The People We Hate at the Wedding
Relationships are awful. They'll kill you, right up to the point where they start saving your life.Paul and Alice’s half-sister Eloise is getting married! In London! There will be fancy hotels, dinners at “it” restaurants and a reception at a country estate complete with tea lights and embroidered cloth napkins. They couldn’t hate it more.The People We Hate at the Wedding is the story of a less than perfect family. Donna, the clan’s mother, is now a widow living in the Chicago suburbs with a penchant for the occasional joint and more than one glass of wine with her best friend while watching House Hunters International. Alice is in her thirties, single, smart, beautiful, stuck in a dead-end job where she is mired in a rather predictable, though enjoyable, affair with her married boss. Her brother Paul lives in Philadelphia with his older, handsomer, tenured track professor boyfriend who’s recently been saying things like “monogamy is an oppressive heteronormative construct,” while eyeing undergrads. And then there’s Eloise. Perfect, gorgeous, cultured Eloise. The product of Donna’s first marriage to a dashing Frenchman, Eloise has spent her school years at the best private boarding schools, her winter holidays in St. John and a post-college life cushioned by a fat, endless trust fund. To top it off, she’s infuriatingly kind and decent.As this estranged clan gathers together, and Eloise's walk down the aisle approaches, Grant Ginder brings to vivid, hilarious life the power of family, and the complicated ways we hate the ones we love the most in the most bitingly funny, slyly witty and surprisingly tender novel you’ll read this year.

The People We Hate at the Wedding Details

TitleThe People We Hate at the Wedding
Author
FormatHardcover
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 6th, 2017
PublisherFlatiron Books
ISBN1250095204
ISBN-139781250095206
Number of pages336 pages
Rating
GenreFiction, Womens Fiction, Chick Lit, Adult Fiction, Humor

The People We Hate at the Wedding Review

  • Amy
    May 27, 2017
    All of my reviews can be found on www.novelgossip.comIf you like snarky humor and watching a train wreck of a family unravel at the seams then I’ve got another great book to add to your summer reading list! First of all, the title/cover combination is pure gold, this is a great book to pick up this summer. It’s light, but has a bite due to its sardonic nature. This is a modern, cynical look at the dynamics of a highly dysfunctional family that could not be more entertaining. It’s told via altern All of my reviews can be found on www.novelgossip.comIf you like snarky humor and watching a train wreck of a family unravel at the seams then I’ve got another great book to add to your summer reading list! First of all, the title/cover combination is pure gold, this is a great book to pick up this summer. It’s light, but has a bite due to its sardonic nature. This is a modern, cynical look at the dynamics of a highly dysfunctional family that could not be more entertaining. It’s told via alternating points of view, primarily through the eyes of Paul, Alice and Donna though you do hear from just about every character at some point. Every single one of them is deeply flawed and not very likable, but watching their relationships was utterly fascinating. These people do not hold anything back, they are brutally honest and at times it’s painfully awkward, but again absolutely entertaining as a reader. This has some racy, risqué scenes but it’s also infused with the type of humor that speaks to my soul. The writing is acerbic, intelligent and scarily insightful and is always filled with snark. It’s really witty and engaging, I read it pretty quick and can’t tell you how many times I vacillitated between giggling and being horrified. The way this family behaves is appalling! I think the book succeeded at what The Nest tried (and failed) to do. If I had one (minor) issue it would be that there was very little time at the wedding and I’m a sucker for drama at a wedding! At the end of the day though, this book isn’t really about a wedding, it’s about a really messed up family, so I’m not mad.
    more
  • Cmorrison
    January 3, 2017
    " if a mans character is to be abused, say what you will, there's nobody like a relative to do the business"...there couldn't be a better quote to describe this delightful and fun read. I received an early copy of this book, and found that I couldn't put it down! The characters are flawed, yet hilarious , and this author draws us into an engrossing world where people are actually allowed to voice what they truly feel about their family. I cannot wait to read his next book!
    more
  • Caryn
    May 27, 2017
    3.5 stars.Ginder puts the "fun" in dysfunctional with this family leading up to a wedding across the pond in England. A more appropriate title "The People We Hate Before the Wedding," as this book never gets to the actual wedding.The book starts with a brother, sister, and their mother who decide if they should head to their half-sister's wedding. Chapters alternate by who is speaking. Ginder easily distinguishes characters with unique voices.This book was more a character study than pure plot, 3.5 stars.Ginder puts the "fun" in dysfunctional with this family leading up to a wedding across the pond in England. A more appropriate title "The People We Hate Before the Wedding," as this book never gets to the actual wedding.The book starts with a brother, sister, and their mother who decide if they should head to their half-sister's wedding. Chapters alternate by who is speaking. Ginder easily distinguishes characters with unique voices.This book was more a character study than pure plot, but there were many scenes that I found myself chuckling. It's also sad in spots as relationships self-destruct.The second half has us hearing from significant others as they propel the story along. I felt the book ended a tad abruptly and would have liked to see what happened with these characters when they returned to the States. Maybe he's saving that for a second book.Thanks to Goodreads Giveaways and Flatiron Books for a copy in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Sterlingcindysu
    May 4, 2017
    Isn't this a great title and cover! I predict this will be a summer beach-reading hit. I read this on a cruise and passed it around when I was done--thanks for the arc! One thing I think will get some negative comments are the stock characters Ginder brings out for our review--young woman in debt, gay guy, unhappy wife who still thinks about her ex and priviledged rich woman who works in non-profits are all accounted. But Ginder puts the twist on them by making them SO outrageously mean/spiteful Isn't this a great title and cover! I predict this will be a summer beach-reading hit. I read this on a cruise and passed it around when I was done--thanks for the arc! One thing I think will get some negative comments are the stock characters Ginder brings out for our review--young woman in debt, gay guy, unhappy wife who still thinks about her ex and priviledged rich woman who works in non-profits are all accounted. But Ginder puts the twist on them by making them SO outrageously mean/spiteful/generous, etc. In other words, whatever their main vanity is, it's magnified to outlandish proportions. The story is told through different viewpoints and is easy to follow even with flashbacks. I bet anyone who reads this will think their life is a piece of cake afterwards!
    more
  • Linda Zagon
    April 2, 2017
    I would like to thank BookBrowse and Flatiron Books for the Advanced Reading Edition of "The People We Hate at the Wedding" by Grant Ginder for my honest review.The genres of this book are Contemporary Adult Fiction, and Humor and Satire.I find that the author describes his complex and complicated characters as completely dysfunctional as a family unit. Their relationships with others and their relationships at work are also dysfunctional.This novel is witty and there is satire surrounding one o I would like to thank BookBrowse and Flatiron Books for the Advanced Reading Edition of "The People We Hate at the Wedding" by Grant Ginder for my honest review.The genres of this book are Contemporary Adult Fiction, and Humor and Satire.I find that the author describes his complex and complicated characters as completely dysfunctional as a family unit. Their relationships with others and their relationships at work are also dysfunctional.This novel is witty and there is satire surrounding one of the half-siblings weddings. There are three siblings in total. Two have the same mother and a different father and live in a comfortable home in America. Their father has just died and there is anger and resentment towards their mother.The other sibling lives in England, and is getting married. She shares the same mother, but her father, who is still living, is very wealthy so she has had many opportunities in education and travel that her siblings have not. There is a tremendous amount of jealousy.There is going to be an elegant wedding and the family from America has RSVP'd. There are mixed feels of resentment, jealousy, and confusion. Don't ask about their significant others, please don't.Grant Tinder describes family dynamics, with love and hate, encouragement and support,emotional feelings and hope, learning self worth, and learning to communicate.Is it possible that one can love and hate at the same time? The author discusses many modern issues such as being gay, adultery,and abuse in relationships.I would highly recommend this intriguing and humorous book.
    more
  • Stacey A. Prose and Palate
    May 29, 2017
    I have found myself on a major dysfunctional character reading binge lately and I absolutely love it. The People We Hate At The Wedding is no exception. Maybe it is because I can absolutely relate to the craziness that was rampant in this hot mess of a family -- from the mother and the son not speaking to each other over a misunderstanding to the animosity Alice harbors towards her half-sister Elosie, or maybe I just needed this snarkiness in my life at the moment. There were moments from the re I have found myself on a major dysfunctional character reading binge lately and I absolutely love it. The People We Hate At The Wedding is no exception. Maybe it is because I can absolutely relate to the craziness that was rampant in this hot mess of a family -- from the mother and the son not speaking to each other over a misunderstanding to the animosity Alice harbors towards her half-sister Elosie, or maybe I just needed this snarkiness in my life at the moment. There were moments from the rehearsal on to the end of the book where I actually laughed out loud, but there were also moments were I cringed and wanted to gag (trash can therapy sessions, NO THANK YOU.) This is a story about three siblings who are stumbling along through life, displeased as to where they currently find themselves, jealous of their half-sister who seems to be living the life that they wish they could have lived, and blaming everyone along the way for their problems . Alice (bless her heart) is just stuck in grief over a loss that happened five years ago and she can not move on from it. Paul (Alice’s brother) is an absolute door mat and struggling with what he wants to do with his life and poor Eloise just wants everyone to get along and be the perfect happy family. But not every family is like a Norman Rockwell painting and this particular one has messiness and drama in spades. The only thing that Paul and Alice can seem to agree on is their loathing for Eloise as her impending marriage approaches. I did feel that this story dragged a bit in the middle and I wish there was more focus on the actual wedding then the time leading up to the big event. That being said, I still found it to be a solid 3.5 star read. If you like snarky characters and flawed families, then this would be an enjoyable read for you. Many thanks to Netgalley and FlatIron Books for providing me with an advanced copy in exchange for my honest review.
    more
  • Kate Olson
    May 29, 2017
    Cutting. That's the best word I can think of to describe this book. Some family stories are warm and happy, and this is sharp and cutting and messy, and yes, at times, funny. Grinder shows family dysfunction in all its completely ugly reality, and has created characters who are simultaneously hateful and worth investing in. There were parts of this book that were just plain gross (read: the garbage can scenes), but in my opinion, when a book is gross and I keep reading, it's a sign of quality wr Cutting. That's the best word I can think of to describe this book. Some family stories are warm and happy, and this is sharp and cutting and messy, and yes, at times, funny. Grinder shows family dysfunction in all its completely ugly reality, and has created characters who are simultaneously hateful and worth investing in. There were parts of this book that were just plain gross (read: the garbage can scenes), but in my opinion, when a book is gross and I keep reading, it's a sign of quality writing and plot. I do wish more of the book had been set actually in England and involving the wedding. The last 20% was my favorite and there were a few laugh-out-loud moments toward the very end. If you have a family that sometimes drives you to tears, and if you understand that life isn't all warm and fuzzy for all of us, this is the summer book for you. Thanks to Net Galley for the digital ARC for review - all opinions are my own.
    more
  • Christina (Confessions of a Book Addict)
    May 16, 2017
    I put this one aside for the time being. I felt like although it was hilarious at times, it was a bit too cynical and crude for me. I didn't think that was possible, but I think I am just not in the right mood for it. May revisit it later this summer.
    more
  • Brian
    April 13, 2017
    Every family has its imperfections and the family at the focus of this novel is absolutely no different. Paul is in a relationship with Mark but is afraid that Mark wants to leave him. He is estranged from his mother Donna who keeps calling Paul but he refuses to answer. Paul's sister, Alice, is in a relationship with a married man. And both Paul and Alice do not want to go to their snooty half sister Eloise's wedding! This was a well written book with some parts that were slightly less engaging Every family has its imperfections and the family at the focus of this novel is absolutely no different. Paul is in a relationship with Mark but is afraid that Mark wants to leave him. He is estranged from his mother Donna who keeps calling Paul but he refuses to answer. Paul's sister, Alice, is in a relationship with a married man. And both Paul and Alice do not want to go to their snooty half sister Eloise's wedding! This was a well written book with some parts that were slightly less engaging than others, in particular the second half. Like many many other books, it features shifting perspectives, some of which include some pretty seemingly minor characters. This was a good book that I was able to read within two nights.
    more
  • Gillian At Home
    May 19, 2017
    This is - hands down - one of the best novels about family, social class, and thirtysomething malaise I have ever read. This is the novel I was expecting The Nest to be. I feel like I've just been to a family wedding and spent the whole time with the most interesting people there.Grant Ginder has created a family of charming, funny, intelligent characters who all come to London for a wedding. Shifting back and forth between perspectives, you have time to enjoy seeing what's inside each family me This is - hands down - one of the best novels about family, social class, and thirtysomething malaise I have ever read. This is the novel I was expecting The Nest to be. I feel like I've just been to a family wedding and spent the whole time with the most interesting people there.Grant Ginder has created a family of charming, funny, intelligent characters who all come to London for a wedding. Shifting back and forth between perspectives, you have time to enjoy seeing what's inside each family member's head. I loved spending time with each of them and their wry observations and biting commentary - I actually giggled reading this on the subway.This book is smartly written. The language is perfectly chosen, but the writing is unpretentious. Unlike a lot of books about people with money, this one doesn't fall into the trap of trying to prove it "belongs" with too many references to brand names or materialism. It was pitch perfect.Congratulations to Ginder, who makes it look easy. I enjoyed this so much, I will read anything he writes.
    more
  • Ellen
    March 24, 2017
    At the heart of this book is a very dysfunctional family with absolutely selfish and unappealing characters. Not the light and fun read at all that the book's description implies. Paul and Alice fly to London to attend their half sister's wedding. Alice is having an affair with a married man, Paul's partner is getting tired of him, and Eloise has everything going for her. Not recommended.
    more
  • Joelle
    March 13, 2017
    1.5 starsDisfunctional family relationships abound in this story revolving around a family wedding. Eloise is a privileged daughter of Donna and Henrique, a playboy Frenchman. Paul and Alice are her half siblings from Donna's disappointing second marriage to an average Midwestern man. Paul and Alice's strong resentment of their sister Eloise creates plenty of drama during the elegant wedding festivities in the English countryside. Will the siblings come to an understanding and allow Eloise's wed 1.5 starsDisfunctional family relationships abound in this story revolving around a family wedding. Eloise is a privileged daughter of Donna and Henrique, a playboy Frenchman. Paul and Alice are her half siblings from Donna's disappointing second marriage to an average Midwestern man. Paul and Alice's strong resentment of their sister Eloise creates plenty of drama during the elegant wedding festivities in the English countryside. Will the siblings come to an understanding and allow Eloise's wedding to go off without a hitch? For me, this book started out with promise but quickly lost momentum. I couldn't really connect or empathize with any of the characters, so their trials didn't really resonate with me. I found most of the characters selfish, and in some cases, unrealistically insecure and self sabotaging. Sadly, this story was just a miss for me, but I gave it 1.5 stars for the English setting (which I would have liked to learn more about other than how "upper crust" it all was). *I received a free advanced copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Peter!
    January 30, 2017
    equally insightful and fun, this book was wonderful. the author perfectly captures the cringeworthy behavior we're all capable of in the lead-up to a family wedding. i highly recommend this book!
  • Anne Wehner
    March 31, 2017
    Great title. "Meh" read.
  • Paula
    March 5, 2017
    I won an early copy of this book in a Goodreads Giveaway and I'm so lucky I did. This book is a fantastic read that brings together a fabulously flawed cast of characters to a family wedding. Their story is a roller coaster ride that you will want to take. I was drawn in from the first page and didn't want to leave even at the last. I'll be going to the mailbox hoping for an invitation to the next wedding in this family. That's for sure!
    more
  • Jamckean
    March 3, 2017
    What an absolute joy to read. Funny, tender, honest and insightful. Anyone who says they do not enjoy this book or see elements of their own insecurities and family dysfunction is lying.
  • Jenna Osborne
    May 11, 2017
    I’ve heard tales about families who get along well, have each others backs and actually look forward to seeing each other. Mind you, I’ve never met any of these mythical families, and I most certainly don’t belong to one. Apparently neither does Grant Ginder, because he has managed to perfectly capture the lying, backbiting, passive-aggressiveness of the modern dysfunctional family in excruciating and sometimes hilarious detail.The People We Hate At The Wedding seems like a simple premise. An ol I’ve heard tales about families who get along well, have each others backs and actually look forward to seeing each other. Mind you, I’ve never met any of these mythical families, and I most certainly don’t belong to one. Apparently neither does Grant Ginder, because he has managed to perfectly capture the lying, backbiting, passive-aggressiveness of the modern dysfunctional family in excruciating and sometimes hilarious detail.The People We Hate At The Wedding seems like a simple premise. An older sister is getting married and she wants her family to attend. How do you spin a whole novel out of that? You add in years of jealousy, frustration, hidden secrets, addiction and loneliness and multiply them by a cross-section of fractured, broken and hopeless relationships.When British Eloise invites American half-siblings Alice and Paul to her fairytale nuptials, her wedding becomes a catalyst for life-changing drama. All of the characters here are stuck, from bereft, pleasantly pill-numbed Alice, to grieving Paul in a bad relationship and a soul-sucking job, to their mother who believes the life she deserved was stolen from her.The younger siblings are frozen somewhere in adolescence, resentful of the hoity-toity life Eloise was granted by her rich father, while they grew up in comfortable but middle class obscurity. Eloise’s clumsy efforts to help them or woo them with her inheritance only serve to make them grow more disgusted and distant.Alice lost a pregnancy and a job she was passionate about, replacing them with a meaningless position and an affair with her married boss. Paul lost his father, who he doesn’t realize never loved him anyway, and spends his life devotedly following a boyfriend who doesn’t deserve him. Their mother is also in a sort of stasis, pining for a time when she felt desired and refined.As we get closer to the wedding, cracks begin to show. Paul’s journey to something approaching self-awareness contains some of the most laugh-out-loud moments of the book. When a fake baby crunches into the nose of his screaming, berating boss who just called him a fairy, I admit I cheered out loud. Later on when he drunkenly pees on his father in a quaint country pub after having described his first three-way sex experience to his half-sister’s soon-to-be in-laws, I definitely guffawed.And if you want to know the context of all that, you’ll just have to read the book.Amid the humor and the pain, there is a lesson here. Not the pat, Hallmark-card sort of lesson, where all we need is love and a puppy to set things right. But a more realistic sort of understanding that families are complex, intertwined organisms. Sometimes they suffocate us even in their distance, but they are also capable of holding us together in a way nothing else can.They may make you crazy, they may make you cringe, but it’s still good to have someone on your side willing to pee on anyone who messes with you.
    more
  • Really Into This
    June 1, 2017
    You can find all of our reviews at http://reallyintothis.com/Happy Reading!The People We Hate at the Wedding immediately struck me – both the title and the cover sucked me right in. I tend to be sarcastic, and at times I have a very sardonic sense of humor, so a book about people we hate at the wedding…sign me up! I wasn’t really sure what I was getting myself into, but the dysfunctional family author Grant Ginder writes for us is deep, difficult and at times hilariously funny, even in their dep You can find all of our reviews at http://reallyintothis.com/Happy Reading!The People We Hate at the Wedding immediately struck me – both the title and the cover sucked me right in. I tend to be sarcastic, and at times I have a very sardonic sense of humor, so a book about people we hate at the wedding…sign me up! I wasn’t really sure what I was getting myself into, but the dysfunctional family author Grant Ginder writes for us is deep, difficult and at times hilariously funny, even in their depressive states.I thought the story telling device of hearing from all of the characters in the book served its point well. We mostly hear from Donna, the mother of the family, and her three children, who each get a turn to tell their story. I enjoy when different view points are revealed to us because I think the perspective builds depth of character. And let me tell you, these are not the most likable people. In fact, I didn’t really know who I was rooting for, or if I was rooting for anyone at all! But, these people are three dimensional and even when they are being horrible to each other, you can see where they are coming from, even though you want to tell them to stop! I have to say I was a little jealous of how they all just laid it out there to each other, saying exactly how they felt. I know a lot of us could use a little bit of that therapy.The People We Hate at the Wedding is a quick, read. Once I got into the meat of it, I finished it within a couple of days. I thought it was extremely smart and well written, and I highlighted a few quotes that I felt were very poignant. I love when Paul, the brother, says “If a man’s character is to be abused, say what you will, there’s nobody like a relative to do the business,” because it is true. No one can get you like someone you love, and it is the heart of this book. This family obviously loves each other, they just don’t have to be traditional in the way they do it.I would call this a great summer, beach read, but it is not for the faint of heart – it definitely leans “R” rated, but that was no problem for me. I loved the book and would recommend to anyone who has a dark sense of humor and loves a great story of family dysfunction. I am Really Into It and am ready for more of Ginder’s books.Special thanks to Grant Ginder, Flatiron Books & NetGalley for providing our copy in exchange for an honest & fair review.
    more
  • Mandy Weeks
    May 7, 2017
    "Family dysfunction at its best. This novel is addicting and entertaining and I couldn't put it down!"- Jennifer Close, New York Times bestselling author of Girls in White Dresses and The HopefulsA Publishers Weekly BEST SUMMER BOOKS, 2017Relationships are awful. They'll kill you, right up to the point where they start saving your life.Paul and Alice’s half-sister Eloise is getting married! In London! There will be fancy hotels, dinners at “it” restaurants and a reception at a country estate com "Family dysfunction at its best. This novel is addicting and entertaining and I couldn't put it down!"- Jennifer Close, New York Times bestselling author of Girls in White Dresses and The HopefulsA Publishers Weekly BEST SUMMER BOOKS, 2017Relationships are awful. They'll kill you, right up to the point where they start saving your life.Paul and Alice’s half-sister Eloise is getting married! In London! There will be fancy hotels, dinners at “it” restaurants and a reception at a country estate complete with tea lights and embroidered cloth napkins. They couldn’t hate it more.The People We Hate at the Wedding is the story of a less than perfect family. Donna, the clan’s mother, is now a widow living in the Chicago suburbs with a penchant for the occasional joint and more than one glass of wine with her best friend while watching House Hunters International. Alice is in her thirties, single, smart, beautiful, stuck in a dead-end job where she is mired in a rather predictable, though enjoyable, affair with her married boss. Her brother Paul lives in Philadelphia with his older, handsomer, tenured track professor boyfriend who’s recently been saying things like “monogamy is an oppressive heteronormative construct,” while eyeing undergrads. And then there’s Eloise. Perfect, gorgeous, cultured Eloise. The product of Donna’s first marriage to a dashing Frenchman, Eloise has spent her school years at the best private boarding schools, her winter holidays in St. John and a post-college life cushioned by a fat, endless trust fund. To top it off, she’s infuriatingly kind and decent.As this estranged clan gathers together, and Eloise's walk down the aisle approaches, Grant Ginder brings to vivid, hilarious life the power of family, and the complicated ways we hate the ones we love the most in the most bitingly funny, slyly witty and surprisingly tender novel you’ll read this year.
    more
  • Janet
    March 24, 2017
    “Weddings and funerals. . .” How many times have we heard that these are the somewhat-mandatory occasions at which we see the relatives from whom we are estranged?Paul, a young social worker employed in the clinic of a psychiatrist who provides unorthodox “immersion therapy” to patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder [imagine a germophobe being required to handle trash and to stand in a garbage can] became estranged from his mother, Donna, shortly after his father's funeral, and at the start “Weddings and funerals. . .” How many times have we heard that these are the somewhat-mandatory occasions at which we see the relatives from whom we are estranged?Paul, a young social worker employed in the clinic of a psychiatrist who provides unorthodox “immersion therapy” to patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder [imagine a germophobe being required to handle trash and to stand in a garbage can] became estranged from his mother, Donna, shortly after his father's funeral, and at the start of the book is insisting he will not attend the high-class London wedding of his better-off older half-sister, who is the product of Donna's first, failed marriage, nor will he even speak to Donna to discuss it. Having moved to Philadelphia to be with his boyfriend Mark, who followed an important academic job there, Paul is happy in this relationship and in gay life.Meanwhile, his sister Alice, who has been having an affair with her married boss, is still mourning a miscarriage and broken relationship of several years back, and is focused on attending the same wedding, and ensuring that her brother goes, too.The going-to-a-rich-sister's-wedding story is, of course, quite trite, but provides an opportunity to get all three main characters out of their comfort zones for some life-changing and, to the reader, amusing experiences. The reader's first impressions about many of the characters' actions turn out to be dead wrong, and the funny title, “The People We Hate at the Wedding”, is not descriptive of any of the parties whom we get to know.This reader is pleased to report that this is not yet another “Bridezilla” story, and that the actual wedding preparations, aside from its role as a plot device to gather the family (including Alice and Paul's jealous attempt at guessing the price of the wedding invitations they just received) , are not obsessed upon.
    more
  • Katie
    May 25, 2017
    I won a copy of this - so am obligated to read & write about it. The writing and editing is okay. I found about 6 chapters to cut completely. slows down in the middle. I stopped there. the characters are hopelessly flawed to the part of being disturbing. It's hard to read about whiny, self-centered, helpless, grown children. I certainly don't like them. They are the people I hate at weddings, btw. The ones aunties call "insufferable." The mother is a sweetie - but she raised some bums. it's I won a copy of this - so am obligated to read & write about it. The writing and editing is okay. I found about 6 chapters to cut completely. slows down in the middle. I stopped there. the characters are hopelessly flawed to the part of being disturbing. It's hard to read about whiny, self-centered, helpless, grown children. I certainly don't like them. They are the people I hate at weddings, btw. The ones aunties call "insufferable." The mother is a sweetie - but she raised some bums. it's a decent story - like a story you'd hear from that gay drunk frat buddy who's a little too rich and a little too self-centered and thinks every person is their psychologist. Funny in some places. Heart warming in others. I began wanting some of those drugs that the characters are chewing down, just to make it through their lives. At some point, you are wondering about what other book you could have been reading. I know some people can relate to privileged lives - and they are still for some reason never satisfied. I can't relate. I wanted to throat punch the main character & tell his sister to grow up ... But they are just characters. So i put the book down & will give it to the local charity to sell. Someone will be benefited.
    more
  • Laura Beasley
    May 21, 2017
    I won a copy of this book on Goodreads First Reads. Sadly I did not like this book at all. The author is a talented writer but his writing style I did not care for. I did not find the book humorous at all. The characters were all dysfunctional and the story just drug. A brother and sister are invited to their step sisters wedding and neither want to go because they do not get along. Paul, the brother, also has had a falling out with his mother and during the nook he and his partner break up. Ali I won a copy of this book on Goodreads First Reads. Sadly I did not like this book at all. The author is a talented writer but his writing style I did not care for. I did not find the book humorous at all. The characters were all dysfunctional and the story just drug. A brother and sister are invited to their step sisters wedding and neither want to go because they do not get along. Paul, the brother, also has had a falling out with his mother and during the nook he and his partner break up. Alice, the sister, is having an affair and he breaks it off while she is in London for the wedding. Eloise, the step sister is a pampered woman and very controlling. Donna, the mother, has lost her second husband and is covering up how he felt about Paul and also bitter about her first marriage. He cheated on her. The book is full of one problem after another and so much complaining. Had I not won the book I would have never finished it. This book may appeal to younger people but not to someone my age.
    more
  • Leslie
    May 10, 2017
    I won an advanced copy of this book in a giveaway. Even though it took me 2 months to read that was not because of the quality of the story. Eloise has a dysfunctional family and is getting married. Her half-brother Paul is gay, her half-sister Alice abuses prescription medication and is having an affair with a married man, and her mother is a divorced widow who occasionally smokes pot. Eloise's father is a rich French guy who dates women younger than Eloise. She grew up in rich boarding schools I won an advanced copy of this book in a giveaway. Even though it took me 2 months to read that was not because of the quality of the story. Eloise has a dysfunctional family and is getting married. Her half-brother Paul is gay, her half-sister Alice abuses prescription medication and is having an affair with a married man, and her mother is a divorced widow who occasionally smokes pot. Eloise's father is a rich French guy who dates women younger than Eloise. She grew up in rich boarding schools in Europe which caused her brother and sister to resent her. Alice, Paul, and Paul's boyfriend Mark go to England for Eloise's wedding. During the trip, their family dysfunction is at its best. Grant Ginder wrote a very funny book. There were parts of the book that I didn't care for though. There were a few times where the story went into more detail than I cared for with Paul and his boyfriend's love life. Other than that, I think it was a very well-written and funny book.
    more
  • Stephanie
    May 10, 2017
    Appropriately titled considering how unlikable most of the people are in this book. I think the last time I was as self-centered as these late 20+'s-60s I was 14 years old. To be fair, the book acknowledges that these characters are flawed and the family does come to somewhat of an understanding of each other in several emotional scenes near the end but, ultimately, there is no change in their characters. Even near the end of the book, one of the sisters ponders why certain things always happen Appropriately titled considering how unlikable most of the people are in this book. I think the last time I was as self-centered as these late 20+'s-60s I was 14 years old. To be fair, the book acknowledges that these characters are flawed and the family does come to somewhat of an understanding of each other in several emotional scenes near the end but, ultimately, there is no change in their characters. Even near the end of the book, one of the sisters ponders why certain things always happen to them and the brothers response is that they "let it"... as if they have no responsibility for any of their actions that caused these things to happen to them in the first place. It is well written. I think I just would have preferred an evolution of characters instead of a platitude about how some families are messed up and some aren't.
    more
  • Mary Mack
    May 14, 2017
    This book is the story of a dysfunctional family and how they come together to disagree over one of their siblings/half siblings wedding. Everything from the past comes up and no matter what - someone feels that they were loved less, treated less favorably than the others. The story has the making of a great reality TV show since every possible family dynamic is included. At the end of the day they realize they are family and when things go awry in their lives, they turn to those that they know This book is the story of a dysfunctional family and how they come together to disagree over one of their siblings/half siblings wedding. Everything from the past comes up and no matter what - someone feels that they were loved less, treated less favorably than the others. The story has the making of a great reality TV show since every possible family dynamic is included. At the end of the day they realize they are family and when things go awry in their lives, they turn to those that they know best and who they can count on.
    more
  • Cora
    May 5, 2017
    There was a point in the middle of this book when I hated every single character and wanted to yell at them all while kicking their shins. However, overall I really liked it, and especially enjoyed Paul, the insecure and sweet (as opposed to Alice, the insecure and bitter; or Eloise, the smug and un-self-aware). Some of it was pretty howlingly funny, in fact, and I would definitely read another book by Grant Ginder.
    more
  • Heidi
    May 17, 2017
    This was a tough read because I didn't particularly like any of the characters. I read through to the end hoping that either they would have consequences for their bad behavior or they would change. While their were consequences, I didn't feel like at the end any of the characters had changed or took responsibility for their mis-deeds. There just seems to be an acceptance that everyone in the family is an awful person in some way, shape or form.
    more
  • Allison
    May 29, 2017
    Dysfunctional family fiction is putting it mildly -- hard to find anything in these characters that made me give a damn about them. I kept hoping for some kind of redemption line to turn it around, and there was a bit in the final chapter, but too late and not enough to redeem my wasted time.
    more
  • Janet Hutcheson
    May 27, 2017
    A dysfunctional family that you love to hate!
  • Cindelu
    May 21, 2017
    I won this book on Goodreads. I read about a fourth of it. I quickly got tired of the whinny, insipid characters and their incredibly annoying lifestyles.
Write a review