, the publishers and Lydia Ruffles for the opportunity to read this book for an honest review. This is an all consuming book of massive proportions which will leave all readers breathless. The book tells the story of Lux a art student. Who is trying to uncover what happened to her over the summer. She remembers nothing but she knows something isn't right. She keeps suffering from intense pain and she has nightmares but when she goes to the do I would like to start by saying thank you to Netgalley, the publishers and Lydia Ruffles for the opportunity to read this book for an honest review. This is an all consuming book of massive proportions which will leave all readers breathless. The book tells the story of Lux a art student. Who is trying to uncover what happened to her over the summer. She remembers nothing but she knows something isn't right. She keeps suffering from intense pain and she has nightmares but when she goes to the doctors they declare her fit and well. As you go in the journey with Lux through her paranoia, anxiety, depression, confussion and pain. The reader is as much in the dark as Lux is. You can try to piece together the puzzle pieces but o had no idea what was going on until Lux discovered the truth. Lux is such a vulnerable character who lays everything out in the open. You can't help feeling for her and waiting to take her under your wing. To try and help her piece together what has happened and give her the support she so desperately needs. This is a moving story that had me moved to tears at the ending of the book. If I have a small criticism it's that at times I felt that it was a little slow and that the last section of the book was a little rushed. But all in all a beautifully written book.
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  • Joanne
    January 1, 1970
    Originally posted on Once Upon a Bookcase.The Taste of Blue Light by Lydia Ruffles completely bowled me over. There were times when I really struggled with it, times when I wanted to give up, but I am so glad I stuck with it, because it's incredible!Lux is unravelling. Over the Summer, she went to a party, and then blacked out, waking up in hospital. She doesn't remember why she blacked out, she doesn't remember waking up in hospital. But she knows she's different now. Suffering from intense mig Originally posted on Once Upon a Bookcase.The Taste of Blue Light by Lydia Ruffles completely bowled me over. There were times when I really struggled with it, times when I wanted to give up, but I am so glad I stuck with it, because it's incredible!Lux is unravelling. Over the Summer, she went to a party, and then blacked out, waking up in hospital. She doesn't remember why she blacked out, she doesn't remember waking up in hospital. But she knows she's different now. Suffering from intense migraines, terrifying nightmares in red, synaesthesia - where the senses overlap, hence the title, and obsessive episodes. All she knows is she wants to get back to who she was before. There's nothing physically wrong with her, and all her doctors and her therapist think she will start to get better if she just remembers what happened. But she has to. If she doesn't start to get better soon, she'll be taken away from everything she loves, her friends and her life at Richdeane, an elitist art school. But those are not the only things she risks losing, as with every moment, she loses more of herself.I really struggled with this book at first. The way it was written just left me completely confused, in that I didn't know what was happening. The first chapter starts with Lux remembering a party at the beginning of the Summer, weeks before her blackout, and it was just baffling. Not the party itself, but Lux's thoughts. The way she worded her thoughts was just completely bizarre to me. I thought The Taste of Blue Light was going to be one of those arty books you had to be super intelligent to understand, because I was completely lost. Several times, I thought about giving up, because I just lost, but the story itself was so intriguing. I'm so glad I stuck with it, because I kind of got used to the strangeness, and came to realise it's not the writer being arty, it's how Lux is now, as she loses herself.It was heartbreaking being with Lux as she tries to figure things out, but gets worse and worse. She'll have obsessive, compulsive thoughts - but not how we would generally think of OCD. For example, at one point where she's certain someone or something is after her, that it's in the woods, but she gets it into her head that she has to face whatever it is instead of hide, and so runs into the woods - and runs and runs, terrified, but also certain she will find whatever she's felt that's after her, and once she faces it, she'll get better - and gets herself lost, and doesn't remember afterwards exactly why she was running in the woods in the first place. Or her desperation to connect with former Richdeane student, actor and singer Jade Grace, with this overwhelming feeling that they are the same, and if only Jade Grace would respond to her incessant, obsessive, almost stalker-like emails, she would start to get better. As the story goes on, she just seems to lose her mind a little more, and I was so engrossed in the story, I felt like I was unravelling right along with her. I'd put my book down at the end of my lunch break and go back to work and just feel really strange, because I have to shelve books, but I was just running in the woods with Lux, it was just such an odd feeling. And it was so hard, so unbelievably upsetting, to see Lux slip away when she tries so hard to hold on. She is just so unwell, and she doesn't know how to make herself get better, and her therapist just keeps on at her to remember. She is struggling, drowning and not knowing which way is up, and it's just heartbreaking.And then she remembers. It was a punch to the gut, reading about what caused her to black out. It was emotional, and it hurt. It was so upsetting, because this book is just so, so timely. It's horrific, and you come to completely understand why her mind would want to protect her from this, and why she would unravel, even thought she couldn't remember. I just got it. I've never experienced what Lux did, but we all have experience of reacting to such events when we hear about them, and with my anxiety, I have felt like I was hanging on by just a thread, and I've not even lived it. So for Lux to have reacted to what she went through the way she did, it was just so completely understandable, and I just wanted to give her the biggest hug. I just wanted to hold her and cry with her. Even now, I'm writing with tears in my eyes, because it just affected me so much.I'm not the biggest fan of the ending, though. I understood why we had the ending, the purpose of the ending, but at the same time, I didn't really enjoy it. I think I would have preferred the book to have finished around 30% earlier. Those last few chapters just felt unnecessary to me, simply because of the time scale. I just thought it wasn't very interesting; I know I don't like books that have the climax, and then end abruptly, but for me, this felt like it was dragged out a bit two much. I don't think Part Two was necessary as it was. It just didn't work for me, but I can see other people enjoying it.This book is absolutely incredible. It's not the easiest of reads, but it's such an important one. It's upsetting, but it's powerful and moving, and really, just a triumph. Such a wonderful debut novel.Thank you to Hodder Children's Books via NetGalley for the eProof.
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  • Chantal Lyons
    January 1, 1970
    This book does not work, for one big reason:It demands that the reader believes in two extremely unlikely things at the same time.You probably haven’t read a novel which is about dungeons and dragons, then halfway through aliens turn up, or a military in space sci-fi with a magic genie as the main character. They just don’t work. ‘The Taste of Blue Light’ is a less extreme example, but I’m at a loss to understand the author’s bizarre choices.The premise is this: Lux Langley is in denial about an This book does not work, for one big reason:It demands that the reader believes in two extremely unlikely things at the same time.You probably haven’t read a novel which is about dungeons and dragons, then halfway through aliens turn up, or a military in space sci-fi with a magic genie as the main character. They just don’t work. ‘The Taste of Blue Light’ is a less extreme example, but I’m at a loss to understand the author’s bizarre choices.The premise is this: Lux Langley is in denial about an undisclosed trauma. So far, so good. Louise O’Neill, feted YA author of ‘Asking For It’, gives the book a glowing recommendation so it must be something immensely topical and relevant to today’s teenagers; mental health; perhaps a bit of toxic masculinity; etc. Right?Except that, even though we know Lux is a hard partier, a hard drinker, and a heavy recreational drug user (ugh), it turns out the trauma she went through, and which is revealed two-thirds of the way through the book, is nothing to do with any of this. No foreshadowing, nothing. It was totally out of the blue and totally unrealistic. Maybe the author’s intention was to surprise readers, with a silent cackle of “haha, obviously they will think it is because someone took advantage of Lux in her vulnerable drug-and-drink-addled state, but NO!” (Anti-spoiler alert: It’s not an alien invasion, but it’s something that would statistically be very, very unlikely). There’s absolutely no reason for Lux to even be a hard drink and drug user, unless the author’s rationale is that it messed up her brain so that she would react even more strongly to the trauma, or something… maybe?The second extremely unlikely thing is this: Lux is a student at a private secondary school that, I’m sorry, would never be allowed to exist in the UK. Richdeane is Hogwarts without the magic and awesome characters – no maths, no sciences, etc. It teaches only arts. ONLY. And because it’s an ultra artsy, expensive school, almost everyone is self-indulged and spoilt, Lux included. Oh my God, is she annoying.Lux’s weird life situation of going to an impossible school serves only to distract from what should be centre stage – her journey of coping with her trauma. And because of that I could never get a grip on the story, never feel it. I had to drag myself kicking and screaming all the way through it.
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  • Ashvin
    January 1, 1970
    (ARC Review) The Taste of Blue Light by Lydia RufflesDisclaimer: I received this ARC published by Hodder Children's Books courtesy of @BookaliciousMY in exchange for my honest review.The Taste of Blue Light is honestly something else. I started reading this book and never imagined a story like this one to play out. This book is mainly about Lux Langley, an artist, who wakes up one day in the hospital and can’t figure out why she’s there and why she is dreaming in red, screaming in the dark. All (ARC Review) The Taste of Blue Light by Lydia RufflesDisclaimer: I received this ARC published by Hodder Children's Books courtesy of @BookaliciousMY in exchange for my honest review.The Taste of Blue Light is honestly something else. I started reading this book and never imagined a story like this one to play out. This book is mainly about Lux Langley, an artist, who wakes up one day in the hospital and can’t figure out why she’s there and why she is dreaming in red, screaming in the dark. All she knows is that she is lucky, and broken. She is desperate to find out the truth about her current state but her time is running out. If she cannot piece together the events of that fateful night of the party, the last time she was conscious, she will be taken away from everything and everyone she loves, that’s if, if the nightmares don’t take her first.I have never read such a book that deals with a traumatized individual quite like this one. Lux Langley is a character that suffers so much and she can’t control her scorched and splintered mind. As a reader, you begin to sympathize with her and as you start to piece together what could have possibly happened to her, you are completely blindsided by something else. I must say, I did not see that coming at all but once I finished this, everything made sense. EVERYTHING.This novel is a rather easy read; however, its content can be a bit too much for the younger audience (below 12). Also, despite enjoying this read, the start of it is rather draggy, and everything interesting only begins roughly towards the middle. But having said that, The Taste of Blue Light is a great debut novel by Ruffles that readers should pick up and indulge in.All in all, The Taste of Blue Light is perfect for the fans of ‘We Were Liars’ (YES) and is a great read in general for YA fans. It isn’t my favorite read this year, but I do foresee people talking only good things about this book. It honestly deserves it. I rate it, 4 ½ stars.
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  • Ilsa
    January 1, 1970
    This one...it was just not for me.I'm sure a lot of people will like this book but I am not one of them. I found myself skimming so much throughout the book and it just didn't interest me. This book was missing a lot of things! It was just not my type of story.I appreciate this book discussed trauma in a unique way. But I'm not hooked? The only parts I was truly interested in was Cal and the rest of it read like a very messy book. I felt disjointed from the whole book for no particular reason. I This one...it was just not for me.I'm sure a lot of people will like this book but I am not one of them. I found myself skimming so much throughout the book and it just didn't interest me. This book was missing a lot of things! It was just not my type of story.I appreciate this book discussed trauma in a unique way. But I'm not hooked? The only parts I was truly interested in was Cal and the rest of it read like a very messy book. I felt disjointed from the whole book for no particular reason. I couldn't resonate with this one Maybe it was the typical characters I couldn't care less about or the story which was just downright boring, or maybe it was because I couldn't relate to anything, the book just didn't click with me. It's not a memorable read or anything I would recommend or buy for someone. Other people would say this is written wonderfully and that Ruffles knows how to tell a poignant and raw story. Other people would say that there are supportive friends and a realistic Main character. I cannot say those things.I just feel nothing actually happened. A story about people forever getting drunk, a bit of drug dealing. Yeah no. Not saying the bit about art wasn't amazing and the mystery about 'what happened' but it was written very and-climatically. I didn't feel anything or was even bothered to try and find out what happened to Lux. It was a bunch of loose ends and a messy first draft that seemed like a poem or something?I was bored! I am glad this book is over! I didn't care. It all seemed a bit pointless to me, to be perfectly honest. It was an 'okay' book. Maybe try it out? You'll probably enjoy it but I just couldn't. I would have DNFed this if it wasn't for Cal.
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  • - ̗̀ SJ ̖́-
    January 1, 1970
    Taste of blue light is a coming of age novel that follows our main character Lux, went to a party one night, then wakes up days later with no recollection of what made her pass out. I personally really enjoyed taste of blue light for it's simplistic writing but realistic characters. No one character was perfect, and they  all had their little issues, much like we do in real life and I found myself relating to them in different aspects because they felt so human. My favourite characters had to be Taste of blue light is a coming of age novel that follows our main character Lux, went to a party one night, then wakes up days later with no recollection of what made her pass out. I personally really enjoyed taste of blue light for it's simplistic writing but realistic characters. No one character was perfect, and they  all had their little issues, much like we do in real life and I found myself relating to them in different aspects because they felt so human. My favourite characters had to be Cal and Mei as they both felt like the kind of people who would make amazing friends and be there for you no matter what. My favourite part of this novel, was the positive representation of counselling, mental disorders, and recovery. All were painted well, the main character coming to see how far she has come because of her counselling, her friends and school mates understanding that she wasn't okay, and that's okay. and finally, the full circle that we feel we come to when we finish this book. Alot of the time, I have the issue where a book will end and I'll be sitting there like 'well what happened to then in a few years?' but this book leaves you with no questions like that as it actually has a piece that is set later in time and shows the immense recovery the main character has made from her traumas. Overall I'm giving this 3.75, most of this is for the plot, characters and the positive light on counselling (we really can never get enough of this) I believe someone dealing with PTSD or different mental issues than me, might connect to this book alot more but for me since I didn't connect with it, I feel like it's a little forgettable. 
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  • Isabelle
    January 1, 1970
    when i first started this book, i couldn't get into the story nor the characters and i felt sad about it somehow. especially since the ratings and reviews seemed to be so promising. the words and explanations just went over my head and i felt like the author might have been trying too hard to make it literate.but then i figured it could have just been me being too tired to really understand what i was reading.so i put the book aside for a day and continued on this morning. it went a whole lot be when i first started this book, i couldn't get into the story nor the characters and i felt sad about it somehow. especially since the ratings and reviews seemed to be so promising. the words and explanations just went over my head and i felt like the author might have been trying too hard to make it literate.but then i figured it could have just been me being too tired to really understand what i was reading.so i put the book aside for a day and continued on this morning. it went a whole lot better and i could connect with lux a lot more. i love her relationships with her friends and cal and her teacher/psychologist. they all care for her so much. her parents too. and they struggle to keep together, but they succeed in a way that only people that truly care can. there is such a realness to this book and i adored it. even after she remembers, especially after she remembers, she is still struggling to be better. to be as normal as she can be and to deal with what happened.i'm a bit of an emotional mess after this, not in a crying kind of way. but i'm just touched and it struck a few chords inside of me that has made me rethink and consider some things about my life. if anything, it made me feel melancholic and sad and made me choke up at times. things were worded beautifully at times and i regret not writing them down or marking them, but i assume i will read it again in the future and then i will make sure to do it.
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  • Martina O'Brien
    January 1, 1970
    Having spotted it popping up on Autumn “must read” lists and with recommendations from big-hitting authors like Louise O’Neill, I opened The Taste of Blue Light with some trepidation. Would it live up to the hype or be just another over-marketed read? I needn’t have worried. From the opening line I knew I was reading something special. The Lux Langley we first meet is not the most likeable character – a shallow, self-obsessed youth living a life of privilege in an exclusive art school. But that Having spotted it popping up on Autumn “must read” lists and with recommendations from big-hitting authors like Louise O’Neill, I opened The Taste of Blue Light with some trepidation. Would it live up to the hype or be just another over-marketed read? I needn’t have worried. From the opening line I knew I was reading something special. The Lux Langley we first meet is not the most likeable character – a shallow, self-obsessed youth living a life of privilege in an exclusive art school. But that Lux has been lost and the girl who remains in her place is broken, confused and desperate to get back to herself. What happened to Lux? What caused her blackout, her injuries, her disturbed mental state? Finding the answers to these questions definitely kept me reading but what truly enthralled me with this book was the writing itself. The beautiful prose outshone the plot and characters. It kept me, a self-confessed skimmer, glued to the text, my eyes forced to re-read if I skipped along too quickly. Lux’s synaesthesia in particular led to captivating passages. This is an exceptional, modern debut novel by a talented writer that I would highly recommend to both adult and young adult readers.Many thanks to NetGalley and Hachette Children’s Group who provided me with a copy of this title in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    This book has the very worthy aim of describing the effect of an undisclosed dramatic trauma on a teenage girl, and how it affects her and her relationships with other people, and to a great extent it succeeds in making clear her confusion and distress, as she tries to piece her life back together.Lux is a pupil at a very exclusive “artistic” boarding school, and during the summer break something happens to her causing a breakdown.She returns to school and her friends Mei and Olivia, in an attem This book has the very worthy aim of describing the effect of an undisclosed dramatic trauma on a teenage girl, and how it affects her and her relationships with other people, and to a great extent it succeeds in making clear her confusion and distress, as she tries to piece her life back together.Lux is a pupil at a very exclusive “artistic” boarding school, and during the summer break something happens to her causing a breakdown.She returns to school and her friends Mei and Olivia, in an attempt to find normality, and during the course of the book, we experience the mental anguish she goes through, which seemed very realistic.When she finally faces the trauma, and her reaction to it can be explained, she can then start to move her life on, and this part is beautifully written. My problem was that I found all the young characters acting like over-privileged, entitled, trust-fund kids, who had no concept of the real world, and seemed to think that their art was all that mattered, a view reinforced by the school management.I’m giving the book three stars, it is a very brave attempt, and should be read by its target audience, who may be less critical than me, because it does succeed in its main aim. Thanks to Netgalley and Hachette Childrens Group for the opportunity to read this book.
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  • Indianna
    January 1, 1970
    Really well written debut novel. I loved it from the beginning and felt very drawn into Lux's world and her fractured mind as she tries to piece it back together. While not everyone will be able to relate fully, there are bits and pieces that definitely belong to every young person and those universal experiences. Will definitely be recommending as a good coming of age novel but for 15/16+ due to a lot of the themes. Otherwise a very well rounded novel that left me wanting, thinking and question Really well written debut novel. I loved it from the beginning and felt very drawn into Lux's world and her fractured mind as she tries to piece it back together. While not everyone will be able to relate fully, there are bits and pieces that definitely belong to every young person and those universal experiences. Will definitely be recommending as a good coming of age novel but for 15/16+ due to a lot of the themes. Otherwise a very well rounded novel that left me wanting, thinking and questioning like every good book should.
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  • Janine
    January 1, 1970
    The Taste of Blue Light mixes atmospheric, descriptive language with a hint of mystery resulting in a unique look into a teenager's brain post-trauma. Lux's synesthesia is fascinating and the setting of Richdeane compelling which made it a very enjoyable read. The author has a way with words which kept me interested to the end, despite not personally connecting with Lux.Recommended for YA fans.Thanks to NetGalley and Hatchette Children's Group for providing me a copy of the book in exchange for The Taste of Blue Light mixes atmospheric, descriptive language with a hint of mystery resulting in a unique look into a teenager's brain post-trauma. Lux's synesthesia is fascinating and the setting of Richdeane compelling which made it a very enjoyable read. The author has a way with words which kept me interested to the end, despite not personally connecting with Lux.Recommended for YA fans.Thanks to NetGalley and Hatchette Children's Group for providing me a copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • I Read, Therefore I Blog
    January 1, 1970
    Lydia Ruffles's debut YA literary thriller is a Marmite book because while Ruffles has a gift for description and can turn a beautiful sentence, this story of, essentially, a poor little rich girl whose journey to self-absorbed artistic pretension is interrupted by an event that (once revealed) had no emotional impact on me given that she's so revolting to her friends and family and because the central conceit doesn't ring true.
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  • Jewels
    January 1, 1970
    I don't often say this, but this book was a real effort to get through. I didn't really warm to any of the characters, some were too sketchy, others were way too self-possessed and self-obsessed for my liking. The plot was quite good, but the book as a whole was overly long and drawn-out - I felt it could have been much more succinct.Thanks to the publishers and NetGalley for allowing me to read this in return for my honest review.
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  • Sarah Turner
    January 1, 1970
    Read this on the back of high praise from Louise O Neill. Can very much understand why.This is the story of Lux, a student at a prestigious but liberal free thinking art college in London. It deals with her life both pre ( precocious and entitled) and post trauma dealing with severe psychological damage. Lux cannot remember the events that have totally damaged her life... and this is not revealed till much later in the book. Until this point we are left guessing for quite some time... at times I Read this on the back of high praise from Louise O Neill. Can very much understand why.This is the story of Lux, a student at a prestigious but liberal free thinking art college in London. It deals with her life both pre ( precocious and entitled) and post trauma dealing with severe psychological damage. Lux cannot remember the events that have totally damaged her life... and this is not revealed till much later in the book. Until this point we are left guessing for quite some time... at times I felt it dragged... but the story is worth it. It is worth getting past this point.Not fo ruin fer teens... but an important voice in modern YA
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  • Kate Neilan
    January 1, 1970
    Beautiful, obscene, crystalline, fluid - this novel is an extraordinary creation. Wonderful.
  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent and gripping first novel
  • Kerr
    January 1, 1970
    review to follow
  • Kirsty Stanley
    January 1, 1970
    Very powerful. Wonderful use of language. Bittersweet.
  • Kirsty (overflowing library)
    January 1, 1970
    really not my sort of read in the end
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