The Captain's Daughter (London Beginnings #1)
When a series of circumstances beyond her control leave Rosalyn Bernay alone and penniless in London, she chances upon a job backstage at a theater which is presenting the most popular show in London. A talented musician and singer, she feels immediately at home and soon becomes enthralled with the idea of pursuing a career on the stage. An injury during a skirmish in India has forced Nate Moran out of the army until he recovers. Filling his time at a stable of horses for hire in London, he has also spent the past two months working nights as a stagehand, filling in for his injured brother. Although he’s glad he can help his family through a tough time, he is counting the days until he can rejoin his regiment. London holds bitter memories for him that he is anxious to escape. But then he meets the beautiful woman who has found a new lease on life in the very place Nate can’t wait to leave behind.

The Captain's Daughter (London Beginnings #1) Details

TitleThe Captain's Daughter (London Beginnings #1)
Author
FormatPaperback
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 6th, 2017
PublisherBethany House Publishers
ISBN0764219200
ISBN-139780764219207
Number of pages338 pages
Rating
GenreHistorical, Christian Fiction, Romance, European Literature, British Literature, Fiction, Victorian

The Captain's Daughter (London Beginnings #1) Review

  • Hannah
    June 26, 2017
    4.5 starsI truly enjoyed this new release by a new-to-me author. I kept trying to get a copy through the library and finally caved and bought it, and am quite glad I did, as it's definitely a series I intend to keep reading.I loved the historical show biz parts! I mean, Gilbert and Sullivan? H.M.S. Pinafore and the debut of Pirates of the Penzance? Oh, yeah. And having real characters like Jessie Bond in it made it even more fun.I also liked the romance. Not too smooch, but definitely heartfelt. 4.5 starsI truly enjoyed this new release by a new-to-me author. I kept trying to get a copy through the library and finally caved and bought it, and am quite glad I did, as it's definitely a series I intend to keep reading.I loved the historical show biz parts! I mean, Gilbert and Sullivan? H.M.S. Pinafore and the debut of Pirates of the Penzance? Oh, yeah. And having real characters like Jessie Bond in it made it even more fun.I also liked the romance. Not too smooch, but definitely heartfelt...exactly the way I like it best.The heroine's background also played a huge part, as well as her faith. It's not every day you find a book where the characters actually stop and talk to God about what's going on in their lives, and have such a strong thread of trusting God in everything. It made her background of growing up in Müller's orphanage feel so much more authentic.I loved the Moran family! All of them are so warm-hearted and welcoming, and of course the hero is the best. He's got some pretty strong stuff to work through, himself, and his family loves him enough to not cut him a bit of slack. Made for some great scenes!The two things I didn't like so well were some instances of "for heaven's sakes" being used way too lightly, and Tony. Tony was a slimy worm and not fun to read about, and I just knew he was up to no good, and yet Rosalyn continues to try to be nice to him.I'll definitely be looking forward to her sister Julia's story next year!
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  • Rachel
    June 20, 2017
    I enjoyed this book and the setting of being behind the scenes in a theater. I've not attended very many theater productions in my life but have enjoyed the few I have. So it was interesting to read small details of backstage life and a few onstage moments. :) And as I've read other reviews on this book, I realize that this book is set at the beginning of theater greats, Gilbert and Sullivan. I believe that some of their productions are still being used today.Rosalyn Bernay is a talented young l I enjoyed this book and the setting of being behind the scenes in a theater. I've not attended very many theater productions in my life but have enjoyed the few I have. So it was interesting to read small details of backstage life and a few onstage moments. :) And as I've read other reviews on this book, I realize that this book is set at the beginning of theater greats, Gilbert and Sullivan. I believe that some of their productions are still being used today.Rosalyn Bernay is a talented young lady who is on the run from false accusations of theft being made by her employer's husband. Although determined and a fast learner, she has also been somewhat sheltered by her life in an orphanage and her position as a lady's companion. When she lands in London, her naivety puts her in a dangerous position which she only narrowly escapes. This start to the book will hook you right away and keep you intrigued to the end.For the most part I liked Rosalyn's character. However, I felt like she was a little too naive when it came to that guy in the theater that kept coming on to her. You would think she would have had a little more sense after dealing with her previous employer's husband. But she does continue to grow and become more confident throughout the book. Nate Moran was a wonderful hero for Rosalyn. He's a bit broody but he's a loyal family man, a hard worker, and as he grows in character throughout the book, he tries not to admit that he's falling for Rosalyn. :) I loved his family! His mom, sisters and brother - all pushing him to move on from the pain of being jilted and get on with his life. Nate and his family are all involved in some form of charity work and are loving and kind to those around them. They are a great refuge and support for Rosalyn.All in all, I think this is a well written, quick and easy read with a gentle love story and a touch of danger. I look forward to reading the next book in this series!*Thanks to LitFuse for a complimentary copy of this book. I was not paid or required to write a positive review and all opinions stated are my own.
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  • Susan
    June 7, 2017
    A lovely read by a new-to-me author. Jennifer Delamere delivers a story that appeals to my love of the musical theater. Her research into the musical world of the actors, actresses and crew of the original Victorian Gilbert and Sullivan productions was a breath of fresh air. Many of her characters were based on real people. Her fictional heroine, Rosalyn Bernay, finds herself delivered from a series of unfortunate circumstances that have placed her at the mercy of the seedier side of Victorian A lovely read by a new-to-me author. Jennifer Delamere delivers a story that appeals to my love of the musical theater. Her research into the musical world of the actors, actresses and crew of the original Victorian Gilbert and Sullivan productions was a breath of fresh air. Many of her characters were based on real people. Her fictional heroine, Rosalyn Bernay, finds herself delivered from a series of unfortunate circumstances that have placed her at the mercy of the seedier side of Victorian London. A job backstage at a theater is the beginning of a new life for her. Through a couple of coincidental meetings, she finds herself working with Nate Moran. Nate is healing from an injury he obtained while serving in the British Army, which he hopes to return to as soon as possible. Will Rosalyn be able to escape those that seek her and find happiness and security in her new life? Will Nate be able to forgive himself, finding absolution that can set him free to seek his own happiness? The author provides the reader with a love triangle that I did not find unrealistic. Throughout history, women have learned to recognize and seek the honorable qualities of a man with integrity, one who will treasure her as God wants of his believers. However, many women have had their heads turned by one who does not have their best interests at heart. I found this to be an entertaining story, filled with life of the theater, romance and an inspirational message of forgiveness and absolution. There are a few unanswered threads in this story that I anticipate to be answered in future books in this series.I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book which I received from the author/publisher. I was not required to write a review. All opinions expressed are my own.
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  • Rachael
    June 14, 2017
    With a new author (to me, anyway), I'm never sure exactly what to expect, but I enjoyed this book. Rosalyn is fairly naive, yet resourceful--which comes in handy when her naivety gets her into trouble. Nate is a kind, gentle hero, still battling his own demons, yet a quiet, protective presence. It's both entertaining and faith-filled.The theatre plays a major role in the story, and the people that make it up are neither wholly selfish nor whitewashed to perfection--just people, both good and bad With a new author (to me, anyway), I'm never sure exactly what to expect, but I enjoyed this book. Rosalyn is fairly naive, yet resourceful--which comes in handy when her naivety gets her into trouble. Nate is a kind, gentle hero, still battling his own demons, yet a quiet, protective presence. It's both entertaining and faith-filled.The theatre plays a major role in the story, and the people that make it up are neither wholly selfish nor whitewashed to perfection--just people, both good and bad, and often a bit of both. While some practices have changed with technology, it's funny how much hasn't changed behind the scenes. It was interesting to read about the background of Gilbert and Sullivan's productions, including the secrecy revolving around Pirates of Penzance and the tactics used to keep the rights to their own productions from being pirated.Not everything is wholly wrapped up, but nothing major is missed; there are two more books to come, at which point I imagine more will be addressed. I look forward to learning more about Rosalyn's sisters, Julia and Cara!Thank you Bethany House and NetGalley for providing a free e-book; I was not required to write a positive review, and all opinions are my own.
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  • Fiction Aficionado
    June 21, 2017
    If you are a lover of historical romance who also happens to have a penchant for Gilbert & Sullivan, you are in for a real treat with this novel. Then again, even if you don’t know a bar of Gilbert & Sullivan’s music there will be plenty to please, because it’s such a unique setting and so well brought to life.Rosalyn Bernay and her sisters have been raised in George Müller’s orphanage since their mother died several years earlier. Their father—a ship’s captain—disappeared at sea two yea If you are a lover of historical romance who also happens to have a penchant for Gilbert & Sullivan, you are in for a real treat with this novel. Then again, even if you don’t know a bar of Gilbert & Sullivan’s music there will be plenty to please, because it’s such a unique setting and so well brought to life.Rosalyn Bernay and her sisters have been raised in George Müller’s orphanage since their mother died several years earlier. Their father—a ship’s captain—disappeared at sea two years before their mother’s death and is presumed dead (except by Rosalyn’s youngest sister, Cara, who still holds out hope. I'm guessing this will be a story-line that arcs across the series.)At the opening of the novel, Rosalyn is seventeen, and therefore moving on from the orphanage to take a position as a maid. Skip forward six years and she’s fleeing a wrongful accusation and being propelled on a journey not of her own choosing. But it leads her to a small London theatre, where a whole new world opens up before her.You’ve got to love a hero who’s working double-time so that his injured brother will still have a job to return to once his broken leg has healed. Nate is quiet, gentlemanly in his manner (although the soldier can come out if necessary), but really only biding his time until he is able to rejoin his regiment and return to India so that he can atone for a lapse in concentration that weighs heavily on his conscience. As Rosalyn gets to know Nate and his family, their friendship quietly blossoms into something deeper, but Rosalyn knows all too well the perils of sea travel. She won’t leave England, and nor could her heart handle a husband who would leave England. It seems they just aren’t meant to be.It was so easy to slip into the world of this novel. The details of theatre life, and even the glimpses at working-class Victorian life with Nate’s family, were abundant, and yet never overwhelming. I did feel as though the story’s momentum plateaued across the middle of the novel, and the plot surrounding the false accusation against Rosalyn had a somewhat anti-climactic resolution, but I was quite happily immersed in the story setting, so it didn’t become as much of an issue as it otherwise might have been.I would also have loved for the writing to go deeper into each character’s point of view, rather than prefacing sentences with declaratives like ‘Rosalyn noticed’ or ‘Rosalyn saw’, and for the writing to have let the characters’ actions speak for themselves rather than interpreting them or pointing them out to the reader. But overall, the writing was nicely in tune with the era and a pleasure to read.I look forward to reading Julia’s story in early 2018.I received a copy of this novel through Litfuse Publicity. This has not influenced the content of my review, which is my honest and unbiased opinion.
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  • Christine
    June 8, 2017
    This was a good book, but the title is driving me crazy. "The captain" in question is not even really in the story and it has nothing really to do with sailing. So there definitely could have been a better title. I really enjoyed the historical aspects and the character development, however, there were two sisters introduced at the beginning (who will probably get their own books later) that I would have liked to have seen more of.
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  • Michelle
    June 5, 2017
    I am loving the cover on this book! Also, the setting is so fun, I love London. As for the story line I had a difficult time fully getting into it. It was slow going for me and while I liked Nate, Rosalyn just didn't click with me. I enjoyed the history and many of the secondary characters but overall this was a slow one for me. I see others giving it rave reviews so it is all a preference thing. Three stars. "I received this book for free from Litfuse. All opinions are my own."
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  • Sandy
    June 5, 2017
    I've really been feeling a desire to read more Christian fiction lately, and I haven't been disappointed in the ones that I've chosen to read. The Captain's Daughter was no exception. This book has so many aspects that I love: Victorian England, morals and a message, plus a love story. Yet The Captain's Daughter was a good bit different than I expected it to be. Yes it takes place in Victorian England, but the majority of the plot takes place in the theater which isn't a setting that I often rea I've really been feeling a desire to read more Christian fiction lately, and I haven't been disappointed in the ones that I've chosen to read. The Captain's Daughter was no exception. This book has so many aspects that I love: Victorian England, morals and a message, plus a love story. Yet The Captain's Daughter was a good bit different than I expected it to be. Yes it takes place in Victorian England, but the majority of the plot takes place in the theater which isn't a setting that I often read about from this time period. At first I wasn't sold, but as the story went on, I became more and more interested in how the theater played into the plot. Yes this story has morals and a message, but this book shows the darker side of London's city life as well as some shady characters that aren't shy about branching out from the cultural norms to satisfy their personal desires. Yes this story has a love story, and well...I guess there's not really a but for that piece, and I wouldn't have it any other way.Rosalyn was easy to like. She grew up with her sisters in an orphanage, but again where you'd think "oh no, not an orphanage, that must have been a horrible experience." Surely the loss of her parents was the horrible experience. The orphanage, however, was a blessing. Rosalyn went into a service position at the age of seventeen unlike most novels from this time period I've read that feature ladies that come from "a good name." Her journey to London ending up as a dresser for a theater company was filled with one misfortune after another. As I mentioned earlier, The Captain's Daughter doesn't shy away from the dark places and people, and Rosalyn seems to run into just about every kind of person who would take advantage of her. And Rosalyn is quite naive, however, she manages to navigate these situations even if there were times I thought she could have opened her eyes a little more.Nate is honorable in just about every way. He's exactly what you would hope to find in a good man. He was in the army for seven years, and due to a hand injury is now only in the reserves. Yet he intends to return to service in hopes to atone for a mistake he made. He hasn't shared the whole story with any of his family so no one really understand his desire to return. In the meantime, Nate is working two jobs. He works at the stables during the day, but then he's temporarily working his brother's job as a stagehand for the theater so that Patrick doesn't lose his position while he heals from a broken leg. And it isn't just Nate. His whole family is noble. They seek to help others as often as they can. They have a few boarders living in their home. Nate does work for the parsonage and his mother and sisters work with a ladies' home.I appreciated that the Christian aspects felt genuine and not forced at all. The Captain's Daughter might have had some shady characters, but there were plenty of heartfelt characters just trying to do the right thing. I loved the mix. And I always appreciate a story that uses Christ as a moral compass without feeling like it is preaching to the reader.Favorite quotes: -"Don't be so quick to give up what God has clearly provided."-"Grab onto the opportunities that open to you."-How ironic that he could wish for her to be happy and yet be so pained to see it.-"But that still doesn't absolve me for what happened." "Perhaps not. But then, absolution doesn't come through what we can do, does it? It comes from another source. One greater than ourselves."The Captain's Daughter was a great choice for me considering I've been in a bit of a reading slump. It pulled me in quickly, but beyond that, I didn't want to put The Captain's Daughter down. I liked how this book had everything I expected but done in a way that caught me off guard. The Captain's Daughter gets 4 Stars from me. Have you read The Captain's Daughter? What did you think? Let me know!
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  • Maureen Timerman
    June 9, 2017
    The author gives us a glimpse into the world of theater back in 1870’s England, and the name drops of Gilbert and Sullivan, well known opera producers whose names live on. Right from the beginning to the end of this book the author showed us how God played a roll in this young woman’s life, she ends up in the right place at the right time. Even when danger lurks somehow she becomes aware of her plight and is given time to flee.Having grown up in a Christian orphanage Rosalyn has known her share The author gives us a glimpse into the world of theater back in 1870’s England, and the name drops of Gilbert and Sullivan, well known opera producers whose names live on. Right from the beginning to the end of this book the author showed us how God played a roll in this young woman’s life, she ends up in the right place at the right time. Even when danger lurks somehow she becomes aware of her plight and is given time to flee.Having grown up in a Christian orphanage Rosalyn has known her share of hardship, and finally ends up all alone in London, then becoming penniless and fleeing from a crime she never committed. She finally ends up at the theater and ends up as a dresser, right spot at the right time, definitely!Then a meeting with a man whom is carrying his own demons, but has such a huge heart, Nate, he is working in his injured brother’s place to hold his job. Coincidence he is there with Rosalyn, don’t think so, but will these two be able to make a connection despite there different goals.The author has given the opening for a new novel to come, first with sister Julia, a woman determined to break into a man’s world and become a doctor, and then I’m sure we will be seeing younger sister Cara.I received this book through Litfuse Publicity Book Tours, and was not required to give a positive review
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  • Amy
    June 16, 2017
    The Captain's Daughter is the first installment to Jennifer Delamere's new series, London Beginnings. After having experienced hard times, Rosalyn Bernay is lead to a theater to work and dreams to one day of becoming a star on stage. While recovering from a wound received during his time in the army, Nate Moran, takes a position at the same theater where Rosalyn is working. He is bitter about his life and hopes to escape back to the Army after he heals. That is, until he meets Roslyn!I thought C The Captain's Daughter is the first installment to Jennifer Delamere's new series, London Beginnings. After having experienced hard times, Rosalyn Bernay is lead to a theater to work and dreams to one day of becoming a star on stage. While recovering from a wound received during his time in the army, Nate Moran, takes a position at the same theater where Rosalyn is working. He is bitter about his life and hopes to escape back to the Army after he heals. That is, until he meets Roslyn!I thought Captain's Daughter to be a pretty good historical fiction. I enjoyed Rosalyn and love how she has been able to overcome her hardships and continue to follow her dreams. The story is sweet, delightful, and entertaining, that includes faith and inspiration. There is a powerful message that all can learn from.I recommend this book and would give it four out of five stars.I received this book from the author, but was not required to write a review. This review is 100% my own honest opinion.
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  • Christian Fiction Addiction
    June 7, 2017
    Starring a courageous and likeable heroine and filled with intriguing historical details, "The Captain's Daughter" is a well-crafted addition to the historical fiction genre. Rosalyn and Nate are characters that you will enjoy getting to know, with their own history of struggles, temptations similar to those you and I face even though this story takes place in the 1800s, and a romance that is sweet to behold. The story flows well and there are many interesting subplots that weave together nicely Starring a courageous and likeable heroine and filled with intriguing historical details, "The Captain's Daughter" is a well-crafted addition to the historical fiction genre. Rosalyn and Nate are characters that you will enjoy getting to know, with their own history of struggles, temptations similar to those you and I face even though this story takes place in the 1800s, and a romance that is sweet to behold. The story flows well and there are many interesting subplots that weave together nicely into a unified whole. And I absolutely love the historical setting this novel takes place in! Having a mom myself who has sung in the opera, the glimpse into the lives of Gilbert and Sullivan and the beginning of their fame was truly fascinating to read about. I quite liked watching how Rosalyn encountered the theatre and found safety there while fleeing rumours she's a thief. Further, I have always enjoyed learning about George Müller and his orphanage in the 1800s, and so I thought it added a unique flavour to the book that it features characters who grew up in that orphanage and learned about the amazing way the Müller's trusted God to provide. This theme permeates the novel, and adds a depth to the story in the midst of Rosalyn's trials that she faces, reminding us that God will provide for our everything need, and bring good from the hardest of circumstance in our lives.Fans of novels that take place in interesting historical settings will love "The Captain's Daughter". And, once you have devoured this story you will be eager to find out what happens next in this "London Beginnings" series. I award this book a rating of 4 out of 5 stars.Book has been provided courtesy of Baker Publishing Group and Graf-Martin Communications, Inc.
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  • Davalynn Spencer
    June 3, 2017
    Author Jennifer Delamere takes the reader into London's world of theatre in 1879 - with all the hovering danger and unexpected traumas one might expect of that era. Everything goes wrong for the heroine, Rosalyn Bernay, and yet an unseen hand defends her. Sometimes that hand is quite visible and attached to the most unexpected people. One, military man Nate Moran, has his own demons to battle. He doesn't need the distraction of attraction.
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  • Loraine Nunley
    June 28, 2017
    This was a very enjoyable read. I loved the slow romance between Nate and Rosalyn. I was also intrigued by the theater world that they find themselves in. I am looking forward to reading the upcoming books in this series. I received this book complimentary as a participant of the Litfuse Blog Tour. I was not required to give a positive review. All of the opinions I have expressed here are my own.
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  • Jamie Holloway
    June 25, 2017
    I enjoyed this novel.
  • Kyree Hummel
    June 1, 2017
    [Note: This book was provided free of charge by Bethany House Publishing. All thoughts and opinions are my own.]THE CAPTAIN’S DAUGHTERBy: Jennifer DelamereAcquired: Bethany Publishing HousePublisher: Bethany Publishing HouseLanguage: EnglishSetting: An 1880 Victorian romance in London, England.The Story: Rosalyn Bernay an orphan since the age of 9 learned both the kindness and cruelty of England after she aged out of the orphanage she lived at with her two sisters. Mile’s away working as a servi [Note: This book was provided free of charge by Bethany House Publishing. All thoughts and opinions are my own.]THE CAPTAIN’S DAUGHTERBy: Jennifer DelamereAcquired: Bethany Publishing HousePublisher: Bethany Publishing HouseLanguage: EnglishSetting: An 1880 Victorian romance in London, England.The Story: Rosalyn Bernay an orphan since the age of 9 learned both the kindness and cruelty of England after she aged out of the orphanage she lived at with her two sisters. Mile’s away working as a service maid or rather a companion she began to enjoy life outside of the orphanage with her employer Mrs. Haufman. Until one day her world starts to crumble, Rosalyn escapes her occupation and runs off to see her sister in a few towns over. As she arrived at the train station her employer right behind she decides to hop on a train to London to escape her sketchy past. When she arrived in London, she is then robbed, tricked, and ends up penniless outside of a theater. However, every time things went wrong, Nate Moran is right there trying to help her.Nate Moran, a trained soldier in the British army, returns home after a recovering from an injury he got while on orders in India. As he heals, he works tirelessly to provide for his family as a hand stage and a worker at the stables. As he returned to London he finds Rosalyn Bernay, each time she had found herself in danger, Nate was near concerned about her wellbeing. Nate had a sketchy past love that caused him to be fearful of Rosalyn. Although he couldn’t help the growing feelings, he felt for her. Nate pushes aside the feelings he felt towards Rosalyn and focused on healing to return to India and be as far away from Rosalyn as possible.Rosalyn believed that God will always provide what she needs. Nate believed in God but, his troubled past made it difficult for Nate to rely on Him. Maybe, just maybe Rosalyn’s belief that God will always provide what she needs…could be Nate Moran.The Review:I loved reading this book! The beginning could be misleading from the actual story. It started off in Dartmoor Coast, 1873 outside of the Orphanage Rosalyn was leaving to start her life as a maid. The author then introduced her sister’s Car and Julia, Rosalyn being the oldest. One may begin to assume the story could be about the sisters and their struggles that brought them to the Orphanage but, the book included much MORE than I could handle. Time skipped into her escape from her employer. I immediately was drawn into the story; many questions were popping into my head. So the story is about the eldest sister? Why is she running? I loved the time jump. It began to get more interesting very quickly! As she began to escape, it started Nate’s story. What I found most that I loved about reading this story, how Jennifer included the presence of God. In every aspect of this story, God was there, and he was beautiful, understanding, and forgiving. Despite the trouble, she faced while in London, God indeed provide and she found herself in the home of Nate Moran himself as well as his family. Through God’s work, Rosalyn found work as a dresser in a Theatre where she found her dream career. There wasn’t anything I didn’t like in this book. The exciting parts ended tastefully in this story, Nate’s peace with his past, Rosalyn clears up her predicament, because of His guidance. I also enjoyed how the women were described as respectable, innocent, women. Despite the circumstances, life has provided because of the grace of God all was healed, and life was prosperous. Nate and Rosalyn’s relationship grew into an extraordinary one. Jennifer did wonderfully allow their relationship to grow slowly instead of an instant starstruck kind of love. Don’t get me wrong, attraction and feelings were there but, it evolved over time rather than a typical romance novel that happens instantaneously. Nate presented himself in Rosalyn’s life as a knight in shining armor trying to protect her from the rough streets of London. Despite some setbacks and finally ending at the home of Nate Moran thanks to his joyous Godly family their relationship blooms. Rosalyn innocence made it difficult to understand her feelings for Nate. And Nate’s past heartbreak made it hard for him to accept a new woman in his life. Through their moments together as they walked home, at the theater, and the little ways Nate shows his love for Rosalyn it was throw music where she was able to see his soul. From then on she knew she was in love with the Celtic soldier. The suspense built up to their first kiss on the last two pages of the book was FANTASTIC! It was what a noble, respectable gentleman and lady would act. It was refreshing to read a romance filled with the promise of forever without the explicit descriptions of anything happening more than simple conversation and admiration. WELL DONE MAAM!Rate: 5/5My reaction:http://gph.is/203CRf0
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  • Nathan Albright
    May 24, 2017
    [Note: This book was provided free of charge by Bethany House Publishing. All thoughts and opinions are my own.]I am of two minds regarding this book. On the one hand, there were many aspects of this book that were delightful, especially the winsome nature of its heroine, Rosalyn Bernay, and the way that she finds a place for herself within the world of Gilbert & Sullivan after having been raised as an orphan [1] in a Christian orphanage. That said, there were many parts of this book that we [Note: This book was provided free of charge by Bethany House Publishing. All thoughts and opinions are my own.]I am of two minds regarding this book. On the one hand, there were many aspects of this book that were delightful, especially the winsome nature of its heroine, Rosalyn Bernay, and the way that she finds a place for herself within the world of Gilbert & Sullivan after having been raised as an orphan [1] in a Christian orphanage. That said, there were many parts of this book that were absolutely infuriating, including the way that the author glosses over the problem of abortion, presents Gilbert & Sullivan as Christians and not as fairly hypocritical people [2], and has an infuriating and entirely unnecessary love triangle where the author goes to considerable lengths to make the heroine mousy enough to accept the attention of two very different men and to unnecessarily and excessively complicate what would already be a difficult courtship between her and the appealing Nate Moran. Someone needs to tell writers of contemporary romances that love triangles are not necessary elements in order to keep up the intrigue of a relationship. Sometimes, as in this case, it merely makes some characters less appealing without making the novel as a whole more interesting.Without giving away too many spoilers, this novel is filled with impossible amounts of divine providence. For example, we begin the novel with some looks at the heroine and her two younger sisters as they face life as orphans before we see the heroine on the run from a lascivious employer and trapped in London after being taken in by the madam of a whorehouse after a meet cute (!?) at the train station with the hero. By the time the two meet again at the Savoy Theater where Rosalyn finds a job as a dresser while Nate fills in for his injured brother, it is fairly obvious that the novel is going to play up divine providence in order to explain ridiculous coincidence. Then, after signposting the romance obviously enough for me to see it loud and clear, the author spends a great deal of time exploring the seedier side of the theater and building up Tony as a rival to Nate in fairly cliched fashion. The novel as a whole features a great deal of humor, a strong concern for justice and truth, and plenty of witty conversations.Overall, my impression of this novel is somewhat mixed. It appears as if the author spent much of her energy building together a few of her favorite aspects of late Victorian English life, such as the orphanage the heroine grew up in as well as the world of Gilbert and Sullivan and the larger-than-life personalities that inhabited that stage. Having created that world and an appealing hero and heroine, the author made the aspects of divine providence too glaring and copied too many tropes of contemporary romance, and added too many subplots--like the heroine's younger sister Julia and her desire to be a medical missionary to Africa and a failed quest to recover a lost watch that is never resolved. Ultimately this is a novel that can certainly be enjoyed, but it is also not special enough to rise above the general body of historical romances that wrestle with the world of faith and culture. It is the sort of book I was happy enough to read for a couple of hours for free, and the sort of book I would not be upset if someone gave me as a present, but not the sort of book I would go out of my way to read at all.[1] See, for example:https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2015...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2014...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2013...[2] See, for example:https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2014...
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  • Kathleen (Kat) Smith
    June 22, 2017
    Love great theater plays like Gilbert and Sullivan's? Or what about the works of George Mueller? How about a love of Victorian England? Can't decide? Pick up The Captain's Daughter by Jennifer Delamere and you won't have to choose. You get them all in this wonderful Christian Historical Romance, the first novel in the London Beginnings series and one you'll want to watch for as consecutive sequels are released. Rosalyn Bernay is forced to flee after the position she had working for a wealthy fam Love great theater plays like Gilbert and Sullivan's? Or what about the works of George Mueller? How about a love of Victorian England? Can't decide? Pick up The Captain's Daughter by Jennifer Delamere and you won't have to choose. You get them all in this wonderful Christian Historical Romance, the first novel in the London Beginnings series and one you'll want to watch for as consecutive sequels are released. Rosalyn Bernay is forced to flee after the position she had working for a wealthy family, suddenly calls her reputation into question when she is accused of being a thief in order to comply to the whims of a promiscuous husband with questionable loyalties to his new wife. Knowing that this ploy has worked for him in the past, he was expecting Rosalyn to run and now vows to hunt her down before she can get too far away. This leaves Rosalyn with very little alternatives as she finds he is mere moments from discovering her, she boards a train bound for London without knowing what she will do when she arrives. She falls prey to some savory characters who take advantage of her uncertainty of what to do. She barely escapes working in a brothel and soon finds herself penniless when a street urchin steals her reticule. She finds herself in a fortuitous circumstance when she is believed to be the newly hired cleaning lady for the theater. She goes along with the ruse and discovers since the former girl doesn't show, they are willing to take a chance on Rosalyn. Yet it seems like God's plan for her life continues as she finds lodgings with the head actress and protection under a handsome solider/stage hand Nate Moran. However when the landlady threatens to toss Rosalyn out after learning she had planned to stay, Nate offers her a room in the large home with his family. It is there he learns more about her plot, her upbringing and her passion for singing and the theater. Now if he can only keep his thoughts clear, he might just finish his temporary stint filling in for his brother Patrick who was injured at work. He has resolved to return to the Army and leave for India as soon as Patrick is able to return and that means he can't have feelings of anything beyond friendship for Rosalyn. I received The Captain's Daughter by Jennifer Delamere compliments of Bethany House Publishers and Litfuse Publicity. This is such a delightful novel because as a reader, you truly get a potpourri of surprises tucked inside as you work your way though the early stages of theater, as well as the life of a homeless person on the dark and dangerous streets of England in the late 1800's. This novel made me want to keep the musical scores of Gilbert and Sullivan as my background music while enjoying the continuing escapes between Rosalyn and Nate. I can't wait to see where this series will pick up in the sequels and hope that readers get more insight into the lives of Rosalyn's sisters next. For me, well worth an evening enjoying this book from cover to cover and worthy of 5 out of 5 stars in my opinion.
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  • Lynda Edwards
    June 26, 2017
    I enjoy historical fiction—the chance to experience the past with people who could have lived it is irresistible to me. These particular characters immediately wound their way into my heart from the first pages and I imagined myself in their world of make believe for a few adventurous days.Rosalyn is the oldest of three orphaned sisters, trying to make her way in a world that can turn from tranquil to dangerous in the time it takes to glance the wrong way. Her backstory is heartbreaking and her I enjoy historical fiction—the chance to experience the past with people who could have lived it is irresistible to me. These particular characters immediately wound their way into my heart from the first pages and I imagined myself in their world of make believe for a few adventurous days.Rosalyn is the oldest of three orphaned sisters, trying to make her way in a world that can turn from tranquil to dangerous in the time it takes to glance the wrong way. Her backstory is heartbreaking and her innocence makes people want to protect her, or take advantage of her. Nate is a stubborn man who firmly locks himself into an idea, reluctant to let it go. His tenacity makes him a sympathetic character, however, because it also makes him fiercely loyal to his family. There is much to recommend Nate, and the mild brooding makes him a bit mysterious and even more appealing. Because Rosalyn and her sisters are raised in George Muller’s orphanage, the Christian aspects of this story are strong. Relying on God in complete faith astounds me, and though these characters are fictional, the Muller orphanage and the story of how it was funded is not. I loved how the tale incorporated the history but it remains largely backstory—it fleshes out the characters some without taking up too much time or feeling like a lecture.The historical detail is interesting and helped the setting be more realistic. Reading about the limelights and their volatility was fascinating, and without even trying, Delamere helps the reader better understand where the phrase about “being in the limelight” comes from. It also gives me a whole new appreciation for modern lighting and safety procedures in the workplace. This novel also does a good job of highlighting how vulnerable women of the past were; even arriving in London unescorted puts our heroine in a precarious position. Other women are endangered by their employers or even those who admire them and are unwilling to maintain proper boundaries. Reputations are still paramount in this time period, and even the appearance of impropriety could throw women into a lifetime of extremely limited options, often ones a woman would never consider outside of desperation.Infused with some humor to help lighten the sometimes difficult narrative, I highly recommend Jennifer Delamere’s writing, especially this latest novel. Themes of forgiveness (including of self), familial love, abandonment, and help for the less fortunate are explored with some depth in this relatable and engaging tale. This is the start of her sophomore series and I look forward to reading the following books, as well as her earlier works that I have missed. I received a free copy of this book from the author and the publisher, but no compensation for this review. I was not required to write a favorable one and the opinions expressed are both honest and my own.
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  • Sherri Smith
    June 28, 2017
    The cover of this book is what drew me into selecting it to read. I have never read Jennifer Delamere before and was intrigued with what type of story she would provide for me.The setting of this book is in London in 1879, and it starts off with Rosalyn Bernay leaving the orphanage where she lived with her two sisters. She is headed off into the world to make her own way. Of course, being of age to leave the orphanage is also a nudge for her to leave. So in this first chapter, we learn of her tw The cover of this book is what drew me into selecting it to read. I have never read Jennifer Delamere before and was intrigued with what type of story she would provide for me.The setting of this book is in London in 1879, and it starts off with Rosalyn Bernay leaving the orphanage where she lived with her two sisters. She is headed off into the world to make her own way. Of course, being of age to leave the orphanage is also a nudge for her to leave. So in this first chapter, we learn of her two sisters and their personalities. From there, we move six years beyond, with Rosalyn trying to escape a home that has accused her of stealing.Then into the picture is Nate Moran. He is hoping to prove to his regiment that he is fit for duty, and to continue his duties in India. In the meantime, he is staying with his family, and taking over a job for his brother at the theater as a stage hand. There, he comes into contact with Rosalyn.To be honest, I had such high hopes for this book. The cover intrigued me, the back cover intrigued me, but it failed to live on it's hype. To me, the prologue to where Rosalyn was leaving the orphanage was unnecessary. The only reason it was there, was to introduce us to her two sisters and their personalities, but because they weren't a part of her story, especially the first part of the book, this could have been weaved in much later. I think the prologue should have been perhaps a reason for why Rosalyn was leaving her employer. I didn't feel like that was really and truly explained. My pity in Rosalyn leaving her previous employer was not there. Yes, I was told why, but my empathy for her just was not there.But beyond that, my interest in this book just dabbled at the surface. I really and truly did want to like it, to find myself diving into it and loving it. But I didn't. This very well could be a personal choice, but sometimes it's a bit off-putting when all other reviews you read give the book high ratings. As for if I will read another book by Delamere, there is a possibility. I don't think the book was terrible, it just bored me a bit and I couldn't really connect with the characters. The main characters. I wanted to love them. I will acknowledge, that the title Captain's Daughter led me into thinking it was about a sea captain, especially with her standing before a river. It isn't, but that's my fault for making an assumption. I even told my mom about this book before I received it, that it was about a sea captain. I was wrong.I received this book complimentary from Bethany House Publishing. All thoughts and opinions are my own
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  • Mimi
    June 21, 2017
    As a first introduction to Jennifer Delamere's writing, I have to say, it was a delightful experience! The Captain's Daughter starts off with the reader getting a quick introduction to three sisters: Cara, Rosalyn, and Julia Bernay. The sisters have had it rough, but they're looking towards the future hopeful.Rosalyn's situation starts off with promise, but when we meet her, things have clearly gone south. Circumstances have her landing in London, and things get even worse, which doesn't seem po As a first introduction to Jennifer Delamere's writing, I have to say, it was a delightful experience! The Captain's Daughter starts off with the reader getting a quick introduction to three sisters: Cara, Rosalyn, and Julia Bernay. The sisters have had it rough, but they're looking towards the future hopeful.Rosalyn's situation starts off with promise, but when we meet her, things have clearly gone south. Circumstances have her landing in London, and things get even worse, which doesn't seem possible. God is at work in the midst of it, and provides at just the right time. With the author's writing, you can sense the turmoil Rosalyn's going through, but you also want to help her out by steering her in a different direction. lolWe're introduced to Nate Moran at the start of the story as well. Poor guy, trying to help Rosalyn, ends up not being so helpful. Thankfully soon after they're able to meet properly and under better circumstances. Nate seems to feel a pull towards Rosalyn, but with being burned once before and planning to head back to India, he tries to keep an emotional distance from Rosalyn.I was really pulled in by the storyline of the opera house. It was fun recognizing names of the people Ms. Delamere wrote about like Gilbert & Sullivan and George Müller. I think because the story covered such a short period of time the reader is easily pulled into the theater world of the story. There were characters I enjoyed like Jessie and Mrs. Hill as well as ones who rubbed me the wrong way like Tony Hayes. It was fun also getting to know Nate's whole family. Makes me hope the author writes more about her, although I'm hoping the next book in the series will either be about Julia or Cara.As for the summary, I was a little confused as to the "talented musician and singer" part. Rosalyn sings a sweet lullaby to her sister in the prologue, but you don't really get that she's grown up to be that person. It seems like she mostly would sing to herself since she spends years as a companion to a widow. When she sings for the first time for fun, you wouldn't think she was a seasoned musician and singer, but that's not really how she's written in the story. As she continues to work at the theater, you can see her natural talent shine through and her joy being part of it all.If you're looking for an easy summer read, this should definitely be on your reading list. I finished it in a day! I'm already looking forward to book two in the London Beginnings series!I received this book for review from Litfuse Publicity.
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  • Gayle Pace
    June 13, 2017
    MY THOUGHTSSetting: London, 1879How tempting and yet, scary it would be to leave everything you know and love to look for a new and different life in a place that is bursting at the seams with new adventures. But new adventures and new things bring about the possibility of trouble, of danger, some of which was never thought of. The past can be scary but the future can be even scarier. The author shows reminds us that life has a tendency to step in, even when it isn't wanted and that is just what MY THOUGHTSSetting: London, 1879How tempting and yet, scary it would be to leave everything you know and love to look for a new and different life in a place that is bursting at the seams with new adventures. But new adventures and new things bring about the possibility of trouble, of danger, some of which was never thought of. The past can be scary but the future can be even scarier. The author shows reminds us that life has a tendency to step in, even when it isn't wanted and that is just what happened to Rosalyn Bernay. Things happened, she had no say in and she was left without any money and all alone, in London. Rosalyn has many talents, of which being a musician and singer and she gets the chance to put those talents to use in a theater in London. But it seems like the past is just a few steps behind her.When backstage Rosalyn meets Nate Moran who is filling in for his brother who broke his leg. Nate was forced to leave his regiment in India with a hand injury, but is just biding his time until he can return.The author gives the reader a good group of characters that have real emotions and those emotions stir up the reader's emotions. We're given one person who has a new life in this theatre and we have one who wants nothing more than to leave it. Are these two characters birds of a feather or are they total opposites? You find yourself feeling everything the characters are feeling. You can relate since they have what the reader can feel as true emotions, true wants and needs. They are survivors, especially Rosalyn. But can two people who want two different things in life come together and find romance? Or will they go their separate ways? Will Rosalyn become a theatre favorite and star? You are drawn into the characters also because they have baggage, which we all do, but you can relate to characters better when you can realize what demons and fears they are trying hard to face. These characters were like regular people not just characters, you could feel like you knew them. I found myself wanting more at the end of the book and whenever that happens to me, I know I've totally enjoyed the book. So if you like historical romance with a real feel for the characters than pick up a copy and try it for yourself. I received a copy of this book from the author and voluntarily decided to review it for Bethany House Book Reviewers. I was under no obligation to give a positive review.
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  • Lisa Johnson
    June 28, 2017
    Title: The Captain’s Daughter (London Beginnings)Author: Jennifer DelamerePages: 352Year: 2017Publisher: Bethany House PublishersMy rating 5 out of 5 stars.One of the strongest reasons to read this story is to learn about the orphanage George Mueller ran in London. The man would never ask for donations or let anyone but God know what was needed in order to care for the children. Never did God fail to provide in miraculous ways for the orphanage. This is the first novel I have read where this tru Title: The Captain’s Daughter (London Beginnings)Author: Jennifer DelamerePages: 352Year: 2017Publisher: Bethany House PublishersMy rating 5 out of 5 stars.One of the strongest reasons to read this story is to learn about the orphanage George Mueller ran in London. The man would never ask for donations or let anyone but God know what was needed in order to care for the children. Never did God fail to provide in miraculous ways for the orphanage. This is the first novel I have read where this true historical figure is part of the plot.The story focuses on three girls who are siblings and find themselves orphaned after their father fails to return from a trip and their mother succumbs to an illness. The oldest is Rosalyn Bernay who is about to leave the orphanage and work at the home of a wealthy woman. Her sisters will remain at the orphanage until their age makes it necessary to begin looking for employment and a place to live. The sisters are as different as night and day; yet, they love each other and long to stay close since they are all they have left in this world. Rosalyn must flee her job after being accused by the wealthy woman’s husband. Where she first ends up puts her in the clutches of a police officer. From there, the story just continues to grow more interesting with a strong theme of faith from beginning to end. The second sister, Julia, comes into the story for a short while. Maybe we get a peek into what her future entails to lay the basis for her story in a future tale. The youngest sister, Cara, is now employed too though what’s to become of her may be the material in a book later in the series.I thoroughly enjoyed Jennifer Delamere’s writing and storytelling and think many will enjoy reading about George Mueller and the fictional character Rosalyn in the first book of the London Beginnings series. I hope the second installment is released soon and anticipate another wonderful tale filled with the strong theme of living a life with faith!Disclosure of Material Connection: I received one or more of the products or services mentioned above for free in the hope that I would mention it on my blog. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will be good for my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255. “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
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  • The Books and Biscuits Blog
    June 6, 2017
    The Captain’s Daughter – Jennifer Delamere (4 Stars)The Captain’s Daughter is the first novel in the London Beginnings series by Jennifer Delamere. Rosalyn Bernay grew up in a British orphanage before becoming the companion of a wealthy woman. However, Rosalyn must flee her situation when the woman’s new husband accuses her of stealing priceless family items. Stranded in London without her luggage, Rosalyn fortunately lands a job at a theater featuring Gilbert and Sullivan’s most recent comic op The Captain’s Daughter – Jennifer Delamere (4 Stars)The Captain’s Daughter is the first novel in the London Beginnings series by Jennifer Delamere. Rosalyn Bernay grew up in a British orphanage before becoming the companion of a wealthy woman. However, Rosalyn must flee her situation when the woman’s new husband accuses her of stealing priceless family items. Stranded in London without her luggage, Rosalyn fortunately lands a job at a theater featuring Gilbert and Sullivan’s most recent comic opera. Along the way, she encounters Nate Moran, a wounded veteran who splits his time between his own job at a local stable and working backstage at the theater to maintain his injured brother’s position. Nate insists that his time in London is only temporary, as he plans to return to his military career in India, once his own battle wounds heal. Together, Nate and Rosalyn navigate the ever-dramatic life of the theater, even as they discover new possibilities for their lives and careers.Ms. Delamere brings a new voice to Christian historical fiction, building on an ever-expanding number of recently-released historical novels set in Britain. Fans of stories set in the Victorian era will be thrilled to read this tale of life in Gilbert and Sullivan’s theater.Overall, I quite enjoyed reading The Captain’s Daughter. In general, Ms. Delamere develops a plotline that feels surprisingly different from many other recent historical novels set in Britain. Her focus on Gilbert and Sullivan’s theater and the behind-the-scenes moments featuring their productions are a true highlight of this work. Additionally, readers looking for pleasant Christian historical fiction will find that many of the characters remain true to the nature of the genre, although they may not be overly complex and developed. Without providing any spoilers, I would have liked to see a stronger ending to the novel, as it felt somewhat truncated and underdeveloped in comparison to the rest of the story. As this is the first novel in the London Beginnings series, I am curious to see how Ms. Delamere continues this set of novels and which characters she chooses to develop further.Special thanks to NetGalley and Bethany House Publishers for the advanced copy of The Captain’s Daughter!Thanks!Brittany at the Books and Biscuits BlogPS. To see the full review, please visit http://booksandbiscuits.com/blog/2017.... Thanks!
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  • Jalynn Patterson
    June 8, 2017
    About the Book:When a series of circumstances beyond her control leave Rosalyn Bernay alone and penniless in London, she chances upon a job backstage at a theater which is presenting the most popular show in London. A talented musician and singer, she feels immediately at home and soon becomes enthralled with the idea of pursuing a career on the stage.An injury during a skirmish in India has forced Nate Moran out of the army until he recovers. Filling his time at a stable of horses for hire in L About the Book:When a series of circumstances beyond her control leave Rosalyn Bernay alone and penniless in London, she chances upon a job backstage at a theater which is presenting the most popular show in London. A talented musician and singer, she feels immediately at home and soon becomes enthralled with the idea of pursuing a career on the stage.An injury during a skirmish in India has forced Nate Moran out of the army until he recovers. Filling his time at a stable of horses for hire in London, he has also spent the past two months working nights as a stagehand, filling in for his injured brother. Although he’s glad he can help his family through a tough time, he is counting the days until he can rejoin his regiment. London holds bitter memories for him that he is anxious to escape. But then he meets the beautiful woman who has found a new lease on life in the very place Nate can’t wait to leave behind.My Review:The Captain's Daughter is all love story and tragedy and it is okay by me. A great way to spend a hot summers day under a shade tree reading all about London. When I was a young girl I just knew that London was cold and foggy all the time mostly because of all the movies I watched that took place in London. So for me a book like this on a hot day is just perfect! The Captain's Daughter is about a young woman by the name of Rosalyn Bernay, that has found herself in the need of money and rather quickly. She finds a job in the theater which is a place that she feels quite at home because she has a talent all her own. She becomes fascinated with all the talent there. What fiction story would be perfect without some love and romance? That's where Nate comes into the picture. He is in the regiment and it is something he takes very seriously. He is recovering from an injury and wants to get back at it as soon as possible. He is very anxious to get out of London but soon fate steps in to change his plans because he meets the lovely Rosalyn Bernay. After meeting this beautiful woman, she has him second guessing everything. A sweet lovely romance set in London in the late 1800's. Perfect read for the beach!**Disclosure** This book was sent to me free of charge for my honest review from the author. All opinions are my own.
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  • Deana Dick
    June 22, 2017
    From the moment I started reading this amazing story I was captivated by the authors words. She was able to transport me to Victorian London with her dazzling descriptions and realism. I could feel the cold nights as our main character wandered the streets. There were times I could feel Rosalyn's fear as she felt helpless and alone. Rosalyn finds herself desperate for help and I found her to be a bit gullible at times. She seemed to believe people to easily. I loved how the author allowed reader From the moment I started reading this amazing story I was captivated by the authors words. She was able to transport me to Victorian London with her dazzling descriptions and realism. I could feel the cold nights as our main character wandered the streets. There were times I could feel Rosalyn's fear as she felt helpless and alone. Rosalyn finds herself desperate for help and I found her to be a bit gullible at times. She seemed to believe people to easily. I loved how the author allowed readers to see Rosalyn as a vulnerable young woman hoping to better herself. I can't imagine what it must feel like to be homeless. Rosalyn has quite an adventure with a few let's just say unsavory people.I absolutely adored Nate from the minute he was introduced. He is a gentleman and has a heart of gold. His family takes Rosalyn in and I loved how they made her feel welcomed. Nate has to come to terms with something that keeps him isolated at times. I was glad when the author finally revealed what it was. It made Nate more real easier to sympathize with him. My favorite part of the story has to be about the theater. What excitement it must have been to me a star on stage during that time period. Rosalyn finds work at the theater but perhaps not exactly what she had always dreamed of. The details of the London Theater were very intriguing. Can you imagine the chaos backstage as the show is about to start? The wardrobe had to be ready and the makeup perfect. I could feel the nervousness of the people as the opening note started. The story was good but maybe slow in some areas. I did like the attraction that was developing between Nate and Rosalyn. Will Rosalyn find happiness in London? What will Nate decide about his future? . Overall the book was good and has some wonderful lessons about trust, faith and family. I received a copy of this book from LitFuse. The review is my own opinion.
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  • Connie Fischer
    June 6, 2017
    Dartmoor Coast, England - 1873Rosalyn Bernay, 17, and her sister, Cara, 13, are finding comfort in a Rosalyn singing a lullaby their mother used to sing to them. It is time for Rosalyn to leave the George Muller orphanage and make her own way in life as a maid to Mrs. Huffman in London. Their bossy sister, Julia, will now be the one looking after Cara. The girls went to the orphanage after their mother died and their father never returned from a sea voyage leaving them to wonder if he is dead or Dartmoor Coast, England - 1873Rosalyn Bernay, 17, and her sister, Cara, 13, are finding comfort in a Rosalyn singing a lullaby their mother used to sing to them. It is time for Rosalyn to leave the George Muller orphanage and make her own way in life as a maid to Mrs. Huffman in London. Their bossy sister, Julia, will now be the one looking after Cara. The girls went to the orphanage after their mother died and their father never returned from a sea voyage leaving them to wonder if he is dead or alive.1879Rosalyn is leaving a job where where she has worked for the last six years. She is heading to the safety of her sister, Julia, who is now a nurse in Bristol. When she arrives in London, a woman tricks her into staying in a brothel she calls a boarding house. Fleeing, she finds herself at a theater where she gets a job as a dresser. Nate Moran and his former commander, Colonel Gwynn, have arrived at their destination after a long carriage ride. The Colonel, although older than Nate, has decided he would like to return to India and would like to see Nate marry and bring his wife there too. However, Nate has promised his brother that he will spend some time in London at the theater where he will take over his brother’s job until he heals after an accident.Rosalyn and Nate become friends as they work together. Soon, it is discovered that Rosalyn has a lovely singing voice and gets her chance to sing on stage. As time comes for Nate to make a decision whether to journey to India, he must decide about a possible future he and Rosalyn may have together.This story was OK but it simply did not have enough substance to draw me in and keep my interest. I found it rather boring and simply not to my taste. I am sure that other readers will like it. Jennifer Delamere is a good author and I have enjoyed her books in the past. Unfortunately, this one is not a favorite.Copy provided by NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review.
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  • Perrianne
    June 15, 2017
    Rosalyn Bernay was raised in an orphanage along with her 2 sisters in England in the late 1800's. Rosalyn ages out of the orphanage and takes a job as a ladies maid. That job eventually becomes problematic, as her employers new husband is set out to ruin her reputation along with false accusations of theft. She flees on foot with little more than a carpetbag and a family heirloom. It's a mad dash through the streets of Linden to the train station. The chase is on as she finally arrives in London Rosalyn Bernay was raised in an orphanage along with her 2 sisters in England in the late 1800's. Rosalyn ages out of the orphanage and takes a job as a ladies maid. That job eventually becomes problematic, as her employers new husband is set out to ruin her reputation along with false accusations of theft. She flees on foot with little more than a carpetbag and a family heirloom. It's a mad dash through the streets of Linden to the train station. The chase is on as she finally arrives in London via train, although not her intended destination. After spending the night in a questionable locale, she flees with nothing but the clothes on her back. She winds up in the theater district and chances upon a job in the theater backstage. Of course you have the good guy/bad guy potential romance. But Rosalyn truly loves being part of the theater and is actually quite a talented singer. It is a good fit for her and she truly enjoys being involved with the cast and chorus of the most popular show in the city.Although I am normally not a big fan of historical fiction, this one really moved well and kept me guessing. I read over 120 pages the first day I began reading. A few things fell into place a bit too easily like finding a job and a place to stay. I also really wonder about the title, as her father is a sea captain but has been missing at sea for years (thus the reason the sisters were in the orphanage in the first place). Her father is mentioned briefly in the beginning but is almost never mentioned again. I am quite sure her next book in the series will be about her sister Julia, who is studying to be a physician - in 1800's England! I intend to read the next book in the series.I received this book complimentary from Bethany House. This review is completely my own and is not in any way influenced by Bethany House.
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  • Becky
    June 25, 2017
    The opening chapters of The Captain's Daughter find former lady's companion Rosalyn fleeing from her employer's roguish husband, mistakenly winding up in a brothel, losing all her belongings, and accidentally finding a job at a London theater. And that's all really just set-up to the real story about Rosalyn's life at the theater and her romance with Nate!I wish the pace at the beginning of the novel hadn't been quite so frantic because the rest of the story felt pretty slow to me. I also felt t The opening chapters of The Captain's Daughter find former lady's companion Rosalyn fleeing from her employer's roguish husband, mistakenly winding up in a brothel, losing all her belongings, and accidentally finding a job at a London theater. And that's all really just set-up to the real story about Rosalyn's life at the theater and her romance with Nate!I wish the pace at the beginning of the novel hadn't been quite so frantic because the rest of the story felt pretty slow to me. I also felt that some of the resolutions (with Rosalyn's employer and with Nate) were a little too neat and convenient, while other plot lines (involving the woman who ran the brothel and the mystery of what happened to Rosalyn's father) were dropped completely.I did enjoy Rosalyn's interactions with Nate, and his family was fabulous—especially his brother Patrick and sister Mary. I definitely felt the draw between Rosalyn and Nate, and I enjoyed watching them get closer to one another.The highlight of this novel for me was the time spent at the theater. HMS Pinafore is playing at the theater Rosalyn and Nate work at, and Gilbert and Sullivan even make cameo appearances in the story! The novel is set during the writing and early production of Pirates of Penzance, and "I Am the Very Model of a Modern Major-General" ran on a loop through my head basically the entire time I was reading this book.While The Captain's Daughter wasn't an "unputdownable" read, I did enjoy it, and I especially liked the unique theater setting.Disclosure of material connection: I received a copy of this book from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review, and the opinions expressed are my own.
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  • Rebecca
    June 24, 2017
    " . . daydreams turned to sad longing when the years passed and their father never came home." Rosalyn Bernay and her two sisters were deeply impacted by the mysterious disappearance of their father at sea and subsequent death of their mother. Raised for many years in George Muller's famous orphanage, Rosalyn embarks on her own at the age of seventeen, only to discover that life in the home of an elite employer can turn quite ugly. Forced out onto the streets amidst swirling accusations, she bar " . . daydreams turned to sad longing when the years passed and their father never came home." Rosalyn Bernay and her two sisters were deeply impacted by the mysterious disappearance of their father at sea and subsequent death of their mother. Raised for many years in George Muller's famous orphanage, Rosalyn embarks on her own at the age of seventeen, only to discover that life in the home of an elite employer can turn quite ugly. Forced out onto the streets amidst swirling accusations, she barely avoids ruin before happening upon simple employment at the respectable Opera Comique, where her path crosses that of soldier-turned-stage-assistant Nate Moran, for the second time in as many days.Nate Moran is terribly relieved to see that the young woman over whom he has worried, has escaped the clutches of ill repute and is comfortably ensconced with reputable theater associates. Rosalyn is an enigma, with her quiet charm and obvious secrets, as she glides into the opportunity set before her with innocence and grace. As is so often the case, a lovely woman attracts attention, and Nate is not the only one in the cast with an eye turned towards Rosalyn. Unfortunately, Nate already plans to return to his career in the military, once his hand is completely healed; following his commission to India. . . . . without a wife. What a lovely slice of history during nineteenth century Victorian England; including a glimpse into the world of Gilbert and Sullivan productions, the broad impact that George Muller made upon thousands of orphaned children, and the waves of change being introduced by women entering the work place. Tucked in between, is a sweet romance.I received a copy of this book from the publisher. The opinions stated are entirely my own.
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  • Suzie
    June 27, 2017
    As a fan of Jane Austen, I enjoy reading about all things England. Jennifer Delemere’s London Beginnings series is one I’m sure to finish after reading the first in the series, The Captain’s Daughter. This Victorian-era novel focuses on the middle class as well as life in the theater during this time.When Rosalyn Bernay flees her employer in order to escape a worse situation, she has no idea the trouble that awaits her. Despite her naiveté, she manages to evade a cascade of trials and meet someo As a fan of Jane Austen, I enjoy reading about all things England. Jennifer Delemere’s London Beginnings series is one I’m sure to finish after reading the first in the series, The Captain’s Daughter. This Victorian-era novel focuses on the middle class as well as life in the theater during this time.When Rosalyn Bernay flees her employer in order to escape a worse situation, she has no idea the trouble that awaits her. Despite her naiveté, she manages to evade a cascade of trials and meet someone who is willing to help.Through a series of events, Rosalyn meets then reconnects with Nate Moran, a military man on leave who is working at the theater in order to save his brother’s position.This book details Rosalyn’s journey to discover her passion and talent as well as Nate’s journey of releasing his self-prescribed guilt over an event in his past.I loved the relationship Rosalyn maintained with her sisters despite their separation (and can I say I’m thrilled book two set to release in March 2018 is about Julia Bernay?) and the inside peeks at life in the theater. Nate’s concern for Rosalyn from their first meeting endeared him to me right away. And the supporting characters—Nate’s sister and the theater group—give depth Rosalyn’s journey. One I am grateful to have embarked upon. Disclosure statement:I receive complimentary books for review from publishers, publicists, and/or authors, including NetGalley. I am not required to write positive reviews. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.
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