You & a Bike & a Road
In 2016, acclaimed cartoonist and illustrator Eleanor Davis documented her cross-country bike tour as it happened. The immediacy of Davis’ comics journal makes for an incredible chronicle of human experience on the most efficient and humane form of human transportation.Eleanor Davis is a cartoonist and illustrator. She lives in Athens, GA and was born in Tucson, Arizona. In 2009, Davis won the Eisner's Russ Manning Most Promising Newcomer Award and was named one of Print magazine's New Visual Artists. In 2015, her book How To Be Happy won the Ignatz Award for Outstanding Anthology or Collection.

You & a Bike & a Road Details

TitleYou & a Bike & a Road
Author
FormatPaperback
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 16th, 2017
PublisherKoyama Press
ISBN1927668409
ISBN-139781927668405
Number of pages172 pages
Rating
GenreGraphic Novels Comics, Sequential Art, Graphic Novels, Comics, Autobiography, Memoir, Art

You & a Bike & a Road Review

  • Alan
    May 21, 2017
    These are often very simple stylized drawings that originate from the author's cross-country bike trek from her parents' home in Tucson, Arizona to her own home in Athens, Georgia in 2016. Eleanor Davis documents her daily travels along the planned 2,000 mile or so journey through border states such as New Mexico and Texas and the people and events she encounters along the way.The impact and the stories behind the pictures are not simple at all though and often have dark underpinnings such as th These are often very simple stylized drawings that originate from the author's cross-country bike trek from her parents' home in Tucson, Arizona to her own home in Athens, Georgia in 2016. Eleanor Davis documents her daily travels along the planned 2,000 mile or so journey through border states such as New Mexico and Texas and the people and events she encounters along the way.The impact and the stories behind the pictures are not simple at all though and often have dark underpinnings such as the "I saw a man get arrested in Fort Hancock yesterday" sequence which can be seen excerpted atSlate online May 15, 2017.There is joy and exhilaration alongside the occasional pain and darkness. You are left understanding why the cover image, which could have been an all bright and sunny bike ride panorama, is left somewhat obscured by the black stylized trees.
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  • Rocco Versaci
    April 27, 2017
    This was a wonderful travel narrative that brought back lots of memories from my own cross-country ride (encounters with strangers, other bikers, Warmshowers, knee pain, etc.). In addition to her clean, direct prose, I really admire Davis' artwork; she's able to capture so much with her pencilwork--especially in the many landscapes she moves through. Highly recommended.
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  • Matt Graupman
    May 22, 2017
    Wow! Eleanor Davis' comics have evolved A LOT over the past few years. I first discovered her work with the (excellent) all-ages "The Secret Science Alliance And The Copycat Crook" and immediately fell in love with her clean cartoon-y pencils. In the years since that book's release, her art has grown progressively more stylized with bold gestural brushstrokes and abstracted, almost Picasso-esque figures. Her latest book, "You & A Bike & A Road," published by indie comics powerhouse Koyam Wow! Eleanor Davis' comics have evolved A LOT over the past few years. I first discovered her work with the (excellent) all-ages "The Secret Science Alliance And The Copycat Crook" and immediately fell in love with her clean cartoon-y pencils. In the years since that book's release, her art has grown progressively more stylized with bold gestural brushstrokes and abstracted, almost Picasso-esque figures. Her latest book, "You & A Bike & A Road," published by indie comics powerhouse Koyama Press, takes this evolution even farther: loose, confident pencil drawings document Eleanor's attempt to bike from Arizona to her home in Georgia; it's a lovely travelogue."You & A Bike & A Road" is precisely the kind of book that I'm thrilled to see Koyama Press champion. Not many publishers would take the risk of releasing glorified journal entries but Davis' story is worth telling. Whether she's relating the prickly conditions at the US/Mexico border or simply missing her husband, Davis is honest and plain, documenting it all with page after page of some of her most unique art. Not since Jim Mahfood's transformation from comix-er to pioneer of so-called "visual funk" have I seen an artist so fully embrace such a huge change in their style; this is wholly original and authentic Eleanor Davis.Comics are constantly changing, embracing new genres, techniques, and voices. Certainly, Eleanor Davis and Koyama Press will always be at the forefront of this evolution. The fact that they've come together to publish "You & A Bike & A Road" seems both revolutionary and, in hindsight, inevitable.
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  • niv
    June 1, 2017
    I savored this reading experience. I am not at all an athletic person, nor do I bike, but there's something universal in the way Davis pits her body against the world, against the wide open spaces that provide beauty, against the inhospitable city-scapes, against the road & her own brain & body.It's a travelogue, rendered without panels, mostly. It's also about the complicated & uncomplicated kindness of strangers, the specificity of being vulnerable as a woman in the world, the safe I savored this reading experience. I am not at all an athletic person, nor do I bike, but there's something universal in the way Davis pits her body against the world, against the wide open spaces that provide beauty, against the inhospitable city-scapes, against the road & her own brain & body.It's a travelogue, rendered without panels, mostly. It's also about the complicated & uncomplicated kindness of strangers, the specificity of being vulnerable as a woman in the world, the safety of passing through the south while being white, what it might take to not be sad--there's so much in this book, as slim as it is. I loved it. There's a sequence towards the middle that highlights the ongoing horror of those trying to cross the border between the U.S. & Mexico. I've read that particular part at least three times and it makes me weep each and every time. I still can't get it out of my head.
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  • Lois
    March 16, 2017
    Such an interesting book. The author sets out on a solo bicycle ride from her parents' home in Tucson AZ to her own home in Athens GA. She has not trained extensively and finds herself struggling, often wanting to give up. The book is a graphic work; she illustrates it with captions about her feelings and her interactions with others. It is a very quick read, but thought provoking with the various people that she meets along the way and her own feelings about what she is doing. Add in the border Such an interesting book. The author sets out on a solo bicycle ride from her parents' home in Tucson AZ to her own home in Athens GA. She has not trained extensively and finds herself struggling, often wanting to give up. The book is a graphic work; she illustrates it with captions about her feelings and her interactions with others. It is a very quick read, but thought provoking with the various people that she meets along the way and her own feelings about what she is doing. Add in the border patrol and other topics and you have an interesting look at the southern and western U.S.
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  • Tess
    May 13, 2017
    So wonderful. I've done a long bike tour and this felt so true in a way I haven't encountered before. I love her pencil drawings, story telling style, and the characters she encounters on her bike journey.
  • Derek Parker
    May 17, 2017
    This is a different kind of work for Eleanor Davis, at least for me. I'm used to her shorter works of fiction. You & a Bike & a Road, her first publication with Koyama, is a diary comic focused on her attempt to bike from Arizona to Georgia, her experiences and her encounters.
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  • Carolee Wheeler
    May 14, 2017
    Eleanor is a force of nature. She's a glorious creation and we are lucky to have her.
  • Michelle
    May 14, 2017
    This book is quiet and simple and so beautiful, I cried many times reading it. Which is basically the measure of if I like a thing: how many times did it make me cry?
  • Jada
    May 25, 2017
    Like a perfect poem with illustrations. I'm inspired.
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