Invincible Iron Man
A new Iron Age begins! From the violent streets of Chicago, an armored hero rises! Clad in her own Iron Man suit, Riri Williams is ready to show the world what she can do as the self-made hero of tomorrow. Her technology just might change the world forever — if she survives that long! But is she ready for all the problems that come with stepping into Iron Man’s jet boots? Problems like her first big villain. And the other guy running around as shell-head. And the laundry list of criminals looking to destroy Tony Stark’s legacy. Oh, and all the super-teams out to recruit her! As Riri’s adventures go viral, it’s time to claim an alter ego of her own — welcome to the Marvel Universe, Ironheart!Collecting: Invincible Iron Man 1-6

Invincible Iron Man Details

TitleInvincible Iron Man
Author
FormatHardcover
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 3rd, 2017
PublisherMarvel
ISBN1302906712
ISBN-139781302906719
Number of pages131 pages
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Superheroes, Marvel, Graphic Novels Comics

Invincible Iron Man Review

  • Sesana
    July 14, 2017
    I actually liked Riri way better than I thought that I would. She's cute and likable, but she's also almost exactly like (Ultimate) Peter Parker and Miles Morales. Same writer, so I guess some of that comes with the territory. Obviously, this is just a stunt to bide time until Tony returns from the dead/nearly dead, again, so it's hard to get really attached to her.
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  • Renata
    July 26, 2017
    There's...a lot to like here, and also...uh...some areas for improvement. I know this isn't a new critique, I saw a lot of similar sentiment expressed when the book first came out, but since I waited for the trade I'm just now chiming in. SO: I know Bendis is one of Marvel's heaviest hitters, and giving him this book is kind of an investment in Riri Williams as a character, which is good, but also...maybe someone who's not a middle-aged white man could have written this new black teen girl chara There's...a lot to like here, and also...uh...some areas for improvement. I know this isn't a new critique, I saw a lot of similar sentiment expressed when the book first came out, but since I waited for the trade I'm just now chiming in. SO: I know Bendis is one of Marvel's heaviest hitters, and giving him this book is kind of an investment in Riri Williams as a character, which is good, but also...maybe someone who's not a middle-aged white man could have written this new black teen girl character? Maybe Riri didn't need a random drive-by shooting as her ~tragic origin story~? Maybe, hear me out, she didn't need a ~tragic origin story~ at all? Also, a lot of the art that was criticized for being too sexy for a 15 y/o girl was variant art. I thought the art for the main comic itself was...okay...not as bad as some of the variants for sure, but she still looks older and more glam than 15. OK. Anyway. I do find Riri delightful, and I completely love her interactions with Hologram Tony (sidenote: is real Tony dead in the current comics? Is everyone dead? Probably everyone is dead) and ESPECIALLY PEPPER POTTS AS RESCUE thank you God please put Pepper Potts as Rescue on every goddamn team. I have no idea what is happening over at the Stark business side of things, probably that will pay off at some point or maybe it won't, I genuinely don't care because PEPPER POTTS AS RESCUE. also I hope there is some follow through on how Riri needs more friends her own age because yes she does.It's a bit of a shaky start but honestly there's enough here that I love that I'll keep reading. I mean, did I mention, PEPPER POTTS AS RESCUE, okay great, bye.
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  • Milo (BOK)
    July 16, 2017
    A really fun, engaging read that welcomes one of Marvel's strongest new characters in the form of Riri Williams, aka Ironheart, to the Marvel Universe. Brian Michael Bendis is so much better with solo character-centric adventures rather than events as is the case with his Miles Morales-written stuff and he brings heart, fun and entertaining down-to-earth energy that establishes Riri as a brilliant, likeable character who makes the perfect replacement for Tony Stark who is still around in A.I. fo A really fun, engaging read that welcomes one of Marvel's strongest new characters in the form of Riri Williams, aka Ironheart, to the Marvel Universe. Brian Michael Bendis is so much better with solo character-centric adventures rather than events as is the case with his Miles Morales-written stuff and he brings heart, fun and entertaining down-to-earth energy that establishes Riri as a brilliant, likeable character who makes the perfect replacement for Tony Stark who is still around in A.I. form in a mentor-role.This book reads a lot better as a trade than in single issues and benefits from some art that puts it right at home in the Marvel universe. I'm leaning towards a 3.5/5 as the book struggles in creating any sort of tension or forward plot momentum other than serving as an early origin story for Riri but it's clear that there's a lot of room to grow. I'm looking forward to seeing where Bendis takes this series going forward and as long as this series follows a more character-driven approach and can avoid getting dragged into big events which is something that happens particularly to Bendis books so, so often, we may have the start of something special here.
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  • Wing Kee
    May 11, 2017
    Good, but could be better.World: The art is fantastic, it's full of emotion and character allow readers to relate to Riri. The world building here is solid, we have a quick little snippet of Riri's little piece of the MU and also the MU comes and visits her to reorient her into Tony's world for the future. The world building is done well without any info dumps, but new readers will need a little more context of what happened with Tony and that side of the world, if there was a bit more balance o Good, but could be better.World: The art is fantastic, it's full of emotion and character allow readers to relate to Riri. The world building here is solid, we have a quick little snippet of Riri's little piece of the MU and also the MU comes and visits her to reorient her into Tony's world for the future. The world building is done well without any info dumps, but new readers will need a little more context of what happened with Tony and that side of the world, if there was a bit more balance of spending time in just Riri's world I would have like it cause by the end of the book Tony's world pretty much takes over hers.Story and Character: I have to write these sections together because they are so linked that I can't write a review with them broken apart. This is an origin tale and Bendis is good with origins. Is Riri's origin original? No really, it the same tragedy and realization and responsibility that a majority of comic book characters gets their origin from, from Spidey, to Daredevil, to Batman and even Punisher the death of a loved one has been used to cliche and this is the case here. Immediately I got a very strong Miles Morales vibe (also a Bendis creation) because of Riri's dialogue and family dynamic and friend, of course it's not completely the same but the pieces are all there. I'm not saying it's a bad thing, Miles is in my opinion one of the best things to come out of the Ultimate Universe and Marvel in the last 10 years (alone with Kamala) and having something that feels tonally similar is a good thing. Riri is an interesting character because of level of Super Genius and it's different and I would have liked more time spent with that, in her own head, in her world, giving us a taste of what it's like to be her and to be that smart in a world where others are so different. There are hints at it, the link to the world with Nat was wonderful and what we see of Riri before Iron-Man is fantastic, I would have loved more of that, more time for her to be her own character because the issue I have most with this book is that much like Tony Stark is doing in the MCU he's taking the spotlight away from everyone else. The story is good but the moment Tony comes, the rest of his MU comes with it and Riri's own family and dynamic and time to introduce readers to it goes out the window. Sure, I understand that Bendis wants to create "Team Ironheart" for Riri this arc, finish with the world building in that aspect. But I would have love more time just Riri being Riri. I liked how Miles had time before he met the rest of the MUU and Kamala had time before Captain Marvel, Iron-Man and Wolverine showed up to meet her. Those two characters had time by themselves in their own little slice of New York and New Jersey respectively for readers to know who they are, who are their friends, their family and life before the cape and how it changes now. I wanted Riri making things for herself, without Iron-Man. I wanted to see Riri steal the suit and know what made her do the things she did. Hopefully we will get more Riri and Co. in the future without the baggage of Tony Stark's cast of characters, but I really doubt it. I'm not saying this story is bad, I really enjoyed it and I did enjoy Riri interacting with that part of the MU and I want to see more of it. I just want Riri to stand out more so that we can see what makes her so different, don't make her a super genius just to justify her being able to make the suit, have Riri be different because of her genius. Let us get into her head and see what she's good at, what she struggles with, her highs and lows, her happiness and sadness. There was a little hint of her and relationships with others but I wanted more, from both sides, from inside her head and also from others like Mom and Nat talking about Riri and interacting with her. I want more character work.I liked this arc, and I liked this character a lot. I love the diversity in Marvel's current lineup, I was never a Marvel reader growing up so I don't have as much hangups with legacy characters, heck I'm a DC guy and we had 6 Robins (DC's diversity issue is another thing for another day) I'm okay with moving on and telling new stories with new characters. I love Kamala, Miles, Moon Girl, Squirrel Girl, Spider-Gwen, Silk, Spider-Woman, Captain Marvel and nor Riri and what they've done with them. This is a good read and a good step in the right direction for diversity and representation. It's not perfect but it's pretty fun.Onward to the next book!*single issues read*
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  • Artemis
    July 29, 2017
    How Marvel can succeed at being lighthearted fun and deadly serious simultaneously.Fifiteen-year-old African-American girl Riri Williams is the new Iron Man. Or Ironheart, as she's called. How creative and diverse Marvel can be if it just tries. The company's representing of how the world and humanity works isn't ending with the new Thor, Ms. Marvel and Spider-Man. Really I think any low sales it gets has to do with its stupid, interfering events like Secret Wars and Civil War II (which, let's f How Marvel can succeed at being lighthearted fun and deadly serious simultaneously.Fifiteen-year-old African-American girl Riri Williams is the new Iron Man. Or Ironheart, as she's called. How creative and diverse Marvel can be if it just tries. The company's representing of how the world and humanity works isn't ending with the new Thor, Ms. Marvel and Spider-Man. Really I think any low sales it gets has to do with its stupid, interfering events like Secret Wars and Civil War II (which, let's face it, only exists to tie in with the 2016 Marvel Civil War movie, despite having nothing to do with it, and make more money). These crossover events keep trying to one-up each other every year or so, and it's annoying - for both current and newer comic readers alike - unneeded, and overall pointless. No wonder some readers don't want to bother wasting their money on them when they just wish to read standalone comics about certain characters, as a possible gateway to further issues and other characters. I know I sound angry here, but I get frustrated with Marvel quite a lot of the time, the way it makes considerable, revolutionary leaps in progress, and then it shoots itself in the foot and backpeddles worryingly later on, blaming others for their own failings, and making excuses not to make progress and attract new readers. Diversity and business go hand in hand, comics industry! Stop avoiding that fact: it'll only make you look bad and bankrupt you sooner or later. Keeping a boycott against Marvel isn't easy, I can tell you.Anyway, back to Riri in her first solo series, 'Invincible Iron Man: Ironheart'. She is, in the graphic novel's own words, a super genius. Nothing new in the Marvel universe, but she stands on her own not just by her race and youth, but by how realistic she is in her anti-socialism. So much so that she had built her own Iron Man suit all by herself: she is a self-made hero, not a poor Distaff Counterpart to a famous male superhero. She has loving parents who try to understand and support her, and one best friend. Or she used to. Riri is a mechanic, a computer expert, and an all-round tech prodigy who spends most of her time working in her garage, angry at the world for its random acts of violence and tragedy. Laws of probabilities frustrate her. A holographic version of the late (?) Tony Stark guides and annoys her. While Riri is mature for her age, emotional outbursts, big and small, let the reader never forget that she is still a teenager. 'Invincible Iron Man: Ironheart' complements teenagers, and knows what intelligent and interesting people they are. Riri has troubles with her iron suit and makes many mistakes. Then she grows to have a sense of fun in her fights and endeavors as both Ironheart and herself. Her diversity, humanity, tragedy and heart make her a vital inclusion in the Marvel canon, alongside Kamala Khan.Riri is not the only well-written female in the comic, however. We have the fantastically kickass Pepper Potts, Mary Jane Watson, Friday the hologram, Tony's mother Amanda Strong, who is now the head of Stark Industries, Riri's mother, the villainous Tomoe the Techno Golem (okay, seriously? My word processor doesn't know the word Golem?!) and her Biohack Ninjas, Commander Sharon Carter of S.H.I.E.L.D., and Dana Richardson of Riri's school. Each woman represents a possible future for Riri - as a friend, ally, foe, and anything in-between. She is given many choices to make throughout her time as Ironheart, and any she picks is a guarantee of trouble. And more loss for her in her young life.'Invincible Iron Man: Ironheart' is almost flawless, filled with complex and interesting characters. The art is great, and the story simply weaves in very serious issues to go with its action scenes; issues that remind me of the breakout YA novel of the same year, 'The Hate U Give'. It is not for children. Not surprising that Brian Michael Bendis wrote this Marvel title. It's thrilling, despite the Tony Stark hologram overstaying his welcome - even considering the "twist" role he will no doubt play in the future - and a few instances of confusion when following panel placements on double-page spreads in the narration. I'm sure the real Stark is really really really positively dead as well. Totally believe you, Marvel. No, really, sure I do.Riri Williams - a new star in the light and darkness of comics' diversity. Of storytelling with heart as well as action. A solo beginning that comes close to breathtaking.Final Score: 4/5
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  • Ken Moten
    June 17, 2017
    You know, Brian Michael Bendis has come in for a bit of a beating between the end of last year to now. A lot of it is earned, but I am going to cut him a break now. While I am disappointed in his work with Miles, I can say that he has been on point with both "Iron titles" and Jessica Jones, Vol. 1: Uncaged!. This book took me back to Ultimate Comics: Spider-Man, by Brian Michael Bendis, Volume 1 and shows me that Bendis still has it in him. He really takes his time and seemed to properly pace hi You know, Brian Michael Bendis has come in for a bit of a beating between the end of last year to now. A lot of it is earned, but I am going to cut him a break now. While I am disappointed in his work with Miles, I can say that he has been on point with both "Iron titles" and Jessica Jones, Vol. 1: Uncaged!. This book took me back to Ultimate Comics: Spider-Man, by Brian Michael Bendis, Volume 1 and shows me that Bendis still has it in him. He really takes his time and seemed to properly pace himself for this origin story. Riri Williams was originally created by Bendis for a television series that never aired. Like with Miles Morales, he sat on the character until he fond a moment to use her and in this case it was Iron Man. Tony Stark is now a Obi-Wan Kanobi figure that trains Riri for her "destiny." Though this origin might be considered a bit more "safe" compared to Bendis' usual style, I will take it. His usual style ain't clicking like it needs to so this will be fine.
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  • J.
    June 24, 2017
    Man I really don't want to be a fussy duddy downer but this should have been better. At first I wondered if it was because having a young girl tied to the legacy of another hero soured the concept but Ms. Marvel handles it just fine and I think that is where the problem lies. Ms. Marvel, as handled by G. Willow Wilson feels authentic and expressive; true to the reality they want to portray. Riri? While an interesting character and concept, she isn't handled with any of the nuance and gravitas af Man I really don't want to be a fussy duddy downer but this should have been better. At first I wondered if it was because having a young girl tied to the legacy of another hero soured the concept but Ms. Marvel handles it just fine and I think that is where the problem lies. Ms. Marvel, as handled by G. Willow Wilson feels authentic and expressive; true to the reality they want to portray. Riri? While an interesting character and concept, she isn't handled with any of the nuance and gravitas afforded to Kamala. Brian Michael Bendis just isn't the right person to give a voice to a young, female, African-American superhero. She feels too much like...well, every other character he has ever written. It's not a terrible book, it just feels disappointing when you take a step back and see it for what it really is.
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  • Frank
    July 27, 2017
    So, here's where we stand: Tony Stark is in a coma, but before that happened he created an A.I. of himself which is being used to help run the suit of his replacement, Ironheart, who is super genius young woman, Riri Williams. I missed a huge swath of Marvel timeline, but it doesn't matter. Whatever happened got us here, which is a good place and continues Marvel's shift to younger, more diverse, and generally more interesting heroes.
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  • Jeff
    July 31, 2017
    This was a great introduction to a new character (although Riri does appear in CIVIL WAR II). What I especially enjoyed was Bendis's treatment of family and friends in relation to Riri and how to get her to be aware of the world around her and not just her scientific endeavors. It's not always easy to establish humanity in superhero comics, but I feel Bendis did a good job of it here. Lots to like and I'm ready for more.
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  • Emmanuel Nevers
    May 14, 2017
    So full of heart and energy!! The new Iron Man (Ironheart) will give you a run for your money as she is every bit deserving of the new Iron Man role. Riri is just great, and this is coming from a long time Tony Stark as Iron Man fan.
  • Mandy
    July 31, 2017
    3.5 stars
  • Grace
    July 11, 2017
    Riri Williams is a sweet summer child and I would kill for her
  • Sevia
    June 27, 2017
    Riri je super, ale jinak pořád průměr.
  • Jon
    July 22, 2017
    A solid story, but the number of Marvel heroes who have been replaced by younger versions makes it feel a little stale.
  • Heider Carlos
    May 11, 2017
    It hits to close to home sometimes...
  • Priscilla
    July 16, 2017
    I wanted so much to love it, because BRILLIANT BLACK GIRL FIGHTING EVIL YES PLEASE, but the writing was just... meh. It didn't capture my heart like Ms. Marvel did.
  • Amanda
    May 7, 2017
    Riri is everything. I hope everyone is reading her story! Marvel is CRUSHING it right now with young female heroes: Iron Heart, Squirrel Girl, Ms. Marvel, Unstoppable Wasp, Moon Girl, Spider-Gwen!
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