The White Trilogy (Inspector Brant, #1, #2, #3)
Hip, violent and funny vignettes of the mean streets of southeast London tie together this rowdy set of short novels by Bruen (The Guards), a modern Irish master of the hard-boiled. Collecting A White Arrest (1998), Taming the Alien (1999) and The McDead (2000) for first U.S. publication, this omnibus showcases the investigations of the aging Chief Inspector Roberts and the brutish Detective Sergeant Brant, with the assistance of the unlucky-in-love Woman Police Constable Falls. They don't always solve their assigned crimes, but know perfectly well if they can nail the occasional major criminal-"the white arrest"-they'll be able to keep their jobs. Among numerous subplots, they pursue a serial killer stalking England's winning soccer team, a vigilante gang hanging drug dealers and a hit man known as "The Alien" because he whacked a victim engrossed in the video of that movie with a baseball bat just as the monster pops out of John Hurt's chest. But quieter moments, such as Brant's visit to his home county in Ireland, are just as interesting.

The White Trilogy (Inspector Brant, #1, #2, #3) Details

TitleThe White Trilogy (Inspector Brant, #1, #2, #3)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseDec 3rd, 2005
PublisherKate's Mystery Books
ISBN-139781932112023
Rating
GenreMystery, Noir, Crime, Fiction, Cultural, Ireland

The White Trilogy (Inspector Brant, #1, #2, #3) Review

  • Patrick O'Neil
    January 1, 1970
    I had a hard go starting Ken Bruen's The White Trilogy. The writing felt clunky, and rough, spit out in bits, and slung at my head like a fishmonger tossing out a three day old Flounder. I was thinking: "I can't do this. Dude writes like a butcher." And then, Bruen did this thing he does, it's really simple: Roberts didn't know what to say. "I don't know what to say," He said. Yup, obviously doesn't take much to impress me. But really, if you think about it, and even if you don't, it’s fucking b I had a hard go starting Ken Bruen's The White Trilogy. The writing felt clunky, and rough, spit out in bits, and slung at my head like a fishmonger tossing out a three day old Flounder. I was thinking: "I can't do this. Dude writes like a butcher." And then, Bruen did this thing he does, it's really simple: Roberts didn't know what to say. "I don't know what to say," He said. Yup, obviously doesn't take much to impress me. But really, if you think about it, and even if you don't, it’s fucking brilliant. And that's pretty much Bruen's schtick, flaunt the obvious, play with the mundane, and beat it to death. He's got a way with words, and he shoves them together into menacing sentences. He's an Irishman, he's written about a million books – and he's my new goddamn hero.
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  • Still
    January 1, 1970
    I finished the final novel in this trilogy a few moments ago.As I understand these are the 1st three novels in the Brant & Roberts series.If you've read all of Ken Bruen's outstanding "Jack Taylor" novels and you have a thirst for more things Bruen this is an excellent book to continue whatever mad tear you might be on.These aren't exactly "crime thrillers" and they're definitely not "police procedurals". They're a breezy romp through a series of adventures and misadventures of two London po I finished the final novel in this trilogy a few moments ago.As I understand these are the 1st three novels in the Brant & Roberts series.If you've read all of Ken Bruen's outstanding "Jack Taylor" novels and you have a thirst for more things Bruen this is an excellent book to continue whatever mad tear you might be on.These aren't exactly "crime thrillers" and they're definitely not "police procedurals". They're a breezy romp through a series of adventures and misadventures of two London police officers who break almost every rule in order to bring villains to justice.As with every book I've read by Ken Bruen this trilogy is highly recommended.
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  • Paul
    January 1, 1970
    Brant's pants and Y-fronts were around his ankles and he felt a baseball bat tap his bum. For a horrific moment, he envisaged rape of an American variety. Fen said, 'I hear you're a hard ass. Time to change that. For the next few weeks when you try to sit, remember: keep yer bloody nose outta people's business.' xXx Stella Davis-Fenton's ex wife- was loading her washing machine. If she could have known it was the last day of her life, she might have done the wash regardless. It's highly doubtfu Brant's pants and Y-fronts were around his ankles and he felt a baseball bat tap his bum. For a horrific moment, he envisaged rape of an American variety. Fen said, 'I hear you're a hard ass. Time to change that. For the next few weeks when you try to sit, remember: keep yer bloody nose outta people's business.' xXx Stella Davis-Fenton's ex wife- was loading her washing machine. If she could have known it was the last day of her life, she might have done the wash regardless. It's highly doubtful she'd have added fabric softener. xXx ... his weapon of choice was a hurley. The national sport in Ireland, apart from talking, is hurling. A cross between hockey and homicide.The White Trilogy contains the best mixture of Irish wit and violence and Brant's escapades are a delight to behold. Recommended by this reader. 5 stars.
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  • Charles
    January 1, 1970
    I like Bruen's jack Taylor books. This less. Still read other GR reviews. I may just have eaten a sour nut.
  • Margaret Wichorek
    January 1, 1970
    These three short novels feature Insp. Roberts and Sgt. Brant-three very tough guys , indeed.They were a fast read, but very violent and somehow, also, very funny. Just like one of those Tarentino films. So, if ou like your noir, very noir, you'll like these.
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  • Pam Mezaraups
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely loved it...well I am a Ken Bruen reader...love Jack Taylor...and now I add Roberts and Brant. I love the N-O-I-R... (Mr. Brant, please note) and I admire the sense of humor, sometimes bitter, in the face of an impossible job. The villains always seem to get their just due...but seldom in a court of law... I am ready for more Roberts and Brant...and I love the females in the action!!!! Loved the "sticky" solution to a girl's problem.
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  • Ace McGee
    January 1, 1970
    The guy guys are bad so the bad guys got to be really bad! Choppy little stories in choppy little (1 -3 page) chapters. Tons of slang and references add to the disruption of the flow but one gets accustomed to it and even learns a few things.But don’t worry. All the baddies get their Just deserts albeit in the last three pages of each book, in quick, ugly manners.Quick read.
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  • Alan Main
    January 1, 1970
    This is a very difficult book to evaluate,the style its written in for me was difficult to follow,and to be honest I did not feel I really enjoyed it. However it is a interesting read,but probably not one I will be repeating.
  • Joshua Nichols
    January 1, 1970
    One of my favorite books of all time.
  • Taylor Lies
    January 1, 1970
    Simply put, I didn’t want it to end!
  • Daniel
    January 1, 1970
    "two lips and chimera"a tribute to e. e. cummingsa fire-breathing she-monster in typographically exuberant stylewith lion's head and a goat's body spitting serpent's bilecummings was also a painterwith no concern for rhyme or meterpunctuation scattered across the pagelike the serpent's tail of a rhetorimportance, elected, of presentationwhere meaning and emotion become clear
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  • Alex Gherzo
    January 1, 1970
    For quite a while I had been meaning to start this series by Ken Bruen (after seeing the movie Blitz, based on his fourth book in the series, starring a perfectly case Jason Statham as Brandt). Finally getting my hands on The White Trilogy, a collection of his first three books -- A White Arrest, Taming the Alien and The McDead -- I decided to make it my first book of 2017. And, despite massive flaws, I really liked it.Detective Sergeant Brandt and Chief Inspector Roberts are a pair of hard-nose For quite a while I had been meaning to start this series by Ken Bruen (after seeing the movie Blitz, based on his fourth book in the series, starring a perfectly case Jason Statham as Brandt). Finally getting my hands on The White Trilogy, a collection of his first three books -- A White Arrest, Taming the Alien and The McDead -- I decided to make it my first book of 2017. And, despite massive flaws, I really liked it.Detective Sergeant Brandt and Chief Inspector Roberts are a pair of hard-nosed London cops. Roberts is a gruff commanding officer who doesn't mind if the rules get broken so long as it bears results. And Brandt is the guy who's not only willing to break those rules, but relishes it. In A White Arrest, they go after a gang of amateur vigilantes murdering drug dealers, as well as a psycho killing cricket players; in Taming the Alien, Brandt heads off to America on the hunt for a hardened criminal who made the mistake of targeting him; and in The McDead, Brandt and Roberts set their sights on the new top gangster in London. Spoilers...The biggest problem with these stories is that they're not very satisfying. Brandt and/or Roberts never actually get their men. The killer in A White Arrest gets away, even after killing Brandt's dog; Brandt never catches up with Fenton "the Alien," and he's left a paraplegic by a hurricane (how's that for random?); and Tommy Logan is shot by a guy he tuned up in a subplot that is present only to offer up someone outside of any of the main or supporting characters to kill him. This sucks, particularly in Taming the Alien, as Fenton is a great villain and a showdown between him and Brandt is set up very well. Also, I don't know if it's just the edition I have or all of them, but there are lots and lots of typos and grammatical errors. Whoever edited the book was either out to lunch or doesn't know what he's doing. Things get particularly confusing when there's a conversation and the quotation marks have no rhyme or reason, so it's difficult to tell who's talking when. These (especially the first) would normally be deal-breakers, but I still found myself loving The White Trilogy. The characters are fantastic and a lot of fun to be around, particularly Brandt. He's the kind of cop we all wish was real at first, but Bruen doesn't go the easy route and make him a total wish fulfillment. Brandt does a lot of unsavory things, like extort business owners for free service (while failing to actually protect them); he even tries to sleep with Roberts' wife. You can't help but like him, however; he's funny as hell, and refreshingly politically incorrect. There's also a sweetness to him underneath the rock-hard exterior; he doesn't extort sex directly from Robert's wife, for example, but rather wants the opportunity to take her out to a nice dinner and impress her. It's almost enough to make you overlook how dishonorable his actions are. Roberts is great too, a guy with a lousy life -- a cheating wife, an ungrateful daughter, skin cancer -- whose only refuge is the job, along with his love of noir movies. The supporting characters, particularly WPC Falls, are great too. Also, and this is a personal thing, but I love how deeply ingrained in London culture the stories are. They couldn't take place anywhere else, and it makes me feel almost like I'm back in England, even if this is the seedier side of London. The narrative tends to meander and go off on tangents, but it's so much fun to be there with these characters that it doesn't matter; in fact, it helps distract from how unsatisfying the main plots are. Brandt's sojourn in Ireland, for example, doesn't really amount to anything, but it's such a pleasant interlude that it doesn't matter. The White Trilogy is a fun, if very imperfect, read, and I'll definitely be picking up the rest in the series before long.
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  • Ian Mathers
    January 1, 1970
    I burned through the first half of this one in a night or two, then it almost burned me out; the whole thing felt just a little too mean spirited and nihilistic to consume in one gulp, and Bruen's impressionistic take on noir was a bit hard to follow when you're speeding through the books that fast. After setting it aside for a week, though, it was easier to see the humour in the characters, and really this is only a few shades darker than something like Terry Pratchett's Night Watch books (and I burned through the first half of this one in a night or two, then it almost burned me out; the whole thing felt just a little too mean spirited and nihilistic to consume in one gulp, and Bruen's impressionistic take on noir was a bit hard to follow when you're speeding through the books that fast. After setting it aside for a week, though, it was easier to see the humour in the characters, and really this is only a few shades darker than something like Terry Pratchett's Night Watch books (and I love those). Funny as hell, thrilling in both (breakneck, spitefulyl gleeful) style and content, relatively daring in form, this is great stuff.
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  • Herb Hastings
    January 1, 1970
    You don't get much more hard boiled than the 3 books in compendium. The stories follow London police into the heart of darkness. The main character is SGT Brant, a violent,and angry force of nature. He says of himself, " I was born angry and then got worse". The closest he has to a friend is Chief Inspector Roberts who is aging but still a man to be reckoned with. Bruen's terse and tight writing style drives these stories at an adrenalin pace. If you like noir fiction, read these books.
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  • Douglas Castagna
    January 1, 1970
    Three books in one, albeit short ones. These books move along at a fast clip and have the feeling thrusting the reader into a boxing match, by the end of each novel one feels rather punch drunk and loopy. His style is sparse and energetic, and while traditionally each book has no real resolution, this does work well as a trilogy since there is carryover. Currently I am reading BLITZ which made me cognizant of the writer when I watched the movie with Jason Stratam.
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  • Kon Lymbo
    January 1, 1970
    I read the Inspector Brant seies in about 3 weeks.I gave each book 4 stars because they are great.The series gets FIVE STARS because it is BRILLIANT! Now to start on Mr Bruen's, Jack Taylor series.
  • Adam
    January 1, 1970
    Ken Bruen’s White Trilogy is breathless black comic mayhem thinly disguised as police procedural. The nonstop jokes, riffs on pop culture and post modern elliptical plots remind me of Steve Aylett. An almost ambient style that is more absorbed than read.
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  • April
    January 1, 1970
    A refreshing kick in the teeth of a book (to call it a mere "crime novel" would be a grave injustice)...features some of my favorite, most memorable & complex baddies, sorta-good guys, and general pieces of work since the last Ellroy I read.
  • Ed O'farrell
    January 1, 1970
    Not Bruen's best work, but entertaining nonetheless. Far better than most of what passes for mystery and suspense fiction these days. My three stars are more a reflection of the context of Bruen's other work than in comparison to other authors. Well worth the time and money.
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  • Mike
    January 1, 1970
    Three excellent interconnected noir tales of inspectors Roberts and Brant bringing their own special blend of law and order to London. Less laconic than present, Bruen develops a great set of characters to surround the inspectors and puts them in service of solid storylines.
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  • David Simonetti
    January 1, 1970
    This is well worth reading. It is filled with total low lives and is a classic detectibve novel with a modern twist that highlights contemporary depravity. The writing is good and the main character is likeable depsite his many flaws.
  • Ellen
    January 1, 1970
    What can I say about Ken Bruen's Tom Brant stories that hasn't already been said? Required reading. A must have for your library. What a ride! Yeah, like that.
  • Jeff
    January 1, 1970
    If you haven't read Ken Bruen, you have a treat in store. Great noir writer from Ireland. His Brant character is wonderful, a Dirty-Harry type cop that everyone loathes, but he gets the job done!
  • Lee Hannah McDonald
    January 1, 1970
    Bruen is quickly becoming one of my favorites. I love the grittiness of his stories and his succinct style of writing.
  • Matt Stewart
    January 1, 1970
    the funniest, most terse crime writing I've ever read - Jim Thompson hepped up on Jon Stewart. it's not literature, but an excellent vacation read.
  • Brian
    January 1, 1970
    It's easy to see the humor in Bruen's unrelenting bleakness but the glimmers of humanity amid the non stop violence it the work of an artist.
  • Susan W
    January 1, 1970
    Series of three. Enjoyed them. Interesting characters which keep you wanting more. No long trials in this world, just the bad taking care of the bad.
  • Jim
    January 1, 1970
    weary of this cockney tarantino style.
  • Tom LS
    January 1, 1970
    kickass pace, great characters
  • Kathleen
    January 1, 1970
    Great characters.After reading all the Jack Taylors, I was jonesing for more. The White Trilogy delivers.The timing is different, but the pitch is perfect.
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