Champions, Volume 1
One of the great team names in Marvel history returns, in incredible new fashion! During the fallout of Civil War II, Ms. Marvel, Nova and Spider-Man quit the Avengers and strike out on their own! With Viv Vision and the Totally Awesome Hulk by their side, these young heroes are determined to change the world their own way - and they're only the beginning! It starts as an idea. It becomes an ideal. But what happens when it turns into a movement - one so big even the Hulk can't stop it? And will one of the greatest X-Men of all forge a new future by their side? Welcome to the Champions, Cyclops! Unfortunately, not all of your new would-be teammates are glad to see you!Collecting: Champions 1-5

Champions, Volume 1 Details

TitleChampions, Volume 1
Author
FormatPaperback
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 16th, 2017
PublisherMarvel Comics
ISBN1302906186
ISBN-139781302906184
Number of pages136 pages
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Superheroes, Marvel, Graphic Novels Comics, Comic Book

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Champions, Volume 1 Review

  • Denise Malta
    March 1, 2017
    Someone said "This could be a good comic but it's being wasted on social justice". What?! How is taking a group of diverse teenage superheroes (that makes it possible for readers of any age, who would usually not feel represented, feel like they have this amazing characters to look up to) and showing how messed up and unfair the world really is and how we CAN DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT (it's in the title) a waste?This comic book does indeed deal with social (in)justice: racism, homophobia, bullying, Someone said "This could be a good comic but it's being wasted on social justice". What?! How is taking a group of diverse teenage superheroes (that makes it possible for readers of any age, who would usually not feel represented, feel like they have this amazing characters to look up to) and showing how messed up and unfair the world really is and how we CAN DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT (it's in the title) a waste?This comic book does indeed deal with social (in)justice: racism, homophobia, bullying, abuse... It tries to show the problems in the world and it tries to prove that there isn't good and bad, rather something in between, shades of gray. In doing so it will state opinions, some of them moral, some of them political. Political opinions can make someone instantly hate something. I didn't agree with everything that was "stated" but I greatly appreciate how much depth and meaning this issues had, while still being about a group of teenage superheroes and adequate for young readers and older ones alike. I have some individual reviews for the single issues dealing with the specific theme within them.
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  • Sesana
    May 26, 2017
    The morality plays can be a bit heavy-handed, but I like the selection of characters, and I like the team interactions.
  • James DeSantis
    May 13, 2017
    I really had a good time reading this. It's aimed for the younger group, and sometimes I don't like it all, but it had a lot of my favorite younger superheroes so let's talk about what worked and didn't work. What I liked: I really loved the art in this. I believe this is the guy who did the art on Big Time for Spider-man run. So enjoyed that. I also really loved the character interactions with each other. I thought them handling situations such as racism, human trafficing, and oversea political I really had a good time reading this. It's aimed for the younger group, and sometimes I don't like it all, but it had a lot of my favorite younger superheroes so let's talk about what worked and didn't work. What I liked: I really loved the art in this. I believe this is the guy who did the art on Big Time for Spider-man run. So enjoyed that. I also really loved the character interactions with each other. I thought them handling situations such as racism, human trafficing, and oversea political issues was a nice touch over the super villain of the week. It doesn't go into as depth as I'd like but as far as a teen book it does it well. Also think the pacing is perfect and the book is never dull. What I didn't like: The fact we can't get deeper into some of the subject matter. Would love a whole arc to take place focusing on the racist city sheriff and get the underlying themes of corruption and such. Felt like if they aimed for a bigger, deeper, scoped story we'd get that. Overall I had a lot of fun reading this. Some good laughs, solid subject matters, good team dynamic, and great pacing. Let's hope it keeps up!
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  • Tom Ewing
    April 29, 2017
    Mark Waid is in full hey-there-fellow-kids mode in this first volume of Champions, a well-meaning but awkward comic whose premise - teen superheroes set out to change the world - is not well-served by a series of done-in-one morality play storylines. Two of the comics here - the one set in fake-Pakistan and the one about a sheriff with a sideline in hate crimes (because he's just SO BAD that the enormous institutional power of the carceral state isn't enough for him, he's gotta start bombing mos Mark Waid is in full hey-there-fellow-kids mode in this first volume of Champions, a well-meaning but awkward comic whose premise - teen superheroes set out to change the world - is not well-served by a series of done-in-one morality play storylines. Two of the comics here - the one set in fake-Pakistan and the one about a sheriff with a sideline in hate crimes (because he's just SO BAD that the enormous institutional power of the carceral state isn't enough for him, he's gotta start bombing mosques himself) - play out in basically the same way: bad stuff happens, the Champions turn up and realise there are no easy solutions, then an easy solution in the form of a big speech by a good person presents itself and the Champs sod off. Meanwhile characters I love in other comics - Miles Morales and Kamala Khan - act like bags of traits (did you know Kamala writes fanfic? Huh? Didja?) while characters I detest - bloody Gwenpool shows up - are their usual wretched selves.The problem is that while it's certainly true that there are no easy solutions to the Taliban or to structural oppression, saying "there are no easy solutions" IS in fact an easy solution to telling a 20-page comic story about them. There are surely good comics to be written as a response to the absurdity, horror, and hope of the present moment, but Champions is a poor, pandering attempt at one.
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  • Tim
    May 19, 2017
    This got a strong emotional response from me. That hasn't happened in awhile. I'm all in for this series.
  • Matt Anderson
    May 29, 2017
    Collects Champions (2016) issues #1-5This series is about young heroes making a difference in the life of everyday citizens. It isn't about typical comic book epics, but rather doing something big and significant for ordinary people, fighting against the type of evil that exists in the real world. While this is an admirable concept, I am more interested in reading something about epic, comic book-style battles. I know that this series has a great following, and I will read future issues to see w Collects Champions (2016) issues #1-5This series is about young heroes making a difference in the life of everyday citizens. It isn't about typical comic book epics, but rather doing something big and significant for ordinary people, fighting against the type of evil that exists in the real world. While this is an admirable concept, I am more interested in reading something about epic, comic book-style battles. I know that this series has a great following, and I will read future issues to see where the story goes, but I wasn't as impressed as I hoped to be. Waid does a great job with the characters, it is just that he is doing a great job in a story that isn't that interesting to me. Maybe once the team is more established, and time doesn't have to be used to create the dynamics between the different characters, I will enjoy the series more. For now, I thought it was just OK. SPOILERS:-Although an official team leader hasn't been established, I think that Ms. Marvel would be the best choice. She came up with the idea for this young team, and she is a breakout character for Marvel. Having her lead this team would be great for her character. -I borderline can't stand Nova.-Miles Morales was much more bland here than I've seen him in other series.-Amadeus Cho comes off different here than his own series. There he is a scientific genius, here he acts like a dumb jock, arrogant to the extreme. -Gwenpool's appearance was fun, and I wish she would join the team officially.
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  • Garrett
    May 18, 2017
    Would have been a five-star. It really would've.This starts off ridiculously strong: Mark Waid at his finest, with a social justice commentary that actually not only holds up in a superhero comics context, but buoys it and pushes the story forward. "We don't punch down" is the motto of these new Champions, and their line-up is freakin' awesome: Kamala Khan/Ms. Marvel, Miles Morales/Spider-Man, Viv Vision, the new Nova, time-displaced Cyclops and Amadeus Cho/Hulk. Young people with powers rejuven Would have been a five-star. It really would've.This starts off ridiculously strong: Mark Waid at his finest, with a social justice commentary that actually not only holds up in a superhero comics context, but buoys it and pushes the story forward. "We don't punch down" is the motto of these new Champions, and their line-up is freakin' awesome: Kamala Khan/Ms. Marvel, Miles Morales/Spider-Man, Viv Vision, the new Nova, time-displaced Cyclops and Amadeus Cho/Hulk. Young people with powers rejuvenating the mission: worked with Cloak & Dagger, Power Pack, Runaways, Young Justice, Teen Titans, Young Avengers and so on.And here it does, too. Middle Eastern unrest and NYC destruction, human trafficking and Atlantis and so on, the dynamic functions flawlessly until the last two issues, which have an ill-defined racist backwater sheriff story coupled with Marvel's dumbest new character, Gwenpool. Just awful and distracting; devoid of Miles Morales and with no direction, these seem to signal the end of new ideas, and even this is metatextually broadcast by the annoying Gwenpool. Terrible.Read someone else's copy, or buy the first four issues individually - whatever. Brace yourself. The promise can't be broken this quickly, can it?
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  • Ken Moten
    April 23, 2017
    I was planning a very detailed and thought-out review of this trade-paperback, but life came at me fast and a certain very important project debuted so I was tiedup . I have decided to forgo my standard review and get straight to it.This book had a lot of promise for me by putting together a young superhero team of Marvels' non-white legacy characters--and time-displaced Cyclops of the X-Men. Then they get Mark Waid to write it. When I heard these things I was very excited. This book was one of I was planning a very detailed and thought-out review of this trade-paperback, but life came at me fast and a certain very important project debuted so I was tiedup . I have decided to forgo my standard review and get straight to it.This book had a lot of promise for me by putting together a young superhero team of Marvels' non-white legacy characters--and time-displaced Cyclops of the X-Men. Then they get Mark Waid to write it. When I heard these things I was very excited. This book was one of two of Waid's sequel projects to All-New, All-Different Avengers Vol. 3: Civil War II (All-New, All-Different Avengers, a book I very much enjoyed. I did not think at first thought that this book could miss-fire, but it commits a mistake that many projects like this are always at risk of.My problem with this book is that it is too didactic and treats its protagonists like symbols and not people. This is not to say that Waid does not try to humanize them, but his good intentions are ruined by his lack of understanding of how millennials function. This is not surprising; though he is ideologically a leftist Mark Waid is still a middle-aged white southerner and thatusually makes it difficult writing teen-aged Asian-Americans, Mexican-Americans or African-Americans (who are also Latino), not to mention females or two characters who are suppose to represent minorities in-general. This means that though he has the pedigree of Stan Lee and Chris Claremont, he also has inherited the problematic legacies of William Faulkner and Flannery O'Connor when it comes to writing about non-whites. When I originally thought about writing this review I observing the fallout over the live-action movie adaptation of Ghost in the Shell. But I subsequently read O'Connor's The Displaced Person and this has also influenced how I felt about this volume. I sympathize with the intent, but the execution was sloppy and to an extent boring. I read issue #6 which is after this book and it introduced a team of diverse young villains called The Freelancers and they were more exciting and more depth and mystery to them than the Champions. This is not surprising since traditionally the "bad-nigger" archetype is more independent minded and against the "natural order" than the loyal, faithful "good-nigger."So to make it plain, this is a book that is a good idea, but needs better execution.
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  • Alex
    May 27, 2017
    Such a great comic series! Volume 1 collects issues 1-5. I enjoyed the interactions between all of the members of the team. I admit I mostly picked this series up because I love Kamala Khan but I ended up connecting with the other characters as well. There are also some fun cameos. I will definitely be keeping up with this series. If you want a charming, diverse, fun read I would highly recommend this comic series.
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  • Alex
    May 5, 2017
    This is now my new fave superhero comic series! I never was a Marvel fan (sadly) but this comic made me enjoy the universe & Ms. Marvel was as awesome as rumored, gonna pick up her personal stories soon ^v^[ P. S. Happy free comic book day everyone! <3 ]
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  • Mike McDevitt
    May 29, 2017
    Yes! More, please!
  • Sevia
    March 20, 2017
    Přestala jsem číst týmovky, ale u mladých superhrdinů prostě výjimku udělat musím. Kvalitou tohle rozhodně nejsou Runaways nebo Young Avengers, nejde tu o vývoj postav, ale spíš o témata - pro dnešní svět hodně důležitá témata. Za to velké +, ale jinak spíš průměr.
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  • Malex
    March 8, 2017
    This new team grew on me really fast! They're young, they see the world for what it is (messed up) but they have faith that they can make it a little bit better. Overall I found this volume very refreshing!I already loved Kamala in her own series so I'm not surprised she's awesome in this one. I was way less familiar with the other characters (at least those new incarnations) but they all form a strong, fun, badass and interesting team :)
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  • Michal Vámoš
    March 4, 2017
    Moc fajn věc. Postavy jsou snad na pár výjimek sympatický a hlavně se mi líbí ten nedotěrný způsob, jakým Champions řeší problémy ve skutečném světě bez nějakého rádoby "poselství". Vracejí se ty hodnoty, které u supráků v Marvelu dlouho chyběly a takhle dobře to Waid zvládl i bez toho, aby dělal ucelený příběh.
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  • Katrina Davies
    February 19, 2017
    Not an awful read, maybe I'm old but the next generation of Avengers aren't setting my world on fire at the minute.Actually, that's kind of their overall objective.They are NOT happy with the ethics and moral code of their elders and are looking to change the face of superhero behaviour.I like the concept and will certainly have another read but, not hooked. Yet.
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