Keeping Place
To be human is to long for home. Home is our most fundamental human longing. And for many of us homesickness is a nagging place of grief. This book connects that desire and disappointment with the story of the Bible, helping us to see that there is a homemaking God with wide arms of welcome―and a church commissioned with this same work. "Many of us seem to be recovering the sacred, if ordinary, beauty of place," writes author Jen Pollock Michel. "Perhaps we're reading along with Wendell Berry, falling in love with Berry's small-town barber and Jayber Crow's small-town life. . . . Or maybe we're simply reading our Bibles better, discovering that while we might wish to flatten Scripture to serve our didactic purposes, it rises up in flesh and sinew, muscle and bone: God's holy story is written in the lives of people and their places." Including a five-session discussion guide and paired with a companion DVD, Keeping Place offers hope to the wanderer, help to the stranded, and a new vision of what it means to live today with our longings for eternal home.

Keeping Place Details

TitleKeeping Place
Author
FormatPaperback
ReleaseMay 7th, 2017
PublisherIVP Books
ISBN0830844902
ISBN-139780830844906
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Christian

Keeping Place Review

  • Jeanie
    March 22, 2017
    The Inklings were, one and all, guilty of the heresy of the Happy Ending. They rejected the modernist aesthetic of dissonance and estrangement, and instead longed to reclaim a world of beauty and goodness-a world of enchantment. In their stories of hobbits and orcs, fauns and beavers and Father Christmas, Tolkien and Lewis told the story of home as the Scriptures tell it: the world has fallen from its original perfection, but it will one day be restored. The enduring legacy of these stories test The Inklings were, one and all, guilty of the heresy of the Happy Ending. They rejected the modernist aesthetic of dissonance and estrangement, and instead longed to reclaim a world of beauty and goodness-a world of enchantment. In their stories of hobbits and orcs, fauns and beavers and Father Christmas, Tolkien and Lewis told the story of home as the Scriptures tell it: the world has fallen from its original perfection, but it will one day be restored. The enduring legacy of these stories testify to the resonance of their hope. Humans long for the thaw of winter and the return of the King. They want to go home. Do you long for home? A place of peace, acceptance, purpose and calling. Jen Pollock Michel speaks in a narration that is profoundly poetic on what home really is and how we long for it. It made me think of my own short comings and disappointments that all point to my longing of home and how I fall short of being home. I have come to find out that I need a better understanding of what home is. With that understanding, I can focus on what is important and leave behind what hinders me. The text is done in two parts. The welcome of home - speaks to our longing, the history , the maker of home, moving from home to home, and the imperishable home.The 2nd part refers to the work of home that speaks to our labor of home done in love, the church, the marriage and how we continually say I do., feasting together, a place of rest and how we finally make it "home". Each of these expresses the gospel in sound ways that you are living the gospel out.Some of the quotes that I found encouraging that speaks of home. Are we engaged in efforts that are relevant to the groans of creation and the cries of the poor? Are we producing disciples whose work is contributing to profound transformation that set people dancing in the streets. Have we joined King Jesus on his grand, sweeping mission of restoration. These are the questions for the church related to housekeeping. They remind us that we make a home for the wandering lost in our cities not simply by throwing open our church doors but by identifying and attending to their most desperate need. Marriage isn't everything. It isn't our home or final hope. Nevertheless, it is worth the routine work of "I do". After all, marriage is its own kind of stability. This study is upside down when it comes to our culture as it should be. It is community minded, not individualized. We were created to not be alone but to be home. One of the AHA moments for me was the discussion of the Sabbath. God created Sabbath for our good to meet our spiritual needs and our physical needs. Sabbath is shown in creation as well. Without the rest of land, we have the danger of creating what happened in the 1930's. The land requires rest just as we do. But the aha moment for me was Sabbath reflects the character of God and his goodness. When I truly practice the Sabbath, I truly experience the presence of God. Another insightful was the work of keeping house. We need housekeeping and we need to embrace it for our good. The stats that Jen shared are staggering and it made me think that any depression that I may suffer is my lack of good housekeeping. Housekeeping is not just a woman's job but as a family unit, housekeeping is living out the gospel. Jen also shares insightful bible study as she goes through each chapter along with her own personal journey of home. I highly recommend this book for both men and women in their desire to come home. A Special Thank You to Intervarsity Press and Netgalley for the ARC and the opportunity to post an honest review.
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  • Cara Meredith
    May 25, 2017
    I may not agree with everything Jen writes (or believes) theologically, but she's an outstanding writer. This story of home is well researched, well told and well worth any (Christian) reader's time.
  • Dorothy Littell
    May 26, 2017
    All of us carry a deep longing for home. Michel writes, "Home represents humanity's most visceral ache—and our oldest desire." In Keeping Place, the author explores this longing and traces it directly back to our never-quite-satisfied hunger for God. Michel is one of the smartest writers of today and has an uncanny ability to tie seemingly disparate threads together in a way that brings readers to many AHA! moments. The book is thoughtful, rich, and incredibly hopeful. (And as usual, Michel is a All of us carry a deep longing for home. Michel writes, "Home represents humanity's most visceral ache—and our oldest desire." In Keeping Place, the author explores this longing and traces it directly back to our never-quite-satisfied hunger for God. Michel is one of the smartest writers of today and has an uncanny ability to tie seemingly disparate threads together in a way that brings readers to many AHA! moments. The book is thoughtful, rich, and incredibly hopeful. (And as usual, Michel is an exquisite writer.)
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  • Aimee Fritz
    May 2, 2017
    Jen Pollock Michel's beautiful, thoughtful, new book is rich with profound but accessible ideas about the physical, relational, and spiritual homes we make.In Keeping Place we begin to understand why we long for home so deeply. Not just the houses we grew up in, the people with grew up with, but far deeper and wider, into nostalgia, grief, women's rights, church, marriage, sabbath rest, and heaven.I have many ideas scribbled in the margins of my copy of Keeping Place. I need to spend much more t Jen Pollock Michel's beautiful, thoughtful, new book is rich with profound but accessible ideas about the physical, relational, and spiritual homes we make.In Keeping Place we begin to understand why we long for home so deeply. Not just the houses we grew up in, the people with grew up with, but far deeper and wider, into nostalgia, grief, women's rights, church, marriage, sabbath rest, and heaven.I have many ideas scribbled in the margins of my copy of Keeping Place. I need to spend much more time praying and writing about them. For now I can only imagine writing them in a journal, it will be so personal:1. What roots have I dug up and transplanted at my 11 different addresses? What have I left behind? What have I lost? What can be found again to make my current Home thrive?2. Can Home be more than one place? - Will my kids say they are from Georgia when they go to college? Or will they always say they're from Wheaton, Illinois? Have I finished grieving my (almost 2 years ago) move away?3. Can I honestly say the Lord is my Home? That all my stuff, my identity, my love, and my service all fits into and under my relationship with the God who loves me?4. How can I make Homemaking more worshipful as a creative, steadfast, and welcoming woman with generous service and firm boundaries? What new things can I try? What old things could I stop?I enjoyed quietly reading Keeping Place by myself, carefully answering the study questions in the back, and praying through the tough answers. It also would be great for small groups, with or without the DVD.
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  • Ivan
    May 15, 2017
    Beautifully book. Fresh reminder that we are grounded in place and with a people. We are emplaced. It has been fun reading this book right after Andy Crouch's 'The Tech-Wise Family,' David Sax's 'Revenge of the Analog,' and Ben Sasse's 'The Vanishing American Adult.' Together these titles not only stress the importance of embodied life but also its beauty.
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  • Collin
    March 30, 2017
    "The desire for home is a good desire, and the Bible assures us that if we want home, we shall have it. Just not in this life."From Genesis to Revelation, the topic of "home" weaves its way throughout the entire narrative of Scripture. Yet, it remains a topic woefully underdeveloped in Christianity today. Thankfully, Jen Pollock Michel is changing that with this book. With elegant prose and theological finesse, Michel exposes readers to the restlessness we all feel, one she pinpoints as our year "The desire for home is a good desire, and the Bible assures us that if we want home, we shall have it. Just not in this life."From Genesis to Revelation, the topic of "home" weaves its way throughout the entire narrative of Scripture. Yet, it remains a topic woefully underdeveloped in Christianity today. Thankfully, Jen Pollock Michel is changing that with this book. With elegant prose and theological finesse, Michel exposes readers to the restlessness we all feel, one she pinpoints as our yearning for the home lost in Eden and promised through faith in Jesus Christ. Divided into two parts, "Keeping Place" describes both the story of home as well as the role we play in it here an now. We all crave a home, but to long for it faithfully means to bear witness to the true story of home—God’s welcome, our rebellion, and the hope of one day dwelling in the full presence of the Homemaker through faith in Jesus Christ.Adding to the robust theology throughout, Michel invites readers into her own story of loss and longing, which causes Keeping Place to read with a depth foreign to much of Christian publishing these days. I can't commend this book highly enough. It's one men and women alike would do well to read for the sake of enriching their love and longing for the home promised in Christ.
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