Lipstick Voodoo (Kincaid Strange, #2)
Kincaid Strange, not your average voodoo practitioner, is back in the freshly imagined and hugely entertaining second installment of Kristi Charish's urban fantasy series. Kincaid Strange cannot catch a break. After dealing with a spate of paranormal murders, there's barely time to recuperate—let alone sleep in—before there's a new problem in Kincaid's world of paranormal activity. When her roommate, Nathan Cade—the ghost of a grunge-rocker with a pathological lack of self-control—comes home bound to a dead body, it's up to Kincaid to figure out how to free him. Ideally before her new mentor, Gideon, a powerful sorcerer's ghost, discovers that Nate is trapped in the body he'd coveted for himself. When Aaron, a Seattle cop on the afterlife beat—and Kincaid's ex—calls her in to help out with a cold case, she takes the chance to mend fences with the police department. The problem: they want to interview Nate's ghost, which she can't produce. Then people from Nate's past start showing up dead, and what's killing them doesn't seem to be human. And the way it's killing them is especially brutal. Nate's hiding something, but he's Kincaid's friend and she wants to help him. But she also wants to stay alive....

Lipstick Voodoo (Kincaid Strange, #2) Details

TitleLipstick Voodoo (Kincaid Strange, #2)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 8th, 2019
PublisherVintage Canada
ISBN-139780345815903
Rating
GenreFantasy, Urban Fantasy, Paranormal

Lipstick Voodoo (Kincaid Strange, #2) Review

  • Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽
    January 1, 1970
    3.75 stars. Final review, first posted on Fantasy Literature:Kincaid Strange is a 27-year-old woman who’s one of the only “zombie practitioners” in the Seattle area. She can temporarily (or permanently, for that matter) raise people from the dead, which is clearly handy when you want to temporarily raise a rich old man and ask him to amend his will in order to avoid a family lawsuit. Lipstick Voodoo opens with just such a scene, with a crotchety old man who’s not impressed with his family’s reas 3.75 stars. Final review, first posted on Fantasy Literature:Kincaid Strange is a 27-year-old woman who’s one of the only “zombie practitioners” in the Seattle area. She can temporarily (or permanently, for that matter) raise people from the dead, which is clearly handy when you want to temporarily raise a rich old man and ask him to amend his will in order to avoid a family lawsuit. Lipstick Voodoo opens with just such a scene, with a crotchety old man who’s not impressed with his family’s reasons for raising him from the dead, and an impressively sleazy lawyer. The laws against paranormal dealings have been relaxed somewhat due to the fallout from the events of The Voodoo Killings, the first book in this KINCAID STRANGE urban fantasy series (obligatory spoiler warning here for that book). Unfortunately Kincaid still has a boatload of problems, many of which resulted from the events in that prior book. She has an on-again-off-again boyfriend, Aaron, a police detective whose new chief hates the paranormal division. So Kincaid’s best client, the police force, won’t hire her as a consultant any more, and Aaron is caught between his boss and his former girlfriend. The vengeful ghost of a powerful sorcerer, Gideon Lawrence, is massively unhappy with Kincaid, particularly since she burned a body that Gideon was planning on taking over and inhabiting.What Gideon doesn’t yet know ― and Kincaid is afraid he’ll find out, since Gideon is entirely capable of choking her to death with a hair dryer cord or some other household object ― is that the body in question was accidentally taken over by another ghost, Kincaid’s roommate Nathan Cade, a grunge rocker who’s been dead (but not gone) for twenty years. Now instead of a ghost for a roommate Kincaid has a zombie, and one whose body is starting to rapidly deteriorate. Even the brain Slurpees (YUM) aren’t helping Nate’s body much. Despite her magical power and expertise in All Things Zombie, Kincaid can’t figure out how to untie Nate from this gradually decaying body.In the middle of this, Aaron unexpectedly offers Kincaid a job helping him investigate a cold case, the apparent murder of a musician, Damien Fell, which occurred over twenty years ago. Nate once knew Damien; he claims not to know anything about Damien’s death, but he’s clearly hiding something important from Kincaid. As Kincaid digs deeper into the case, interviewing Nate’s old girlfriend Mindy and his bandmate and drummer Cole, people start dying in gruesome ways.It’s always exciting when the sequel is better than the first book in a series, and that’s how I felt about Lipstick Voodoo. This one gets points for really sucking me into the story, much more than The Voodoo Killings. I had a couple of issues with the underlying logic of the mystery. For one thing, Damien Fell is described as a “devout Mormon” who never drank alcohol or even coffee or tea ― one of the reasons his death from a heroin overdose is suspicious. Yet Damien is also supposed to have been “hooking up” with Mindy before his death, which would contradict his character as a devout Mormon. There’s also an undeniably creepy demon-like power from the Otherside (the spiritual dimension) called Eloch, with black, smoky tendrils that reach out and freeze their victim, but the powers it displays didn’t seem to mesh very well when the answer to the mystery of Eloch was finally revealed.These quibbles aside, Lipstick Voodoo wove a compelling mystery that kept me glued to its pages. It’s interesting reading a zombie fantasy where the zombies are the more sympathetic characters; it’s mostly the humans and the odd wraith and ghoul that cause the real trouble. As I mentioned in my review of The Voodoo Killings, Kristi Charish‘s writing is reasonably good. She’s not using any poetic language, evocative imagery or other literary tricks, just straightforwardly telling a story. So this is a fairly light, quick read.Which brings me to my final quibble: reading the two books in this series back-to-back, I noticed a couple of places where Charish uses almost word-for-word the same language in both books to describe some secondary characters, including entire paragraphs. It struck me as a bit lazy or sloppy.Several elements of the plot in Lipstick Voodoo hang heavily off of events from The Voodoo Killings, and there’s a lot of significant character development that carries over from that first book as well. In fact, I started reading this book before I’d read the first one, but called a halt about 100 pages in because so much of the plot here relies on understanding events and characters from The Voodoo Killings. So I went and read that book and then started this one over again. Hence, I’d very strongly recommend reading the books in this KINCAID STRANGE series in order.I received a copy of this book from the publisher for review. Thanks!!
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  • Mogsy (MMOGC)
    January 1, 1970
    4 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2019/01/20/...It was nice getting back into the world of Kincaid Strange with Lipstick Voodoo, and reading it has made me realize how much I’d missed this kind of urban fantasy. Thing is, I’m just not reading as much of the genre as I used to. I’ve gotten pickier these days, and my UF reads are mostly limited to series I’ve already started and to only books that I feel are breaking the mold. While I would hesitate to label the Kincaid S 4 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2019/01/20/...It was nice getting back into the world of Kincaid Strange with Lipstick Voodoo, and reading it has made me realize how much I’d missed this kind of urban fantasy. Thing is, I’m just not reading as much of the genre as I used to. I’ve gotten pickier these days, and my UF reads are mostly limited to series I’ve already started and to only books that I feel are breaking the mold. While I would hesitate to label the Kincaid Strange novels as “typical”, admittedly they do follow a certain type of formula, containing a lot of the tropes often associated with the genre. At the same time though, I’m guessing that’s where all the warm and fuzzy down-earth-vibes I’m getting are coming from.Lipstick Voodoo is the sequel to The Voodoo Killings, and picks up soon after the events of the first book. As one of the only few licensed (and legit) paranormal practitioners on the entire west coast, Kincaid Strange has got her hands full with new jobs, and yet she’s still always nearly broke. At the moment, simply trying to keep her zombie roommate “alive” and in one piece is draining her bank account. Nathan Cade used to be a pretty big deal on the 90’s Seattle grunge scene before he died in a boating accident at the height of his fame, and until recently, he’s spent the last two decades or so continuing his musical career as a ghost. But now, due to a magical ritual gone wrong, he is trapped in an animated corpse that is slowly decomposing, and if Kincaid doesn’t find a solution to the problem soon, his spirit will die along with its vessel.Meanwhile, Kincaid is also in trouble with Gideon, the ghost of a sorcerer who is currently furious with her for destroying a body he had intended to inhabit. Now Gideon figures she owes him a huge debt, and he’s not going to rest until it is exacted. As if her life wasn’t complicated enough, Kincaid is also trying to sort out her feelings for Aaron, her ex-boyfriend who is a detective on the police force. The reopening of a twenty-year-old paranormal case has led to Aaron calling her up for her expertise, and the fact that it involves a murdered rocker who was a contemporary of Nathan Cade’s has both the detective and our protagonist wondering if her undead roommate may have had something to do with the death.Lipstick Voodoo was everything I wanted—fast and fun, with just the right amount of offbeat humor and charm. We mostly have our main character to thank for that. In some ways, Kincaid Strange reminds me a bit of a modernized Anita Blake (but savvier and less raunchy), most likely due to her supernatural ability to draw energy from the otherworld to fuel her necromantic magic. But while she may conform to the familiar archetype of the urban fantasy female protagonist (e.g., strong and independent, to the point of preferring to work alone; having few female friends and strained relationships with remaining family members; always getting in trouble with the powerful head honchos of the paranormal community because of her snarky, sometimes impetuous attitude; dealing with a tricky situation with an on-again-off-again beau, etc., etc., etc.), Kincaid also possesses a number of qualities that endeared me to her personality. For one thing, unlike a lot of bull-headed heroines who can’t see past their own self-importance, she knows what her weaknesses are and isn’t afraid to take an L if it means fighting another day. She’s also very loyal to the people she cares about. And slowly but surely, she’s coming around to the idea that it’s okay not to have to fight one’s battles alone.On the world-building side of things, I’m once more impressed. As any fan of this genre knows, establishing the setting and a “sense of place” is always a huge component of an urban fantasy series, and I like how Kristi Charish is continuing to build upon her paranormal version of Seattle with an eye towards detail and atmosphere. Not only has she populated her world with all manner of creatures from ghouls to ghosts, she’s taken care to include examples of how the presence of the supernatural has also impacted everyday life. Incorporating the musical culture of the city into her story was also a stroke of genius; I’d liked this aspect when I read the first book and was thrilled to see it carried through to this sequel.Lipstick Voodoo also ties up several plot threads from the previous novel while introducing new ones to look forward to. For a series that only has two books out right now, Kincaid Strange is already flowing like an extremely well-oiled machine with the promise of even more quirky and entertaining stories to come. I am looking forward to the next adventure starring our plucky heroine.Audiobook Comments: I made the switch from print to audiobook with this installment, a decision I do not regret at all. I generally find that most urban fantasy works great in audio, especially with a book as light and fun as Lipstick Voodoo. As a bonus, Susannah Jones was fantastic as narrator, possessing the perfect voice and cadence to portray Kincaid Strange, but she also delivered incredible performances for all the other characters. If you’re an audiobook listener thinking about checking out this series, I highly recommend this format.
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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    I read Lipstick Voodoo over a weekend. I found it fun, fanciful and quite original. Charish does a great job pulling the reader into Kincaid Strange's world. I really enjoyed that this is both paranormal in nature but has a fabulous mystery that keeps you guessing almost till the very end.I received this ARC copy of Lipstick Voodoo from Penguin Random House Canada - Vintage Canada. This is my honest and voluntary review. Lipstick Voodoo is set for publication Jan. 08, 2019.My Rating: 4 starsWrit I read Lipstick Voodoo over a weekend. I found it fun, fanciful and quite original. Charish does a great job pulling the reader into Kincaid Strange's world. I really enjoyed that this is both paranormal in nature but has a fabulous mystery that keeps you guessing almost till the very end.I received this ARC copy of Lipstick Voodoo from Penguin Random House Canada - Vintage Canada. This is my honest and voluntary review. Lipstick Voodoo is set for publication Jan. 08, 2019.My Rating: 4 starsWritten by: Kristi CharishSeries: Kincaid Strange Series, The Sequence in Series: Book 2Paperback: 384 pagesPublisher: Vintage Canada Publication Date: January 8, 2019ISBN-10: 0345815904ISBN-13: 978-0345815903Genre: Paranormal MysteryAmazon: https://www.amazon.com/Lipstick-Voodo...Barnes & Noble: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/lips...Want more check us out on Tome Tender Book Blog or on Facebook
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  • Helen Power
    January 1, 1970
    Kincaid Strange is back in this dark and adventurous follow up to “The Voodoo Killings”. Since this is the second in the series, there are spoilers for the first book in this review! Synopsis:Voodoo practitioner Kincaid Strange is invited by her ex-boyfriend, a cop, to consult on a cold case that just might have been a paranormal murder.  The case is connected to her roommate, Nathan Cade, the ghost of a 90s grunge rock star.  Meanwhile, Kincaid must also navigate a new relationship with her new Kincaid Strange is back in this dark and adventurous follow up to “The Voodoo Killings”. Since this is the second in the series, there are spoilers for the first book in this review! Synopsis:Voodoo practitioner Kincaid Strange is invited by her ex-boyfriend, a cop, to consult on a cold case that just might have been a paranormal murder.  The case is connected to her roommate, Nathan Cade, the ghost of a 90s grunge rock star.  Meanwhile, Kincaid must also navigate a new relationship with her new mentor, the ghost of a psychopath sorcerer who used nefarious means to coerce her into becoming his apprentice. Everyone has their secrets, but who can Kincaid trust?World-BuildingThis book is captivating from its very first page. I absolutely adore the detailed world that Charish has created.  It's similar to real-life Seattle, but very dark and swarming with ghosts, zombies, ghouls, and other mysterious creatures from the Otherside.  The amount of detail that Charish has put into engineering this world is praiseworthy. As a health sciences librarian, I almost died from excitement when she mentioned “PubDead”, the paranormal version of PubMed. Let’s be friends, Kristi.A major part of the world-building is the scientific way that Otherside works in this series.  Discussions of binding ghosts and setting mirrors all have a very matter-of-fact tone, with detailed nuances.  Some pages read like a paranormal textbook, but with a little more sass, since it’s all coming from Kincaid’s point of view.PlotThere are several plot lines in this story that are seamlessly interwoven.  I love how Charish blended effortlessly from one to the other, and they’re so interconnected it’s hard to tell where one begins and the other ends. Excellent storytelling.CharactersSide characters in this book are also well-developed. Gideon, the mysterious ghost of a sorcerer, is quite intriguing.  This book gives us just enough information about his past to  give us a better sense of who he is, but he's still an enigma.  Since Nate is a ghost, he isn’t expected to grow as a person, which is something Kincaid comments on in the book. However, I noticed that he had a little development of his own, which I won’t reveal here, because it’s a spoiler!I did find the character development for her love interest, ex-boyfriend Aaron, to be lacking. It seems like Kincaid makes a revelation about their relationship (or lack thereof) during the latter half of the book, but it isn’t quite addressed fully enough for my liking before the final pages. I suppose I’ll have to wait for the next book for this.  I recommend this book to anyone who’s interested in a dark fantasy with a badass female lead.  It has a very detailed world, but it's not presented in a monotonous way.  It’s very similar in feel to Kim Harrison’s Hollows book series.  *Thank you to Vintage Canada and Netgalley for the ARC for review!*Find this review and others on my website: https://powerlibrarian.wordpress.com/
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  • ☕ Kimberly
    January 1, 1970
    I listened to the first novel, The Voodoo Killings but scheduling had me reading this time around. Because this is urban fantasy and a lot of what happens in Lipstick Voodoo results from what occurred in book one.I love this series from Nate, her ghostly friend to the scary and intriguing Gideon. I have to confess Gideon has me perplexed, but page time with him was one of my favorite things in this story. For those who don't know Gideon is a powerful dead sorcerer. Kincaid find herself indebted I listened to the first novel, The Voodoo Killings but scheduling had me reading this time around. Because this is urban fantasy and a lot of what happens in Lipstick Voodoo results from what occurred in book one.I love this series from Nate, her ghostly friend to the scary and intriguing Gideon. I have to confess Gideon has me perplexed, but page time with him was one of my favorite things in this story. For those who don't know Gideon is a powerful dead sorcerer. Kincaid find herself indebted to him, and it appears she will work as his apprentice.Kincaid is a powerful and skilled practitioner who seems to fly by the seat of her pants. She is smart, but not well-rounded in her knowledge. She tends to learn as she goes. Nate is in serious trouble and hiding things from Kincaid.Despite her relationship ending with Seattle PD, Kincaid's ex, Aaron a paranormal detective calls her in when a cold case has possible ties to Nate, her ghost. Before you know it Kincaid is secretly helping him with a strange murder that also leads back to Nate and his singing career.The author mixes in humor and snark as Kincaid gets herself out of predicaments and works to solve the case. After, the events in the previous book she needs a win. Some training scenes with ghouls, a ghost and time spent with Lee and her partner offered some interesting history on supernatural creatures from Wraiths to zombies.I loved the twisted Otherside, the undead city below Seattle and watching Kincaid investigate. I have a feeling we are just witnessing the beginnings of what Strange is capable of and the ending set up the next book leaving me longing for its release. This review was originally posted at Caffeinated Reviewer
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  • Shelley
    January 1, 1970
    *Source* Publisher*Genre* Urban Fantasy*Rating* 4.0*Thoughts*Lipstick Voodoo, by author Kristi Charish, is the second installment in the authors Kincaid Strange series. The story picks up shortly after the events of The Voodoo Killings. Kincaid is a kick-ass heroine who appeals to fans of Elena Michaels and Sookie Stackhouse. Lipstick Voodoo spends more time in the living world than The Voodoo Killings and captures the ’90s grunge vibe of Seattle, with forays into the beautifully crafted Undergr *Source* Publisher*Genre* Urban Fantasy*Rating* 4.0*Thoughts*Lipstick Voodoo, by author Kristi Charish, is the second installment in the authors Kincaid Strange series. The story picks up shortly after the events of The Voodoo Killings. Kincaid is a kick-ass heroine who appeals to fans of Elena Michaels and Sookie Stackhouse. Lipstick Voodoo spends more time in the living world than The Voodoo Killings and captures the ’90s grunge vibe of Seattle, with forays into the beautifully crafted Underground City, the paranormal hub run by the mysterious Lee, who just happens to be the cities oldest living zombie. *Full Review @ Gizmos Reviews*https://gizmosreviews.blogspot.com/20...
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  • Kimberly
    January 1, 1970
    Reviewed for Wit and Sin Kincaid Strange, the best voodoo practitioner in the Pacific Northwest, has not been having a good time lately. After solving a series of murders that left her physically and emotionally worn out, all she wants is to get back to doing normal séances and zombie raisings. But before you can say “feral zombie,” Kincaid is up to her ears in problems again. She’s in debt to a sorcerer’s ghost, her roommate and best friend, Nathan Cade – ghost of a grunge rock star – is trapp Reviewed for Wit and Sin Kincaid Strange, the best voodoo practitioner in the Pacific Northwest, has not been having a good time lately. After solving a series of murders that left her physically and emotionally worn out, all she wants is to get back to doing normal séances and zombie raisings. But before you can say “feral zombie,” Kincaid is up to her ears in problems again. She’s in debt to a sorcerer’s ghost, her roommate and best friend, Nathan Cade – ghost of a grunge rock star – is trapped in a zombie’s body, and now her Seattle cop ex wants Kincaid to look into a murder involving people from Nate’s past. It’s more than your average practitioner could take… But Kincaid Strange is anything but average.Return to Kristi Charish’s fantastical and fascinating world of zombies, ghosts, and ghouls in Lipstick Voodoo . I loved Kincaid’s first outing - The Voodoo Killings - and couldn’t wait to see what happened next for the kickass voodoo practitioner.Kincaid continues to be a great protagonist. She’s strong but flawed, smart but doesn’t know everything, and when her back’s against the wall, she’ll continue to fight, especially if someone she cares about is in danger. This time around, her irresponsible but loveable roommate, Nate, has gotten her into hot water. Nate is trapped in a zombie body and the clock is ticking for her to figure out how to get him out before Nate burns out. Nate has a fun personality and it’s easy to see why Kincaid adores him, but that doesn’t mean she’s blind to his flaws. Nate’s impulsive nature has gotten him into deep trouble and he’s got secrets Kincaid will have to suss out when supernatural murders strike and it’s clear there’s a connection to him. I loved watching how Kincaid’s mind worked as she unraveled the rapidly multiplying mysteries. Lipstick Voodoo also brings the return of other fascinating characters. From the powerful zombie Lee Ling to the surprisingly interesting Mork to Gideon Lawrence, a sometimes-terrifying sorcerer’s ghost, there are a wealth of complex secondary characters that round out this story extremely well. I loved delving deeper into Gideon’s character in particular; he’s powerful, dangerous, intriguing, and I very much want to learn more about him. He and Kincaid have an interesting relationship and his insights into Kincaid’s character add to the story. Lipstick Voodoo is a twisting blend of paranormal mystery, action, and the emotional struggle of a woman caught between the living and the dead. There’s a lot going on in this book, but Ms. Charish deftly weaves all the threads together to create a wonderful, engaging story. If you haven’t read The Voodoo Killings I highly recommend doing so before diving into this book (unless you don’t mind huge spoilers). I finished Lipstick Voodoo a well-satisfied reader, but I cannot wait to see what Ms. Charish has in store for Kincaid next!FTC Disclosure: I received the ebook edition of this book for free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review and purchased the audiobook edition. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.
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  • Bonnie
    January 1, 1970
    Rating: 3.5 of 5 starsShort Summary: Kincaid Strange, voodoo practitioner, finds herself searching for a solution when her roommate ghost, grunge rocker Nathan Cade, comes home bound to a body risen from the dead. Things take even more of a turn for the worse when people from Nathan’s past are being killed in gruesome ways and the local authorities begin to suspect Strange of being involved.Thoughts: It’s hard for Urban Fantasy to be anything but formulaic, however, Charish manages to incorporat Rating: 3.5 of 5 starsShort Summary: Kincaid Strange, voodoo practitioner, finds herself searching for a solution when her roommate ghost, grunge rocker Nathan Cade, comes home bound to a body risen from the dead. Things take even more of a turn for the worse when people from Nathan’s past are being killed in gruesome ways and the local authorities begin to suspect Strange of being involved.Thoughts: It’s hard for Urban Fantasy to be anything but formulaic, however, Charish manages to incorporate enough unique details to make this feel like something refreshingly original. Between the vast array of paranormal beings and the wide cast of memorable characters, this is one series to be paying attention to.Verdict: The world-building that Charish laid the groundwork for means that (hopefully) there are many more installments in the crazy life of Kincaid Strange to look forward to. I also desperately hope that Susannah Jones continues to narrate her adventures because she does an absolutely superb job.I received this book free from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    Lipstick Voodoo, is the second book in the Kincaid Strange series. The first book, The Voodoo Killings was released in 2016 so I had to do a quick relisten to help me get back into the world. I enjoyed it the second time around just as much as I did the first time. Lipstick Voodoo takes place about two weeks after the events in The Voodoo Killings. This time around Kincaid is working a lipstick séance (a term coined by voodoo practitioners referring to seances where no really wants to hear what Lipstick Voodoo, is the second book in the Kincaid Strange series. The first book, The Voodoo Killings was released in 2016 so I had to do a quick relisten to help me get back into the world. I enjoyed it the second time around just as much as I did the first time. Lipstick Voodoo takes place about two weeks after the events in The Voodoo Killings. This time around Kincaid is working a lipstick séance (a term coined by voodoo practitioners referring to seances where no really wants to hear what the ghost/ zombie has to say. In this case, it’s a family fighting over a will of a cheating husband. Kincaid is working gigs like this because she lost her job with the Seattle police department, thanks to the new chief who doesn’t believe in the paranormal. Aaron, Kincaid’s ex-boyfriend, is a cop and works under the chief. He has tried to help her out as much as he is willing to without losing his own job. He contacts her in hopes she will help him with a cold case from the 1990s. This case happens to have a connection to Kincaid’s ghost buddy, Nate. Nate was a 90’s grunge rocker who died around ‘95-’96. He also knows the victim in the cold case, but he and Kincaid already have their hands full with a problem from the end of The Voodoo Killings (won’t say more so as not to spoil you). This issue, plus the cold case, is the major storyline for Lipstick Voodoo. Kristi Charish has done a great job building a world surrounded by paranormal creatures like ghouls, ghosts, zombies, Jinn, poltergeist, and wraiths. They are all part of the Otherside. The mystical world that allows people to become these creatures after they die. While the rules are not completely clear, yet, we get more info in the second installment, and it seems more will be forthcoming with each book in the Kincaid Strange series. Like similar series such as Charley Davidson and White Trash Zombie series, the Kincaid Strange series deals with mystery cases in each book with an overall story arc coming from book to book. I wouldn’t say each book ends on a cliffhanger, but Charish knows how to keep readers intrigued with a teaser for the next big thing in the overall plot line at the end of each novel. The Kincaid Strange series has become an audio-only series for me all thanks to Susannah’s brilliant delivery of the characters. I rarely change the speed of an audiobook when I listen, but I was rushed to relisten to The Voodoo Killings so I could listen to Lipstick Voodoo. After listening to that whole book at 1.25x speed, Susannah’s voices for the returning characters sounded a little off to me at the slower speed. After adjusting the speed I felt like I was listening to the same narrator. After listening to both books, Susannah is now the voice I have in my head for Kincaid and I can’t see myself reading any following books in the series.
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  • Gaele
    January 1, 1970
    Set in a Seattle that is filled with zombies, ghouls, poltergeists and ghosts, my introduction to this urban fantasy series was a dive in the deep end, intriguing with a dash of information added to try and keep me current. Kincaid Strange seems to fit into this world fairly easily, being a voodoo practitioner with a part-time gig assisting the police. Interesting enough to keep me intrigued, curious about the Seattle setting rather than New Orleans, but hey, it’s the author’s world to create – Set in a Seattle that is filled with zombies, ghouls, poltergeists and ghosts, my introduction to this urban fantasy series was a dive in the deep end, intriguing with a dash of information added to try and keep me current. Kincaid Strange seems to fit into this world fairly easily, being a voodoo practitioner with a part-time gig assisting the police. Interesting enough to keep me intrigued, curious about the Seattle setting rather than New Orleans, but hey, it’s the author’s world to create – I’m only meant to enjoy the ride and the quirks presented. Kincaid is an intriguing sort – a bit offbeat and quirky with a best ‘ghost’ friend, and she’s not always happy with ‘humans’ around her. Not quite socially awkward, but gaffes enough to keep her at the fringes of that label, I found her intriguing enough to want to know how she worked and what she was capable of. In this book, she’s forced to find other ways to pay the bills as Captain Marks (he who signs off on her being paid) isn’t inclined to have her consult any more, but she’s also got worries for her bestie, Nate – and find a way to release him from a body that is rotting around him, and al keys seem to lead to Gideon, a sorcerer who may or may not be inclined to help, but at a price. When Kincaid’s ex comes to her with a cold case that is tied tangentially to Nate, and involves a former band-mate caught up in a group of cold cases from the mid-90’s. OK – so we’ve got two different mysteries to solve, a friend to help, a former boss who may or may not be interested in what she has to say and the ‘underground’ that may hold the keys to put it all together. I’d have to say that I found this story intriguing and a bit different from the norm, if not quite falling into my “I have to know more, now” pile. Charish managed to keep my interest, give me some background information to keep me current, and have me wondering just what Kincaid is planning for the long-term and her plans to keep Seattle as her home. All indicators point to a third in the series, one that I’m sure to look out for after I catch all up with the first book from the series. I received an eArc copy of the title from the publisher via NetGalley for purpose of honest review. I was not compensated for this review: all conclusions are my own responsibility. Review first appeared at I am, Indeed
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    From the very beginning we are thrown into Kincaid’s chaotic life and while she never gets to take a breather or to sleep, neither does the reader. The action is non-stop and every stage ends in a mini cliff-hanger so I felt compelled to keep reading until I dropped my e-reader on my head (for real) because I just couldn’t stay up any longer. This is a seriously suspenseful and fast paced story and there is no intermission or downtime. It is running from one disaster to the next the entire book. From the very beginning we are thrown into Kincaid’s chaotic life and while she never gets to take a breather or to sleep, neither does the reader. The action is non-stop and every stage ends in a mini cliff-hanger so I felt compelled to keep reading until I dropped my e-reader on my head (for real) because I just couldn’t stay up any longer. This is a seriously suspenseful and fast paced story and there is no intermission or downtime. It is running from one disaster to the next the entire book. It also throws you right into the story which heavily relies on events in “The Voodoo Killings.” There is no time to catch up with what happened in the previous book in the series so you might want to re-read before starting this one. I really enjoyed the first book in this series and could not be happier to be in this world again. It is so intricately imagined and detailed that it feels like it might actually be real. The magic system is so unique that I am constantly being surprised by which “monsters” show up next. In this book, even Kincaid is surprised! The recurring characters are a true joy and their banter and bickering always makes me smile, and often cringe. There is a lot of dark humour in this story and although the situations are dire and possibly catastrophic, it is not at all depressing. This is a super fun series and I am dying (not literally) for more undead hijinks!Thank you to Penguin Random House Canada and Vintage Canada for providing an Electronic Advance Reader Copy via NetGalley for review.
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  • Anne - Books of My Heart
    January 1, 1970
    This review was originally posted on Books of My HeartReview copy was received from NetGalley. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review. 4.5 hearts With the world and characters established, I enjoyed this second book in the Kincaid Strange series even more than The Voodoo Killings. I feel Kincaid is still so alone.  No one, even her friends, seem to help her.  Throughout Lipstick Voodoo, I  worried who would hurt her or betray her. She seems to constantly have This review was originally posted on Books of My HeartReview copy was received from NetGalley. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review. 4.5 hearts With the world and characters established, I enjoyed this second book in the Kincaid Strange series even more than The Voodoo Killings. I feel Kincaid is still so alone.  No one, even her friends, seem to help her.  Throughout Lipstick Voodoo, I  worried who would hurt her or betray her. She seems to constantly have new issues thrown at her and spends lots of time reacting rather than being able to set forth with purpose.  For her level of talents, I'm surprised often at how much she doesn't know. The great thing is there is so much character growth ahead for her.The plot was like real life, a mish mash of multiple happenings all at once. I love the complexity these layers give. Kincaid had her problem with Nate the zombie/ ghost. Aaron calling her in to work murder cases, for FREE, with the lure of getting back to her police consulting.  Gideon providing lessons and tasks for her to learn but also to assist him.Finally, I feel she and Nate were truly working together. I hope she has her first real ally.  Gideon is a conundrum.  What is he really about? Sometimes he seems terrifying and evil; sometimes he even acts like a mentor or friend.  Aaron was a douche, is a douche and likely will continue to be a douche.So, this was really exciting and I can't wait to see what is next for our girl. The ending sets up the next wild adventure.  She has so much potential. If she can dump the douche, curb Nate's worst meanderings, and survive Gideon."... There is always corruption in the ruling class. Even in your United States today.""Except the US is a democracy where we vote on our leaders. They aren't elected by their family members."Lee made a derisive noise. "Never mind that two families, the Bushes and the Cintons, have appeared in all your elections since 1988 and split the presidency between themselves for twenty years, and the orange man has instated his offspring in positions of power. No, there is certainly no corruption or nepotism occurring in hte choosing of your candidates." 
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  • Dani
    January 1, 1970
    Review: 4/5 stars This is the second novel in the Kincaid Strange series by Kristi Charish.I will say the intriguing way that the author interweaves the paranormal elements : necromancy, voodoo etc was my favorite part of this book. It is what made for a really entertaining read. In the sea of other paranormal books that contain similar elements ( that I have read and enjoyed) this series manages to stand on its on and the characters stand out.I will say the reason for my one star deduction was Review: 4/5 stars This is the second novel in the Kincaid Strange series by Kristi Charish.I will say the intriguing way that the author interweaves the paranormal elements : necromancy, voodoo etc was my favorite part of this book. It is what made for a really entertaining read. In the sea of other paranormal books that contain similar elements ( that I have read and enjoyed) this series manages to stand on its on and the characters stand out.I will say the reason for my one star deduction was due to issues in grammar, punctuation, and syntax. It made the writing choppy in places and interrupted my experience inside the book world. As this is an ARC I’m hopeful that these issues will be fixed before release day and that the plot will flow much smoother. There were a lot of interweaving plot lines ( Kincaid can’t seem to manage a break) that were quite interesting and all managed to contribute something to the book. This second installment is perfect for fans of the first book and for those new to the series and who want to pick up an entertaining paranormal read I highly recommend this series.*** Thank you to Netgalley, Vintage Canada, and the author for an ARC copy of this book in exchange for an honest review***
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  • LilyElement
    January 1, 1970
    Lipstick Voodoo is book 2 in the Kincaid Strange series. This series is so unique and worth a read if you're a fan of the Urban Fantasy genre. Our leading lady sees ghosts and raises zombies for her clients, oh and gets into tons of trouble. It makes for an interesting read to say the least.Kincaid Strange returns and she's dealing with the ramifications from the previous book. Her friend that is a ghost happens to be inhabiting a body and she can't figure out how to unbind him. He'll wind up de Lipstick Voodoo is book 2 in the Kincaid Strange series. This series is so unique and worth a read if you're a fan of the Urban Fantasy genre. Our leading lady sees ghosts and raises zombies for her clients, oh and gets into tons of trouble. It makes for an interesting read to say the least.Kincaid Strange returns and she's dealing with the ramifications from the previous book. Her friend that is a ghost happens to be inhabiting a body and she can't figure out how to unbind him. He'll wind up dead if she can't get him out. And if the sorcerer finds out that's what happened to the body he wanted he'll be livid and they both might wind up dead. The main things Kincaid has to solve this time around is that someone killed a man and his body is frozen solid. When Kincaid checks out the scene she sees something unsettling, and has to puzzle out Otherside being morphed into something that it shouldn't be able to. We're learning right along with Kincaid and hoping she can figure it all out before the time runs out.Lipstick Voodoo is a great read you won't be able to put down. I'm loving the series so far and can't wait to see what happens in the next book. Kincaid is a unique character and the book isn't like anything else I've read before. There's quite a bit of paranormal mixed into the story so if you're a fan of Urban Fantasy with lots of paranormal beings, don't pass this book up.
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  • Janet Newport
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you NetGalley and Penguin Random House Canada for this arc.The blurb sounds like this would be a great read for me. I see where lots of others have really enjoyed this. Must just be me... I had a tough time with this one. Part of the problem might be that I haven't read the first book in this series. While it started off interesting and fun, it quickly devolved for me.... too many unfamiliar characters with unfamiliar backstories came at me too fast. I plugged on, but just never was able t Thank you NetGalley and Penguin Random House Canada for this arc.The blurb sounds like this would be a great read for me. I see where lots of others have really enjoyed this. Must just be me... I had a tough time with this one. Part of the problem might be that I haven't read the first book in this series. While it started off interesting and fun, it quickly devolved for me.... too many unfamiliar characters with unfamiliar backstories came at me too fast. I plugged on, but just never was able to connect with any of them. I found the pacing to be kind of stop and go (too many time outs for some more meaningless dialog). I gave up around the 60% mark.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    The second installment in the Kincaid Strange series finds her over her head in trouble once again. I really like the premise and all the elements of this series. Great characters and a world that I want to learn more about. I’m looking forward to more Kincaid, Nate, and Gideon. *ARC provided by NetGalley for an honest review.
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  • Savvy Little Book Club Yvonne M.
    January 1, 1970
    *I received a ARC of this book from Netgalley/publisher for an honest review*I didn’t finish the book. I tried really hard to like it but it was just blah. I love the paranormal and voodoo and necromancy and was pumped for this but it fell flat for me.I guess it just wasn’t meant for me.
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  • Douglas Meeks
    January 1, 1970
    I usually wait until less than a month before release to read and write reviews but after reading The Voodoo Killings I found that I HAD to read this ARC that I had received since book 1 was so good.While this was an exceptional story I did not think it reached the 5 Star level that book 1 did but it was more of a combinations of frustrations than the story actually lacking. I got tired of a boyfriend who was not even a good friend much less any one who really cared but the author tried to make I usually wait until less than a month before release to read and write reviews but after reading The Voodoo Killings I found that I HAD to read this ARC that I had received since book 1 was so good.While this was an exceptional story I did not think it reached the 5 Star level that book 1 did but it was more of a combinations of frustrations than the story actually lacking. I got tired of a boyfriend who was not even a good friend much less any one who really cared but the author tried to make me think he really did but it did not come across as real. I am still trying to figure out Gideon and he may be my favorite character even if he really needs some social interaction that does not include death threats. I want to see more of him and this came close. I have to say that in my personal opinion when the heroine is involved in near death situations many times the "Captain" is a level of frustration for me I hated, he served no real purpose other than to make a gritty story kind of depressing when local police politics was involved in the story, but it did serve one purpose to show how spineless her "boyfriend" really was at times.The fact remains that with all that it was still an exceptional story and that kept you guessing (most likely wrong) with twists and turns you never saw coming and a heroine that spends most of the book so tired from paranormal fights you feel tired right along with her. As the story builds and it gets more complicated you just can't figure out the "whodunnit" and it was a bit of a surprise.So a great story that had some character frustrations that kept me from getting the same level of enjoyment as I did with book 1 but be assured I will be grabbing the next book as soon as I can but since I have totally ruined my reviewers schedule by reading/reviewing this book 5 months before release means I will have a horribly long wait :(
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  • Erica
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC of this novel via NetGalley and Penguin Random House Canada in exchange for an honest review. Kincaid Strange, the paranormal practitioner, is trying to figure out how to help her roommate Nathan Cade after her last case left him entrapped in another body and indebted to Gideon, a powerful sorcerer's ghost. Kincaid's ex, Aaron, brings her in on a new paranormal investigation that links to a 30 year old cold case in which Nate is a suspect. Something is murdering Nate's old band I received an ARC of this novel via NetGalley and Penguin Random House Canada in exchange for an honest review. Kincaid Strange, the paranormal practitioner, is trying to figure out how to help her roommate Nathan Cade after her last case left him entrapped in another body and indebted to Gideon, a powerful sorcerer's ghost. Kincaid's ex, Aaron, brings her in on a new paranormal investigation that links to a 30 year old cold case in which Nate is a suspect. Something is murdering Nate's old band mates, freezing them to death, something Kincaid has never encountered before. Kincaid is running out of time to save Nate, but he's keeping secrets that may just make her a target. Lipstick Voodoo is the second novel in the Kincaid Strange series. This novel picks up where the first novel (The Voodoo Killings) leaves off with Kincaid still recovering from her last paranormal battle. I absolutely loved the first novel and was so excited to get the chance to read an early copy of the second book. Kincaid is still as spunky as ever and we get to reunite with some of the characters from book 1 such as: Lee, Nate, Aaron, Gideon (yeah), and Mork. One complaint is that I didn't care for the character/plot rebuilding that took up a lot of the first half of this novel. It's great for people who haven't read the first book (read the first book), but felt like a repeat of everything I had already read. We are introduced to a new entity which freezes its victims and has an unusual effect on otherside. The novel ended in a way that suggests we might be getting more adventures from Kincaid and Gideon in the future...fingers crossed. Am I the only one hoping that there might be a romantic element later between Kincaid and Gideon? This is such a fun preternatural/paranormal series with a feisty and strong female protagonist. This is definitely one of my favorite series and a perfect fall read.
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  • Crittermom
    January 1, 1970
    Lipstick Voodoo is a pleasant departure from the average paranormal/ urban fantasy.  While it isn’t perfect, (Nate can be extremely annoying) it has a lot in its favor - an intriguing magical premise (spiritual energy comes from the otherside and can be used to contact/raise the dead), a capable heroine, and interesting supporting characters (a sorcerer’s Ghost, a zombie attorney/bar owner, a dead grunge rocker stuck in a decaying body, etc..).  Kincaid Strange is a Voodoo practitioner, bringing Lipstick Voodoo is a pleasant departure from the average paranormal/ urban fantasy.  While it isn’t perfect, (Nate can be extremely annoying) it has a lot in its favor - an intriguing magical premise (spiritual energy comes from the otherside and can be used to contact/raise the dead), a capable heroine, and interesting supporting characters (a sorcerer’s Ghost, a zombie attorney/bar owner, a dead grunge rocker stuck in a decaying body, etc..).  Kincaid Strange is a Voodoo practitioner, bringing the dead back in order to resolve issues and answer questions.  She was looking for murderers with the local police, but the new chief has canceled all contracts and is painting all practitioners as charlatans.  Now, she is left dealing with lawyers looking to resolve disputed wills. Kincaid’s biggest problem is her friend Nate. His ghost has somehow gotten caught in a decaying body - the body that a powerful sorcerer had planned to inhabit.  She is drawn into helping with a cold case, the accidental overdose of a rocker that simply doesn’t add up. Nate is connected, but he refuses to share how. Soon the body of a former roadie shows up, frozen solid and surrounded by ice - in the middle of a former dive bar.  I didn’t care too much for Nate.  He was remarkably stubborn and creepy when it came to stalking his former girlfriend, and his propensity for keeping secrets endangers them both.  Of course the book would be a LOT shorter if he hadn’t been. It’s a small weakness in the plot. On the whole Lipstick Voodoo is an entertaining book and shows a lot of promise.  I have high hopes for the future of this series.4 / 5I received a copy of Lipstick Voodoo from the publisher and Netgalley.com in exchange for an honest review.— Crittermom
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  • Brianne
    January 1, 1970
    Many Thanks to Net-Galley and the publisher for an advanced e-copy. This did not affect my rating.*4/5*The Voodoo Killings was one of my favourite books of 2016. I devoured it. I pushed it on my friends. I waited and wished and hoped for a sequel. It was such a unique concept. Voodoo practitioners who can raise zombies, and summon ghosts. Kincaid Strange is the last voodoo practitioner in Seattle - she has an ex-boyfriend, Aaron, who is a cop and is trying to help Kincaid get back to work with t Many Thanks to Net-Galley and the publisher for an advanced e-copy. This did not affect my rating.*4/5*The Voodoo Killings was one of my favourite books of 2016. I devoured it. I pushed it on my friends. I waited and wished and hoped for a sequel. It was such a unique concept. Voodoo practitioners who can raise zombies, and summon ghosts. Kincaid Strange is the last voodoo practitioner in Seattle - she has an ex-boyfriend, Aaron, who is a cop and is trying to help Kincaid get back to work with the Seattle police. Her best friend, Nathan Cade, is a ghost. He was a grunge musician in the 90's. Their relationship is still as hilarious in this book, as it was in the first. This book directly follows The Voodoo Killings, with Kincaid trying to figure out how to unbind Nate from the dead body he mysteriously and mistakenly got bound to. Along with that, Aaron has called upon Kincaid to look at a cold case that has ties to Nate. She also must work with Gideon, a sorcerer's ghost who has a temper. I love this series so much. I just love how unique it is. I love the underground world of the dead.. We learn a lot about a new type of afterlife. I love that it's set in Seattle. I love the characters, and I want more. Kristi Charish is such a sweetheart of an author. She is Canadian, and The Voodoo Killings was repackaged in the summer of 2018 to appeal to new fans across the border in the States. I hope that she was reached may many new fans. There were a few parts that seemed to drag on a little bit for my taste, but it was still a chaotic, rollicking good time.
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  • Laurie
    January 1, 1970
    Kincaid Strange can’t get a break. She’s a necromancer who raises the dead for a living. Like people who shoot the messenger, clients aren’t always pleased with what their dearly departed have to say when she raises them, and they take that out of Kincaid. So how to pay the rent is just her first worry… her roommate, Nathan Cade, has his own problems. He’s a ghost, but now he’s stuck in a zombie body that is rapidly breaking down. Kincaid has no idea how to help him. She’s being stalked by Gideo Kincaid Strange can’t get a break. She’s a necromancer who raises the dead for a living. Like people who shoot the messenger, clients aren’t always pleased with what their dearly departed have to say when she raises them, and they take that out of Kincaid. So how to pay the rent is just her first worry… her roommate, Nathan Cade, has his own problems. He’s a ghost, but now he’s stuck in a zombie body that is rapidly breaking down. Kincaid has no idea how to help him. She’s being stalked by Gideon, the powerful ghost magician who kind of owns her after a mishap. Then there is her ex, Aaron, the Seattle cop who is on the supernatural beat. He’s come to her with the problem of a supernatural serial killer, one who is freezing their victims solid. Seattle PD has washed its hands of the supernatural bureau, so there is zero money in it for Kincaid and she finds herself in the freelancer’s usual position of ‘doing it for the exposure’. I liked Kincaid, although with the constant action she really didn’t have much time to show many moods other than ‘exhausted’. I kind of liked Nate, but he’s immature (although trying) and the stalking of his ex meant he lost a lot of points with me. The ex-boyfriend/PD guy had no personality. Gideon has possibilities. I’ll be keeping an eye out for this new urban fantasy series. This is the second book in the series; I’ve not read the first one. Four stars.
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  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    *Thank you to NetGalley for the ARC*Lipstick Voodoo is the second novel in the Kincaid Strange series by Kristi Charish. This novel is set a couple weeks after the events of her first book, The Voodoo Killings. This series follows Kincaid Strange, a voodoo practitioner and her roommate Nathan Cade, the ghost of a grunge-rock star.I read The Voodoo Killings when it was released in 2016, but to be honest I didn’t remember anything about it. That being said, I knew that I had enjoyed it enough for *Thank you to NetGalley for the ARC*Lipstick Voodoo is the second novel in the Kincaid Strange series by Kristi Charish. This novel is set a couple weeks after the events of her first book, The Voodoo Killings. This series follows Kincaid Strange, a voodoo practitioner and her roommate Nathan Cade, the ghost of a grunge-rock star.I read The Voodoo Killings when it was released in 2016, but to be honest I didn’t remember anything about it. That being said, I knew that I had enjoyed it enough for me to be interested in reading the newest book in the series. Unfortunately, Charish gave very few reminders of what had taken place in the first book. I understand it is difficult- the author doesn’t want to give away to much from the book, but I was so confused trying to follow all the characters and the plot, especially because this novel took place immediately after the events and the main characters were still dealing with the fall out. I wish she would have just given some small reminders as to who various characters were and how they were related to Kincaid.Though the story was entertaining enough, I found the plot to be confusing at times. Also, I found myself skimming over parts, which is unusual for me. Some of the conversations Kincaid had were very long-winded. I will likely still read the next installment, as my curiosity was peaked just enough in the final chapters, that I would like to know what happens next.
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  • Kari Marie
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy from NetGalley for an honest review.Two stars: It was ok. There is a lot room for growth. The stars are for the fact that it was different story. I maybe would have given three but I felt like I was missing a lot of knowledge because I have not read book 1. Kincaid Strange is Voodoo Practioner. Her best friend is a ghost, or was a ghost. Now Nate is a zombie hybrid. Nate’s past is about to catch up to him and drag Kincaid along for the ride. Interestingly, Aaron, the ex-boyfrie I received a copy from NetGalley for an honest review.Two stars: It was ok. There is a lot room for growth. The stars are for the fact that it was different story. I maybe would have given three but I felt like I was missing a lot of knowledge because I have not read book 1. Kincaid Strange is Voodoo Practioner. Her best friend is a ghost, or was a ghost. Now Nate is a zombie hybrid. Nate’s past is about to catch up to him and drag Kincaid along for the ride. Interestingly, Aaron, the ex-boyfriend cop, is the one to bring up Nate’s past. Will Kincaid be able to solve the mystery and save Nate? To make things interesting Kincaid renegade on a deal with Gideon and he has come calling.This was a cool premise. I like the Voodoo aspects and wish there had been more of that. This was a different story but it dragged a little. Kincaid was a little boring and there were no good or funny dialogues between the characters. I have not read the first book so maybe that has something to do with it. There were definitely parts where reading the first book would have helped. None of the characters were built for me. They seemed a little one dimensional. The first part of the book was the most interesting and that was before the actual story started. The potential is there. The characters need more to them.
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  • SouthernTodayGoneTomorrow
    January 1, 1970
    Written by Kristi Charish, which it turns out is the second novel in the Kincaid Strange series, is about a voodoo practitioner, the only one registered in the Northwest of the US, who raises zombies. But she has a few problems, including an ex she is trying to get going with again, an ancient wizard and ghost who is upset with her, a zombie that shouldn't be there, and clients.This isn't a bad book. In fact, if you are a zombie fan, I highly recommend it. It involves a bit more of "how zombies Written by Kristi Charish, which it turns out is the second novel in the Kincaid Strange series, is about a voodoo practitioner, the only one registered in the Northwest of the US, who raises zombies. But she has a few problems, including an ex she is trying to get going with again, an ancient wizard and ghost who is upset with her, a zombie that shouldn't be there, and clients.This isn't a bad book. In fact, if you are a zombie fan, I highly recommend it. It involves a bit more of "how zombies are made" and different kinds, as well as the idea of what happens to a spirit and other interesting topics.Its a decent book. It just wasn't what I wanted to read, and wasn't really my style. Part is because, again, I ended up hopping in on the second book. The other half is, it takes a lot for me to be interested in a zombie book. I do know a few folks who I will suggest this series to, see what they think.A good choice for zombie fans who are tired of post-apocalypse stories and urban fantasy fans.
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  • Valerie -Cats Luv Coffee
    January 1, 1970
    Kincaid Strange is a voodoo practitioner. However, she's not your stereotypical voodoo priestess! Twenty-seven years old, she's in Seattle, WA, of all places, doing what it takes to keep the rent paid. She's headstrong, tenacious, and more importantly, a little unconventional. Sounds like a great protagonist, right? She raises the dead to pay the bills. She's great at her job; Not so great at people skills. She's obviously more comfortable in the company of the dead. She's extremely likable, in Kincaid Strange is a voodoo practitioner. However, she's not your stereotypical voodoo priestess! Twenty-seven years old, she's in Seattle, WA, of all places, doing what it takes to keep the rent paid. She's headstrong, tenacious, and more importantly, a little unconventional. Sounds like a great protagonist, right? She raises the dead to pay the bills. She's great at her job; Not so great at people skills. She's obviously more comfortable in the company of the dead. She's extremely likable, in spite of her poor decisions and innate ability to create chaos in her life. To add to the mayhem, she has a ghost turned zombie for a roommate, and an ex-boyfriend working for the city's police force that recently distanced itself from all things paranormal. Did I mention the sorcerer's ghost that pops by occasionally in her bathroom mirror, or that said sorcerer can't know about the zombie incident? Awk-ward. Read the rest of my review over at Cats Luv Coffee.
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  • Andrea Thatcher
    January 1, 1970
    Another paranormal page turner in the Kincaid Strange series! And since there’s a bit of a cliffhanger in the epilogue I’m joyfully assuming it’s not the last! While I enjoyed catching up with most of the same characters from book one, I didn’t find them all as compelling this time. The nonstarter will-they/won’t-they romance between Aaron and Kincaid fell flat for me in this novel. By no means do I think there needs to be a romantic storyline to make a book interesting, but if it’s not interest Another paranormal page turner in the Kincaid Strange series! And since there’s a bit of a cliffhanger in the epilogue I’m joyfully assuming it’s not the last! While I enjoyed catching up with most of the same characters from book one, I didn’t find them all as compelling this time. The nonstarter will-they/won’t-they romance between Aaron and Kincaid fell flat for me in this novel. By no means do I think there needs to be a romantic storyline to make a book interesting, but if it’s not interesting why not leave it out completely? There was lots of ghoulish mystery and ghostly action, with some new facets of the Otherside to discover. I’m kind of between three and four stars! But I love these characters and this world so much I erred on the side of generous. I want everyone to know it’s worth picking up.
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  • Penny Noble
    January 1, 1970
    I am becoming a fan of this author, and this second book in the Kincaid Strange series is one of the reasons why. I really like the main character Kincaid, and I am fond of Nate; they make an interesting team, and this book strengthens their friendship bond. Now, I have to admit that Gideon is probably becoming my favorite character. He’s an anti-hero, and I can’t wait to find out more about him. I do admit I liked him in the first book even if I don’t think he was supposed to be likable in the I am becoming a fan of this author, and this second book in the Kincaid Strange series is one of the reasons why. I really like the main character Kincaid, and I am fond of Nate; they make an interesting team, and this book strengthens their friendship bond. Now, I have to admit that Gideon is probably becoming my favorite character. He’s an anti-hero, and I can’t wait to find out more about him. I do admit I liked him in the first book even if I don’t think he was supposed to be likable in the first book. He seems to be the strongest character in the book, and I hope he makes Kincaid stronger; she really needs it. I hate that she just seems so alone, and no one really seems to have her back besides Nate. This book is well-written, has great characters, and a very interesting plot. I am looking forward to reading more in this series. I do recommend this book and series! I was provided the e-book which I voluntarily reviewed.
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  • Sarai Henderson
    January 1, 1970
    This was a fantastic unique story that is a wonderful addition to this series. The author does a wonderful job pulling you into the book with the paranormal elements and mystery of the story. We follow the main character Kincaid Strange, who can raise the dead, temporally or permanently. I don't think I've read a book like this before, and it was nice change in scenery. If you are looking for something new, this would be a great addition to your library. Received an advance reader copy in exchan This was a fantastic unique story that is a wonderful addition to this series. The author does a wonderful job pulling you into the book with the paranormal elements and mystery of the story. We follow the main character Kincaid Strange, who can raise the dead, temporally or permanently. I don't think I've read a book like this before, and it was nice change in scenery. If you are looking for something new, this would be a great addition to your library. Received an advance reader copy in exchange for a fair review.
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  • Coreena McBurnie
    January 1, 1970
    I am really enjoying this series. It is fun, clever, and keeps me reading. I love the sense of humour in these books and the lightness of them, especially considering they deal with zombies and ghosts.Kincaid is a great character who is smart and talented, but also fallible. It is interesting to see how she solves the mysteries around her.And I love Nate, the dead grunge rock star. He presents lots of interesting challenges, especially in this book.If you are looking for a lighthearted, modern, I am really enjoying this series. It is fun, clever, and keeps me reading. I love the sense of humour in these books and the lightness of them, especially considering they deal with zombies and ghosts.Kincaid is a great character who is smart and talented, but also fallible. It is interesting to see how she solves the mysteries around her.And I love Nate, the dead grunge rock star. He presents lots of interesting challenges, especially in this book.If you are looking for a lighthearted, modern, non-apocolyptic zombie/ghost/mystery, then you’ll enjoy this series.
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