Midnight at the Electric
Kansas, 2065 Adri has been handpicked to live on Mars. But weeks before Launch, she discovers the journal of a girl who lived in her house over a hundred years ago, and is immediately drawn into the mystery surrounding her fate. While Adri knows she must focus on the mission ahead, she becomes captivated by a life that’s been lost in time…and how it might be inextricably tied to her own. Oklahoma, 1934 Amidst the fear and uncertainty of the Dust Bowl, Catherine longs for the immortality promised by a professor at a traveling show called The Electric. But as her family’s situation becomes more dire -- and the suffocating dust threatens her sister’s life -- Catherine must find the courage to sacrifice everything she loves in order to save the one person she loves most. England, 1919 In the recovery following World War One, Lenore tries to come to terms with her grief for her brother, a fallen British soldier, and plans to sail to America in pursuit of a childhood friend. But even if she makes it that far, will her friend be the person she remembers, and the one who can bring her back to herself? While their stories spans thousands of miles and multiple generations, Lenore, Catherine, and Adri’s fates are entwined in ways both heartbreaking and hopeful.

Midnight at the Electric Details

TitleMidnight at the Electric
Author
FormatHardcover
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 13th, 2017
PublisherHarperTeen
ISBN0062393545
ISBN-139780062393548
Number of pages272 pages
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Historical, Science Fiction, Teen, Fiction, Family, Fantasy, Science Fiction Fantasy, Young Adult Historical Fiction, Young Adult Science Fiction

Midnight at the Electric Review

  • Emily May
    January 3, 2017
    “Earth,” Alexa finally said. “It’s not that great anyway.” And they all smiled sadly. Because, of course, she was being sarcastic. Of course, it was everything. What a strange, quiet, beautiful book. Anderson is the author of one of my favourite YA books of all time - Tiger Lily - making her someone whose books are auto-buys for me. And Midnight at the Electric didn't disappoint. I feel like I should issue a warning that those going into this book should prepare themselves for a slow, gentle, b “Earth,” Alexa finally said. “It’s not that great anyway.” And they all smiled sadly. Because, of course, she was being sarcastic. Of course, it was everything. What a strange, quiet, beautiful book. Anderson is the author of one of my favourite YA books of all time - Tiger Lily - making her someone whose books are auto-buys for me. And Midnight at the Electric didn't disappoint. I feel like I should issue a warning that those going into this book should prepare themselves for a slow, gentle, but emotional read. Anderson fans will expect this after reading both Tiger Lily and The Vanishing Season. There is something so haunting and all the more effective about the subtle way these stories unfold. The author reveals powerful concepts and insights into humanity through the quiet interactions between people, and their private thoughts. When she retells Peter Pan, the focus is on the inner turmoil of a young girl and the heartache that comes with growing up, changing, and not having things turn out how you'd hoped. When she tells this story about a Mars colonist in the year 2065, the focus is not on space travel and the future, but on the deep sadness of leaving something behind, and the excitement of experiencing something new. “I think that’s what you say when you can’t have something you want, isn’t it? You say you don’t want it in the first place.” Though the book starts with Adri - an orphan who has been chosen as one of the first colonists on Mars - it actually tells three different stories. Adri has been sent to live with her distant and aging cousin, Lily, while she prepares for her new life, but in Lily's home she discovers the diaries of a girl called Catherine who lived during the Dust bowl of 1930s America, and letters to Catherine's mother from Lenore, an English girl who lost her beloved brother in the First World War.All of these stories are tied together by Galapagos, a tortoise that has appeared in the lives of all three women. And all three women are on the cusp of leaving - Lenore leaving England; Catherine leaving her dust-covered town and the boy she loves; Adri leaving Earth. The book is infused with melancholy... because there is something very sad about change and leaving, even new beginnings are tinged with the sadness of that left behind.The book is full of relationships, reluctant friendship, love and loss, without ever feeling too sentimental or manipulative. It is strange how a book that has such a sad atmosphere can be somehow hopeful and uplifting at the same time. It contains all the bittersweetness of something ending, and something else beginning. “Do you think I can change?” she finally asked.Lily looked at her, curious and thoughtful. “Well,” she replied, “are you dead?”They smiled at each other, a slow unfolding. Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Youtube
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  • Sarah
    March 14, 2017
    (I received an advance copy of this book for free. Thanks to HarperCollins and Edelweiss.) “Maybe now would be a good time for me to pre-apologize. I’m not really a get-to-know-each-other kind of a person. I’m not charming or anything. I’m, like, the opposite of that.” This was a YA story about a girl leaving for Mars, who finds an old relatives letters and reads them.Adri was quite a prickly character, and she really didn’t seem to like being around people much at all. I did understand her ne (I received an advance copy of this book for free. Thanks to HarperCollins and Edelweiss.) “Maybe now would be a good time for me to pre-apologize. I’m not really a get-to-know-each-other kind of a person. I’m not charming or anything. I’m, like, the opposite of that.” This was a YA story about a girl leaving for Mars, who finds an old relatives letters and reads them.Adri was quite a prickly character, and she really didn’t seem to like being around people much at all. I did understand her need to find out how things ended though, and I was pleased that she began to appreciate people a bit more towards the end of the book.The storyline in this was about Adri going to stay with a distant cousin whilst training to go live on Mars, and finding some old personal letters in the room she was staying in. These letters then gave us the stories of Catherine - who lives in Oklahoma in 1934, and Lenore - who lives in England in 1919. Catherine was worried about her younger sister who had dust pneumonia, and Lenore was coming to terms with her brother’s death during the war, and hoping to travel to America to meet up with her childhood friend. I did find these interlocking stories quite interesting, and I found myself wanting to know what happened next, there was something missing for me though.The ending to the story was okay, and I was pleased that we got to find out what happened to each of the girls, and how their stories tied together.6.5 out of 10
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  • Emily (Falling for YA)
    January 4, 2017
    This novel sounds really ambitious...I'm not even sure how this story could be told is less than 300 pages. If anyone can do it though it would be Jodi Lynn Anderson.
  • Lenna • Sugar Dusted Pages
    April 14, 2017
    4.5 StarsJodi Lynn Anderson is one of my very favorite authors. Tiger Lily is my favorite YA book, and that and The Vanishing Season both made me cry.Her writing is so beautiful, her stories so bittersweet. After reading this I felt sad... but not in a bad way. More like how sometimes you feel lonely when you remember a good memory. Or when something happens that you know is right, but it doesn't make it any less melancholy. I'm honestly not sure how to review this. I'll try though. *sobs*As alw 4.5 StarsJodi Lynn Anderson is one of my very favorite authors. Tiger Lily is my favorite YA book, and that and The Vanishing Season both made me cry.Her writing is so beautiful, her stories so bittersweet. After reading this I felt sad... but not in a bad way. More like how sometimes you feel lonely when you remember a good memory. Or when something happens that you know is right, but it doesn't make it any less melancholy. I'm honestly not sure how to review this. I'll try though. *sobs*As always, each of her characters were so well developed. Which is pretty amazing, as this book is under 300 pages. I got a clear sense of who each person was, and the intricacies of their personalities, motives, and hopes. I thought Adri's development in particular was fantastic. She started out so closed off and lonely, and throughout the book slowly starts to feel okay letting people in. I'll admit I didn't like her at first. But she grows sooo much. And then (view spoiler)[she leaves. (hide spoiler)] And while this was the right ending, it didn't make it any less bittersweet. I should really stop being surprised by these PAINFUL endings. All of Anderson's books are like this. *sniffles* I really enjoyed Catherine's journal and Lenore's letters as well, and their individual stories were so sweet and compelling and the way they connected was really well done. One important thing to know about this book is that there really isn't a plot. Nothing happens. But this book isn't about what happens. It's about relationships, romantic and friendly and familial, and the tiny moments that can change a life forever. I did feel like Lenore's and Catherine's characters lost a lot of their development the second half of the book. Or maybe they just changed? Either way, I definitely preferred the first half. The second half was still so good, just not AS good. If that makes sense. Also, didn't like how SHORT this book was. I want more!! I need more!!But really, the shortness really makes this book powerful. The ending leaves a lot to the imagination, much like real life.Would you pay $10 for Eternal Life? You Can at the Electric! Midnight Shows Only!" That quote makes clear both the title and the ending of the book. My emotions are too muddled to discuss it clearly, but it is really poignant and compelling. And that was a terrible review. But the FEELS. Ugh. Maybe I'll reread this closer to the release date and write a more coherent review... Also, think it's time to reread Tiger Lily. Because apparently I need more emotional agony in my life.**Thank you to the publisher for the review copy.
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  • Maria
    February 14, 2017
    I loved this book! I was immediately intrigued by the back cover when I found this ARC, and I was hooked from the first page.Midnight at the Electric tells the stories of three very different young women in three very different time periods: Adri, who lives in 2065 and has been handpicked to live on Mars after Earth has been all but destroyed by climate change; Catherine, who lived on the same farm in 1934 when the midwest was ravaged by the Dust Bowl as her sister slowly suffocating from dust p I loved this book! I was immediately intrigued by the back cover when I found this ARC, and I was hooked from the first page.Midnight at the Electric tells the stories of three very different young women in three very different time periods: Adri, who lives in 2065 and has been handpicked to live on Mars after Earth has been all but destroyed by climate change; Catherine, who lived on the same farm in 1934 when the midwest was ravaged by the Dust Bowl as her sister slowly suffocating from dust pneumonia; and Lenore, who lives in 1919 post-WWI England and must come to terms with her brother's death and her own future. Connecting three different stories in three different time periods is a big undertaking, and Anderson manages to do it deftly in under 300 pages. I LOVED that while this book had some understated romance, the most important relationships were the strong female friendships that impacted the women. Their friendships were complicated but they felt so real.The writing was stunning, the pacing was spot-on and the characters all felt like real, flawed human beings. My only critique of this book was that it wasn't longer! I would have gladly read a few hundred pages more. Not everything got wrapped up neatly, but the ending felt appropriate and so fitting for the story.
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  • Zemira (Kylo Ren fangirl) Warner
    April 3, 2017
    Midnight at the Electric is food for the soul.
  • Nikki King
    May 30, 2017
    Review to come! Catch it first on Love at First Write!
  • Valerie
    May 17, 2017
    I really liked this at first, and I do really like this in general. I mean, it was a story within a story within a story, which is pretty cool. And it's all about closure which is a plus for me. The reason why this wasn't amazing was mainly because I felt like the plots for the two other characters were just meh. Nothing mind-blowing.
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  • Aleya
    May 15, 2017
    That was beautiful. I'll have to write a review when it's not way past my bedtime.
  • Jessica Lyn
    February 6, 2017
    I have heard wonderful things about Jodi Lynn Anderson's writing (particularly Tiger Lily), so I was excited to see this novel among the various ARCs at my bookstore.When I first picked this up, the synopsis sounded interesting. I loved the idea of three different stories set during different time periods. But of course I wondered how they would all be woven together.With that being said, Anderson pulled it off! The writing was stunning, and the characters were all lovable. Each of the ladies - I have heard wonderful things about Jodi Lynn Anderson's writing (particularly Tiger Lily), so I was excited to see this novel among the various ARCs at my bookstore.When I first picked this up, the synopsis sounded interesting. I loved the idea of three different stories set during different time periods. But of course I wondered how they would all be woven together.With that being said, Anderson pulled it off! The writing was stunning, and the characters were all lovable. Each of the ladies - Adri, Cathy, and Lenore - all faced different questions, but one thing remained constant: friendship. Despite the situations they faced, they all had someone that helped them. I wish I could pull them out of the book and just sit and talk with them! I feel like each story ended nicely, but of course I hoped for more from them because I honestly loved it too much to end. :)
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  • Meaghan Wijnmaalen
    March 18, 2017
    First off, I would like to thank the publisher and author for providing me this ARC to review. Please note that the version I read was an advanced copy, and certain events/language may be changed in the published edition.“No one wants to disappear. Words pin things down and make them real, and they last so much longer than we do.”Stars (Out of 10): 6/10 StarsOverall Thoughts: This was a pretty interesting book. It was at times slow, and I never truly got hooked into the story or connected to the First off, I would like to thank the publisher and author for providing me this ARC to review. Please note that the version I read was an advanced copy, and certain events/language may be changed in the published edition.“No one wants to disappear. Words pin things down and make them real, and they last so much longer than we do.”Stars (Out of 10): 6/10 StarsOverall Thoughts: This was a pretty interesting book. It was at times slow, and I never truly got hooked into the story or connected to the characters, but I did end up enjoying it all the same. I especially liked the three POVs, and their connection to each other through a century of time. The Good: Interesting premise, pretty decent plot, and some interesting character growth. Also loved how all the eras/POVs ended up being so connected!The Bad: Didn’t really end up caring for any of the characters, felt slow at points, and was a bit shortSPOILERS BEGIN HEREThe Characters: While I couldn’t connect with any of the characters, or love them, they perfectly fit the story. I specifically liked Adri and her journey through the months we saw her, and how her fascination with the letters brought her closer to Lily, and more able to let other people into her life. I also loved how interesting the lives of all three were, and how while none of the girls seemed to have more than 100 pages of plot/writing dedicated to them, they were all fleshed out pretty well, with their own lives and backstories.The Plot: I ended up quite liking the plot. The jumping from era to era was well down, and ended at perfect moments to both leave us wondering, and excited to see where each character’s story would go. In addition, I love how wrapped up the ending was, and how people from years past managed to change the life of someone living a century after them!The Favorite Character: Adri, her growth was cool to see.This review can also be found on my blog: https://paragraphsandpages.wordpress....
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  • Katie
    March 1, 2017
    Read this on a flight to Munich from Boston. Couldn't put it down--I love Anderson's prose and will be blogging about this one for certain.
  • Andge (Down the Rabbit Hole)
    May 23, 2017
    Blog | TwitterRating: 4.5 starsThank you Edelweiss and HarperCollins for this copy in exchange for an honest review**Midnight at the Electric comes out June 13, 2017**Going into this novel, I barely knew what I was getting into. Sure, the synopsis suggests that it's like a 3-in-1 kinda book, right? 3 girls living at different times with their own set of problems. But what I hadn't anticipated? The amazing way that Anderson connected and intertwined the girls' stories together in a way that was j Blog | TwitterRating: 4.5 starsThank you Edelweiss and HarperCollins for this copy in exchange for an honest review**Midnight at the Electric comes out June 13, 2017**Going into this novel, I barely knew what I was getting into. Sure, the synopsis suggests that it's like a 3-in-1 kinda book, right? 3 girls living at different times with their own set of problems. But what I hadn't anticipated? The amazing way that Anderson connected and intertwined the girls' stories together in a way that was just so beautifully done. There's a little something for everyone in this novel. The futuristic side takes place with Adri's story, living in 2065 where people can actually fly off to Mars to hopefully start over again as Earth has been ravaged with natural disasters and parts of cities have fallen. She's not a very nice or social person, but her story really sets the foundation of this whole book. Coming to live with the only relative she's got left in this world, Lily, as she's about to embark on the opportunity (and journey) of a lifetime to Mars gets her reflecting about family. Enters the gorgeous introduction of the next girl's story, Catherine, as Adri finds her journal.Catherine's story turns this book into a historical plot. With the horrible setting of the Dust Bowl that terrorized the farmlands in the '30s, her story brought out the true struggles such families faced to even physically survive the amount of dust blowing into their lungs. With a tragic love story at the heart of Catherine's plot, it kept me greatly entertained and as intrigued as Adri was in figuring out who this family was that used to live on Lily's farm, and how they may possibly connect to them. But WITHIN Catherine's story was a link to Lenore's story, our final protagonist. As Catherine's mother's best friend before she moved away, Lenore's letters to her childhood bestie made me reminisce about my own childhood friends and the pain of wondering if time changed us no matter how we may've wished we stayed the same. Set in the aftermath of WWI, I really enjoyed Lenore's story too, in a different way from the others. First, I adore letter formats for stories, but Lenore's voice was so relatable. She wasn't perfect and she felt far from it many times. There was a bit of romance in there, but it wasn't essential to have her falling in love with someone for her story to be amazing the way it was. Figuring out how to move on from the pain of losing her brother to the war and feeling the closeness of her relationship with Catherine's mother no matter how many years it's been since they were physically together was more than enough. And some mysterious components that were present in Adri's time could only unfold from as far back as Lenore's time, which really excited me at the prospect of linking everything together.But what did I love the most?We have to go back to Adri's story. As a person who didn't know how to get along with others very well, it was how she grew from this experience of connecting to these people who had departed so long ago that touched my heart. She took what Catherine's journal and Lenore's letters gave her to realize more about herself and where she was at the moment with Lily. That family was important. And so is what we leave behind that stays beyond the finite length of our lives. It was so profound. And I may have even teared up a bit at the end.I shall end off with some of Adri's insights that resonated with me, as I hope they too will also resonate with you (especially after you read it in context of the full novel when it comes out)."I'm not much on writing, and I always wondered why some people are so drawn to it. But now as I sit here trying to think of what to say, I think I understand. No one wants to disappear. Words pin things down and make them real, and they last so much longer than we do...I wanted to tell you most of all that I think it's our love that gets passed along. Onward and forward."Overall Recommendation:Midnight at the Electric connects 3 girls and their stories together in a such a poignant way, touching on various matters from loss of a family member to struggling to save a loved one. Despite the time difference between the stories, there're all connected somehow, and figuring out the links between them slowly was half the fun of this novel. For such a short length, Anderson really packed it in with just the right amount for each girl. I truly recommend reading it, no matter if you don't like historicals or futuristic novels. It's a book that weaves together what's truly important to people despite the cultural context, and I guarantee this would be a read that keeps you guessing and an ending that leaves some parts up for the imagination.----------------------------------------------------For more of my reviews, check out Down the Rabbit Hole:
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  • Teenage Reads
    May 30, 2017
    One of life’s many mysteries is what happens before you lived, events you can only read about but never experience, and what happens after you die you might not ever know. The last veteran to fight in World War One has already died, and many from World War Two are slowly dying off. What for them was a big part of their lives, today are in the history books. To accurately know about the past, and more accurate, your own, you have to talk to relatives, read diary entries from past grandparents, do One of life’s many mysteries is what happens before you lived, events you can only read about but never experience, and what happens after you die you might not ever know. The last veteran to fight in World War One has already died, and many from World War Two are slowly dying off. What for them was a big part of their lives, today are in the history books. To accurately know about the past, and more accurate, your own, you have to talk to relatives, read diary entries from past grandparents, doing your own Nancy Drew and finding out the links that have been faded away with age.Adri never knew her family. Her mother and father died when she was young, and she was placed in a group home as none of her parents had siblings. That did not matter as Adri had one goal in life: go to Mars. She became the best in everything, from being fit enough to go as well as acing all her tests (her fields are biology and engineering), she along with her team had six months before they launch. There is just one problem with Adri: her social skills. She never learned how making small talk or make friends, making her isolated from the group. When the training took place in Kansas, Adri discover a long lost cousin, Lily, who would take her in for those months before her launch. Lily got that Adri did not want to be friends, and with her pet tortoise, Galapagos, left Adri alone. Exploring the house Adri finds the diary of Catherine Goodspeed, a girl who lived in the house hundreds of years ago, suffering from the dust storms. Determine to see how Catherine is related to her, Adri dives into the past to learn about Catherine and Lenore, finding out how they relation to her and Lily. As Adri days are numbered, she goes deep into the past finding what the detectives missed in the case that would change her life.Catherine and her family were battling the Dust Bowl, a phenomenon that took the prairies during the thirties that did great damage to the livelihood of the people. People died from the dust blowing around, so that many families were left with the option to either leave, or die in the dirt. With a little sister, Breeze, dying from the dust infecting her lungs, and an unwilling mother, Catherine was left to make the tough decision to save her sister. Follow by her long time crush Ellis, the story gets the title when the midnight circus came in with an act called The Electric, where for ten dollars you can touch lightening in a bottle that will give you eternal life. The tale then goes further back to Catherine’s mother friend Lenore, who was dealing with her own griefs. Lenore was seventeen in the year 1919, after losing her brother Teddy to the war, and her best friend Beth (Catherine’s mother) leaving England four years’ prior, Lenore was quite alone. Lenore was determined to leave her family behind, and join Beth in America once she had enough money. Then she met James, her first friend in a while, and began to trust him with what she holds dear. He is hiding something from her, something big, as they grow closer to each other in the cottage, the truth comes out, about everything and how it all started.Jodi Lynn Anderson skillfully jumped throughout generations to give you the story of Midnight at the Electric. Adri was what you would expect: smart, somewhat witty, and not good at small talk (which makes you like her). After all, she trained her entire life to be selected to go to Mars, that girl had no time to make friends. Yet she softens up to Lily, especially when Lily goes with Adri on her quest to find out what happened to Catherine and Lenore. Catherine also went through her own troubles, and not just the dusty one. Her love for Ellis was cute, but there were more important matters on the table, as Breezy was dying, and their mother refuses to do anything about it. Then there was Lenore and James, who had their secret romance. Lenore looks put together on the outside, but in the inside she was not as she told James this: “But I can’t promise you that I’m unaltered, And I’m not sure that I want to be”. All these different love stories all fall back to Adri who is in the present. Anderson ties each story slowly and purposely, so you finish the book on a high note as Adri blasts off into Mars, knowing how she, Catharine and Lenore are all connected. With a heartwarming tale, set across multiple location and generations, Anderson connects the dots from multiple point of views, about Lenore overcomes her grief, Catherine saves her sister, and Adri learning to love.
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  • Brenda Ayala
    June 1, 2017
    Midnight at the Electric evoked a lot of very strong emotions for me. It's a story about relationships, loss, and pining. It reflects on what makes relationships lasting and what draws people together. It's ridiculous really--it's such a small book about so many people, how does it make me feel things!?Relationships are all entangled. Adri meets her long lost elderly cousin Lily and bonding with her first important person. Catherine realizing she must choose between the boy she loves and what sh Midnight at the Electric evoked a lot of very strong emotions for me. It's a story about relationships, loss, and pining. It reflects on what makes relationships lasting and what draws people together. It's ridiculous really--it's such a small book about so many people, how does it make me feel things!?Relationships are all entangled. Adri meets her long lost elderly cousin Lily and bonding with her first important person. Catherine realizing she must choose between the boy she loves and what she knows or leave it all behind for her sister. Lenore getting the closure she needs on her brother's death and finding solace in a new friend. There's so much want and need within each story and I seriously just wanted to give every single one of these women a big hug--even crochety young Adri. They all had lonely roads that they made worthwhile, and it was beautiful.Stupid skinny book.
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  • Cindy
    May 15, 2017
    Three young women who will never meet- but whose paths are intertwined in startling ways- are linked together over space and time by their indomitable spirit and desire for a better future. Adri is one of a chosen few to help colonize Mars in 2065 after climate change has irreversibly damaged Earth. Catherine’s family farms in Oklahoma during the Dust Bowl era and faces grim choices to survive. Lenore, an Englishwoman traumatized in World War I, decides to immigrate to America. All three young w Three young women who will never meet- but whose paths are intertwined in startling ways- are linked together over space and time by their indomitable spirit and desire for a better future. Adri is one of a chosen few to help colonize Mars in 2065 after climate change has irreversibly damaged Earth. Catherine’s family farms in Oklahoma during the Dust Bowl era and faces grim choices to survive. Lenore, an Englishwoman traumatized in World War I, decides to immigrate to America. All three young women are affected by events outside their control, and must choose to start their lives anew and recreate themselves in ways they can barely imagine. Readers of all ages will be surprised by their connection and moved by the sincerity of their hope.
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  • Jennifer Armstrong
    March 17, 2017
    The mysterious title of this book points to a central metaphor - if you were at a carnival show, and believed a huckster's promise of life eternal, what might that mean and how might that play out? Galapagos the tortoise, a character whose extreme lifespan encompasses all the characters in the story, is also a good stand-in for Adri, the hard-shelled pioneer who will be spending her artificially extended life on Mars. Does living forever in the letters, journals, and memories that give this stor The mysterious title of this book points to a central metaphor - if you were at a carnival show, and believed a huckster's promise of life eternal, what might that mean and how might that play out? Galapagos the tortoise, a character whose extreme lifespan encompasses all the characters in the story, is also a good stand-in for Adri, the hard-shelled pioneer who will be spending her artificially extended life on Mars. Does living forever in the letters, journals, and memories that give this story its power count? Does storytelling bestow everlasting life? There's plenty to enjoy in this story of three young women whose lives connect over time. I look forward to selling this in our store.
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  • Becky
    May 18, 2017
    In the year 2065 Adri is selected to be a colonist on Mars. Adri is sent to live in Oklahoma while preparing for her mission she discovers a journal written by Catherine in 1935 and letters from Lenore who was living in England in 1919. Adri must solve the mysteries from the past to get guidance for her future.This book has three very distinct narratives that are intwined to tell the whole story. For this to work it is necessary for all three of the narrative to equally contribute to the story H In the year 2065 Adri is selected to be a colonist on Mars. Adri is sent to live in Oklahoma while preparing for her mission she discovers a journal written by Catherine in 1935 and letters from Lenore who was living in England in 1919. Adri must solve the mysteries from the past to get guidance for her future.This book has three very distinct narratives that are intwined to tell the whole story. For this to work it is necessary for all three of the narrative to equally contribute to the story However, I only connected with Catherine. I found myself wishing that the entire book was about Catherine's experiences during the Dust Bowl. Also, I am not a fan of ambiguous conclusions so the ending didn't quite work for me.
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  • Everdeen Mason
    May 30, 2017
    (More of a 3.5)I really enjoyed this! It was recommended to me because of some of the sci-fi elements, but really that wasn't what was interesting about this book. I appreciated the quick study on character emotion, and the way Anderson deftly wove the relationships. It was the right amount of sentimental. I felt touched when I put the book down, and un-bothered by the things that went unanswered.
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  • Karin
    May 11, 2017
    Beautiful and affecting story about several female characters of different ages and at different times (future, 1935 dust bowl, post war 1920) connected by journal entries, letters, and an ancient turtle named Galapagos. Loved it.
  • Clay
    June 1, 2017
    Loved. Note how many boxes this author deftly and affectingly checks. A singular, multilayered, multigenerational story. I'll be appreciating the parallels and echoes in this one for a very long time. Highly recommended.
  • R.
    February 16, 2017
    This book is so so good. This is one you just have to read.
  • Tiffany
    March 21, 2017
    Picked up an ARC at work. Even though I guessed the ending I really liked the way this came together at the end! Read it in a day.
  • Lucy (That Book Gal)
    March 13, 2017
    This takes place in Kansas!! It's amazing!! It was so fun!!
  • Ali Standish
    March 13, 2017
    Gorgeous storytelling, a spellbindingly unique premise, and characters that stay with you once you've turned the last page.
  • Paige Newman
    March 8, 2017
    I thought this was fantastic. The prose was so well done and the stories were engrossing and heartfelt. For it only being 238 pages, so much happened, but it didn't feel rushed. There were such strong themes of friendship, handling grief, and family. They were all so relatable and the different stories connected so well.
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  • Ana (Owl Always Be Reading)
    March 9, 2017
  • Melissa
    February 15, 2017
    Swallowed this down in a day. The irresistible title has a supernatural vibe, and the prose, though never explicitly speculative, is so good and rich it has a tinge of fantasy about it.I must start and put down a dozen books a week, but something about this was immediately, subtly compelling without being flashy. Likewise, its nesting doll format never felt forced, just intriguing.
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  • Talia
    January 23, 2017
    Yeeeees this was so good. Each of the three women that this book highlights have stories I found myself wishing would be made into separate books of their own. I will admit the read started a bit slow (Adri was certainly the least interesting character for me), but it picks up a lot once you get into Catherine's timeline. And from there I didn't want to put this book down. It's a quick, enjoyable read that will definitely leave you wishing there was an epilogue. And then an epilogue epilogue. An Yeeeees this was so good. Each of the three women that this book highlights have stories I found myself wishing would be made into separate books of their own. I will admit the read started a bit slow (Adri was certainly the least interesting character for me), but it picks up a lot once you get into Catherine's timeline. And from there I didn't want to put this book down. It's a quick, enjoyable read that will definitely leave you wishing there was an epilogue. And then an epilogue epilogue. And then just more books.
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  • Michelle Ann
    January 13, 2017
    Once again, her writing just memorizes me. No one knows how to tug on my heart strings like Jodi Lynn Anderson, but I do have one major complaint about this book- it was much too short. I wanted more of everything. I could have had a whole novel dedicated to each of these characters, but that's just me being selfish more than anything.
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