Theft by Finding (1977-2002)
One of the most anticipated books of 2017: Boston Globe, New York Times Book Review, New York's "Vulture", The Week, Bustle, BookRiotDavid Sedaris tells all in a book that is, literally, a lifetime in the makingIt's no coincidence that the world's best writers tend to keep diaries. If you faithfully record your life in a journal, you're writing every day--and if you write every day, you become a better writer. David Sedaris has kept a diary for forty years. This means that if you've kept a diary for a year of your life or less, Sedaris is at least forty times better at writing than you are. In his diaries, he's recorded everything that has captured his attention--overheard comments, salacious gossip, soap opera plot twists, secrets confided by total strangers. These observations are the source code for his finest work, and with them he has honed his self-deprecation and learned to craft his cunning, surprising sentences. Now, for the first time, Sedaris shares his private writings with the world in Theft By Finding: Diaries 1977-2002. This is the first-person account of how a drug-abusing dropout with a weakness for the International House of Pancakes and a chronic inability to hold down a real job became one of the funniest people on the planet. Most diaries -- even the diaries of great writers -- are impossibly dull, because they generally write about their emotions, or their dreams, or their interior life. Sedaris's diaries are unique because they face outward. He doesn't tell us his feelings about the world, he shows us the world instead, and in so doing he shows us something deeper about himself.Written with a sharp eye and ear for the bizarre, the beautiful, and the uncomfortable, and with a generosity of spirit that even a misanthropic sense of humor can't fully disguise, Theft By Finding proves that Sedaris is one of our great modern observers. It's a potent reminder that there's no such thing as a boring day--when you're as perceptive and curious as Sedaris, adventure waits around every corner.

Theft by Finding (1977-2002) Details

TitleTheft by Finding (1977-2002)
Author
FormatHardcover
ReleaseMay 30th, 2017
PublisherLittle, Brown and Company
ISBN0316154725
ISBN-139780316154727
Number of pages528 pages
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Autobiography, Memoir, Humor, Biography, Writing, Essays, Biography Memoir

Theft by Finding (1977-2002) Review

  • Toni
    January 14, 2017
    Great article in this week's "New Yorker" about this book to be published on May 30th. Obviously I'm anxiously awaiting this date.I am an insane David Sedaris fan. I fall asleep listening to his audiobooks every night. I just set the timer for 30 or 45 minutes, and they shut off, and I'm sleeping. I rotate the books, or listen depending on my mood. Since they're essays, it doesn't matter where they stop. Note: And they aren't boring! They make me happy and I know every word, that's why I can fal Great article in this week's "New Yorker" about this book to be published on May 30th. Obviously I'm anxiously awaiting this date.I am an insane David Sedaris fan. I fall asleep listening to his audiobooks every night. I just set the timer for 30 or 45 minutes, and they shut off, and I'm sleeping. I rotate the books, or listen depending on my mood. Since they're essays, it doesn't matter where they stop. Note: And they aren't boring! They make me happy and I know every word, that's why I can fall into a blissful slumber. David is a performer, as well as a humorist, writer, comic. It's so much better to have him tell you his stories, than to read them yourself.When we saw him live, standing in line to get our books signed, my husband wanted to tell him that I fall asleep with him (David) every night. haha Never got the chance, the line was endless and we gave up.Anyway, I can't wait to get this book!!!Great article and tease in this week's "New Yorker" for this book. I know I'm going to buy the print edition but I want glossy pictures. No mass market cheap paper for me!
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  • Trin
    April 18, 2017
    David Sedaris is so authentically David Sedaris. This first collection of his diaries reveal him as everything you'd expect, and want, him to be, and reading it only made me love him more. The feeling of being in the backseat (or perched on the handlebars of his bike, perhaps) as he struggles through his early years is both incredibly reassuring and, of course, hilarious. There is so much fantastic observational humor in this: Sedaris spends loads of time just sitting in various IHOPs and writin David Sedaris is so authentically David Sedaris. This first collection of his diaries reveal him as everything you'd expect, and want, him to be, and reading it only made me love him more. The feeling of being in the backseat (or perched on the handlebars of his bike, perhaps) as he struggles through his early years is both incredibly reassuring and, of course, hilarious. There is so much fantastic observational humor in this: Sedaris spends loads of time just sitting in various IHOPs and writing down what people say and do. His eye (ear?) for detail is superb. And his own wonderful personality shines through at every turn.Most mind-blowing moment (which I am spoiler-tagging only because I got so much pleasure out of being surprised by it, not because I actually think you can spoil history/reality): (view spoiler)[Sedaris, as he himself points out in the introduction, very casually mentions the first time he meets his long-time partner/love of his life Hugh, noting that he's "handsome and gay" but really being more focused on the $20 he's making helping another friend move a ladder. (Of course.) Then, just TWO DAYS LATER, he applies for the Macy's elf gig that the time-traveling reader knows would soon truly launch his career with "The Santaland Diaries." Holy cow. Everything about this guy's life changed (for the better) over the course of three days in October 1990, and at the time he had no idea. This gives me a lot of feelings that I can't adequately describe, but which there is probably some German word for. (hide spoiler)]
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  • lp
    March 24, 2017
    A little dark and very funny. Sedaris is the master at observing others and picking out the humor. THE MASTER. I want him to live inside my brain and point things out to me twenty-four hours a day.
  • Margaret Heller
    February 23, 2017
    This doesn't come out until the end of May; I reviewed it for Library Journal. If you are a David Sedaris completist you are going to definitely want to get this one since it fills in a lot of context around his essays.
  • Michael
    April 24, 2017
    I don't listen to NPR, and I'm not a huge David Sedaris follower. I have read 3 of his books after this one, and seen him live once - so I do know his stuff pretty well.Theft by Finding is classic Sedaris form, wry, witty, fully of one-liners and based on his extraordinary powers of observation. It deals with the mundane for the most part, but makes that mundane interesting with remarkable stylistic affect and a fantastic sense of voice.Especially if you listen to this one, you will notice how M I don't listen to NPR, and I'm not a huge David Sedaris follower. I have read 3 of his books after this one, and seen him live once - so I do know his stuff pretty well.Theft by Finding is classic Sedaris form, wry, witty, fully of one-liners and based on his extraordinary powers of observation. It deals with the mundane for the most part, but makes that mundane interesting with remarkable stylistic affect and a fantastic sense of voice.Especially if you listen to this one, you will notice how Mr. Sedaris has a great talent for voices, spoken and written. His impressions are on point, whether it is southern drawl, russian spy, bronx born native, or jewish grandmother. He really does have a voice for radio, and I was astounded that he even remembered the precise tone of voice and accents in this book - given that it is simply a collection of his diaries from the past 40 some odd years.As for cons, the book gets a little too mundane at points and definitely ventures into familiar Sedaris territory. If you have read his previous works you may see some repetition in content here, but delivered differently. It's also interesting to observe his transition from feeble and down-on-his-luck meth head to relatively self-obsessed member of the literati. The beginning of the book as such is more interesting than the end, as I imagine the comforts afforded by his success have made juicy anecdotes harder to come by.
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  • Melinda
    April 27, 2017
    Just affirms everything you already love about him. He has this perfect ability to mine the everyday for those surreal moment of comedy. It's like a really long collection of hilarious Facebook posts. It's hundreds of pages describing visits to the IHOP that somehow never get boring. I loved it.
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