Your Inner Awakening
Discover the Four Questions that Will Forever Transform Your Life's Journey No matter how much money, status, or success they may have, very few people experience true joy and personal freedom. Byron Katie knows this reality too well. In the midst of a "normal and successful" life, she was sinking deeper and deeper into depression and despair until a sudden, profound insight into how the mind works set her on the path to a life filled with love for everything life brings. Eager to help others find this freedom, Katie developed a revolutionary process to make this transformation practical, a simple yet powerful method of inquiry known as The Work. The Work's four powerful questions and turnaround (which is a way of experiencing the opposite of what you believe) have transformed the lives of hundreds of thousands of people throughout the world. In Your Inner Awakening, Byron Katie will teach you how to use The Work for yourself to question and undo any stressful thought that keeps you from experiencing mental clarity. You'll discover that trying to let go of a painful thought never works; instead once you have investigated it, the thought lets go of you. Eventually you may find, as so many others have, that peace and joy flow into every area of your life.

Your Inner Awakening Details

TitleYour Inner Awakening
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 13th, 2007
PublisherSimon Schuster Audio/Nightingale-Conant
ISBN-139780743562720
Rating
GenreSelf Help, Nonfiction, Personal Development, Spirituality, Psychology

Your Inner Awakening Review

  • Jeske
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely not my cup of tea. Where it is of course useful to question your own thoughts about a situation that causes stress or anger or depression, to do so with a much too simplified method where the turnout is always the same (your thoughts are false) is in my opinion missing the mark in many and even harmful in some situations. I'd rather take myself and my thoughts seriously on the whole, taking it with a pinch of salt here and there of course. When endeavouring to examine my thoughts, i w Absolutely not my cup of tea. Where it is of course useful to question your own thoughts about a situation that causes stress or anger or depression, to do so with a much too simplified method where the turnout is always the same (your thoughts are false) is in my opinion missing the mark in many and even harmful in some situations. I'd rather take myself and my thoughts seriously on the whole, taking it with a pinch of salt here and there of course. When endeavouring to examine my thoughts, i would rather use a much more open-minded and successful method: that of the cognitive behaviour therapy. One wisdom i took from it was: whenever you find yourself battling against reality, you will lose. It will definitely make me unhappy to focus on things i cannot change. But then again, if the suffragettes had this attitude do you think women would be able to vote nowadays? I'd like to stick to this old wisdom:Lord, grand me the serenity to accept the things i cannot change, the courage the change the things i can and the wisdom to tell the difference.
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  • Keshav Bhatt
    January 1, 1970
    Having worked on the 4 questions worksheet from the recommendation of many of my friends who are coaches, I really enjoyed learning more about the ideas behind it. Byron Katie created what she calls the "Four questions" as a means of self inquiry to delve deeper into your psyche and your thoughts. As with anything, you need to try it out for yourself to experience the benefits. For me, I've found them incredibly powerful in shifting your focus to what the real truth of your experience is. Especi Having worked on the 4 questions worksheet from the recommendation of many of my friends who are coaches, I really enjoyed learning more about the ideas behind it. Byron Katie created what she calls the "Four questions" as a means of self inquiry to delve deeper into your psyche and your thoughts. As with anything, you need to try it out for yourself to experience the benefits. For me, I've found them incredibly powerful in shifting your focus to what the real truth of your experience is. Especially in moments of conflict, anger, annoyance etc at yourself or those around you. I loved listening to her live coaching because of this, and hearing again and again, how what we believe the truth is vs actually inquiring deeper - it's different. The great thing about the questions is it focuses on you taking responsibility for things and looking within, instead of what most do - look externally to blame/make excuses etc etc. Helping you to realise how much of your suffering, in practice, is totally self created. The four questions are simple. 1.) Is that the absolute truth? 2.) Can you know that 100% to be true?3.) How does that thought make you feel? How do I react when I think that thought?4.) Who would you be without that thought? What I will take away from this book is to practice this line of self inquiry as a daily practice. Combined with the learnings from Don Miguel Ruiz & Neil Strauss about wounds, and reactivity I think this will give me some tangible things to work on in each moment of my life. It's a empowering process of analysis and inquiry. Reminds me of what I learned from S N Goenka about constantly digging deeper into the nature of what is "real" and what isn't. Can't wait to read more her work!
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  • Pam
    January 1, 1970
    I just love her philosophy. Your own thoughts can create peaceful or stressful feelings in your life. So simple to question the beliefs your mind has and truly become a positive thinker. Great book.
  • Nadin Soliman
    January 1, 1970
    it works!
  • Mike
    January 1, 1970
    This book started off a one for me. By the time it was finished, I could see the merit in the approach.
  • Suzanne
    January 1, 1970
    Better the second time. I read this 8 years ago and felt very confused by it.
  • culley
    January 1, 1970
    Self-help guru alert! What’s all this Katie Byron stuff about? I have heard several people talking about Katie Byron, so I decided to check it out.According to Katie, we suffer when we believe our thoughts, and we are freed from our suffering when we question our thoughts. Our untrue thoughts are the source of suffering. Katie has developed a concrete technique for questioning your thoughts. She calls this The Work and refers to it as meditation— I think of it as mind training. Her technique is Self-help guru alert! What’s all this Katie Byron stuff about? I have heard several people talking about Katie Byron, so I decided to check it out.According to Katie, we suffer when we believe our thoughts, and we are freed from our suffering when we question our thoughts. Our untrue thoughts are the source of suffering. Katie has developed a concrete technique for questioning your thoughts. She calls this The Work and refers to it as meditation— I think of it as mind training. Her technique is particularly effective against externalization and is paired nicely with Lojong slogan 12, drive all blames into one. Own your shit! She has people work on a "Judge-Your-Neighbor Worksheet” then go through a cognitive process of questioning these judgements. Katie’s methods are accessible and should be able to assist people with blame and judgement, especially people who are new to personal growth. It is easy to get started with The Work and it would be useful for people to have access to this tool when they are creating their own suffering. At the same time, I think it would be potentially problematic to rely on this tool too much. There are many logical errors built into the thought processes of The Work, detailed here:http://mortentolboll.weebly.com/a-cri...I have a problem with the fact that the entire question cycle is rhetorical. I also have issue with the way The Work eliminates all negativity. The Work is a solid tool when you are mentally spiraling out of control. When things are really bad, The Work can surely help. As a first step in personal growth (eliminating blame and externalization), The Work is a cheaper than therapy and likely to be effective. But trying to use The Work to achieve enlightenment, as Katie indicates, is likely to be problematic. It is good to question our thoughts— we should all do this regularly. The Work is a great tool, but it should not be the only tool.
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  • Laurie
    January 1, 1970
    Byron Katie has such great insight into life. She understands how we project our challenges and frustrations onto other people. As one who often seeks others' approval, I love how she reminds us that we need to get our own approval for ourselves. That is the most important thing. Accept and love ourselves for who we are. Next, love and accept others for who they are without trying to change them. Then, drop the whole "trying to get others to approve of us" bit. It will never work.and of course.. Byron Katie has such great insight into life. She understands how we project our challenges and frustrations onto other people. As one who often seeks others' approval, I love how she reminds us that we need to get our own approval for ourselves. That is the most important thing. Accept and love ourselves for who we are. Next, love and accept others for who they are without trying to change them. Then, drop the whole "trying to get others to approve of us" bit. It will never work.and of course...remember to stop and "do the work". Love, Love, Love.
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  • Arminda Lindsay
    January 1, 1970
    Start with this one. I've been walking my way around Byron Katie for over a year now because I couldn't wade through all the YouTube videos or make time to pick up "Loving What Is." My coach sent me this one and I've just finished listening and I'm a fan, a believer and a convert to Katie's four questions. For those ready to rid themselves of negative thinking, fear, and corrosive victim mentality, answering Katie's questions will take you inside yourself which is where all the answers reside. H Start with this one. I've been walking my way around Byron Katie for over a year now because I couldn't wade through all the YouTube videos or make time to pick up "Loving What Is." My coach sent me this one and I've just finished listening and I'm a fan, a believer and a convert to Katie's four questions. For those ready to rid themselves of negative thinking, fear, and corrosive victim mentality, answering Katie's questions will take you inside yourself which is where all the answers reside. Highly recommend.
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  • jencurlygurl
    January 1, 1970
    To be fair, I didn't finish this book. I found the first couple of chapters so extremely off-putting, that I actually got mad. What is said is so extremely inflated and arrogant. The author claims that suffering ALWAYS (note there are no exceptions) is optional. How narrow is her view of the world to claim something so ridiculous? Of course for her it might have been optional, as her biggest problem was her own awful behaviour to her kids. I found this truly awful.
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  • Theresa
    January 1, 1970
    Miraculous
  • Maureen
    January 1, 1970
    JUST WONDERFUL, BUILDING ON LOVING WHAT IS, AND DEEPENING MY UNDERSTANDING OF THE WORK OF BYRON KATIE. LIFE CHANGING.Whoops, caps lock on, not declaiming :)
  • Lindsay
    January 1, 1970
    Byron Katie's Work is transformative. I've thoroughly enjoyed reading her books and I can't think of anyone who wouldn't benefit from The Work.
  • DianeK Klu
    January 1, 1970
    Another great book for the school of life.
  • Brian Tibbetts
    January 1, 1970
    interesting..
  • Wendy Hollister
    January 1, 1970
    a good guide for living a full and peaceful life. Great life skills.
  • Majeed
    January 1, 1970
    Lovely
  • Ash
    January 1, 1970
    It is an average book
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