Black Panther
Wakanda! Home of the Black Panther, a proud and vibrant nation whose legends and mysteries run deep. Now, delve deep into Wakanda’s lore with a love story where tenderness is matched by brutality! You know them as the Midnight Angels, but for now they are just Ayo and Aneka — young women recruited to become Dora Milaje, an elite task force trained to protect the crown of Wakanda at all costs. But with their king shamed and their queen killed, Ayo and Aneka must take justice into their own hands! They’ve been officers. Rebels. Lovers. But can they be leaders? Plus: the return of former White Tiger, Kasper Cole! As Wakanda burns, Cole can only watch helplessly from halfway around the world. Will he find a new beginning — or meet a painful end? Collecting BLACK PANTHER: WORLD OF WAKANDA #1-6.

Black Panther Details

TitleBlack Panther
Author
FormatPaperback
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 27th, 2017
PublisherMarvel
ISBN130290650X
ISBN-139781302906504
Number of pages144 pages
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Glbt, Graphic Novels Comics

Black Panther Review

  • Erica
    June 20, 2017
    This came across my desk and I had to do a triple-take. I know the Black Panther movie is coming out next year and it looks like it will be amazing. Gabe's been foaming at the mouth over it forever so I know I'll be seeing it, whether I want to, or not. While I'm not familiar with the Black Panther through any first-hand experience, I've heard the entire damn story of T'Challa and T'Chaka and so I'm ready.What I wasn't ready for was seeing Roxane Gay credited as the author, right there on the fr This came across my desk and I had to do a triple-take. I know the Black Panther movie is coming out next year and it looks like it will be amazing. Gabe's been foaming at the mouth over it forever so I know I'll be seeing it, whether I want to, or not. While I'm not familiar with the Black Panther through any first-hand experience, I've heard the entire damn story of T'Challa and T'Chaka and so I'm ready.What I wasn't ready for was seeing Roxane Gay credited as the author, right there on the front cover. I squeaked, internally, "NO WAY! She writes comics now?"I should have learned my lesson with Margaret Atwood. The answer to my question is, "No. No, she doesn't write comics. She lends credibility to the work with her name and that's about it."Coates was a consultant for this one since this is basically the origin story for two of his Black Panther characters. Gay writes this story because it's about black female warriors who fall in love. That all makes sense...it just didn't work.It all starts with a group of warrior woman, the Dora Milaje, pronounced "DOR-ah muh-LAH-jay...which means "Adored Ones" training their new recruits. The captain of the group, Aneka, takes an immediate dislike to one of the upstarty newbies, which is pretty standard in these stories. And as it turns out, as trite as it is, the source of dislike is really sexual attraction because of course it is. So Aneka and her rival, Ayo, become lovers. Yay, black female romantic relationships between fighting women. Not so yay, though: why does there always have to be a romantic plot? If there's a lead female, especially a badass lead female, she MUST fall in love, usually against her will because she knows she's strong enough to not be in love but, dammit, her latent femininity always wins out and first there's love, then there's marriage, and also usually betrayal or death or something. And drama. Always so much drama. This is no different on the drama front.So that made me flare my nostrils in distaste. But I get it. This is good representation and I'm just a person who hates romance so we can move on.And we do. We move on to all the standard plot developments. There's a newbie who is a mole! And then her father dies and she wants REVENGE! There are men who hit on Aneka and Ayo when they're in NYC and the ladies crush the guys' spirits and probably also their bones because that's not how you treat women! The Dora Milaje beat up bullies because they're keeping Black Panther's homeland as utopic as possible. And Black Panther shows up here and there and everyone is always excited to see him because he's the real hero until he's a disappointment. And there are bonus stories at the end, too. Actually, "The People for the People" was good, both story and art. I liked that one.Anyway, the main story is cliche and stuff but not enough to warrant 2 stars.No, those 2 stars were for the terrible clunkiness of the whole thing. The writing is not good. I felt like I was reading comics from the '80's. Silly dialogue, ridiculous exposition, choppy flow, and just a general sense of clumsiness, overall. It was a struggle.And now maybe I will finally learn NOT to read comics written by authors who make their livings writing books and essays.
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  • Thomas
    June 18, 2017
    This is solid. I'll start off with noting the protagonists of the story because I don't see this very often: Black. Lesbian. Warriors.Ayo is a new recruit to the Dora Milaje, the protectors of the Black Panther and Wakanda. She has to learn her place, and in the process becomes enamored with her captain. This is a prequel to the Coates run of Black Panther, so we see how Wakanda is being neglected by T'Challa and what these women decide to do to protect their country.The romance feels like it co This is solid. I'll start off with noting the protagonists of the story because I don't see this very often: Black. Lesbian. Warriors.Ayo is a new recruit to the Dora Milaje, the protectors of the Black Panther and Wakanda. She has to learn her place, and in the process becomes enamored with her captain. This is a prequel to the Coates run of Black Panther, so we see how Wakanda is being neglected by T'Challa and what these women decide to do to protect their country.The romance feels like it could have used another page or three to fully develop from initial attraction to full relationship - not that Gay skimped on pages, but I feel like we could have used a few more internal reflections on the buildup to the relationship. That said, their relationship itself is portrayed as troubled because one of the commitments of the Milaje is to be available as a potential bride for the Black Panther (which is its own patriarchal, empirical trope that goes unaddressed here). This troubled me a little bit but I'm ultimately okay with it because of where the rest of the relationship goes: it is accepted. It is natural. Their commander tells them to listen to their hearts. We need examples like this in pop culture.The sixth issue included here is separate from the first five. This was jarring to me and I have no idea about the background of the White Tiger except the paragraph intro we got in this volume. That said it broadens the scope of Wakanda, its enemies, and its allies.If you want something off the white, male, mainstream path of comics, read this. If you want more Black Panther in your life because of the trailer for the upcoming film, read this. If you enjoy women kicking ass and taking names, read this.
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  • Shernell
    June 21, 2017
    Awesome comic! I have to read more back issues and current of Black Panther but I really enjoyed this one.
  • Lobo
    January 18, 2017
    Afrofuturyzm i lesbijskie wojowniczki <3 2017 zapowiada się dobrze komiksowo - jest Amerika Chavez i Hawkeye, a teraz jeszcze World of Wakanda. Obawiam się, że stracę przez to pieniądze.
  • Liz Kay
    June 13, 2017
    Black warrior lesbians. What's not to love? Sure the last issue in the collected addition has absolutely nothing to do with the first five and probably belongs in another book. Whatever. You saw that this book has black warrior lesbians, right?
  • SJ
    June 30, 2017
    i've never read any other Black Panther volumes so i'm not sure how this one fits into the larger narrative, but it appears to be a side-story anyway, focusing on two of the elite warriors in the Wakandan Dora Milaje. i liked that the main characters were humans with no superpowers struggling to find their place in a world with superheros; i think it's relatable, since even though in the real world there aren't people with extraordinary abilities, there *are* people and institutions with disprop i've never read any other Black Panther volumes so i'm not sure how this one fits into the larger narrative, but it appears to be a side-story anyway, focusing on two of the elite warriors in the Wakandan Dora Milaje. i liked that the main characters were humans with no superpowers struggling to find their place in a world with superheros; i think it's relatable, since even though in the real world there aren't people with extraordinary abilities, there *are* people and institutions with disproportionate power, and figuring out how to position oneself in response, especially if you become aware that their power is corrupt, is difficult. So is figuring out what justice means in a given situation, and following through even though you know other people may not understand (the way Aneka does). This is also primarily a love story between two women, and I liked the way they had multiple discussions about their differing comfort levels with going public. Again, I think the dynamics are mirrored often in the real world, with social expectations substituted for the expectation to 'be available' for T'Challa.
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  • Alan
    May 10, 2017
    I know people are tired of my saying this, but this series makes me miss Christopher Priest. Because, the sixth chapter brings back Kasper Cole (from Priest's the Crew), and it is so good. Cole is more real to me, as a character, than the two Dora Milaje who occupied the first five chapters.Cole is a detective trying to do better. He's not perfect as a man, and the mother of his daughter, and his mother aren't happy with him either. While he questions his decision, he lets T'Challa draw him back I know people are tired of my saying this, but this series makes me miss Christopher Priest. Because, the sixth chapter brings back Kasper Cole (from Priest's the Crew), and it is so good. Cole is more real to me, as a character, than the two Dora Milaje who occupied the first five chapters.Cole is a detective trying to do better. He's not perfect as a man, and the mother of his daughter, and his mother aren't happy with him either. While he questions his decision, he lets T'Challa draw him back into T'Challa's game of smoke and mirrors. So Cole is going on one mission, and finds himself directed into another (not too different from Priest's The Crew). As to the first five chapters, expanding upon the Dora Milaje and their way of life was interesting. How the Dora Milaje figured into the then ongoing Wakandan civil ware, made sense and was a good idea. I just never connected with the primary characters.
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  • Rachel
    May 8, 2017
    Read in single issues. Knowing Ayo and Aneka (as written by Roxane Gay) don't have their own comic anymore makes every month a little sadder. The plot ties in nicely to the early issues of Ta-Nehisi Coates' Black Panther, and as with that series each issue is a little stronger as the writer gets used to the medium. I hope that Marvel decides all their major titles need spin-offs about rebel warrior lesbians.
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  • Rucha
    June 19, 2017
    Read single issues
  • Erica McGillivray
    May 31, 2017
    Overall, I really loved Roxane Gay's foray into comic books. However, there was a bit of a hiccup at the beginning, and issue #6 really brought my rating down.
  • Delaney
    June 28, 2017
    3.5 Stars
  • Liz
    December 8, 2016
    I know absolutely nothing about the Marvel world of superheroes, but I loved this. Basically anything Roxane Gay writes, I will read, and this was an extremely entertaining branching out of my reading comfort zone.
  • Kevin Catalano
    November 25, 2016
    Unnecessary to compare, but I liked this story a lot better than Black Panther #1. The art, however, is a tad on the cartoony side for me. Still, very excited for upcoming issues!
  • Samantha
    December 13, 2016
    I am excited that stories about women superheroes are being told. However, I learned that I'm just not that into superheroes unless they are deeply flawed.
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