Ninjak
From New York Times best-selling writer Matt Kindt (4001 A.D.) and superstar artists Clay Mann (Poison Ivy), Doug Braithwaite (Armor Hunters), Butch Guice (Captain America) and many more, comes the first oversized hardcover of the seven-time Harvey Award nominated series the A.V. Club calls “immensely entertaining”!Then: Meet inexperienced MI-6 recruit Colin King on his first mission in the field as he learns the basics of spycraft and counterintelligence, and develops a volatile relationship with his first handler.Now: Colin King is Ninjak, the world’s foremost intelligence operative, weapons expert, and master assassin. And he’s hunting the Shadow Seven – a secret cabal of shinobi masters with mysterious ties to his training and tragic past.Collecting: Ninjak 1–13

Ninjak Details

TitleNinjak
Author
FormatHardcover
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 11th, 2017
PublisherValiant Entertainment, LLC
ISBN1682151573
ISBN-139781682151570
Number of pages448 pages
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Superheroes

Ninjak Review

  • Iain Macleod
    March 23, 2017
    Ninjak is a bloody awful idea which should have stayed in the 90's. But Valiant make the smart choice of putting Matt Kindt in charge of him. Kindt seems to have some measure of affection for him because he portrays the character straight down the line without taking the piss and imbues him, and the villains here too, with clever and off beat character designs that seem as if they were intended for Kindt's more indie and highbrow Mind MGMT.While this is a superhero/espionage/sci-fi/fantasy comic Ninjak is a bloody awful idea which should have stayed in the 90's. But Valiant make the smart choice of putting Matt Kindt in charge of him. Kindt seems to have some measure of affection for him because he portrays the character straight down the line without taking the piss and imbues him, and the villains here too, with clever and off beat character designs that seem as if they were intended for Kindt's more indie and highbrow Mind MGMT.While this is a superhero/espionage/sci-fi/fantasy comic it has a surprisingly hard edge with a couple of characters flashbacks approaching near Hellraiser levels of gore and sadism.A good addition to the Valiant library that shows a stronger cohesiveness with its universe of characters and events than Marvel and particularly DC manage to these days.
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  • Michael Giuliano
    May 8, 2017
    So far I've only seen Ninjak as a member of a team, or as a recurring supporting character in other people's books. Here is the master spy and assassin as he's meant to be: a kick-ass loner who is willing to do anything to succeed in the mission at hand. A fun spy book with a touch of mysticism, a great Ninjak solo book (but you should wait to read this until you've already read The Valiant and/or The Book of Death, to avoid getting confused with the timeline).
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  • Charlie
    June 23, 2017
    Freaking Valiant continues to produce the most ridiculously good, insanely well-produced comics on the market today.That's all. Go read it for yourself. And enjoy!
  • Shannon Appelcline
    March 25, 2017
    Ninjak was one of the VH-1 characters who was just too '90s. I mean, he's a super-spy ninja. Despite those origins, he's been used well in the VH-E universe, and Kindt continues to rehabilitate him here by turning him into an anti-Batman. His parents are still alive, but uncaring, while the butler who raises him is abusive.Weaponeer (1-5). The main story of Weaponeer is quite well done: an exciting bit of spy craft that is follows the tropes of Jack Vance's Demon Princes, as Ninjak prepares to f Ninjak was one of the VH-1 characters who was just too '90s. I mean, he's a super-spy ninja. Despite those origins, he's been used well in the VH-E universe, and Kindt continues to rehabilitate him here by turning him into an anti-Batman. His parents are still alive, but uncaring, while the butler who raises him is abusive.Weaponeer (1-5). The main story of Weaponeer is quite well done: an exciting bit of spy craft that is follows the tropes of Jack Vance's Demon Princes, as Ninjak prepares to find and kill seven demonic arms dealers. However, it really excels in its multiple levels of stories, as we're simultaneously learning about Colin's youth, his early days with MI6, and even the history of his foes. It's more depth than you ever see in a comic, and what raises this from good to great.The Shadow Wars (6-9). Ninjak hunts the remaining four members of the Shadow Seven (though I must have missed something, because I only count six!). This volume continues to be exciting and it continues to have great backstory on Colin, including a few different surprises. The villain-of-the-month formula is a little stagnant, but despite that, this continues to be an enjoyable book.Operation Deadside (10-13). My problem with this third volume of Ninjak is that it's a muddle. That's in large part due to the immersion into the Shadowman mythos. Mind you, Kindt actually seems to do well with Deadside, given it some character that was missing from the similar dimensional travels of The Death-Defying Doctor Mirage: Deluxe Edition, but it's not enough when you really can't figure out what's going on with the Magpie, who seems to be Shadowman gone evil.Maybe this would be cleared up if Valiant ever published Shadowman: Deluxe Edition, Book 2, which has been getting pushed back on their schedule for years, but without that, I just don't know what was going on here (and the story also loses a lot of its emotional resonance).The biggest problem with this volume is that it's in a continual slide downward. However, I trust that'll be turned around with the next volume, when it steps away from the Shadowman stories.
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