Tallulah The Tooth Fairy CEO
Tallulah the Tooth Fairy is not only the founder and CEO of the largest teeth collecting organization on the planet, Teeth Titans, Incorporated, she's a clever and wildly successful business woman with an affinity for all things dental. A natural innovator and problem solver, Tallulah finds herself unexpectedly stumped when six year-old Ballard Burchell leaves a note instead of his tooth under his pillow. What's a Tooth Fairy to do when there's no tooth to take?

Tallulah The Tooth Fairy CEO Details

TitleTallulah The Tooth Fairy CEO
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 19th, 2016
PublisherThe English Schoolhouse
Rating
GenreChildrens, Picture Books, Humor, Fantasy

Tallulah The Tooth Fairy CEO Review

  • KDV
    January 1, 1970
    I want to live like Tallulah! Very original and amusing.
  • Abigail
    January 1, 1970
    Tallulah the tooth fairy, founder and CEO of Teeth Titans, Incorporated, confronts an unexpected challenge in this brightly-illustrated picture-book. Although she and her assistant tooth fairies take care of the world's children, when it comes to their baby teeth falling out, she isn't sure how to proceed when a little boy leaves her a note explaining that he has lost his tooth. Should she still leave him a reward, even though he doesn't have a tooth to offer in exchange? There isn't anything in Tallulah the tooth fairy, founder and CEO of Teeth Titans, Incorporated, confronts an unexpected challenge in this brightly-illustrated picture-book. Although she and her assistant tooth fairies take care of the world's children, when it comes to their baby teeth falling out, she isn't sure how to proceed when a little boy leaves her a note explaining that he has lost his tooth. Should she still leave him a reward, even though he doesn't have a tooth to offer in exchange? There isn't anything in her handbook on the issue, so she convenes a meeting of her top fairies...Tallulah The Tooth Fairy CEO is the first picture-book I have read from both Tamara Pizzoli, an expatriate African-American educator and author living in Italy, and Federico Fabiani, an Italian illustrator who makes his debut here. Although I enjoyed the colorful, stylish illustrations from Fabiani, the story left a bad taste in my mouth. Not only does Pizzoli's narrative here feel aimed more at adult readers in general - as an online friend of mine noted in her own review, children are unlikely to care very much about Tallulah's therapy sessions or yoga exercises - it addresses contemporary race issues in a way that might feel snide and hurtful to some readers. Ironically, given the fact that both the Tooth Fairy and Santa Claus (represented here by Mrs. Claus) are European-derived cultural figures, the only two white characters - the activist protesting Mrs. Clause, and the tooth fairy assistant wearing the "#All Fairies Matter" t-shirt - are held up to both narrative and illustrative ridicule. This might work in a book aimed at adults, but in a story for children, especially at a time when we're having discussions about representation and how that effects young people's psychological well being, it feels rather tone-deaf. Unfortunately, the racial problems here aren't confined to the black-white axis, as the scene in which Tallulah summons her top aides depicts an entire table of black women, save the aforementioned t-shirt-wearing Tom. Given that Tallulah's corporation is said in the story to take care of all of the world's children, why are there no Latino or Asian fairies? Why is there only one man? And why is that very question, posed by Tom, held up to ridicule? An adult might appreciate the irony here, but will a child? Or will they simply take away the impression that such concerns are invalid when posed by white people?I'd like to think that this is a book with its heart in the right place (I'm honestly not sure), but in the end, the delivery was terribly flawed. What might work as edgy humor in an adult book feels abusive in one for younger children. Ironically, given that almost the entire cast of characters here is of African descent, there is also something rather Eurocentric about a story in which the entirety of the world is served by tooth fairies - figures from European tradition. As it happens, there are a number of different cultural traditions from around the world, concerning the disposal of baby teeth. Young readers interested in exploring those traditions, and getting a truly multicultural take on the subject, might want to pick up something like Throw Your Tooth on the Roof: Tooth Traditions from Around the World instead.
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  • Effie
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book! I actually laughed out loud at one point reading it. I love the artwork. The little details enhance the humor of the writing. Tallulah is an inspiration. I feel like I should follow her "strict schedule that keeps her both busy and fulfilled." Great possible answers to common questions about the tooth fairy with an empowering role model of a successful (and stylish) CEO for little girls (and, of course, other kids too.) A++++
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  • La Coccinelle
    January 1, 1970
    While not necessarily a bad book, Tallulah the Tooth Fairy CEO may represent a bit of a mismatch between itself and its intended audience. As an adult, I was slightly bored with the first part of the book that sets up Tallulah's enterprise as a large corporation (Teeth Titans Inc.) and places her as the head of this vast tooth-collecting empire. Does a little kid really want to read about an adult's schedule of therapy, yoga, and errands? The story really only gets going later, when Tallulah has While not necessarily a bad book, Tallulah the Tooth Fairy CEO may represent a bit of a mismatch between itself and its intended audience. As an adult, I was slightly bored with the first part of the book that sets up Tallulah's enterprise as a large corporation (Teeth Titans Inc.) and places her as the head of this vast tooth-collecting empire. Does a little kid really want to read about an adult's schedule of therapy, yoga, and errands? The story really only gets going later, when Tallulah has to deal with a kid named Ballard who has misplaced his lost tooth. There's no protocol for such a situation, so Tallulah has to figure out what to do.Part of the reason I feel like this book is a mismatch for its audience is because of the race issue. Despite the exchange of teeth for money (known as tand-fé) originally being a Northern European tradition, in this book, the whole Tooth Fairy empire is presented as the purview of people of colour. Only two white characters appear in the whole book, and both of them are portrayed as annoying activists. (If you want to try to explain to a five-year-old child the significance of Tom's #AllFairiesMatter t-shirt and his complaint about the lack of diversity on the board of directors, more power to you.) While I don't necessarily have a problem with the Tooth Fairy being black (she's a fictional character, after all, and could potentially be any colour), the way the race issue is handled--probably as a wink to adults who might be reading the book--seems kind of unnecessary for a children's story about a fairy... especially since most little kids won't "get it" without some sort of explanation.For these reasons, I have a feeling that parents reading this book to their kids will probably enjoy it more than the kids themselves. While the idea of the Tooth Fairy heading up a multinational corporation dedicated to collecting teeth is amusing, the attempts to make it current and diverse kind of push it out of the suitability range for the five-to-seven age group. If you're still young enough to believe in the Tooth Fairy, you're probably not going to have a great grasp of intersectionality and political hashtags.
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  • Danielle
    January 1, 1970
    I am obsessed with Tallulah
  • Jill Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    Oh. My. Goodness. Did I love this children’s book… I’m well-known among those who know me for liking the more, let’s say, unusual children’s books. Felicity Floo is a household favorite, as are the deliciously off-beat Hat books by Jon Klassen and the life-altering realizations of Arnie the Doughnut, to name a few…This latest find isn’t exactly quirky, so much as it’s stylish. That’s a word you don’t hear applied to children’s books all that often – although it really should be, since many child Oh. My. Goodness. Did I love this children’s book… I’m well-known among those who know me for liking the more, let’s say, unusual children’s books. Felicity Floo is a household favorite, as are the deliciously off-beat Hat books by Jon Klassen and the life-altering realizations of Arnie the Doughnut, to name a few…This latest find isn’t exactly quirky, so much as it’s stylish. That’s a word you don’t hear applied to children’s books all that often – although it really should be, since many children’s books have glorious artwork that is vastly underrated as well as clever, sophisticated-yet-straightforward language that brings startling clarity to the complexities of childhood and growing up… This is one of THOSE books. An exceedingly original, smart tale that shines a light on social issues while simultaneously entertaining – and it is packaged beautifully with gloriously sharp illustrations. It’s a real treat.As is the author, Dr. Tamara Pizzoli. Dr. Pizzoli was kind enough to answer a few questions about her writing and her life, and I dare you to read her words and NOT immediately want to check out her book… It reads exactly as she speaks – the sophisticated simplicity I described above is on full display in both the interview and the story. Enjoy!Full review AND author interview: http://blog.jill-elizabeth.com/2016/1...
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  • Dawn Rutherford
    January 1, 1970
    This is a weird book, but I enjoyed it.
  • astro_filo
    January 1, 1970
    Wonderful book, beautiful tale of a contemporary world with stunning illustrations
  • Akosei
    January 1, 1970
    This is such a lovely book! Everything about it just draws you in. The story is snappy, funny, and affirming. The illustrations are sharp and beautiful--and I totally wanted some of Tallulah's outfits! I highly recommend this book for children and the child in all of us!
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  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    Laugh out loud funny for adults, too.
  • ellis
    January 1, 1970
    okay, this wins best picture book of the year. cute art, funny story, positivity, and just enough jokes for the adults to not get totally sick of it too quickly.
  • Andrew
    January 1, 1970
    This creative and stylish book had me cracking up! Tallulah is the CEO of all tooth fairies, and it's not a job she takes lightly. She knows everything there is about the job-- except one night, a young boy has left a note in place of his truly lost tooth... and the Employee Manual doesn't specify what to do in this situation! Even as an adult, I hope to one day be as cool and successful as Tallulah-- and she will inspire you to be, too!
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  • SomdahSaysSo
    January 1, 1970
    I know its a children's book but I bought this book for myself. Once I saw the cover I had to get it. A tooth fairy named Tallulah and she has a beautiful afro. Tallulah is a business women, she hangs with Mrs. Clause, does yoga and attends therapy. And the illustrations are A+. Highly recommend.
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  • Shamekia
    January 1, 1970
    This book is too much. It's too long to be a picture book; it's much better suited for a middle grade chapter book. I could see a whole series of Tallulah books for kids 8-12 years old. The content is really mature for the intended audience (running a business, training employees, there's even a bit about protesting fur). Picture books tend to be written for children under age 8. I don't think 5 year olds would find this interesting. There's a lot of adult humor that I think would go over childr This book is too much. It's too long to be a picture book; it's much better suited for a middle grade chapter book. I could see a whole series of Tallulah books for kids 8-12 years old. The content is really mature for the intended audience (running a business, training employees, there's even a bit about protesting fur). Picture books tend to be written for children under age 8. I don't think 5 year olds would find this interesting. There's a lot of adult humor that I think would go over children's heads. Clearly I'm the dissenting opinion on this title, but I'm already tough on picture books to begin with. I wouldn't read this for storytime, or after-school outreach. I might give it to an older child that seemed interested, but the picture book format might be a turn-off for anyone over age 8. The artwork is lovely and the premise is great, but the story misses the mark.
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  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    This vibrant picture book imagines what it might be like to be the tooth fairy. But Tallulah isn't just a run of the mill tooth fairy. She's the CEO and the one responsible for training the others. She faces a challenge when a young boy, Ballard, has literally lost his tooth, and leaves a note saying just that. After consulting with her board of directors about what to do, Tallulah writes him a note, gives him a gift, and also provides a shiny gold coin. I like the authorial voice here and the c This vibrant picture book imagines what it might be like to be the tooth fairy. But Tallulah isn't just a run of the mill tooth fairy. She's the CEO and the one responsible for training the others. She faces a challenge when a young boy, Ballard, has literally lost his tooth, and leaves a note saying just that. After consulting with her board of directors about what to do, Tallulah writes him a note, gives him a gift, and also provides a shiny gold coin. I like the authorial voice here and the confidence that Tallulah exudes.
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  • Krissy Neddo
    January 1, 1970
    Was looking forward to seeing a tooth fairy of color, but alas this is another picture book for adults. Sigh. Such a missed opportunity here. The beginning left me wondering "what do I say about this book??!" Too many agendas in this one. When Tallulah went into the house to gather a tooth the story picked up, but sadly this will be not be a storytime book for my elementary students.
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  • Roseann Podias
    January 1, 1970
    It was a funny and interesting take on the Tooth Fairy. The language was mature and I found one illustration enough to color my opinion as negative for a picture book. My children’s librarian colleagues agree.
  • Adriana Martinez Figueroa
    January 1, 1970
    AAAAA I LOVE THIS
  • Lynn
    January 1, 1970
    Awesome illustrations and mock serious biography tone made me smile. I'm not sure that intended audience is going to quite get this though.
  • Renee
    January 1, 1970
    I love this book
  • Edward Sullivan
    January 1, 1970
    If Pam Grier were a tooth fairy? A funny, stylish, modern take on a classic fantasy figure.
  • Briar
    January 1, 1970
    I'm kind of obsessed with this book at the moment to be perfectly honest. That's all. Read it.
  • Miss Ryoko
    January 1, 1970
    The illustrations were really fun! I love Tallulah's design! She's awesome
  • Erica Flory
    January 1, 1970
    Lovely book
  • Annese
    January 1, 1970
    Hilarious!!! I genuinely laughed out loud for this one. Definitely a picture book for adults more than children, but entertaining nonetheless.
  • Tibby (she/her)
    January 1, 1970
    This book is amazing! It’s got great illustrations, excellent text, tons of humor that will appeal to both kids and the adults reading it to them, wonderful vocabulary and lots of details relating to teeth that are fun to spot, not to mention a good story.I had originally bought the book for my daughter. She’s kind of into the idea of mythical people and creatures like Santa, the Easter Bunny, and the Tooth Fairy despite the fact that we don’t actually celebrate them. Go figure. (Thanks, consume This book is amazing! It’s got great illustrations, excellent text, tons of humor that will appeal to both kids and the adults reading it to them, wonderful vocabulary and lots of details relating to teeth that are fun to spot, not to mention a good story.I had originally bought the book for my daughter. She’s kind of into the idea of mythical people and creatures like Santa, the Easter Bunny, and the Tooth Fairy despite the fact that we don’t actually celebrate them. Go figure. (Thanks, consumerism that markets those ideas so strongly to children.) I wanted to get it because look at her! Tallulah is amazing and a CEO!I absolutely love that the story challenges the usual idea and imagery of the tooth fairy that shows her as white, blonde, and medieval. In fact, the story takes that head on. In the note written by Ballard, he has drawn the tooth fairy in that way despite being black himself. Tallulah reads the note and the first comment she makes is “that looks nothing like me”. She does comment in the next sentence that she isn’t that small, but between those lines is the unspoken fact that she is also clearly not white.The text is longer, so unless you think your child or younger audience is motivated to listen, or is good at listening, I would recommend it for 1st through 3rd grade (my third grade class last year had a superb sense of humor and would have LOVED this book). The vocabulary is pretty sophisticated too. The vast majority of it makes perfect sense in context and shouldn’t cause a problem. It very much brought to mind William Steig, particularly Dr. DeSoto and Shrek and how he uses language.The language also ties into the humor of the story. There are plenty of funny asides for parents and kids and the twist at the end is both a great message and satisfying. Do not miss the boardroom scene wherein Tallulah asks for advice about what to do with Ballard’s note. Her board is made up of all black women, except for one white dude, who is complaining about the lack of diversity and wearing an All Fairies Matter shirt. Hilarious nod to current events and again a subtle nod to defaulting the Tooth Fairy to white.The illustrations appealed to me because of their clean modernity which made Tallulah seem all the more cool. The colors are bright without being garish or saccharine. The art appealed to my daughter because each picture has lots of tiny tooth details and invite long looks (I highly recommend flipping through the pictures before reading it through the first time because they are so captivating).If you are looking for general books to add to your collection this is well worth it. Move it to the top of your list or gift it the next time a tooth falls out.
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