The Rebellion's Last Traitor
In a dystopian world ravaged by war and environmental collapse, one man fights history to discover the truth about his wife and child. After decades of war, the brutal Tathadann Party restored order toshattered Eitan City by outlawing the past and rewriting history. Memory is a commodity bought and sold, and experienced like a drug. Henraek works as a Tathadann memory thief, draining citizens memories.Everything changes when Henraek harvests a memory of his own wife s death, in the hidden rebellion that once tore apart their city. Now he will do whatever it takes to learn the truth even ifit means burning Eitan City to the ground.

The Rebellion's Last Traitor Details

TitleThe Rebellion's Last Traitor
Author
FormatPaperback
ReleaseJun 6th, 2017
PublisherAngry Robot
ISBN0857666568
ISBN-139780857666567
Number of pages352 pages
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Dystopia, Fiction

The Rebellion's Last Traitor Review

  • Benoit Lelièvre
    June 11, 2017
    So, this is barely a science fiction novel. This of it like a Ballardian novel set in a distant alternate reality but that discusses something inherent to ours: in this case, the opressor/opressed dynamic. If you know a thing or two about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, this novel echoes many of its issues. Repression, terrorism, civil war, rewriting of past events. Nik Korpon shrewdly used political parties in his novel rather than races, but he makes a sound point nonetheless. There are some So, this is barely a science fiction novel. This of it like a Ballardian novel set in a distant alternate reality but that discusses something inherent to ours: in this case, the opressor/opressed dynamic. If you know a thing or two about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, this novel echoes many of its issues. Repression, terrorism, civil war, rewriting of past events. Nik Korpon shrewdly used political parties in his novel rather than races, but he makes a sound point nonetheless. There are some definitely less Balladrian themes to this novel here like parenthood for example. THE REBELLION'S LAST TRAITOR gets a little sentimental when it addresses the question of kids and personal legacy which is great I guess if you do have kids. I thought that having two narrators (Hanraek and Walleus) was confusing because they both talked in the first person. Otherwise I've enjoyed this sneaky political novel a lot. I think it's quite pertinent in the age of Star Wars. The kind of read that may break your heart, but that will expand your mind.
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  • Christopher Novas
    June 16, 2017
    The Rebellion’s Last Traitor is Nik Korpon’s latest offering, coming off his contribution to the SOUL STANDARD (a 4-way author interconnecting novel-in-novellas, say that 5 times fast). It’s an interesting departure for Nik Korpon as he’s mainly known as a crime writer with noir leanings, but in TRAITOR he’s created a thriller dressed with splashes of sci-fiction telling an overarching mystery spanning a decade.TRAITOR follows Hanraek, former rebel leader-turned memory thief, and Walleus, a form The Rebellion’s Last Traitor is Nik Korpon’s latest offering, coming off his contribution to the SOUL STANDARD (a 4-way author interconnecting novel-in-novellas, say that 5 times fast). It’s an interesting departure for Nik Korpon as he’s mainly known as a crime writer with noir leanings, but in TRAITOR he’s created a thriller dressed with splashes of sci-fiction telling an overarching mystery spanning a decade.TRAITOR follows Hanraek, former rebel leader-turned memory thief, and Walleus, a former comrade/rebel leader-turned high ranking official in the Tathadann Party. Memories are bought and sold in this not-so-distant future, allowing the Tathadann Party to rewrite history of Eitan City as they see fit. Memories are also experienced as a drug, and Hanraek comes upon a memory of his dead wife and child which will change the course of both protagonist’s lives and the course of Eitan City as a whole.The world building in this novel is intricately expanded upon as Korpon touches upon key moments in its history: the flames of Amergin, the Resource Wars which lead the world down its path to the present day, the beginnings of the Struggle (rebel group), the aristocracy and politics of Eitan City. It encapsulates into a rich, culturally/socially varied world which is easy to digest. Much of the novel parallels our own contemporary issues: class warfare, terrorism, fascism, and rebellion (duh), but is never done in a way which Korpons views are shoved down the readers throats. It’s getting to the root of where those things come from, on both sides of the issue, and the novel is quite engaging in that regard. It discusses these issues throughout the narrative in an unflinching, and honest way.Nik Korpon’s writing has evolved yet again. While I wouldn’t say his previous books plots were weak, I would say that he has definitely stepped his game up quite a few notches. Some of the twists regarding Hanraek’s plot thread came at you so unexpectedly & fastball quick, so that was a great experience for me. I read this novel in about 3 sittings, so it’s very much a page turner. As I’ve said before, Nik Korpon is one of the very best when it comes to writing action and that’s no different here — some of the fight sequences alone are film-worthy. The contemporary drama between these former comrades, what is said/unsaid, political intrigue, and the hidden blades throughout the narrative pay off quite well.Some have said that dual protagonists are indistinguishable from the other, and I have to disagree. Their viewpoints upon the world, society at large are very distinct, as is the use of language between both. Hanraek is a man caught in the unending grief of the loss of his wife and child, and lashes out quite frequently throughout the novel, whereas Walleus is a more calculated individual keeping a poker face even through the most stressful of circumstances.All in all, this is a layered, smart novel that has something in it for just about any reader, really.
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  • Goldilocks275
    June 16, 2017
    This is a typical revenge tale comparable to that which is often found in video games but wrapped in a minority report/blade runner world. The writing isn't very good, ranging from mediocre and unimaginative to broken. The plot itself is decent, relying on a two-person story dynamic with interweaving plot lines to reveal more about the world and backstory of the characters. Ultimately, the big revelations don't hit hard enough and the world building isn't quite good enough to separate this tale This is a typical revenge tale comparable to that which is often found in video games but wrapped in a minority report/blade runner world. The writing isn't very good, ranging from mediocre and unimaginative to broken. The plot itself is decent, relying on a two-person story dynamic with interweaving plot lines to reveal more about the world and backstory of the characters. Ultimately, the big revelations don't hit hard enough and the world building isn't quite good enough to separate this tale from the rest of the pack.
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  • Mark Gardner
    May 16, 2017
    I saw Nik Korpon’s The Rebellion’s Last Traitor on Netgalley, and since I groove scifi, and Angry Robot in general, I decided to give it a whirl.The Good: Intricate world building. The backstory of the word envisioned by the author displayed a lot of thought and a love of the fictional world created. The gritty dark noir feel of the city and its inhabitants really drove home the totalitarian oppression committed against the citizens.The Bad: The rebellion that ended so long ago that put so many I saw Nik Korpon’s The Rebellion’s Last Traitor on Netgalley, and since I groove scifi, and Angry Robot in general, I decided to give it a whirl.The Good: Intricate world building. The backstory of the word envisioned by the author displayed a lot of thought and a love of the fictional world created. The gritty dark noir feel of the city and its inhabitants really drove home the totalitarian oppression committed against the citizens.The Bad: The rebellion that ended so long ago that put so many characters on the varying sides was to more interesting that the main storyline. But these little snippets were almost an afterthought. In fiction like Firefly, the loss of the rebels was so important that it was integrated into each episode. Also, the alternating narrative is nice, but the style of both characters and their POVs were pretty much the same. More than once I had to flip back to the first page of the chapter to verify what POV I was in.The Disappointing: The story was super confusing. There was a complex socio-political thing going on, but there just wasn’t enough information to really click. I had no investment in the characters. The Rebellion’s Last Traitor has so much potential, but the execution was left muddy and confusing.The Final Word: I’m probably the wrong person to ask if I’d recommend this story. I like all sci-fi, even bad sci-fi. Reading this book felt like I had accidentally picked up the second book in a series, and I spent most of the read lost. I’m going to give this on three stars.
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  • Anna Asplund
    May 4, 2017
    Walleus and Henraek were part of the revolution, but that's over now and they both have moved to working for the government that defeated everything they fought for. Now, when there's another chance for rebellion, each man must decide what his priorities are and his position in the new fight.I'm not entirely sure what to think of this book.Overall, I really really enjoyed it. It was an interesting dystopian sci-fi thriller and I easily got caught up in the story and the world. It intrigued me an Walleus and Henraek were part of the revolution, but that's over now and they both have moved to working for the government that defeated everything they fought for. Now, when there's another chance for rebellion, each man must decide what his priorities are and his position in the new fight.I'm not entirely sure what to think of this book.Overall, I really really enjoyed it. It was an interesting dystopian sci-fi thriller and I easily got caught up in the story and the world. It intrigued me and I really enjoyed seeing this perspective of a possible future.A few strong points:1) A fascinating plot. There was so much going on in this book, but it worked really well overall. There were some really complex connections between many characters and it gave the book an interesting depth. I really liked that aspect of it.2) A well-built world. The author obviously had thought this world and history out quite a bit and that made it a rewarding read. The world was unique, with new technology and ideas, and I really loved being exposed to all that. It felt like traveling to a new place.3) The alternating narrations. The story is told by Walleus and Henraek and it was interesting to see their different perspectives and opinions side by side. The most interesting part to me was that one of them would know something the other wouldn't and the readers' knowledge of that information completely changed the way the book was read. The way this was told was brilliant and worked fabulously.But it wasn't perfect. I do have a few complaints:1) The story was sometimes confusing. The author obviously had a great idea of what was happening where and to who, but as a reader, it was difficult to get pushed into this book without any background. It felt a little like coming halfway through a party and missing everything that had lead up to the current party game or conversation. I could piece together most of the story, but I still felt like I was missing bits and pieces of it and that was frustrating sometimes.2) The narratives weren't different enough. While Walleus and Henraek were very different characters, the way they narrated didn't differ much. It would get a bit confusing switching between chapters and sometimes I'd have to go back to the chapter heading to make sure I knew who was narrating currently. I loved the alternating, but they were written too similarly.Overall, this was a really fun book and I recommend it to sci-fi readers, especially those who love dystopian futures.
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  • Angel
    June 7, 2017
    A well-crafted mix of noir and sci-fi, Korpon manages to create a fairly robust world while providing a pace that wasn't bogged down.That said, some aspects of the plot and history of this world could have been further fleshed out but I it certainly doesn't detract from the experience. I had a great time reading The Rebellion's Last Traitor and recommend it to those looking to find a novel that provides something a little different than the norm.
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  • Jena
    April 27, 2017
    Whenever I get the chance to read a post-apocalyptic Science Fiction novel, I am all in. Add in a gritty noir vibe reminiscent of a 1940's detective novel and there's absolutely no way I can say no.We find ourselves in a future version of our world. I'm not sure where the exact setting is supposed to be, but I suspect Scotland or thereabouts. Knowledge of the location isn't a requirement to enjoy the story, or at least it wasn't for me.And its a good story. Dark but compelling, with a plot that Whenever I get the chance to read a post-apocalyptic Science Fiction novel, I am all in. Add in a gritty noir vibe reminiscent of a 1940's detective novel and there's absolutely no way I can say no.We find ourselves in a future version of our world. I'm not sure where the exact setting is supposed to be, but I suspect Scotland or thereabouts. Knowledge of the location isn't a requirement to enjoy the story, or at least it wasn't for me.And its a good story. Dark but compelling, with a plot that pulls you into turning page after page needing to know what happens next.We alternate between two main characters, Henraek and Walleus. They both used to fight for the rebels and now work for a group, the Tathadann, who overtook the area years back. Henraek is a broken man, forced to work for the people he hates, after losing his wife and son to the war.Walleus is a bit more complicated. He has secrets, dark secrets, that leave you guessing his true loyalties and motivations all the way to the end. More on him later.I really liked how creative the story was, and how complex the characters were. I imagine in any place taken over by a regime that rules in ruthless and totalitarian ways, the day to day lives of those citizens would be anything but black and white. People are never all good or all bad, or at least, rarely. The author does a good job capturing the complexity of this struggle.If you love a gritty, dark novel you will enjoy this book. I think if you like anything 1940's detective noir, you will also really enjoy the narration. I give the book 3 out of 5 stars.This book was provided to me via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.**POSSIBLE SPOILERS AHEAD! If you haven't read this book yet, DO NOT READ FURTHER**I gave this book only three stars, because while I was gripped by the story, it could have been stunning.There were two pieces of the plot that I wish had been developed a bit more. The first is what really drew me in to the book. Memory theft.Henraek's job in the Tathadann is stealing memories from people. You can then insert these memories into various viewers and watch them. He's given a list daily and he goes about his job trying not to think about what he's actually doing. He must not feel too bad though, because he always take an extra vial to sell to the black market.This is an interesting side plot. The people who buy memories on the black market and become addicted to them. These junkies are mentioned multiple times throughout the book, and one junkie in particular comes back again and again, but there isn't any discovery over who he is or why he's relevant. I think maybe he was just an example of how desperate and alone these people can become chasing lost memories, but this leads me to more questions not answered. Why do they become addicted to the memories? What memories are they chasing? How could anyone's random memories lead to such addiction, especially people who want to relive memories of lost, loved ones? It wasn't exactly clear to me and I would have LOVED to see this more developed.Back to the memory theft. These memories are drained and the people are left as empty shells. Alive but gone. Which raised some questions. There isn't really any mention of what happens to these shells after they've been robbed. We witness him engaging in this theft twice, and he simply places coal over their eyes, and leaves them. The coal is mentioned as important, a signal of something, but again, I have no idea what. Maybe it isn't important, but it felt like a loose end to me.The memories are stored by the Tathadann, but we don't really see why, what they're looking for, or even why specific people are targeted. I also would think if there was still a rebellious faction in this city, that the outrage of people hollowed out and stolen would cause more of an outrage than the book implied. There really is no mention of it, other than the disgust generated towards addicts. If the addicts themselves are so repulsive, shouldn't the creators of the addiction also be reviled? ESPECIALLY if it left these shells of people all over the place?This underdeveloped piece of plot is even more important because of Henraek's girlfriend, Emeriann. Her husband was also killed in the last rebel battle. And we find Henraek stealing the memories of her dead husbands grandfather in the beginning. He then goes BACK and steals the fathers later on. He is conflicted about this, but takes them anyway. Fine, he's doing his job, but what about Emeriann? She's part of the new rebellion and expresses disgust over addicts, yet nothing is EVER mentioned about her in-laws or her new boyfriend's role in creating these addicts? Or again, these shells of people left all over the city? I just didn't buy it. She is willing to die for the rebel cause, yet loves a man who is responsible for so much that she hates?The second piece of plot I wish was developed more was Walleus himself. Walleus was the original traitor. He's the one who we are led to believe gave the Tathadann the information they needed to take down the rebels. This information led to massive deaths, including the death of Henraek's wife and son. I felt it was a stretch that Henraek continued to view Walleus as a friend. He knew of his betrayal, knew that he was forced into submission, and yet still continues to view the guy as his friend? Because they grew up together? I don't buy it. I would have liked a more treacherous relationship with both of them scheming to undo the other. That would have felt more realistic to me. The other issue with Walleus, is why he turned in the first place? We find out that he actually has Henraek's son, and is raising him, telling the boy his parents are dead. His desire to keep the child as his own plays a major role in why he stays, but why turn in the first place? Other than belief that the rebellion was doomed and he needed to survive. Henraek himself, eludes to Walleus' confusing nature, but the narration doesn't really give us more depth in that regard.We also learn that Walleus has a mutated son, born with deformities including scaled skin, flippers for hands and the inability to talk in more than clicks. I found it odd that mention of this defect or mutation wasn't examined more. This seems like something major. Is this the only child like this? Where did it come from? Again, why don't we see more mention of other characters with these issues?There were other things about Walleus I didn't like. He's described as being fat, his large stomach is mentioned multiple times, in various ways. Yet this guy is also then described as being able to take out men younger, stronger and more in shape because he has field and fighting experience? Skills like that don't just happen because you could once do them. And, yes, experience will work in your favor in any fight, but it doesn't guarantee it. Overall, I felt that as one of the two main protagonists, he needed development and consistency. I felt like the author was trying to make him more human, more relatable, more sympathetic. Instead, we was a confusing character.My other issue, and it is mild, was the language. Don't get me wrong, I am not a reader that frills at the presence of a curse word in a book. I think swearing, especially in a society like this, often needs to happen to make the characters and dialogue believable. My problem is that the swearing itself is what usually felt unbelievable. Do you remember when you were young, and swearing was new? So you did it all the time? Or when you thought it would make you seem tough, or angry, or grownup? I do. And that's how the swearing felt to me. New. Or, like it was added in because it should be there. Not because it naturally belonged. A few times it felt like it was there for pure shock value alone. A minor complaint, I know, but I consider myself a refined user of explicative words, and hate to see them mistreated in any way.I will say, the strength of the plot made me overlook these complaints. I did roll my eyes a few times at repetitive phrases (I could never read the words 'reptilian part of the brain' again and be completely happy), but I continued to turn the pages. I genuinely wanted to know what happens next. There was tension and unsolved mystery. I love when authors add a bit of a Shakespearean twist of 'information known too late', and this was blended in towards the end. In all, I enjoyed it, but it didn't blow me away. Which is disappointing, because honestly, I feel like this book had major potential to be a show stopper. A few developments and details would have easily taken it from three to five stars.
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