Fateful Mornings (Henry Farrell #2)
Tom Bouman’s Dry Bones in the Valley won the Edgar Award for Best First Novel and a Los Angeles Times Book Prize. The New York Times hailed it as “beautifully written,” and the Washington Post called it a “mesmerizing and often terrifying story.”In Wild Thyme, Pennsylvania, summer has brought Officer Henry Farrell nothing but trouble. Heroin has arrived with a surge in burglaries and other crime. When local carpenter Kevin O’Keeffe admits that he shot a man and that his girlfriend, Penny, is missing, the search leads the small-town cop to an industrial vice district across state lines that has already ensnared more than one of his neighbors. With the patience of a hunter, Farrell ventures into a world of shadow beyond the fields and forests of home.

Fateful Mornings (Henry Farrell #2) Details

TitleFateful Mornings (Henry Farrell #2)
Author
FormatHardcover
ReleaseJun 27th, 2017
PublisherW. W. Norton Company
ISBN0393249646
ISBN-139780393249644
Number of pages368 pages
Rating
GenreMystery, Fiction, Crime, Thriller, Mystery Thriller, Literary Fiction, Adult Fiction

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Fateful Mornings (Henry Farrell #2) Review

  • Paromjit
    June 24, 2017
    Without doubt, this is a beautifully written mystery set in Wild Thyme, a rural place in Pennsylvania, policed by Henry Farrell. There are dark regional omens such as rise in burglaries and the arrival of heroin, and low income poor areas, like the Heights, that are proving to be dangerous to frequent. Heroin addicts, Kevin O'Keeffe and Penny Pellings, have had their baby daughter, Eolande, put into foster care. Kevin is struggling with his memories when he tells Henry that he shot a man and Pen Without doubt, this is a beautifully written mystery set in Wild Thyme, a rural place in Pennsylvania, policed by Henry Farrell. There are dark regional omens such as rise in burglaries and the arrival of heroin, and low income poor areas, like the Heights, that are proving to be dangerous to frequent. Heroin addicts, Kevin O'Keeffe and Penny Pellings, have had their baby daughter, Eolande, put into foster care. Kevin is struggling with his memories when he tells Henry that he shot a man and Penny has disappeared, although there was blood and patches of her hair in their trailer. This is not a fast paced read, it is a slow paced, character driven story that meanders, with an impressive sense of location, culture and the seasons. It is a read which at times is more interested in looking at people and the rhythms of nature in depth, and the crime feels incidental.Henry investigates, venturing into areas that do not welcome cops and across statelines with the stealth of the hunter that he is. His wife is dead, and he still hasn't come to terms with it. His personal life revolves around a married woman, Shelly Bray, which he knows is a mistake and so it proves to be. He is close friends with Ed, who runs a construction company specialising in the use of retrieved timber and deploying traditional and time consuming techniques, and his wife, Liz, the local GP. When Kevin who works for Ed is locked up in prison, Henry moonlights by working for Ed so that he can complete a contract. Ed, Liz and Henry play in a band, The Country Slippers, with Henry's instrument being the fiddle. Henry comes to find himself slowly gelling into a relationship with Julie, a woman he works with as a cop and in his construction job with Ed. Amidst all this is the hunt for Penny, a closer in depth look at Kevin to understand precisely what he did and saw, the enigma that is Sage Buckles, and the emergence of a dangerous man who abducts people and is responsible for killing a cop.I enjoyed the slow pace of this book that is just soaked with rural vibes and real lives. Henry is a flawed and grieving man who is determined to get to the bottom of what happened to Penny and is undeterred that it takes some time to do so. The author gives us a good idea of the people and issues that arise in many rural areas of the US. We observe the jurisdictional policing nightmares, whilst at the same time seeing the team work that takes place when cases cross statelines. This may not be a novel for everyone, I can imagine many who will be frustrated with the slow pace and a plot that is not driven solely by the crime aspects of the story. However, if you are looking for beautiful and atmospheric writing, rural culture and a focus on characters, then this is for you. Many thanks to Faber and Faber for an ARC.
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  • Donna
    March 25, 2017
    In Wild Thyme, Pennsylvania, Officer Henry Farrell is the law -- the only cop the town has. Kevin O'Keefe is mostly a druggie and he reports his girlfriend Penny missing. The story meanders along with many sub-plots. The author's words are quite descriptive and the countryside is very pretty. I liked the way the author developed Henry's character but the mystery was difficult for me to follow.I received a copy of this book from a Goodreads giveaway.
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  • Craig Sisterson
    May 8, 2017
    We’ve had to wait a little while for a sequel to Bouman’s exquisite, mesmerizing debut Dry Bones in the Valley (2014), which won the Edgar Award for Best First Novel and the LA Times Prize, among other accolades. But at last we’re back alongside Office Henry Farrell on his beat among the backwoods and byways of rural Pennsylvania. Farrell is having a trouble-filled summer in Wild Thyme. While he’d rather be hunting turkey, drinking IPAs, and playing his fiddle, instead he’s busy dealing with the We’ve had to wait a little while for a sequel to Bouman’s exquisite, mesmerizing debut Dry Bones in the Valley (2014), which won the Edgar Award for Best First Novel and the LA Times Prize, among other accolades. But at last we’re back alongside Office Henry Farrell on his beat among the backwoods and byways of rural Pennsylvania. Farrell is having a trouble-filled summer in Wild Thyme. While he’d rather be hunting turkey, drinking IPAs, and playing his fiddle, instead he’s busy dealing with the arrival of heroin, a surge in burglaries, and an adulterous fling from which he can’t seem to extract himself. When local handyman Kevin O’Keeffe’s drug-addled girlfriend disappears, and O’Keeffe gives a rambling semi-confession to maybe shooting a man, Farrell’s life gets even more complicated. He’s pulled in all sorts of directions by the various powers and influences in his community, as he tries to sort the truth from everything that obscures. And there's a lot that obscures. His investigations take him across the state border to the backcountry equivalent of vice-filled back alleyways. Fateful Mornings is an interesting, at times frustrating, read. Bouman’s elegant prose and knack for evoking backcountry life in vivid detail is again on show, but this sophomore effort lacks the tension and narrative drive of his debut. Dry Bones in the Valley earned comparisons to rural noir masters like John Hart and James Lee Burke, but in Fateful Mornings Bouman veers more towards James Sallis territory, with formless and meandering plotting, in among lots of lovely description and characterization. He doesn’t quite, yet, have Sallis' touch for making that work, but there’s still plenty of quality here. The plotline is not so much two steps forward, one step back, as one step forward, three to the side, circle back around, and bow to your partner. Bouman's writing is elegant, poetic, and unique, and there are interesting strands of philosophy and different ways of looking at the world threaded throughout, but I can imagine that many readers, whether crime fans or not, may find the storyline's looseness off-putting. I couldn't quite make up my own mind about it, but in the end felt like I admired what Bouman was trying to do rather than fully being engaged in the tale.
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  • Linda
    May 28, 2017
    My first book from this author. I was quite impressed with the elegance of the prose (even though I found it cryptic at times). However, I found the story meandering and the characters quite unlikeable making it very difficult to engage with the story.
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  • Laura
    March 13, 2017
    The story was segmented, choppy, and lacked flow. It was bogged down with information about the city, counties, and locale. Which could have been overlooked; except, the details provided were dull and often irrelevant to the storyline. Actually, the same can be said about most of the side stories. They were uninteresting and added nearly nothing to the plot. There are about 275 pages of mundane narrative, until an interesting character in Coleman Tod is introduced. However, it's short lived and The story was segmented, choppy, and lacked flow. It was bogged down with information about the city, counties, and locale. Which could have been overlooked; except, the details provided were dull and often irrelevant to the storyline. Actually, the same can be said about most of the side stories. They were uninteresting and added nearly nothing to the plot. There are about 275 pages of mundane narrative, until an interesting character in Coleman Tod is introduced. However, it's short lived and the conclusion of the story and novel are as lackluster as the first 275 pages. I really wanted to like this book more than I did, but between the clunky flow and cluttered story building I just couldn't get pulled in and lost in the novel the way I would have wanted.
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  • Brittany
    March 16, 2017
    Mystery is my favorite genre, and this book is a great example of why. I enjoyed reading this book so much. I was pulled into this book from the beginning and found it hard trying to pick a spot to stop reading and put it down. So most of the time, I just kept reading. I would highly recommend this book to fans of mystery novels.
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  • Janet Martin
    March 17, 2017
    Not as strong as the 1st episode in this series, but still a solid mystery with a wonderful sense of place, fine character development and a plot that moves both quickly and surely, with a few surprises.
  • Maggie
    April 30, 2017
    Wonderful, brought some fond memories from when I lived in that area of Pennsylvania, Well done, plot kept me wondering who really killed Penny. Keep up the good work.
  • Margit
    March 24, 2017
    Received an ARC of the book from the publisher.If you like your crime novels to be of the meandering it's a boys life variety, this is the book for you. It felt as if more time was spent on telling the protagonists life history, personality quirts, hobbies, and foibles than was spent trying to solve the various crimes that were committed. For what it was, it was well written; however, what it was wasn't really my cup of tea.
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  • Laura
    April 17, 2017
    I love this series! Great characters and beautiful writing.
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