Marriage of a Thousand Lies
Lucky and her husband, Krishna, are gay. They present an illusion of marital bliss to their conservative Sri Lankan–American families, while each dates on the side. It’s not ideal, but for Lucky, it seems to be working. She goes out dancing, shedrinks a bit, she makes ends meet by doing digital art on commission. But when Lucky’s grandmother has a nasty fall, Lucky returns to her childhood home and unexpectedly reconnects with her former best friend and first lover, Nisha, who is preparing for her own arranged wedding with a man she’s never met.As the connection between the two women is rekindled, Lucky tries to save Nisha from entering a marriage based on a lie. But does Nisha really want to be saved? And after a decade’s worth of lying, can Lucky break free of her own circumstances and build a new life? Is she willing to walk away from all that she values about her parents and community to live in a new truth? As Lucky—an outsider no matter what choices she makes—is pushed to the breaking point, Marriage of a Thousand Lies offers a vivid exploration of a life lived at a complex intersection of race, sexuality, and nationality. The result is a profoundly American debut novel shot through with humor and loss, a story of love, family, and the truths that define us all.

Marriage of a Thousand Lies Details

TitleMarriage of a Thousand Lies
Author
FormatHardcover
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 13th, 2017
PublisherSoho Press
ISBN1616957905
ISBN-139781616957902
Number of pages288 pages
Rating
GenreFiction, Glbt, Queer, Adult Fiction, Contemporary, Adult, Audiobook, Romance, Cultural

Marriage of a Thousand Lies Review

  • Jennifer Blankfein
    May 3, 2017
    Follow me on https://booknationbyjen.wordpress.com for all reviews and recommendations.A lovely debut, Marriage of a Thousand Lies brings to light the layers of struggles that shape our decisions on how we choose to live our lives. Lucky and her husband Kris are both gay, in a marriage of convenience to keep Kris in the country and for Lucky to mend the relationship with her disapproving family and save face in the eyes of the Sri Lanken community. Lucky returns home to care for her ill grandmot Follow me on https://booknationbyjen.wordpress.com for all reviews and recommendations.A lovely debut, Marriage of a Thousand Lies brings to light the layers of struggles that shape our decisions on how we choose to live our lives. Lucky and her husband Kris are both gay, in a marriage of convenience to keep Kris in the country and for Lucky to mend the relationship with her disapproving family and save face in the eyes of the Sri Lanken community. Lucky returns home to care for her ill grandmother and is reunited with Nisha, her old friend whom she had a romantic relationship with when they were younger. Nisha is preparing for her arranged marriage to a man, but in the weeks leading up to her wedding the suppressed love and desire of these former lovers are unleashed forcing both Nisha and Lucky to reevaluate their choices and how they want to live their lives. Is it better to follow your heart and be shunned from your family and community or should you live a lie to be accepted? Marriage of a Thousand Lies brings us on a journey of struggles and pressures, as Nisha and Lucky make their decisions on how to live and where to find acceptance.Last week, on the 20th anniversary of Ellen Degeneres coming out at gay on national tv to 42 million viewers, I reflected on how far we have come in the United States when it comes to acceptance and treating all people equally. Yes, we have progressed in 20 years, but there are still many individuals and groups that preclude some from being considered equal and treated fairly. It is part of the human struggle to protect and honor the past while we grow and accept change and celebrate difference moving forward. Little by little we are finding the balance, one family and one community at a time, as brave individuals choose to live authentically and gain support from their inner circle. I enjoyed this well written novel as it touched on the personal struggles of each character with the added bonus of Sri Lankan traditions and customs. Marriage of a Thousand Lies will be available June 13th.
    more
  • Jessica Woodbury
    November 22, 2016
    LGBT fiction remains a relatively white male place (it's much more G than L, B, T, etc.) so it's always welcome to see a new entry into queer fiction about a brown woman. Lucky is Sri Lankan, her family is tight knit and their community likes things just so. Girls grow up and marry boys and have babies. Lucky thinks she's cheated the system, she has a marriage her parents approve of but she still gets to be herself. Both Lucky and Kris, her husband, are gay, and their arrangement as friends who LGBT fiction remains a relatively white male place (it's much more G than L, B, T, etc.) so it's always welcome to see a new entry into queer fiction about a brown woman. Lucky is Sri Lankan, her family is tight knit and their community likes things just so. Girls grow up and marry boys and have babies. Lucky thinks she's cheated the system, she has a marriage her parents approve of but she still gets to be herself. Both Lucky and Kris, her husband, are gay, and their arrangement as friends who can take on lovers has worked. So far.But when Lucky's old girlfriend Nisha, who's also in her small Sri Lankan community, gets engaged, it throws her plan awry and Lucky must decide what she really wants her future to be.While Lucky's general arc is a familiar one in queer literature (can you live as yourself without losing your unsupportive family?) the setting and the characters feel different and new. I am not a big fan of the title and I wanted something more from the writing. I'm not quite sure what it was that I wanted, it's hard to say, sometimes I felt really swept along in the story and sometimes at a remove. We need more books like this.
    more
  • Karina
    December 18, 2016
    "Let me tell you something about being brown like me: your story is already written for you. Your free will, your love, your failure, all of it scratched into the cosmos before you're even born. My mother calls it fate, the story written on your head by the stars, by the gods, never by you." 4.5 starsThis book is important. RTC
    more
  • Renee Rutledge
    December 8, 2016
    Heartbreaking and triumphant. In Marriage of a Thousand Lies, Lakshmi, called Lucky, must choose between honoring family traditions or living openly as a queer woman. Debut author SJ Sindu is a literary talent, adept at showing how complicated and painful the choices can be when promises to loved ones, personal freedoms, and deep-seeded values are at stake. Rich with symbolism and insight, this is the kind of book you enjoy from beginning to end and leave feeling wiser, more appreciative, and mo Heartbreaking and triumphant. In Marriage of a Thousand Lies, Lakshmi, called Lucky, must choose between honoring family traditions or living openly as a queer woman. Debut author SJ Sindu is a literary talent, adept at showing how complicated and painful the choices can be when promises to loved ones, personal freedoms, and deep-seeded values are at stake. Rich with symbolism and insight, this is the kind of book you enjoy from beginning to end and leave feeling wiser, more appreciative, and more open.
    more
  • CaseyTheCanadianLesbrarian
    May 18, 2017
    Thoughts to come!
  • Annie Hartnett
    December 24, 2016
    I adore Lucky, the narrator of this novel, a secretly-gay twenty-something Sri Lankan-American. I loved living with her, making decisions with her, feeling her pain over her mother's refusal to accept her. Complex, layered, heartfelt. One of those books where you'll think of the narrator a long time later, hoping they are doing alright. I hope Lucky is doing alright. And I can't wait for book to be in the world in 2017, because it's a story we need right now. It's a heartbreaking story, but ulti I adore Lucky, the narrator of this novel, a secretly-gay twenty-something Sri Lankan-American. I loved living with her, making decisions with her, feeling her pain over her mother's refusal to accept her. Complex, layered, heartfelt. One of those books where you'll think of the narrator a long time later, hoping they are doing alright. I hope Lucky is doing alright. And I can't wait for book to be in the world in 2017, because it's a story we need right now. It's a heartbreaking story, but ultimately, it made me hopeful.
    more
  • Devin Murphy
    November 27, 2016
    I was offered an Advanced reading copy of this book by the publisher and am thrilled I was. The main character, Lucky, in this debut novel felt instantly real and interesting. The writing is so precise and beautiful that it pulled me in right away, especially in moments of close physicality that left her inner life raw and exposed. There are two excellent moments at the start of this book when the main character goes to her Shri Lankan family home in Boston that set the stage of the larger narra I was offered an Advanced reading copy of this book by the publisher and am thrilled I was. The main character, Lucky, in this debut novel felt instantly real and interesting. The writing is so precise and beautiful that it pulled me in right away, especially in moments of close physicality that left her inner life raw and exposed. There are two excellent moments at the start of this book when the main character goes to her Shri Lankan family home in Boston that set the stage of the larger narrative. She recounts tracing a raised scar on a family members face as a child, and each time she asked of its origin, she was told a different story. Then in a study of family pictures, many of her uber-successful oldest sister, and also of the beautiful second sister, we find the pictures of our heroine growing up. Awkward. Uncomfortable. Struggling with an identity. There is one picture of Lucky in a Bharatanatyam dancing costume, which metaphorically represents the pressures of culture, family, sexuality, and responsibility draped on her. A beautiful but sad picture. It shows how her life has and will be made up of bucking against these pressures. She could conform, but is too much of a unique, and honest presence for that. So these pictures become an important part of the book, offering moments Lucky can freeze time and assess herself, and see what has and what still needs to change. Changing and reshaping her story, just like the origin of that family members scar, until something clicks, until she knows her true self and can share that with others. This book screams that our hearts always want something extra on the side. There is the version of her in the pictures at her home, and another in a wedding photo, but she is most at home, or her desires are most in line at a club, which feels like a true world she can share among “androgynous youngsters with pierced noses, aging twinks with bright hair, hard and soft femmes in flirty dresses.” There Lucky can paint a world for the reader in her own spectacular color palate. This is a love story. As complex and nuanced as any I’ve read in a long time. Loving others. How we pretend to love others. How we do all that with ourselves too. How difficult and tiring it all is. Sindu is a first rate writer, and so young. It feels like a gift to find such a talent at the start of their career so I can look forward to what else is sure it come. This writer has a big heart, and she lays it all down in these pages. I great read.
    more
  • Kathleen Flynn
    March 5, 2017
    I fear this will get pigeonholed -- LGBT fiction, but with South Asian immigrants! And that some people will seek it out because of that, and others avoid it for the same reason. But "Marriage" deserves to be read on its own terms, as a heartfelt and moving story just about being human. Specifically about the limbo of being in your late 20s, caught between adolescence and full maturity, between the demands of family and community, and the inconvenient imperatives of your own nature.
    more
  • Brian Platzer
    December 3, 2016
    Smart, subtle, and very entertaining. Sindu does a great job of establishing characters quickly and then letting the plot flow naturally. An exciting, important novel.
  • Sassafras Lowrey
    June 27, 2017
    outstanding debut novel. in this book we get a captivating queer narrator grappling with duty, honor, desire, responsibility, tradition, family, loss and sex. this is a fantastic book - i finished it in just a few days.
  • Joslyn Allen
    May 31, 2017
    Review published: https://chronicbibliophilia.wordpress...“Let me tell you something about being brown like me: your story is already written for you. Your free will, your love, your failure, all of it scratched into the cosmos before you’re even born. My mother calls it fate, the story written on your head by the stars, by the gods, never by you. Everyone is watching you, all the time, praising you when you abide by your directives, waiting until you screw up. And you will screw up.”SJ Sindu’s Review published: https://chronicbibliophilia.wordpress...“Let me tell you something about being brown like me: your story is already written for you. Your free will, your love, your failure, all of it scratched into the cosmos before you’re even born. My mother calls it fate, the story written on your head by the stars, by the gods, never by you. Everyone is watching you, all the time, praising you when you abide by your directives, waiting until you screw up. And you will screw up.”SJ Sindu’s debut novel, “Marriage of a Thousand Lies”, tells the story of Lakshmi (called “Lucky”), a queer woman of color navigating the land mines and guilt trips of cultural beliefs and expectations. Lucky’s parents and their community are Tamil immigrants from Sri Lanka, a fiercely insular group bound by tradition.“Silence is the rule. Words are complications, sharp edges that cut up our tongues. We keep them in with walls of teeth, preserve the peace. Om shanti shanti shanti, as the prayer goes. Peace at any cost, as the prayer goes.”Lucky has been forced to hide and deny her sexuality all her life. In a desperate bid for acceptance, she has even engaged the ultimate beard – she has married Krishna (Kris), a gay man and fellow Tamil. These best friends do their best to shield themselves from the barbs of the world, hiding behind their sham marriage and hoping to pacify their families’ demands. But the tolls of lying, the costs of deception weigh heavily on Lucky.“There’s a saying in Tamil that a thousand lies can make a marriage. Here’s the truth: I’m tired of lying.”When Lucky’s grandmother is hospitalized, Lucky returns to her mother’s home to help care for her failing Ammamma. Back in her family’s orbit, however, her own struggles bubble to the surface. A grown woman now unemployed and living under her mother’s roof, Lucky is infantilized, reverting to secrecy and submission in order to placate her mother. When her first love announces her upcoming arranged marriage, Lucky lurches for solid ground.“Marriage of a Thousand Lies” questions the truths we omit and the lies we perpetrate out of love. It highlights the growing pains and constant compromises of becoming an adult and managing your parents’ expectations. It exposes the self-defeating and often damaging notions of immigration and assimilation.“Immigration policies re-create heightened natural selection. The smartest and those with the most resources make it out, along with a handful of those who just get lucky.”Sindu writes a story of self-acceptance full of love and conflict. “Marriage of a Thousand Lies” is beautiful and bold, deeply honest and full of lies. And oh so very good.“‘It’s always about the ones who aren’t here. Remember that.’The sentiment seems to be one that every Sri Lankan understands implicitly, we who start every cultural function with a moment of silence for those lost in our country’s decades-long ethnic civil war. Never forget the empty chairs. Never forget who should’ve been here.”Thank you to Soho Press, Inc. for providing a complimentary Advanced Review Copy in exchange for a fair and honest review. “Marriage of a Thousand Lies” will be published in the US on June 13, 2017.
    more
  • Debbie Germosen
    June 22, 2017
    "Let me tell you something about being brown like me: your story is already written for you. Your free will, your love, your failure, all of it scratched into the cosmos before you're ever born. My mother calls it fate, the story written on your head by stars, by the gods, never by you."SJ Sindu, Marriage of a Thousand LiesI have not read many LGBTQ novels and I'm trying to change this. And what better time than during Pride month? Marriage of a Thousand Lies was a fascinating and interesting bo "Let me tell you something about being brown like me: your story is already written for you. Your free will, your love, your failure, all of it scratched into the cosmos before you're ever born. My mother calls it fate, the story written on your head by stars, by the gods, never by you."SJ Sindu, Marriage of a Thousand LiesI have not read many LGBTQ novels and I'm trying to change this. And what better time than during Pride month? Marriage of a Thousand Lies was a fascinating and interesting book. It reveals how challenging "coming out" can be for some individuals and why. Kris and Lucky are married, gay and in a marriage of pure convenience. They both lead secretive lifestyles due to the strict traditions and beliefs held in their Sri Lankan and Indian culture. Unfortunately, in numerous cultures, gay individuals are often disowned and rejected by their loved ones. I can't imagine my family disowning me simply because of my sexual preference. In Marriage of a Thousand Lies, my heart went out to Lucky, who was constantly between a rock and a hard place. Lucky wants her mother's approval and unconditional love, but this proves to be a challenge and central theme in the book. I found myself rooting for Lucky and wishing she would lead the life she so desperately craves. Sindu weaved a beautiful story full of complex and realistic characters. She is a remarkable storyteller and I look forward to more of her thought-provoking stories.Thanks to Edelweiss and Soho for giving me an ARC of the book in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Bob H
    June 7, 2017
    Lucky, though living a good and modern life in New England, is still tugged at by her identity as part of a Sri Lankan family. For their sake, she -- as Lakshmi to her family -- is in a sham marriage with Kris, a gay Sri Lankan immigrant as well. The family emigrated to America, barely escaping the civil war in their home country, and "never forget the ones who should have been here," whether disappeared in the conflict, or in the form of a baby sister who died before Lucky's birth.Lucky's grand Lucky, though living a good and modern life in New England, is still tugged at by her identity as part of a Sri Lankan family. For their sake, she -- as Lakshmi to her family -- is in a sham marriage with Kris, a gay Sri Lankan immigrant as well. The family emigrated to America, barely escaping the civil war in their home country, and "never forget the ones who should have been here," whether disappeared in the conflict, or in the form of a baby sister who died before Lucky's birth.Lucky's grandmother's ill-health is one part of her past tugging at Lucky, and brings her to a sudden and unexpected meeting with her childhood friend -- and first love -- Nisha, herself now betrothed. As she tells Nisha, as they prepare for Nisha's traditional wedding, the two women could have a life together, but can they?It's a novel with considerable family depth, past history, well-drawn characters and compelling prose, in a debut novel that should be a cross-cultural classic and an important contribution to LGBT literature.
    more
  • Tracy
    May 31, 2017
    This is a really important novel examining some of the unique struggles LGBTQ POC from traditional households and cultures face. Lucky's journey isn't always a fun or easy one to read (it's a bit like watching someone be emotionally buried alive) but her desire to be herself and write her own story captures a real struggle people face even here in America where people sometimes naively believe we are in a post -gay society where 'no one cares who you love.' Lucky is not just a character to blind This is a really important novel examining some of the unique struggles LGBTQ POC from traditional households and cultures face. Lucky's journey isn't always a fun or easy one to read (it's a bit like watching someone be emotionally buried alive) but her desire to be herself and write her own story captures a real struggle people face even here in America where people sometimes naively believe we are in a post -gay society where 'no one cares who you love.' Lucky is not just a character to blindly pity - she is complicated and sometimes selfish and sometimes frustrating. I'm sure some would find her behavior off putting but I found it to be refreshingly realistic and relatable.In some parts the book felt disjointed and sometimes repetitive but it's still an overall solid debut novel that adds an important and unique voice to literary fiction.
    more
  • Heather Bailey
    November 21, 2016
    I was provided with an advance reader copy of this novel in exchange for my honest review. SJ Sindu’s novel is a poignant and nuanced exploration of what it means to be caught between two worlds. Lucky’s struggle to hold on to her identity while remaining a part of her family is palpable. While there are times in which Lucky feels deep anger and frustration, there are also moments in which she exhibits beautiful tenderness. SJ Sindu interweaves these two facets of Lucky’s character seamlessly; s I was provided with an advance reader copy of this novel in exchange for my honest review. SJ Sindu’s novel is a poignant and nuanced exploration of what it means to be caught between two worlds. Lucky’s struggle to hold on to her identity while remaining a part of her family is palpable. While there are times in which Lucky feels deep anger and frustration, there are also moments in which she exhibits beautiful tenderness. SJ Sindu interweaves these two facets of Lucky’s character seamlessly; she is at once a gay Sri Lankan who feels trapped in the cultural conventions of her family’s worldview while she tenderly cares for her aging grandmother and wants to maintain a relationship with her mother. Lucky has edges and dimension; she is a character whose struggle toward understanding and embracing her identity is one that we can all recognize.
    more
  • Len
    May 25, 2017
    Very, very lucky to have picked up a pre-release copy of this beautiful novel at work - get it when it comes out!I'm sure someone, at some point, will classify this as Lesbian Fiction which, while that's fine, I don't think it would be entirely accurate. This is such a gorgeous story of love and family and religion and tradition and culture, that, to narrow it down to a somewhat niche genre would be a real disservice.I don't often give 5 stars - Marriage of a Thousand Lies deserved it.To be show Very, very lucky to have picked up a pre-release copy of this beautiful novel at work - get it when it comes out!I'm sure someone, at some point, will classify this as Lesbian Fiction which, while that's fine, I don't think it would be entirely accurate. This is such a gorgeous story of love and family and religion and tradition and culture, that, to narrow it down to a somewhat niche genre would be a real disservice.I don't often give 5 stars - Marriage of a Thousand Lies deserved it.To be shown so many different ways of life, and their challenges - to be able to actually find yourself understanding the grays involved, where you normally might see things as black and white - and to have it wrapped in such evocative writing was a total pleasure.
    more
  • Dontana
    March 23, 2017
    This was...ok. It is exactly what it says it is...it will give you feels. nit the warm, fuzzy kind. The push and pull between Lucky and her family, the disaster that is Lucky and Nisha. It was realistic to the challenges that LGBT POC face; the struggle between being yourself and being the person your family wants you to be. I liked the insight into Sri Lankan culture. It was a bit slow and plodding, very internal and Lucky-centered. I find myself wanting to compare it to Emma Donoghue's Hood. T This was...ok. It is exactly what it says it is...it will give you feels. nit the warm, fuzzy kind. The push and pull between Lucky and her family, the disaster that is Lucky and Nisha. It was realistic to the challenges that LGBT POC face; the struggle between being yourself and being the person your family wants you to be. I liked the insight into Sri Lankan culture. It was a bit slow and plodding, very internal and Lucky-centered. I find myself wanting to compare it to Emma Donoghue's Hood. They are similar in tone, though Hood is way more depressing and ends with a bit more hope than this.
    more
  • Liz
    June 13, 2017
    Please read more of my reviews at: http://cavebookreviews.blogspot.comWe worship the idea of freedom and independence in the USA. I struggled in my young life because I wanted total independence and freedom from the time I was just a kid. I came from a family who placed religion combined with an old European culture above everything else. Making the family look good was paramount and more important than my happiness or well being.Lucky, Lakshmi's nickname, has zero freedom as she was born into a Please read more of my reviews at: http://cavebookreviews.blogspot.comWe worship the idea of freedom and independence in the USA. I struggled in my young life because I wanted total independence and freedom from the time I was just a kid. I came from a family who placed religion combined with an old European culture above everything else. Making the family look good was paramount and more important than my happiness or well being.Lucky, Lakshmi's nickname, has zero freedom as she was born into a traditional Sri Lankan family. The belief that all babies are born with their fate invisibly inscribed on the top of their heads sums up the experience of life in Lucky's culture. This invisible fate reinforces the beliefs that bind Lucky to a husband that is for the sake of appearance only. Lucky and her husband, Krishna, are gay. They get their freedom through the marriage. Lucky can live away from home and Kris gets a visa so he doesn't have to return to India. The couple are best friends and the arrangement works up to a point.Lucky's mother is rarely happy with any of Lucky's accomplishments. When Lucky has to return home to help her mother care for the grandmother, her world starts closing in on her. Her restricted life is suffocating and making her miserable. Loyalty to her family, even her father who humiliated her mother with a divorce, makes Lucky's life a living hell. The restrictions are painful and I felt them with her, every one of them. An obvious solution to the prison that is this kind of life has already been done by her sister, Vidaya who left home and has not returned. The family has no idea where she is, only that she loved a man named Jamal and he could not be accepted into the family's sphere of acceptability.This is a novel detailing the life of many in the LGBTQ community with the added weight of a traditional culture with expectations and taboos going back thousands of years. S. J. Sindhu has written a deeply touching and painful story. It is a new voice for detailing the tapestry of lives that deserve to be recognized and loved for who they are.ARC received courtesy of NetGalley and Soho Press (June 13th 2017).
    more
  • Naomi Wilson
    May 6, 2017
    3.5 stars I struggled through the first 100 or so pages.Lucky is an Sri Lankan lesbian. She marries a gay Sri Lankan man so that they both can be accepted by their community. When Lucky's grandma becomes ill she returns home to help care for her. She spends time with her best friend and first love who is also newly engaged. As the arranged wedding gets closer and it's obvious her friend doesn't want to go through with it, Lucky tries to talk her out of it and in the process has to make decisions 3.5 stars I struggled through the first 100 or so pages.Lucky is an Sri Lankan lesbian. She marries a gay Sri Lankan man so that they both can be accepted by their community. When Lucky's grandma becomes ill she returns home to help care for her. She spends time with her best friend and first love who is also newly engaged. As the arranged wedding gets closer and it's obvious her friend doesn't want to go through with it, Lucky tries to talk her out of it and in the process has to make decisions concerning her own happiness. The combination of the family dynamic, Sri Lankan culture, and LGBT community made for a very interesting and entertaining story.
    more
  • Elissa
    March 10, 2017
    Marriage of a Thousand Lies tells the story of a lesbian Sri Lankan-American woman named Lucky who marries her best friend, a gay man, in order to keep her conservative family happy—despite her feelings for anther woman. It's a beautiful, funny and heartbreaking story about love, family, religion and the struggle we all face to be true to ourselves without hurting the people we love. Despite the heavy topics, the book is a quick, enjoyable read, and I loved the character of Lucky and the book as Marriage of a Thousand Lies tells the story of a lesbian Sri Lankan-American woman named Lucky who marries her best friend, a gay man, in order to keep her conservative family happy—despite her feelings for anther woman. It's a beautiful, funny and heartbreaking story about love, family, religion and the struggle we all face to be true to ourselves without hurting the people we love. Despite the heavy topics, the book is a quick, enjoyable read, and I loved the character of Lucky and the book as a whole.
    more
  • Jen
    June 11, 2017
    Marriage of a Thousand Lies is a novel about families and tradition. It is about trying to find yourself, and be true to who you are. It speaks to a deep part of everyone who feels like they have to play a part to remain within a family or a society that seems to want to tell you to be quiet, and be like everyone else. This is a deeply moving but ultimately hopeful story that broke my heart but reminded me that taking the easy option isn't always the path to happiness. A rarely seen look into th Marriage of a Thousand Lies is a novel about families and tradition. It is about trying to find yourself, and be true to who you are. It speaks to a deep part of everyone who feels like they have to play a part to remain within a family or a society that seems to want to tell you to be quiet, and be like everyone else. This is a deeply moving but ultimately hopeful story that broke my heart but reminded me that taking the easy option isn't always the path to happiness. A rarely seen look into the life of a lesbian Sri Lankan-American woman told with a unique voice by a brilliant author.
    more
  • Anne Paschke
    June 26, 2017
    This was a really lovely read. Lucky's story and the people in her life are real and compelling, and I couldn't stop thinking about them even after putting the book down. Aside from being enjoyable, it is (just as the blurb on the book says) important - a reminder that even people in the same place in the same group of friends facing similar challenges have dramatically divergent forces pulling them to react differently, as Tasha and Lucky and Nisha do.
    more
  • BookTrib Community
    June 21, 2017
    We learned so much by reading this book! Check out our full review here: https://booktrib.com/2017/05/marriage...
  • Colleen
    June 19, 2017
    What a beautifully written book.
  • Lisa Duffy
    June 1, 2017
    In precise and vivid language, Marriage of a Thousand Lies offers a complex story about family, love and identity. Poignant and necessary, S.J. Sindu’s debut is a must read.
  • Amanda Clay
    February 23, 2017
    4.5 really. I loved this book. I loved Lucky and her struggle with love and the life expected of her. An interesting peek at another America. Made me cry, but that's not a bad thing.
  • Jaclyn
    June 23, 2017
    A beautifully written story about love and family.
  • Ming
    June 17, 2017
    This was a light read but a solidly written book. I liked that it reflected a relationship between two South Asians.It was unique or clever in some aspects (e.g., F2F, the marriage of convenience,, a divorced mother). I didn't like the asymmetry of Lucky's marriage when compared with Nisha's upcoming marriage, and I recall this scenario from somewhere.The pacing was a bit uneven. And I thought the inclusion of the rugby house and its residents and the runaway sister were superfluous to the story This was a light read but a solidly written book. I liked that it reflected a relationship between two South Asians.It was unique or clever in some aspects (e.g., F2F, the marriage of convenience,, a divorced mother). I didn't like the asymmetry of Lucky's marriage when compared with Nisha's upcoming marriage, and I recall this scenario from somewhere.The pacing was a bit uneven. And I thought the inclusion of the rugby house and its residents and the runaway sister were superfluous to the story.
    more
  • Lalitha
    March 5, 2017
    A welcome addition to the LGBT fiction genre, Marriage of a Thousand Lies presents a familiar story: a first-generation Sri-Lankan woman struggles to meet the cultural expectations of her close-knit community, which means hiding her queer identity. Lucky has found an arrangement that works for her: she's married to Kris who's also gay; both are somewhat cruising through life, unable to form any real attachments. When she finds out her ex-gf, Nisha, is getting married, Lucky's life is shaken up a A welcome addition to the LGBT fiction genre, Marriage of a Thousand Lies presents a familiar story: a first-generation Sri-Lankan woman struggles to meet the cultural expectations of her close-knit community, which means hiding her queer identity. Lucky has found an arrangement that works for her: she's married to Kris who's also gay; both are somewhat cruising through life, unable to form any real attachments. When she finds out her ex-gf, Nisha, is getting married, Lucky's life is shaken up and she must figure out whether to pursue an authentic life. But at what cost?Sindu's writing is poignant, but I wish there was more character development for Kris, as well as more of Vidya's backstory. Still, I would recommend this one given its unique perspective and emotional resonance.
    more
  • Demi
    February 12, 2017
    Sindu's story of a young Sri Lankan-American woman torn between her sexuality and her family's expectations is marvelous. Lucky's voice shines as she wrestles with her love for her family and the desire she feels for her best friend, Nisha. Add in her marriage of convenience to Kris (also gay) and an ailing grandmother, and you have this lyrical, heartfelt, poignant novel. Sindu shines heart and light on Lucky's unique-yet-universal circumstance; it is a pleasure to read even as it hurts.
    more
Write a review