Egypt's Sister (The Silent Years, #1)
Five decades before the birth of Christ, Chava, daughter of the royal tutor, grows up with Urbi, a princess in Alexandria's royal palace. When Urbi becomes Queen Cleopatra, Chava vows to be a faithful friend no matter what--but after she and Cleopatra have an argument, she finds herself imprisoned and sold into slavery. Torn from her family, her community, and her elevated place in Alexandrian society, Chava finds herself cast off and alone in Rome. Forced to learn difficult lessons, she struggles to trust a promise HaShem has given her. After experiencing the best and worst of Roman society, Chava must choose between love and honor, between her own desires and God's will for her life.

Egypt's Sister (The Silent Years, #1) Details

TitleEgypt's Sister (The Silent Years, #1)
Author
FormatPaperback
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 4th, 2017
PublisherBethany House
ISBN0764219324
ISBN-139780764219320
Number of pages379 pages
Rating
GenreHistorical, Christian Fiction, Christian, Christian Historical Fiction, Cultural, Egypt, Fiction

Egypt's Sister (The Silent Years, #1) Review

  • Katie
    July 6, 2017
    Read in one setting, even while cooking and eating dinner. I will pre-order the next book as soon as it is available on kindle.
  • Faith
    June 8, 2017
    **Many thanks to Bethany House and Netgalley for providing me with an ARC for this book!**The Silent Years. They passed between the days of Malachi and the first Christmas. Every Jew longed to hear God's voice, but he did not speak. At least not through the prophets. Chava and her father, Daniel and brother, Asher, live in Alexandra, Egypt, during its glory days. Egypt is as prosperous as its ever been, and Daniel has work at the royal palace, tutoring princes and princesses. Even for Jews in Eg **Many thanks to Bethany House and Netgalley for providing me with an ARC for this book!**The Silent Years. They passed between the days of Malachi and the first Christmas. Every Jew longed to hear God's voice, but he did not speak. At least not through the prophets. Chava and her father, Daniel and brother, Asher, live in Alexandra, Egypt, during its glory days. Egypt is as prosperous as its ever been, and Daniel has work at the royal palace, tutoring princes and princesses. Even for Jews in Egypt, not a great position to be in, they're content.Especially Chava, who's lucky enough to be friends with Urbi, the second princess of Egypt. One day Chava seems to hear YHVH's voice, telling her that she and Urbi will be together on Urbi's happiest and last days. For a while Chava is content to dwell like this, her life given to serve her best friend who will one day rule as the queen of Egypt. But then political tensions rise as Julius Caesar and others vie for dominion of the Roman Republic. Chava finds herself caught in the middle- and when she is sold into slavery, it will take all her resilience and faith to escape- and survive.Likes:-This was a genuinely well-written Christian book. It was all about the Silent Years, a period which fascinates many, and managed to weave Cleopatra and Mark Antony, Octavian and Julius, into the story of a small Jewish family. The writing was lush and descriptive, and it had the feel of a lovely mainstream book with great editors. -The characters make mistakes. Hallelujah, a Christian book where not everyone is a saint! -I was constantly guessing about what would happen next, although some of the foreshadowing got a little obvious. More on that later.-I thought the romance was genuinely well done and did not dominate the story at all. While the book never really talked about a call to singleness, it did incorporate that into the story, and it was well-done.-All the clever references to things that I know are true about Jewish life. Things like the name of God and the stories about the Septuagint. It felt very authentic.-Cleopatra was a real person, and truly made sense. Her figure was tragic, but still very human. Dislikes:-The Chekhov's guns were frequent, and it got a little bit predictable. -I didn't feel like Chava was all that well-developed at first, but that got better as the story progressed.Content warnings:-LANGUAGE: none-SEX: the story takes place in Rome, and many of the main characters are female slaves. The sexual aspect is not glossed over, but it is never depicted either with any kind of detail, and the main character is never taken advantage of. A few characters are pregnant, there is some talk of mistresses, and much of the later story deals with being a midwife.-VIOLENCE: While there are massacres and revolts mentioned, no violence is really straight-up depicted. A baby is still-born, a mother dies in labor, a character is found with throat slit. Another character commits suicide. This was a good book, and I enjoyed it. Thanks again to Bethany for the ARC.
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  • Valentina Markasović
    July 31, 2017
    I received a copy of this e-book from NetGalley, free of charge. Thank you!I requested this book as soon as I saw it deals with the period of Cleopatra, Caesar, and Mark Anthony. What I didn't realize is that Angela Hunt is a renowned author of Bible fiction, with many books under her belt. It's certainly visible from her writing style, about which I have no complaints. The setting was depicted faithfully, and the original characters developed very well. The historical figures, in my opinion, su I received a copy of this e-book from NetGalley, free of charge. Thank you!I requested this book as soon as I saw it deals with the period of Cleopatra, Caesar, and Mark Anthony. What I didn't realize is that Angela Hunt is a renowned author of Bible fiction, with many books under her belt. It's certainly visible from her writing style, about which I have no complaints. The setting was depicted faithfully, and the original characters developed very well. The historical figures, in my opinion, suffered from the telling-instead-of-showing syndrome - some parts slightly felt like reading a textbook.Connected to my previous point, for a book that I thought would centre on Cleopatra, the novel dealt with Cleopatra remarkably scarcely. We follow around Chava (only when I read the Author's Note did I realize I had been pronouncing the protagonist's name wrongly) as she grows up as Cleopatra's friend, only to be sold into slavery as a result of an unfortunate event. From there, a new horizon opens up for Chava (and Cleopatra, Caesar's murder, marriage to Mark Anthony, etc.) is only fleetingly referenced, until some last 30 pages.The prospect of having a Jewish childhood friend of an Egyptian queen as a narrator is one of the things that drew me into this book, but, as illustrated above, it has its drawbacks. There is a big part of the novel that deals with nothing but describing Chava's life as a farm slave, and is not very tumultuous, so you might want to be aware of this before picking this book up in hopes of finding an intrigue-filled historical fiction novel about the Alexandrian war and the demise of the Roman Republic.
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  • Robin Lee Hatcher
    July 31, 2017
    I absolutely love Angela Hunt's biblical fiction. This one is a little different because it takes place during the 400 years between the last book of the Old Testament and the first books of the New Testament. The "Silent Years." Cleopatra is a secondary but pivotal character in the story, and I felt myself steeped in history (in the very best sense) as I read it. Perhaps my favorite part of the book was watching Chava (the protagonist, childhood friend of Cleopatra and daughter of a Jewish scho I absolutely love Angela Hunt's biblical fiction. This one is a little different because it takes place during the 400 years between the last book of the Old Testament and the first books of the New Testament. The "Silent Years." Cleopatra is a secondary but pivotal character in the story, and I felt myself steeped in history (in the very best sense) as I read it. Perhaps my favorite part of the book was watching Chava (the protagonist, childhood friend of Cleopatra and daughter of a Jewish scholar/tutor) mature, both in life and in faith. I don't know if Chava's story will continue in another book, but if so, I will buy it the instant it is available.
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  • Nadine Keels
    July 21, 2017
    As the Jewish daughter of a royal tutor, Chava grows up close to palace life in Alexandria. She’s sure that she’ll not be parted from her girlhood friend, the princess Urbi, not even when Urbi ascends to the throne and becomes Queen Cleopatra. But when a crushing betrayal lands Chava in slavery, she wonders what will become of her life and a promise God once spoke to her in Egypt’s Sister, a novel by author Angela Hunt.I’ve enjoyed Biblical Fiction by this author before and was intrigued to hear As the Jewish daughter of a royal tutor, Chava grows up close to palace life in Alexandria. She’s sure that she’ll not be parted from her girlhood friend, the princess Urbi, not even when Urbi ascends to the throne and becomes Queen Cleopatra. But when a crushing betrayal lands Chava in slavery, she wonders what will become of her life and a promise God once spoke to her in Egypt’s Sister, a novel by author Angela Hunt.I’ve enjoyed Biblical Fiction by this author before and was intrigued to hear that she’d be writing a series about the biblical “Silent Years.” My favorite aspect of this novel is the fact that Chava hears God during this period when He’s supposedly silent. (Yeah—I don’t believe God goes mute so much as we go deaf, but I won’t get into that.)Now, there were some things in the novel that didn’t make complete sense to me. The process of Chava’s enslavement, for one, didn’t seem to make logical business sense. Aside from that, while this book is called A Novel of Cleopatra, the queen is off screen for most of it. She’s out there living her (now notorious) life, while Chava is left to pine and obsess over her. Eventually, Chava herself alludes to “obsessing over Urbi” for years.I also found the extent of Chava’s naiveté to be unbelievable at times. Although she’s done some growing by the later chapters, it’s hard for me to be super-enthused about a story when I only feel so-so about the main character.Still, the ending of the novel has put me in anticipation of the next one in The Silent Years series.___________Bethany House provided me with a complimentary copy of this book for an honest review.
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  • Angela
    July 22, 2017
    Angela Hunt is a well known name in Christian fiction and she is no stranger to biblical fiction either. In fact, the first Christian fiction book I read as a teenager was a book based on the Genesis account of Joseph written by Hunt. Since then, Hunt has continued to write in a variety of Christian fiction genres and she has recently returned to biblical fiction with her Dangerous Beauty series and now the Silent Years series. The Silent Years refer to the time between the end of the Old Testam Angela Hunt is a well known name in Christian fiction and she is no stranger to biblical fiction either. In fact, the first Christian fiction book I read as a teenager was a book based on the Genesis account of Joseph written by Hunt. Since then, Hunt has continued to write in a variety of Christian fiction genres and she has recently returned to biblical fiction with her Dangerous Beauty series and now the Silent Years series. The Silent Years refer to the time between the end of the Old Testament and the beginning of the New. Although Egypt's Sister began a little slow, the writing style in first person and the historical detail woven into the plot kept me reading and interested. The premise is that Chava, a Jew living in Alexandria Egypt, is close friends with Princess Urbi - the future Queen Cleopatra we all know. Chava's father is tutor to the royal children and Chava enjoys the privileges of being close to the royal family. She is naive and innocent of the turmoil in the Ptolomy family line until Urbi is suddenly queen and does not act like the childhood friend Chava loves. When Cleopatra does the unthinkable, Chava finds herself stripped of her home, family, and status. She is suddenly a slave with no rights - the lowest rung on the Roman ladder. But years earlier, Chava 'heard' God tell her she would bless Urbi and be with her on her final day. After surviving the boat voyage to Rome and finding herself working a farm for a noble Roman family, any future with Urbi seems impossible. But God has amazing ways of working, even in the impossible.I've always loved Egyptian history and all the myths surrounding Cleopatra. Hunt did an amazing job of weaving fact and fiction together. And telling the story from Chava's point of view was especially interesting. Without doing a history book dump every fifty pages, Hunt let the reader know what was going on politically, socially, and culturally in Rome and Alexandria. I found the storyline of Chava's midwife exploits interesting and unexpected.One thing that kept coming to my mind is how similar ancient Rome is to our modern day society. We might not have the strict social classes but we devalue human life through abortions, we judge others at a glance, immorality is completely acceptable and sometimes expected. But I believe the main theme of Egypt's Sister is that God works when we don't see it. When things crumble and we can't see how His Name would ever be glorified, we need to step back, rest in Him, and continue following what we know He commands. It's not always easy or popular but God knows what is to come and He is never surprised by the evils of man. Our role as Christians is to follow Him and trust Him with our lives.I received a copy of this book from the publisher for review purposes. The opinions and review are my own thoughts and words and were not influenced in any way by other factors.
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  • Jill
    June 13, 2017
    I am always excited when one of my favorite authors comes out with a new book. I have been reading Angela Hunt's books for years, and I am never disappointed. She writes in historical and contemporary genres, and I enjoy both of them. However, her Biblical fiction is my favorite. In this newest series, she is tackling the "silent years" between the Old and New Testament. Egypt's Sister is a fictionalized account of Cleopatra's rise to power told thru the eyes of her closest friend, Chava.I loved I am always excited when one of my favorite authors comes out with a new book. I have been reading Angela Hunt's books for years, and I am never disappointed. She writes in historical and contemporary genres, and I enjoy both of them. However, her Biblical fiction is my favorite. In this newest series, she is tackling the "silent years" between the Old and New Testament. Egypt's Sister is a fictionalized account of Cleopatra's rise to power told thru the eyes of her closest friend, Chava.I loved the character development of Chava through out this book. She begins as a pampered, shallow girl who wants nothing more than to spend all of her time with her friend, the princess. Her relationship with Cleopatra boarders on obsessive. Eventually she is betrayed by her friend and she learns to rely on God. By the end of the book, she is a mature women who knows her own mind.Another wonderful aspect of this book is the historical detail. I learned so much about the day to day lives of the Egyptians and Romans of that time. It also put the timeline leading up to the birth of Christ into perspective. The scope and detail reminded of the Mark of the Lion series by Francine Rivers.If you enjoy historical fiction with a lot of detail and strong female characters, I would definitely recommend this book. I cannot wait for the next book in the series to come out so I can learn more about this fascinating time in history. I received this book for free for the purpose of review.
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  • kerrycat
    April 22, 2017
    (I gave this four stars in the July edition of Romantic Times Book Reviews, https://www.rtbookreviews.com/book-re...)Always a fascinating figure, Cleopatra takes a backseat to Chava, who wrestles believably with the restrictions of the historical period to listen to God’s instructions and suffer through the consequences as best she can, even as her circumstances become dire. The historical detail, depth of characterization and hopeful outlook of this story will keep readers entertained and inspi (I gave this four stars in the July edition of Romantic Times Book Reviews, https://www.rtbookreviews.com/book-re...)Always a fascinating figure, Cleopatra takes a backseat to Chava, who wrestles believably with the restrictions of the historical period to listen to God’s instructions and suffer through the consequences as best she can, even as her circumstances become dire. The historical detail, depth of characterization and hopeful outlook of this story will keep readers entertained and inspired while learning more about the historical figures and Biblical history from this era.Chava has no reason to believe that her childhood friendship with Urbi should change as they grow up, even as Urbi, a princess, becomes queen, and the differences in their religious beliefs become a point of contention. Chava has heard the voice of HaShem directing her to stay by the side of her friend, now Queen Cleopatra, rather than marry as her father wishes, but choosing between her faith and her friend is a life-changing decision that carries Chava from home as a slave, where she learns how to use her strength and intelligence in the service of God.
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  • English
    July 12, 2017
    I had a few reservations before picking this book on Netgalley, mainly due to an older book I read by this author years ago which really wasn't great. I did, however, enjoy the movie adaptation of her more recent work 'Risen' and the subject was interesting. My final feelings on the book were decidedly mixed. There were definitely shades of Ben-Hur in the plot, with the story of a Jewish girl name Chava from a privileged background remaining faithful to her God and her principles when her whole I had a few reservations before picking this book on Netgalley, mainly due to an older book I read by this author years ago which really wasn't great. I did, however, enjoy the movie adaptation of her more recent work 'Risen' and the subject was interesting. My final feelings on the book were decidedly mixed. There were definitely shades of Ben-Hur in the plot, with the story of a Jewish girl name Chava from a privileged background remaining faithful to her God and her principles when her whole world was turned on its head, and in the midst of terrible adversities including being sold into slavery. That part of the story was genuinely well-told, emotional and exciting, albeit a little bit repetitive in a couple of places. Chava, grew a lot in the course of the story, and though I rooted for her, I'm not sure I ever totally warmed to her. I won't say she was perfect but close to it. The religious message was also touching and delivered authentically without being preachy. I thought it was well handled, as since of course the novel is set a few decades Before Christ, it does not fit into the traditional remit of 'Biblical Fiction'. Judaism, not Christianity is the faith of the faithful, and of course, no New Testament existed so they drew guidance, encouragement, and peace from what they had whether that was the Old Testament Scriptures or the works of the Great Philosophers of old. However, I had a number of issues. Whilst many details well-researched and authentic, others were not. Obvious Americanisms coming from the mouths of first century BC Alexandrians were just--- no. Chava talking about traveling several 'blocks' to the city docks was almost too much. (For goodness sake, stop it with everyone in the Ancient and Medieval world measuring distance in 'blocks'! I'm sure readers can grasp miles and yards). There were other glaring historical errors, one that stood out for me was the mention of raw sewage flowing down the rat-infested streets of ancient Rome. All this in the very city that was famous for its network of underground sewers, unique in the Classical world, and transporting this technology across the Empire. Also the description of slaves being transported in Tiny berths and conditions reminiscent of the transatlantic slave trade and terrible also didn't ring true. I mean seriously, why would the person who had supposedly paid over a year's wage one slave then keep her in conditions so bad it destroyed her beauty and nearly killed her only to sell her for a fraction of the price? It's this inconsistency in terms of research and accuracy that bothers me with a lot of Christian Fiction, in which minor details are correct, but major ones are allowed to slip. I have also noticed in several of this authors books the tendency to idealize the culture in which her protagonists lived: but at the same time have historical people judge the world around them and its people according to modern expectations and standards, unattainable and unrealistic at the time. So there were some modern romantic ideas bandied about 'Why can't Cleopatra just marry whoever she wants because she loves them no matter who they are?' and 'Poor her, having to marry for duty/politics'. Finally, I really did not buy the sympathetic depiction of Cleopatra as a type of victim who just wanted to do the best for her country: I think it's a naive depiction that does not take account of the savage realities of the ancient world and its politics. This was a world in which most people were prepared to do literally anything to preserve power and survive, and few had qualms about murdering anyone they perceived as a threat or using their body to achieve their ends. Please don't try and tell me that a woman who killed her brother and sister, and famously had affairs with two Roman generals was somehow above such tactics or was more moral than others because she loved her country and made a good childhood friend. I requested a copy of this title from Netgalley and listened on the Audiobook of my own volition. I was not required to write a positive review and all opinions expressed are my own.
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  • Lydia Howe
    July 22, 2017
    Why I Choose this Book:Historical fiction is my favorite genre, and this is a time period I’ve rarely read anything about. Therefore, whenever I get the opportunity to review a historical fiction book that doesn’t appear to be overly romantic, I jump at the chance.What I Thought about this Book:Can we just take a moment to bask in the wonder of authors who are able to create such totally amazing books like Egypt’s Sister? This book. Ah, how do I describe it? The world building was so complete an Why I Choose this Book:Historical fiction is my favorite genre, and this is a time period I’ve rarely read anything about. Therefore, whenever I get the opportunity to review a historical fiction book that doesn’t appear to be overly romantic, I jump at the chance.What I Thought about this Book:Can we just take a moment to bask in the wonder of authors who are able to create such totally amazing books like Egypt’s Sister? This book. Ah, how do I describe it? The world building was so complete and real and well-done that I felt like I’d been catapulted into Alexandria and the ancient world of power struggles and slaves and not being able to trust anyone, and all from the perspective of a naive little girl who danced through life with unbelievably drawn conclusions to life.Chava was a brilliant narrator, because as the reader we could see the truth staring us in the face, but she was so blinded to it. I wanted to shake some sense into her, and wondered at the wisdom of her father for not doing so.The first half of the book was by far my favorite. Everything about it was amazing. I realized later that I never actually connected with the characters, I never had the urge to laugh or cry. That’s rather surprising to me because I liked this book such a huge amount. I think what it all boils down to though is that the world building was so fantastically well done that I was intrigued beyond what most books have the power to accomplish. I went to the library when I was about halfway done with reading Egypt’s Sister and got all the nonfiction books they had on ancient Egypt. (Okay, it’s a small library and we had a grand total of four books on ancient Egypt, but still….)This book made me want to study that era in history and take it all in and learn more, more, more.One thing I greatly appreciated was the lack of sordid details regarding the debauchery and wicked lifestyles that took place in Alexandria and Rome at that time in history. It does mention it, and it’s certainly present, but I thought the author did a phenomenal job of not dwelling on it.The second half of the book was still really well written and interesting, but I thought it lacked the undeniable pull of the first half of the book.Another element of the book I greatly enjoyed was seeing how Chava’s Jewish heritage and faith influenced her decisions. There was a lot of good faith content in this book, although it’s obviously way different looking at the Bible through the eyes of life before the coming of Christ. It was so cool to see what life might have been like for Jews during that long gap of time that takes place between the Old and New Testament.Conclusion:Although it doesn’t go into details, there are still enough mentions of the wickedness from that time period the I wouldn’t recommend this book for anyone under the age of 17 or 18.Rating:I’m giving Egypt’s Sister 4 out of 5 stars and 8 out of 10.*I received this book from Bethany House Publishers in exchange for an honest review
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  • Fiction Aficionado
    July 29, 2017
    3.5 STARS ~ This was one of those books that commanded my attention while I was reading it, yet somehow left me a little disappointed at the same time. I love reading historical fiction based around actual historical figures—particularly political or military leaders who have played a huge role in shaping history. I don’t even mind when the story invents (or fleshes out) an unknown companion as a narrator, such as Chava in this story, but in this case I thought it was a little misleading to labe 3.5 STARS ~ This was one of those books that commanded my attention while I was reading it, yet somehow left me a little disappointed at the same time. I love reading historical fiction based around actual historical figures—particularly political or military leaders who have played a huge role in shaping history. I don’t even mind when the story invents (or fleshes out) an unknown companion as a narrator, such as Chava in this story, but in this case I thought it was a little misleading to label the book ‘A Novel of Cleopatra’. Despite Cleopatra’s influence in Chava’s life, she remains little more than a background character in the novel.The novel begins in Urbi and Chava’s childhood, capturing the essence of their developing friendship from the age of eleven, when they swear to be forever friends, through to Urbi’s rise to the throne as an eighteen-year-old and the early years of her reign as she shares the throne with her ten-year-old brother. Throughout this time, Chava holds fast to the words she believes HaShem (God) spoke to her one night: Your friendship with the queen lies in my hands. You will be with her on her happiest day and her last. And you, daughter of Israel, will know yourself, and you will bless her. As a result, Chava refuses to marry, believing her place is beside Cleopatra, and she waits patiently for the time when Cleopatra will finally call her to the palace to be her lady-in-waiting.My attention began to wane during this first part of the story because it felt as though the real story was happening to Urbi, and Chava was simply relating what she could see from the sidelines. But then things drastically changed for Chava, and not in a good way. From here, the story became more engaging, because it really was Chava’s story, rather than Chava waiting to take her place in Urbi’s story. But a word to sensitive readers: The first century BC was a brutal world. There were a few events in Chava’s journey that turned my stomach, and while the story didn’t dwell on them, simply knowing they took place was unsettling enough.From a historical point of view, the novel was well researched, and I found myself wishing I could visit the Alexandria described in these pages, but Chava’s story felt less compelling than the political figures in whose shadows she stood, and I couldn't help wanting more of their stories; more of the tensions between Octavian (Augustus Caesar) and Mark Antony, and more insight into Cleopatra’s motivations.Still, it was an interesting read overall, to see the way in which Chava’s life was taken completely out of her control, but HaShem used that to fulfil the words He spoke to Chava in His own way, rather than in the way Chava had envisaged. I received a copy of this novel from the publisher. This has not influenced the content of my review, which is my honest and unbiased opinion.
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  • Prairie Sky Book Reviews
    July 29, 2017
    Cleopatra, Ancient Egypt’s most famous queen, is a fascinating character who has intrigued many throughout history. When I discovered that Angela Hunt’s newest Biblical Fiction novel from Bethany House would be about this infamous woman, I definitely wanted to give it a try! “Egypt’s Sister” is book number one in “The Silent Years” series, and tells the story of Cleopatra through the eyes of her (fictitious) childhood friend and daughter of the royal tutor. Although I have not had the pleasure o Cleopatra, Ancient Egypt’s most famous queen, is a fascinating character who has intrigued many throughout history. When I discovered that Angela Hunt’s newest Biblical Fiction novel from Bethany House would be about this infamous woman, I definitely wanted to give it a try! “Egypt’s Sister” is book number one in “The Silent Years” series, and tells the story of Cleopatra through the eyes of her (fictitious) childhood friend and daughter of the royal tutor. Although I have not had the pleasure of reading many novels by Angela Hunt, it became crystal clear in this book that she is a masterful storyteller and meticulous researcher. With vivid description and strong emotion, the land of Egypt comes to life on the pages while the characters march distinctly through our imaginations. Now, this is both good AND bad at times, because Ancient Egypt wasn’t exactly a place where everyone walked the moral high ground. . . Actually quite the opposite! In truth, numerous bits and pieces of the story, many of which are likely based in historical fact, are absolutely abhorrent! Just a couple examples include Cleopatra’s marriage to her brother(s), the murder of royal family members (siblings, children, etc.) who posed a threat to the throne, and the inhuman ways that unwanted babies were disposed of. Strangely enough, however, I don’t regret reading “Egypt’s Sister”. Why? Well, if you can get past the tragic-but-historically-accurate details mentioned before, you will find a richly drawn and fascinating story filled with twists and turns in the plot, highly inspiring character growth, and thought-provoking questions about faith, trust, and God’s ultimate purposes. While not a sweet or comforting story by any means, nor one that I recommend to young readers, it was ultimately a book that stuck with me for numerous reasons (many of them good!) and that I will read again in the future. If you enjoy Biblical Fiction, or if the concept of an Ancient Egyptian setting intrigues you, don’t miss “Egypt’s Sister”. You will never think of Cleopatra in the same way again!“Book has been provided courtesy of Baker Publishing Group and Graf-Martin Communications, Inc.”
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  • ☘Tara Sheehan☘
    July 2, 2017
    I’ve followed Angela Hunt’s writings for years thanks to her predictable ability to turn out a good book especially when she delves into historical fiction as she has this ability to make you believe her stories could have happened. Her biblical fiction takes that ability to new heights as she has this way to make the Bible come alive. This latest is no exception as she takes us back in time to the years between the Old & New Testament and provides us a unique view of Cleopatra’s rise to pow I’ve followed Angela Hunt’s writings for years thanks to her predictable ability to turn out a good book especially when she delves into historical fiction as she has this ability to make you believe her stories could have happened. Her biblical fiction takes that ability to new heights as she has this way to make the Bible come alive. This latest is no exception as she takes us back in time to the years between the Old & New Testament and provides us a unique view of Cleopatra’s rise to power which we are privy to through the eyes of her loyal friend. Her storyline isn’t overly predictable so you get to have the fun of guessing what is going to happen next through most of her novel.Like a typical Hunt book her character development is fleshed out so we really get a feel for who Chava is, her place in the world, her relationship to Cleopatra and her faith. She made her version of Cleopatra seem tragic and authentic as if this was more than an idealized version altered for a story. She has a real knack for creating strong female characters. She didn’t write her characters as being flawless human beings who simply believe in God and have perfect lives which can be an irritating part of Christian fiction.The historical details she puts makes you feel like you are really learning something about the lives of Egyptians and Romans as well as how the socio-political climate was pre-Christ. Reading about the ‘Silent Years’ as seen from a Jewish family who is navigating the world of Mark Antony, Cleopatra, and Octavian against a descriptive landscape gives you the feel of a secular book so for anyone who gets a little nervous reading prototypical Christian fiction you should rest easy and give this a chance.If you’re into historical Christian fiction you should add Angela Hunt to your Must Read list as she is guaranteed to provide well-written Christian books.
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  • Vik Arch
    July 25, 2017
    Wow! This book is amazing yet it tells a story of hardship, betrayal and lack. Chava comes as a royal playmate to Princess Urbi. Nothing can break their trust and friendship as long as they lived, especially after Urbi performed the blood vow to never forget each other. The girls lack of nothing, having the best Egypt could ever give them. Nothing stood on their way of being whatever they wanted to be at the royal palace. Chava never saw the difference between her and the pharaoh’s daughter, bec Wow! This book is amazing yet it tells a story of hardship, betrayal and lack. Chava comes as a royal playmate to Princess Urbi. Nothing can break their trust and friendship as long as they lived, especially after Urbi performed the blood vow to never forget each other. The girls lack of nothing, having the best Egypt could ever give them. Nothing stood on their way of being whatever they wanted to be at the royal palace. Chava never saw the difference between her and the pharaoh’s daughter, because she knew that she would always love and serve Urbi. But her dad wasn’t that sure, he talled her that they are different: Chava comes from the Jewish lineage and Urbi is Egyptian princess. The time went on, when Chava started to read scrolls and started to help her dad on learning the names of God. She was curious and learned a lot of things from the scrolls and writings, and with that curiosity questions started to come, especially how their God spoke to her people. After a while she started to listen if God would talk to her, but when He did she was afraid to share the massage, which bound her connection and sealed Urbi’s fate for worth.Lovely story of the Jewish girl born in the Alexandria, so tragically tied to the most famous person in Egypt, the girl called Urbi which would be known as Cleopatra in her adult life.
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  • Rebekah Love Dorris
    July 31, 2017
    Angela Hunt's most recent novel, Egypt’s Sister, transported me back to the early days of the Roman Empire, right during the zenith of Julius Caesar’s reign.Through the eyes of Chavah, a pampered Jewish playmate to the notorious Cleopatra, I stepped into a world that’s heretofore been shrouded in dusty antiquity except for old Elizabeth Taylor movies (which are also pretty ancient, and which I can’t recommend, since I never saw any. Except National Velvet. But I digress).Anyway, if you’re a hist Angela Hunt's most recent novel, Egypt’s Sister, transported me back to the early days of the Roman Empire, right during the zenith of Julius Caesar’s reign.Through the eyes of Chavah, a pampered Jewish playmate to the notorious Cleopatra, I stepped into a world that’s heretofore been shrouded in dusty antiquity except for old Elizabeth Taylor movies (which are also pretty ancient, and which I can’t recommend, since I never saw any. Except National Velvet. But I digress).Anyway, if you’re a history buff like I am, you’ll enjoy this journey to a forgotten world where slaves blended into the tapestry, yet their stories were as vivid as any woven mural, and their lives worth far more but esteemed far less than the marble busts they dusted.I loved getting such a well-researched glimpse into the fabulous intimate lives of people like Julius Caesar, Cleopatra, and Mark Antony. Much of the book read like a John Wayne movie, and I was pleased to watch the main character grow from a self-centered child to a strong, wise woman.Such a unique story idea could only come from a master novelist, and I look forward to learning much more from Angela Hunt as I continue growing as a writer.Much thanks to Bethany House Publishers for providing this book for free in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Linda
    August 1, 2017
    I'm not a fan of ancient history settings and stories, but anything by Angela Hunt is a must-read for me. True to form, she swept me into the story and held my attention throughout the novel. Hunt seamlessly intertwines fact and fiction in this captivating tale of friendship, power, and faith. Her impeccable research add depth and rich historical detail without dragging the story down or making it read like a textbook. Set in the intertestamental period, also known as the Silent Years, the time I'm not a fan of ancient history settings and stories, but anything by Angela Hunt is a must-read for me. True to form, she swept me into the story and held my attention throughout the novel. Hunt seamlessly intertwines fact and fiction in this captivating tale of friendship, power, and faith. Her impeccable research add depth and rich historical detail without dragging the story down or making it read like a textbook. Set in the intertestamental period, also known as the Silent Years, the time between the Old and New Testaments when God did not speak to his people through prophets, Egypt's Sister is a reminder that God is always present even when He is silent. I completely loved this novel and couldn't set it aside until the last page was turned. Don't miss this fascinating story!Disclosure of Material Connection: I received a copy of this book free from Baker/Bethany House for a blog tour. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
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  • Alannie Marshall
    July 21, 2017
    I recently finished reading Egypt’s Sister by Angela Hunt. This was an interesting story that definitely captured my attention. The characters, especially Chava, were the strongest part of the story. I found myself wondering exactly how everything would turn out. The main plot line of the story was definitely Chava’s relationship with God, which is very unique in most inspirational fiction (although based on the name of the genre, you might assume otherwise). I appreciated that aspect of the sto I recently finished reading Egypt’s Sister by Angela Hunt. This was an interesting story that definitely captured my attention. The characters, especially Chava, were the strongest part of the story. I found myself wondering exactly how everything would turn out. The main plot line of the story was definitely Chava’s relationship with God, which is very unique in most inspirational fiction (although based on the name of the genre, you might assume otherwise). I appreciated that aspect of the story, and I felt that it was accomplished very well. That being said, I did not feel a particular connection to the characters, despite the fact that they were well written. I was interested in what happened to them, true, but I could have easily set this book down and never picked it up again without losing sleep over the ending. In a way, the ending contributed to this feeling, as it came out a tad anti-climactic. That being said, it might just be a matter of taste, as I do not often read biblical fiction. Overall, a well written story that just didn’t do it for me. I received this book from the publisher, but I was in no way required to leave a positive review. All opinions are my own.
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  • Daniela Green
    July 24, 2017
    An enthralling story about two girls who are raised in Pharaoh's household. One, the daughter of the king, and the other, the daughter of the royal tutor, Chava and Urbi became best friends, blood sisters for life. When Urbi unexpectedly becomes Queen Cleopatra, her ultimate betrayal sends Chava to the lowest depths of society, where at any given moment she could lose her life. After being in prison for a while, she is sold at a slave market. When she arrives at her new home, she finds out that An enthralling story about two girls who are raised in Pharaoh's household. One, the daughter of the king, and the other, the daughter of the royal tutor, Chava and Urbi became best friends, blood sisters for life. When Urbi unexpectedly becomes Queen Cleopatra, her ultimate betrayal sends Chava to the lowest depths of society, where at any given moment she could lose her life. After being in prison for a while, she is sold at a slave market. When she arrives at her new home, she finds out that after a life of leisure she has no skills to offer, so she decides to become a midwife. After reading everything she possibly can to educate herself in the art, she finally has the chance to show her new learned skill. After a delivery, she finds favor in her master's house due to her intelligence, skill, and beauty. Chava rises to become the most sought out midwife in all of Rome. During a time of war Chava is summoned and asked to do the unthinkable to gain her freedom: she has to go to the Queen and ask her to give herself to Rome. This is a story of love, loyalty, betrayal, and trust. I highly recommend this book."Blood of my blood and heart of my heart"-Urbi (Queen Cleopatra)
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  • Michelle Kidwell
    July 10, 2017
    Egypt's SisterA Novel of Cleopatraby Angela HuntBethany HouseBethany House PublishersChristianPub Date 04 Jul 2017I am reviewing a copy of Egypt's Sister through Bethany House Publishers and Netgalley:Five decades before Christ Chava, the daughter of the royal tutor grows up with Urbi a princess in Alexandria's royal Palace. Urbi grows up to become Queen Cleopatra.Ten days after Alexandria buried the twelfth Macedonian Greek to call himself King of Egypt people gathered outside for the wedding o Egypt's SisterA Novel of Cleopatraby Angela HuntBethany HouseBethany House PublishersChristianPub Date 04 Jul 2017I am reviewing a copy of Egypt's Sister through Bethany House Publishers and Netgalley:Five decades before Christ Chava, the daughter of the royal tutor grows up with Urbi a princess in Alexandria's royal Palace. Urbi grows up to become Queen Cleopatra.Ten days after Alexandria buried the twelfth Macedonian Greek to call himself King of Egypt people gathered outside for the wedding of Cleopatra VII and Ptolemy XIII.Chava has always known Cleopatra as Urbi, not the queen, but her friend, but now Queen Cleopatra is in danger, at the risk of assasinated. Will Chavabe able to protect her friend?Chava finds herself cast off alone in Rome, forced to choose between love and honor, between her desires and God's Will in Life.I give Egypt's Sister five out of five stars!Happy Reading!
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  • Carol
    July 16, 2017
    Egypt's Sister is such a wonderful yet one that taught me so much. I know what the author wrote was fiction but it was made to be so real - it was fascinating, I loved every moment I stole away to read it and I did have to steal away to read it and I honestly meant it - it was worth it - magnificent, intriguing and most of all enjoyable - what a story. Now I know and I am sure you are too that American-isms are not going to come from them but that is what makes the book so enjoyable - and that i Egypt's Sister is such a wonderful yet one that taught me so much. I know what the author wrote was fiction but it was made to be so real - it was fascinating, I loved every moment I stole away to read it and I did have to steal away to read it and I honestly meant it - it was worth it - magnificent, intriguing and most of all enjoyable - what a story. Now I know and I am sure you are too that American-isms are not going to come from them but that is what makes the book so enjoyable - and that is just an unspoken agreement - between reader and writer that that is just A-ok with us because this book would not be the hit it is without it. The main character Chava is immature and obsessive in the beginning and due to all her trials and tribulations she starts to trust in GOD and ends up in trusting in GOD and Mature and strong - if you trust in GOD you become strong and mature - Amen? I received a complimentary copy of this book; all the opinions in my review are all my own.
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  • Martha
    July 22, 2017
    I was not sure how well I would enjoy this book as this time period has not always been my favorite. However, Angela Hunt did not fail me. She takes a time period that is often forgotten and brings it alive in a way that you want to read more about it. This book is not a “HEA” tale, but one of suffering, pain and turmoil, woven with the beauty of words.I loved the midwifery angle that was put in the book as well, and struggled with the constant devotion to a friend that was not really a friend. I was not sure how well I would enjoy this book as this time period has not always been my favorite. However, Angela Hunt did not fail me. She takes a time period that is often forgotten and brings it alive in a way that you want to read more about it. This book is not a “HEA” tale, but one of suffering, pain and turmoil, woven with the beauty of words.I loved the midwifery angle that was put in the book as well, and struggled with the constant devotion to a friend that was not really a friend. In my own life, I have struggled with that, asking myself why I might stay loyal to a friend that has not returned the favor.In this story of Cleopatra, it would be excellent for a student in high school to read. There is little to no romance in this book, but it does contain some harsher realities of the time period, but not in graphic detail.This book was given to me for review by Bethany House. The opinions contained herein are my own.
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  • Amanda
    July 30, 2017
    While I have enjoyed a wide variety of Angela's novels, I have to say that her historical fiction is where her talent as an author shines. I'm not sure why I even picked up this book, since Cleopatra is one of my least favorite women in history. I'm so glad that I decided to read this story regardless though! It was a wonderful blend of history and fiction. I enjoyed getting to know the main character and liked that there was so much to her story. I highly recommend this one and look forward to While I have enjoyed a wide variety of Angela's novels, I have to say that her historical fiction is where her talent as an author shines. I'm not sure why I even picked up this book, since Cleopatra is one of my least favorite women in history. I'm so glad that I decided to read this story regardless though! It was a wonderful blend of history and fiction. I enjoyed getting to know the main character and liked that there was so much to her story. I highly recommend this one and look forward to reading the other books in the series, as it gives a unique look into what was going on in the world before the birth of Jesus Christ.I received this book from Bethany House in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Simone
    July 26, 2017
    Angela Hunt has begun a wonderful new Christian series with Egypt's Sister, the story of Cleopatra.  No one had heard from God in four hundred years, yet the Jews were forever faithful servants. This story was so filled with descriptions that you could picture each and every scene with amazing detail.  The characters were realistic and believable.  The story increased my faith and I'm sure it will yours.
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  • Elizabeth Dennison
    July 23, 2017
    Loved reading this new book by Angela Elwell Hunt! She has done it again and gave us a deep look into history and the culture!!
  • Diane Moyle
    June 9, 2017
    Angela Hunt continues to write wonderful historical novels that take you back into Biblical times. This story is a deviation from her normal tomes where she writes about a woman in the Bible. In this story, her character is fictional and her time is the 400 silent years from the last prophet in the Old Testament to the writing of the new. This time, her main character, Chava, is fictional and a friend of Cleopatra. She fills the pages with an enthralling story of two young girls growing up in th Angela Hunt continues to write wonderful historical novels that take you back into Biblical times. This story is a deviation from her normal tomes where she writes about a woman in the Bible. In this story, her character is fictional and her time is the 400 silent years from the last prophet in the Old Testament to the writing of the new. This time, her main character, Chava, is fictional and a friend of Cleopatra. She fills the pages with an enthralling story of two young girls growing up in this ancient era, one is Jewish, devoted to her God and the other worships many gods and becomes queen of Egypt. The author brings this tale to life by having Chava tell her life’s journey in the first person. You experience her despair as her life of privilege comes to a shocking end and her family is ripped apart. You are also witness to her strong faith in God and how it assists her in times of misery and hopelessness. You get a taste for the lifestyle of both the rich and poor in early Egypt. All these factors combine to give the story depth and character and inspire the reader to keep reading.This story can be read and enjoyed by early teen readers to adults. I recommend this to anyone who enjoys reading stories that involve characters from the Bible. Although this book doesn’t pertain to a particular person, it does pertain to the era and helps you to understand the challenges that were faced by everyday people, both Jewish and non-Jewish.
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  • Ann Theis
    July 28, 2017
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