This Impossible Light
Fifteen-year-old Ivy’s world is in flux. Her dad has moved out, her mother is withdrawn, her brother is off at college, and her best friend, Anna, has grown distant. Worst of all, Ivy’s body won’t stop expanding. She’s getting taller and curvier, with no end in sight. Even her beloved math class offers no clear solution to the imbalanced equation that has become Ivy’s life.Everything feels off-kilter until a decision to change the way she eats gives her a boost in confidence and reminds Ivy that her life is her own. If she can just limit what she eats—the way her mother seems to—she can stop herself from growing, focus on the upcoming math competition, and reclaim control of her life. But when her disordered eating gives way to missed opportunities and a devastating health scare, Ivy realizes that she must weigh her mother’s issues against her own, and discover what it means to be a part of—and apart from—her family.

This Impossible Light Details

TitleThis Impossible Light
Author
FormatHardcover
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 6th, 2017
PublisherPhilomel Books
ISBN0399173722
ISBN-139780399173721
Number of pages339 pages
Rating
GenrePoetry, Young Adult, Realistic Fiction

This Impossible Light Review

  • Natalie
    May 3, 2017
    From the YouTube slam poetry star of Shrinking Women (more than 5 million views!) comes a novel in verse about body image, eating disorders, self-worth, mothers and daughters, and the psychological scars we inherit from our parents.I've listened to Myers slam poem countless times in the past, so I was beyond ecstatic to see her name grace the cover of this novel in verse. And just like her spoken word hit me harder than I expected, so did This Impossible Light.The story begins with Ivy starting From the YouTube slam poetry star of Shrinking Women (more than 5 million views!) comes a novel in verse about body image, eating disorders, self-worth, mothers and daughters, and the psychological scars we inherit from our parents.I've listened to Myers slam poem countless times in the past, so I was beyond ecstatic to see her name grace the cover of this novel in verse. And just like her spoken word hit me harder than I expected, so did This Impossible Light.The story begins with Ivy starting her sophomore year of high school after a hard-hitting summer where changed in her life: her parents' divorce, her older brother, Sky, moving out, her best friend, Anna, being back from her three-month visit in Paris, but still feeling miles away.Hoping for a fresh start with the new school year, Ivy quickly discovers that things aren't always as simple as they seem. And with so many things in life being out of her control, Ivy decides to take hold of the one thing she can dictate: her body.“If I tell you,will you listen?”This powerful exploration of body image, depression, eating disorders, loneliness is guaranteed to stay in my memory for a long, long time to come. Its relentless truth felt like a much-needed and healing read for my past self.And as always, my favorite show, Skam, was brought to mind with the mentions of these topics. But with this book I just wished we could’ve gotten a similar scene as the one of Vilde and Noora noticing and supporting one other through their struggles in season two: Our main character was drifting away from everyone and rarely speaking, and it physically hurt me to see her go through all of it alone. Which reminds me of another fitting quote from the aforementioned TV series:  Lily Myers takes notices of the small pains and little lonelinesses I've felt so strongly in the past, and it really shook me to my core to experience them now through Ivy. Also, the top-notch writing and poetry in this book was utterly phenomenal, and I just want to shout it from the rooftops. But for now, I'll settle with sharing some of my favorite bits and pieces in here:  This really hit me hard.    All in all: This was a surprising read for me since I wasn't expecting to love so damn much about it, like the fact that it focused solely on Ivy's journey without adding any unnecessary romances into it. And the fact that we got to see her process towards recovery with the help of family and friends. Plus, it was a quick read because of the poetry format. I was mesmerized, to say the least.ARC kindly provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.Expected publication: June 6th, 20175/5 stars Note: I'm an Amazon Affiliate. If you're interested in buying This Impossible Light, just click on the image below to go through my link. I'll make a small commission! This review and more can be found on my blog.
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  • Hirdesh
    June 16, 2017
    Review soon.
  • Nicole
    June 20, 2017
    First things first: I received this book through NetGalley.Trigger warning: eating disorder.Summary: Fifteen-year-old Ivy's world is in flux. Her dad has moved out, her mother is withdrawn, her brother is off at college, and her best friend, Anna, has grown distant. Worst of all, Ivy's body won’t stop expanding. She's getting taller and curvier, with no end in sight. Even her beloved math class offers no clear solution to the imbalanced equation that has become Ivy’s life.Everything feels off-ki First things first: I received this book through NetGalley.Trigger warning: eating disorder.Summary: Fifteen-year-old Ivy's world is in flux. Her dad has moved out, her mother is withdrawn, her brother is off at college, and her best friend, Anna, has grown distant. Worst of all, Ivy's body won’t stop expanding. She's getting taller and curvier, with no end in sight. Even her beloved math class offers no clear solution to the imbalanced equation that has become Ivy’s life.Everything feels off-kilter until a skipped meal leads to a boost in confidence and reminds Ivy that her life is her own. If Ivy can just limit what she eats—the way her mother seems to—she can stop herself from growing, focus on the upcoming math competition, and reclaim control of her life. But when her disordered eating leads to missed opportunities and a devastating health scare, Ivy realizes that she must weigh her mother's issues against her own, and discover what it means to be a part of—and apart from—her family.This book. THIS BOOK!!!This book totally caught me off guard. Once again it's one of those books that I got from Netgalley, forgot about it and then started reading it without reading the summary again and didn't know what to expect.The book deals with some tough topics but I think, they are handled really sensitive and respectful. The writing was so damn beautiful. Seriously, some of these moments in Ivy's life were so painful but they were written in the most beautiful way.Poetry is my new favorite thing but I only ever read books with lots of different poetry, this time it was a whole book, a whole story. And it was beautiful.It was super easy to get into, I started the book and pretty soon was half way through it. The characters were wonderful and so fleshed out.Aaaah, I just love this book so much, it made me feel all the things and I highly recommend it.
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  • Kirsty
    May 10, 2017
    I received a digital copy of this book for free from the publisher via NetGalley.Click here to watch my video review of this book: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ecLdN...I picked this book up originally as I wanted a quick read, and I had never tried reading a fiction book written in verse before. I am unable to comment as to how this measures up to authors such as Ellen Hopkins, as I have yet to read one of her books. I will say though, that the writing flowed wonderfully for me, and even brou I received a digital copy of this book for free from the publisher via NetGalley.Click here to watch my video review of this book: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ecLdN...I picked this book up originally as I wanted a quick read, and I had never tried reading a fiction book written in verse before. I am unable to comment as to how this measures up to authors such as Ellen Hopkins, as I have yet to read one of her books. I will say though, that the writing flowed wonderfully for me, and even brought me to tears on a couple of occasions.The story follows a teenage girl named Ivy, who goes through quite the emotional rollercoaster of a journey. This book doesn't make for easy reading at times, as Ivy deals with her parents divorce, an eating disorder, loneliness, exhaustion and also depression. I feel that all these topics are handled incredibly well, though I would exercise extreme caution when reading this if you have ever suffered from an eating disorder.I didn't think I would end up getting attached to Ivy, or any of her family and friends, because of the writing being in verse. I thought this might somehow hinder my experience of getting fully immersed in the story, but if anything the opposite was true. I felt incredibly connected to Ivy, and the further I read on, the more I realised this would be a five star read for me. Everyone felt so real, so genuine, and I felt like I was there with Ivy every step of the way, like a fly on the wall.I highly recommend checking this book out as it is a relatively quick read, though is difficult to read in one sitting due to how heavy the subject matter is. All the same, I absolutely loved this book, and I hope to read more by this author one day.
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  • Resch Reads
    April 16, 2017
    *Book Received in Exchange for Honest Opinion/Review*Heavy, dense, thought-provoking, and hauntingly accurate, Lily Myers takes a look into the dramatic, ugly, and damaging world of eating disorders. The verse is elegant and powerful, and the story line will draw you in. If you are looking for a light read, this book is not your book. This book is a lot, and I will even admit that I had to read it with breaks because it will bring you down before it lifts you back up.Lily Myers painfully capture *Book Received in Exchange for Honest Opinion/Review*Heavy, dense, thought-provoking, and hauntingly accurate, Lily Myers takes a look into the dramatic, ugly, and damaging world of eating disorders. The verse is elegant and powerful, and the story line will draw you in. If you are looking for a light read, this book is not your book. This book is a lot, and I will even admit that I had to read it with breaks because it will bring you down before it lifts you back up.Lily Myers painfully captures eating disorders to a T. From the need for control, to the downward spiral, to the daily battle to just try. As someone who has struggled with an eating disorder, this book is the truth. No matter how sad, and heart-breaking it is, its a daily battle and struggle. The inner demons that Ivy struggles should resonate among all women who have ever looked in the mirror and struggled with the reflection they saw staring back at them. It is also a chilling reminder that while Ivy was battling so many demons, those who loved her most couldn't even tell. She wore her mask well, and as a result left me with my emotions raw.This book is weighing heavily on my soul, but as I close the last page, I am feeling one last remaining emotion, hope. I feel comfort knowing Ivy is attempting to find resolution in life, and knowing that it is okay to relinquish some of the control, if only for a little bit.
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  • Elise (The Bookish Actress)
    June 8, 2017
    This is a book that will work for a lot of readers. If you're into verse, I think you should pick this up. Sadly, I don't think it was for me. Novels in verse just hardly ever land for me. I usually like poetry in verse, but after a few of these, I realized they all sounded exactly the same. None had depth beyond “words said in a pretty way”. I don't hate free verse poetry; in fact, I quite enjoy the hard emotions behind it. But here's the catch; it needs to have emotions. But the language here This is a book that will work for a lot of readers. If you're into verse, I think you should pick this up. Sadly, I don't think it was for me. Novels in verse just hardly ever land for me. I usually like poetry in verse, but after a few of these, I realized they all sounded exactly the same. None had depth beyond “words said in a pretty way”. I don't hate free verse poetry; in fact, I quite enjoy the hard emotions behind it. But here's the catch; it needs to have emotions. But the language here isn't poetry. I like free verse because it invites feelings in me. These words incited nothing in me; not feelings, not love for any of the characters. The main character narrating this piece is hopelessly generic. There's this trend in YA literature of writing generic characters so anyone can relate to the story. I get it. I just don't particularly like it. Characters like this end up seeming like plot devices, not people. Unfortunately, in a story depending mostly on a stylistic method to stand out, my dislike for stories told in verse poetry overtook my opinion. As an overall story, this was quite compelling. While I found the characters fairly generic, they were all likable enough. The portrayal of eating disorders is very good, going off what I've read before about portrayal. It's not a bad book. It just wasn't for me.
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  • Casey (caseyrosereads)
    June 6, 2017
    I'm a big fan of "Shrinking Women" and was excited when I learned earlier this year that Myers would have a book coming out. I finally got the chance to read that book today and was once again stunned by the beauty of her careful, precise prose. Ivy's story is a familiar one, with divorce and the changing dynamics of friendships adding new complications to the habits/issues we learn from our parents. I appreciate the Myers and her publishers included resources for those who may be experiencing e I'm a big fan of "Shrinking Women" and was excited when I learned earlier this year that Myers would have a book coming out. I finally got the chance to read that book today and was once again stunned by the beauty of her careful, precise prose. Ivy's story is a familiar one, with divorce and the changing dynamics of friendships adding new complications to the habits/issues we learn from our parents. I appreciate the Myers and her publishers included resources for those who may be experiencing eating disorders and disordered eating behavior. I hope that anyone who reads this and finds Ivy's experience to feel close to home that you're able to focus on the tools she's able to use by the end of the story in order to once again be able to find peace in your body and to know that you are already enough.
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  • katwiththehat
    May 29, 2017
    Lily Myers does such a great job of really pulling you into Ivy's head in "This Impossible Light" and showing the way her self-image and sense of stability slowly crumble as she falls deeper into the stages of her eating disorder. This is a quick read, but a very effective one. I love the way Ivy reflects on very small details... family vacations... a fish shaped waffle iron that made Saturday mornings cozy... Myers does an outstanding job at making the comforting life she's mourning tangible an Lily Myers does such a great job of really pulling you into Ivy's head in "This Impossible Light" and showing the way her self-image and sense of stability slowly crumble as she falls deeper into the stages of her eating disorder. This is a quick read, but a very effective one. I love the way Ivy reflects on very small details... family vacations... a fish shaped waffle iron that made Saturday mornings cozy... Myers does an outstanding job at making the comforting life she's mourning tangible and oh so easy to picture. 4/5 stars.
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  • Billiebumblebee
    June 18, 2017
    I don’t really read poetry, and sure I’m bad at it as I’m not the kind of reader to linger on every word and phrase (I like to be swept along for a journey), but I really enjoyed this. It was a painful read and the unusual writing amplified this deeply emotional story that was utterly heart breaking. So many important issues are brought up in this book - body imagine, family, friends, loneliness, eating disorders, depression – yet it never felt “overcrowded". Stunning.
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  • Kristy K
    June 18, 2017
    Written in verse, this tells the story of 15 year old Ivy as she tries to navigate her way through her parents divorce, her BFF slipping away from her, her body changing, and keeping up appearances as the Smart Girl in school. A poignant tale that I related to on multiple levels.
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  • Amy's Book Reviews
    May 6, 2017
    **Thanks to NetGalley for providing a free copy of THE IMPOSSIBLE LIGHT in exchange for my honest review**If you're expecting anything similar to Laurie Halse Anderson or Ellen Hopkins, you'll be sorely disappointed. Novels in verse need to be more than prose formatted to look like poetry. With verse, every word needs to be meaningful and important to the plot or character, to advance the story or knowledge of the narration.For the most part, the quality of Lily Myers writing feels bland and uno **Thanks to NetGalley for providing a free copy of THE IMPOSSIBLE LIGHT in exchange for my honest review**If you're expecting anything similar to Laurie Halse Anderson or Ellen Hopkins, you'll be sorely disappointed. Novels in verse need to be more than prose formatted to look like poetry. With verse, every word needs to be meaningful and important to the plot or character, to advance the story or knowledge of the narration.For the most part, the quality of Lily Myers writing feels bland and unoriginal. While she occasional pens a gem, the surrounding rusty metal turns the skin green. I enjoyed the math and science metaphors, the strongest part of Myer's writing.Ivy, the unoriginal narrator, quickly develops an eating disorder after her parents divorce and her best friend changes. The same story has been told so many times it has become cliché.THE IMPOSSIBLE LIGHT is mercifully a very quick read. I can't think of a reason to recommend.
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  • Deidra Purvis
    June 28, 2017
    (Originally posted on https://mackinbooksinbloom.com/2017/0...)Summer is an exciting time working in Classroom Services here at Mackin. With the end of one school year comes the a fresh start to the new one as teachers revamp their classrooms and add updated titles to their classroom libraries. At the heart of each classroom library list that I recommend to teachers is the philosophy that students must be able to see themselves in the books they’re reading. We build lists that are culturally div (Originally posted on https://mackinbooksinbloom.com/2017/0...)Summer is an exciting time working in Classroom Services here at Mackin. With the end of one school year comes the a fresh start to the new one as teachers revamp their classrooms and add updated titles to their classroom libraries. At the heart of each classroom library list that I recommend to teachers is the philosophy that students must be able to see themselves in the books they’re reading. We build lists that are culturally diverse and representative of the hard issues teenagers face daily.In the new novel in verse This Impossible Light (2017) by Lily Myers, 15-year-old Ivy is facing challenges many teens can find all too relatable. Opening the novel, we learn that Ivy’s father recently left her mom—coinciding with her brother’s departure to college and her best friend’s summer vacation to Paris. Ivy is left alone in the once lively, now empty house; it’s just Ivy and her mother who isn’t at all the same.To make matters worse, at the start of the new school year, Ivy’s best friend Anna is back from Paris and seems to be completely changed. She has a new friend and a new love for drinking at parties. Ivy can’t fit in like other girls. She feels too big—too tall and too wide.Ivy becomes obsessed with controlling her life. If she works harder, studies harder, bikes harder, and eats less—then she will be thin, and she will earn the scholarship she needs to get out of the house like her brother did. Somehow, though, through her struggle to gain control, Ivy is losing control more than ever.There are so many reasons this book belongs in classroom libraries. As a teenager, like many teens, I also struggled with my relationship with food. The way Ivy describes how she feels about food reminds me about my same struggles—telling me how realistically Myers represents the emotions involved in eating disorders. I also see important questions teenagers need to discuss including the complications of friendships over time and the complications when parents are no longer perfect.Ivy’s love for math adds a whole new dynamic to this book, opening up some interesting cross-curricular activities involving math.Finally, novel in verse is an important text-structure which teenagers need to experience. It can sometimes be intimidating to read in verse, but this novel is an easy and quick read that will leave students with new reading skills under their belts. The form also allows plenty of opportunities for teachers to pick apart the text into small sections for students to analyze in a close-reading session.While I highly recommend this novel for high school classroom libraries and for teachers to consider making available to students for literature projects, I was not blown away by every aspect of the novel. I felt a flatness in the relationships within this novel. While I understood that Ivy and Anna were once best friends, I never got the chance to see the raw happy friendship in the novel. I never quite felt the relationship in a way that would have added depth. I also would have liked to see another level to Ivy. The entire novel is written in a very depressed tone—I would have loved to see more of Ivy before she was depressed so that I could have really felt like I knew her as a friend. Instead, I only saw her depression, taking away from really knowing her entire character.Again, I do highly recommend adding this book to your high school classroom library for the upcoming year. This novel opens up much needed space to talk about relationships, body image, and eating disorders. Also, I don’t mean to overlook what a great opportunity this book creates for a cross-curricular activity with a math class. It could be so much fun to apply some of the math Ivy mentions in the novel. As someone who’s not a math wiz, and can’t go into much detail here, but I’m sure your next door math teacher could help and would love to get involved. Also don’t forget that this novel offers teenagers a new writing style to analyze, and it’s a quick and easy read.Enjoy!
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  • Imane
    May 18, 2017
    It's not very easy to review a book that ended up affecting you more than you thought it would. I have nothing but positive things to say about this book. The Impossible Light is a novel in verse that follows a 15 year old girl named Ivy. She just went through what could be the worst summer of her life where her parents' divorce made her see another version of her mom -silenced and ready to crumble-, which is a very sad thing. She also lost her best friend that came from Paris a totally differen It's not very easy to review a book that ended up affecting you more than you thought it would. I have nothing but positive things to say about this book. The Impossible Light is a novel in verse that follows a 15 year old girl named Ivy. She just went through what could be the worst summer of her life where her parents' divorce made her see another version of her mom -silenced and ready to crumble-, which is a very sad thing. She also lost her best friend that came from Paris a totally different and changed person and her brother Sky moved out on top of it all. So she was left all by herself to face all of this, alone. Poor Ivy just wanted to get back the "Before" version of her life but she knows that it can't happen and that it's not really up to her. She knows she has no control over what's happening to her and so try to imagine the aftermath of losing this much so fast and not being able to do anything about it. Horrible, right?I couldn't put it down aside from the times where I needed a pause to retrieve myself, to feel and to think. (No, you're the one who's been crying!) It was very captivating from start to finish. This book is definitely not your go-to light read. It tackles lots of difficult subjects such as the relationship between us and our body image and how it could deeply affect us, eating disorders, depression, broken families and friendships and the scars we inherit from these last two.Before getting into this book, I didn't understand eating disorders that much. Of course, the book didn't deliver a textbook definition of what an eating disorder is but at least, I got a little bit more familiar with it and I got to know what it's like and how it can destroy a person. I haven't personally experienced suffering from an eating disorder so I can't really say whether it's accurate or not but I am familiar with depression and anxiety and I know what It's like to lose control and to try to get it back by controlling a very specific thing that will give you the illusion of control but in real, is just breaking you. It's probably why I felt a lot for Ivy and a great part of this book felt very relatable. It happens to be a great sign because my main problem with novels written in verse is the fact that I can't get attached to the characters and therefore can't feel empathy towards them. But let me tell you, Lily Myers just knows how to choose the right words to describe in a very realistic way the mind of a 15 year old teenager going through divorce , an ED and a need of control. And this is what the novel is all about: Ivy's journey.This wasn't my first novel written in verse but this is definitely one of the very few that I loved so I was pleasantly surprised. It is divided into six "chapters": Unknown Variables, Compression, Half-Life, Limits, Discontinuous Function, Exponential Growth. I love how these chapters were given titles related to Ivy's favorite class: Calculus. I know that Compression and Half-Life are more related to Physics but I guess Smart Girl must've had a thing for Physics too or Science in general. I also love how at the end of the book, a list of additional resources were given about eating disorders along with body-positive blogs and websites. It's genuine.
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  • Heather
    June 10, 2017
    I was given an early copy of this book to review by the publisher on Netgalley. All thoughts and opinions are my own.This Impossible Light is a book written in verse by the spoken-word poet Lily Myers. It talks about themes that include: disordered eating, divorce, depression, anxiety, friendships, family relationships, and isolation. There are so many things talked about in this book, but these are the major themes. Ivy is a "smart girl." She's always gotten all A's, had a loving family, and he I was given an early copy of this book to review by the publisher on Netgalley. All thoughts and opinions are my own.This Impossible Light is a book written in verse by the spoken-word poet Lily Myers. It talks about themes that include: disordered eating, divorce, depression, anxiety, friendships, family relationships, and isolation. There are so many things talked about in this book, but these are the major themes. Ivy is a "smart girl." She's always gotten all A's, had a loving family, and her best friend Anna by her side. Her world shatters during the summer after 9th grade when her mother and father announce they're getting divorced, her older brother Sky moves away to culinary school, and her best friend Anna returns from 3 months in Paris, seeming really different than before. Ivy struggles to accept these changes, but takes comfort in her calculus class where her teacher enrolls her in a math competition. But even math can't help her feel in control, and so she starts to watch what she's eating and start exercising all day every day until these things take over her life. I found this book to be very good and it made me quite emotional in some places. I found that this was a realistic depiction of an eating disorder (bulimia and anorexia) as well as a realistic portrayal of anxiety and depression. In general, this book is just a really good portrayal of a hard time in someone's life, and I think it's something that people can relate to.This book is also very easy to read. I started and finished in a day. I think novels written in verse are some of the easiest to read and it's very accessible. I thought the style was good and the novel didn't suffer for the style in the slightest. There's also an introduction to each section with a math term which I didn't really get because math is definitely not my strong suit but I'm sure people who love math will find it a nice little addition. The only negative I've found in this book is just that it's nothing new. I feel like I've read this book before, in this same format, about these same issues. It reminds me of an Ellen Hopkins book. So I gave it a 4 stars because I felt like it was still good, just not unique. Overall, I enjoyed this book and I would recommend it because of all the positive things that I found in it. The themes are important and well-done, and the style is easy to read. There's honestly no reason to not read this book.
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  • LouLou
    June 6, 2017
    Please read review in its entirety at http://www.compassbookratings.com/rev...Written in verse, YA author Lily Meyers writes an impeccably realistic novel about disordered eating in, This Impossible Light. Teenage protagonist Ivy is losing everything; her family is falling apart from divorce, her mother hardly notices her, her best friend is becoming distant, and her body is changing.Desperate for some semblance of control Ivy becomes consumed with thoughts of perfection. She begins restricting Please read review in its entirety at http://www.compassbookratings.com/rev...Written in verse, YA author Lily Meyers writes an impeccably realistic novel about disordered eating in, This Impossible Light. Teenage protagonist Ivy is losing everything; her family is falling apart from divorce, her mother hardly notices her, her best friend is becoming distant, and her body is changing.Desperate for some semblance of control Ivy becomes consumed with thoughts of perfection. She begins restricting her food and consuming herself with school work. Ivy thinks she has it all figured out, that’s until things start spiraling out of control. Obsessed with thoughts of obtaining a flawless body, her grades begin to drop. Unable to sustain her restriction of food she starts binging and purging. In few words, the author conveys an accurate account of not only the development of an eating disorder, but the thoughts and feeling associated with someone going through it-- their obsession with perfection, food, and body image. As I read this, I could feel the same desperation, anxiety, and sadness Ivy was experiencing. Although it was heartbreaking, the author leaves readers' feeling hopeful about Ivy's recovery.The author never glamorized disordered eating, nor was she critical or demeaning about someone going through it. Because eating disorders affect both genders of all ages, this book could be read by anyone and may be suitable for pre-teens who have access to a guardian to help them understand the dangers of disordered eating.Review of an Advance Readers' Copy
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  • Candace
    May 9, 2017
    “She says depression has made her own issues worse / She says it can be a lifelong war.”This Impossible Light by Lily Myers follows fifteen-year-old Ivy in the aftermath of her parents’ divorce.This book deals with such important topics such as depression within older people that can reflect on younger kids who look up to them, eating disorders and grieving of something other than a dead person, showing that it’s okay to feel the same after losing something - i.e. a happy family - than you would “She says depression has made her own issues worse / She says it can be a lifelong war.”This Impossible Light by Lily Myers follows fifteen-year-old Ivy in the aftermath of her parents’ divorce.This book deals with such important topics such as depression within older people that can reflect on younger kids who look up to them, eating disorders and grieving of something other than a dead person, showing that it’s okay to feel the same after losing something - i.e. a happy family - than you would after losing someone.However, despite all these heartbreaking themes, you are still inclined to believe that everything is going alright, gaining the thought patterns of Ivy as she goes down the path of self-destruction. You believe everything is fine because that’s what she’s telling you until everything goes wrong and you feel stupid for thinking it would all work out for her if she continued going on the way she was. Ivy was a brilliantly written unreliable narrator.I’d recommend this book to anyone from 13-16 specifically because I believe the themes dealt in this book and the way they were dealt with would be incredibly relatable to kids at that age, whether it is personally or through their friends or family members.“I don’t want this to be my story.”Overall, 4/5 stars for a heartbreakingly intriguing storyline and beautiful, easy-to-read writing style. I managed to read this all in one day.
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  • Peggy
    June 21, 2017
    Ivy's world in complete upheaval. Her parents decided to divorce, which came as a complete surprise to Ivy. Her brother moved out and is busy with college classes and work. Dad has moved in with his new girlfriend, and her mother is struggling with depression and emotionally unavailable. Her best friend spent the summer in France and has returned with new interests, including a new friend and a fondness for parties and alcohol. Ivy feels very much alone. Add to all of this the physical changes t Ivy's world in complete upheaval. Her parents decided to divorce, which came as a complete surprise to Ivy. Her brother moved out and is busy with college classes and work. Dad has moved in with his new girlfriend, and her mother is struggling with depression and emotionally unavailable. Her best friend spent the summer in France and has returned with new interests, including a new friend and a fondness for parties and alcohol. Ivy feels very much alone. Add to all of this the physical changes that Ivy is experiencing, she is becoming curvy and much more womanlike, and Ivy is feeling like her life is completely out of control. Looking for something that is within her control, Ivy decides to resculpt her body. She draws lines on her mirror to frame the shape she wants and begins counting calories and bike riding. She is very goal driven and always accomplishes what she sets out to do. But this goal is unreasonable and Ivy begins a dangerous downward spiral. Told in verse, this is a very powerful story. Recommended for ages 12 and up.
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  • Georgette
    May 16, 2017
    I did not know what to expect, having not read a long-form poetry narrative before. But from the start, I was caught in the downward spiral and dragged along for the ride.Some other reviewers said that Lily Myers captured the mentality of those who develop eating disorders. I don't have personal experience to compare it to, but it seems very realistic - the chain-of-events that led to a need to control one little part of your life is a familiar one. As a novel told in poetry, there are some beau I did not know what to expect, having not read a long-form poetry narrative before. But from the start, I was caught in the downward spiral and dragged along for the ride.Some other reviewers said that Lily Myers captured the mentality of those who develop eating disorders. I don't have personal experience to compare it to, but it seems very realistic - the chain-of-events that led to a need to control one little part of your life is a familiar one. As a novel told in poetry, there are some beautiful lines in there, some that made me have to stop because the sadness was a little much. At the same time, I also felt that it was simplistic. If this was novel told in prose, there could be more opportunities for character development across the board. However, for a quick read, this works too. Sometimes poetry is a what happens when you distill many words into a few that works just as well.(ARC courtesy of NetGalley)
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  • Kimberly Larsen
    June 20, 2017
    Top student Ivy is dealing with her parents' broken marriage, her mother's depression & anorexia, a former BFF who has outgrown Ivy, and high school. Her aim is to get a scholarship to a top school and become an engineer. Ivy's dreams are in jeopardy when she becomes obsessed with her size and struggles with bulimia, and grades begin falling. Her emotionally absent mother offers no support; Anna has moved on; Ivy is alone. After a bad accident, Ivy's family has to face her illness, and her m Top student Ivy is dealing with her parents' broken marriage, her mother's depression & anorexia, a former BFF who has outgrown Ivy, and high school. Her aim is to get a scholarship to a top school and become an engineer. Ivy's dreams are in jeopardy when she becomes obsessed with her size and struggles with bulimia, and grades begin falling. Her emotionally absent mother offers no support; Anna has moved on; Ivy is alone. After a bad accident, Ivy's family has to face her illness, and her mother opens up about her own history with control & eating disorders. Ivy's experience seems honest and realistic. This novel in verse concludes with Ivy on a path to recovery.
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  • Kate Klassa
    June 9, 2017
    I chose this book expecting a standard book format and instead found it full of poetry-like structuring, which I purposefully found off-putting because it wasn't actually poetry it was just regular sentences awkwardly chopped up. However, I found the story completely absorbing and finished reading it in two bursts. This Impossible Light relates the downward spiral 15-year-old Ivy finds herself in when she turns to an eating disorder to cope with her unstable life. Told from Ivy's first person pe I chose this book expecting a standard book format and instead found it full of poetry-like structuring, which I purposefully found off-putting because it wasn't actually poetry it was just regular sentences awkwardly chopped up. However, I found the story completely absorbing and finished reading it in two bursts. This Impossible Light relates the downward spiral 15-year-old Ivy finds herself in when she turns to an eating disorder to cope with her unstable life. Told from Ivy's first person perspective, it's a haunting and sobering look into how quickly things can spin out of control. I received a free copy via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Emily
    June 25, 2017
    Connecting with Ivy was easy. Her struggle to be the "smart girl" everyone believed her to be I can completely relate to, though that's where our similarities stop. Watching her struggle with her family and an eating disorder was heartbreaking and I now realize how quickly things can spiral out of control.I think this novel will allow readers to take a examine eating disorders from the outside, allow them to observe others view on body image, and help them to reevaluate how much they allow it to Connecting with Ivy was easy. Her struggle to be the "smart girl" everyone believed her to be I can completely relate to, though that's where our similarities stop. Watching her struggle with her family and an eating disorder was heartbreaking and I now realize how quickly things can spiral out of control.I think this novel will allow readers to take a examine eating disorders from the outside, allow them to observe others view on body image, and help them to reevaluate how much they allow it to impact their daily lives. Hopefully, it will help prevent eating disorders or inspire those who are suffering to realize they are not alone and that help is available.
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  • Tara
    May 25, 2017
    Everything in Ivy's life is changing. Her parents have gotten divorced, her brother has moved out to attend culinary school, and her best friend just returned from a summer in Paris with a new friend. Ivy has always been known as the Smart Girl, and she takes pride in this identity. As Ivy struggles to deal with all of the changes in her life, she focuses on what she can control--studying, exercising, and eating. Ivy continues to force control over her diet and exercise, while quickly spiraling Everything in Ivy's life is changing. Her parents have gotten divorced, her brother has moved out to attend culinary school, and her best friend just returned from a summer in Paris with a new friend. Ivy has always been known as the Smart Girl, and she takes pride in this identity. As Ivy struggles to deal with all of the changes in her life, she focuses on what she can control--studying, exercising, and eating. Ivy continues to force control over her diet and exercise, while quickly spiraling out of control.Novel in verse--a super quick read.I read an ARC from NetGalley.
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  • Hristina
    May 8, 2017
    This Impossible Light is a novel in verse about a girl named Ivy and her struggles after her parents’ divorce. It’s a heavy read subject-wise, but it didn’t impress me.I liked the poetry, there are some amazing, powerful lines hidden in the verses, and I liked how it was all organized. But it’s a before-seen plot, and those powerful lines aren’t enough to carry the filler ones. Not to mention, it continuously reminded me of The Princess Saves Herself in This One.I thought I was going to love thi This Impossible Light is a novel in verse about a girl named Ivy and her struggles after her parents’ divorce. It’s a heavy read subject-wise, but it didn’t impress me.I liked the poetry, there are some amazing, powerful lines hidden in the verses, and I liked how it was all organized. But it’s a before-seen plot, and those powerful lines aren’t enough to carry the filler ones. Not to mention, it continuously reminded me of The Princess Saves Herself in This One.I thought I was going to love this book, I’m really bummed out that I didn’t.Copy received through NetGalley.
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  • haani
    May 8, 2017
    This book begins with Ivy, 15 year old, whose parents just divorced, her brother moving out and doesnt feel like she known her best friend at all. Wanting it just like before is impossible and she doesnt handle it well. Falling in and out, she began having body image and leads her into eating disorder. [TW: Puking] Told in the form of poetry, this book could made you weep. I love the fact that it doesnt input any romance, and she got help from professional. Ivy is really a Smart Girl and i hope This book begins with Ivy, 15 year old, whose parents just divorced, her brother moving out and doesnt feel like she known her best friend at all. Wanting it just like before is impossible and she doesnt handle it well. Falling in and out, she began having body image and leads her into eating disorder. [TW: Puking] Told in the form of poetry, this book could made you weep. I love the fact that it doesnt input any romance, and she got help from professional. Ivy is really a Smart Girl and i hope the best for her. I know that i would recommend this book if it ever come in conversation.
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  • Kelley Brown
    June 10, 2017
    This was a very poignant book. It describes so beautifully and so sadly the distress faced by a teenager who is suffering through her parents' divorce, disordered eating, the fear that she is no longer being seen, and the feeling that her friends are moving on without her. The poetry of this book makes the reader experience the same brokenness as the narrator. A very, very good book!
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  • Emily
    May 25, 2017
    I received this book as an ARC through NetGalley. I think the author does a wonderful job of writing the struggle of a teenager trying to gain control in a life that is coming apart as it is known. Reminiscent of Ellen Hopkins (who I admittedly haven't read since high school). I plan on purchasing for my library's YA fiction collection.
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  • Sydney Syphus
    May 7, 2017
    This book is captivating from the very beginning. The book as a whole conveys the message to be yourself and illustrates the way many teens are torn between themselves about who they want to be. I love that this book is written in verse because it really lets your imagination take over and it's easier to get lost in the story.
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  • USOM
    June 5, 2017
    This Impossible Light is a beautiful wok of art. Combining poetry and narrative, the culmination is not only touching, but incredibly relateable. If you enjoyed, "Shrinking Women" this is a must. It takes the story of a young girl suffering from an eating disorder, and complicates it. By making it about her: her relationship with grief, her mother, and her friends, this book reads quickly, but will move you. I loved every aspect, from the mathematical concepts, to the thematic touches, to the wo This Impossible Light is a beautiful wok of art. Combining poetry and narrative, the culmination is not only touching, but incredibly relateable. If you enjoyed, "Shrinking Women" this is a must. It takes the story of a young girl suffering from an eating disorder, and complicates it. By making it about her: her relationship with grief, her mother, and her friends, this book reads quickly, but will move you. I loved every aspect, from the mathematical concepts, to the thematic touches, to the word choices. It deals with issues of fractured families, changing bodies, and moving on. While it can be impossible for us to find the light at some moments or another, it is always there. I cannot get over how in love I am with this story and am already looking forward to reading it again. Disclaimer: I received this book in exchange for an honest review from Netgalleyfull review: https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/revi...
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  • Allison
    July 1, 2017
    This is not my favorite novel in verse that I have read, but I thoroughly enjoyed it. However, I do wonder if it would be helpful or harmful to teen girls struggling with eating disorders. Would it help them work through their struggles, or would it be a trigger? I'm not sure.
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