The Tower of the Antilles
"Achy Obejas's collection is about fictional Cuban migrants who never quite escape the land they’ve left."--Electric Literature"For twenty years I’ve been a fan of the genius Achy Obejas--since I first read Memory Mambo in 1996. Obejas has been the model of a writer for me in every way--a master in her aesthetics, an inspiration in her politics, fearless and vital in every page. The Tower of the Antilles is another brilliant collection, a story of many Cubas, intensely personal and political, erotic and cerebral. I found myself holding my breath as I devoured this book, as I navigated the various avenues of the body, the blood, and all those seemingly impossible roads that lead to a place we try to call home."--Porochista Khakpour, author of The Last Illusion"These stories are like a long dream of many parts, mixed desire, love, longing, anger—Obejas is a master of the human, able to conjure her characters’ heartbeats right under your fingertips, their breaths in your ears."--Alexander Chee, author of The Queen of the Night "Achy Obejas's new story collection begins and ends with a question: What is your name? The answer is an abounding one. Counterrevolutionaries, the witnesses to the arrival of Columbus's caravels, poets, Supermán--the characters in these stories, in all their riveting variety, name themselves as Cuban, and are bound in complex ways by the geography of their hearts, if not the geography beneath their feet. An audacious and remarkable read!"--Chantel Acevedo, author of The Distant MarvelsPraise for Achy Obejas:"Obejas writes like an angel, which is to say: gloriously...one of Cuba's most important writers."--Junot DíazThe Cubans in Achy Obejas's story collection The Tower of the Antilles are haunted by an island: the island they fled, the island they've created, the island they were taken to or forced from, the island they long for, the island they return to, and the island that can never be home again.In "Supermán," several possible story lines emerge about a 1950s Havana sex-show superstar who disappeared as soon as the revolution triumphed. "North/South" portrays a migrant family trying to cope with separation, lives on different hemispheres, and the eventual disintegration of blood ties. "The Cola of Oblivion" follows the path of a young woman who returns to Cuba, and who inadvertently uncorks a history of accommodation and betrayal among the family members who stayed behind during the revolution. In the title story, "The Tower of the Antilles," an interrogation reveals a series of fantasies about escape and a history of futility.With language that is both generous and sensual, Obejas writes about lives beset by events beyond individual control, and poignantly captures how history and fate intrude on even the most ordinary of lives.

The Tower of the Antilles Details

TitleThe Tower of the Antilles
Author
FormatHardcover
ReleaseJul 4th, 2017
PublisherAkashic Books
ISBN1617755397
ISBN-139781617755392
Number of pages150 pages
Rating
GenreShort Stories, Fiction, Glbt, Contemporary

The Tower of the Antilles Review

  • David
    June 8, 2017
    These are some good stories, I steamed right through. Seemed like many had a different kind of narrative approach than a lot of other stories I've been reading recently, in a good way. Interesting stuff.
  • Laurel
    July 14, 2017
    The Tower of the Antilles, a book of short stories by Achy Obejas, concerns individuals who live in Cuba under revolutionary rule and those who have physically escaped to the United States. I say, “physically escaped” because their emotional ties to Cuba are still strong and unbreakable. They have this in common with those they have left behind. Some of the stories in this book really appealed to me and struck me as great examples of the migrant experience. Others didn’t seem to fit, and I felt The Tower of the Antilles, a book of short stories by Achy Obejas, concerns individuals who live in Cuba under revolutionary rule and those who have physically escaped to the United States. I say, “physically escaped” because their emotional ties to Cuba are still strong and unbreakable. They have this in common with those they have left behind. Some of the stories in this book really appealed to me and struck me as great examples of the migrant experience. Others didn’t seem to fit, and I felt gave the book an uneven feel. I was particularly struck by the opening story, “The Collector,” which was an excellent lead-in to the rest of the stories. Ultimately, The Tower of the Antilles is a small book with big stories and a good addition to Latin American literature.
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  • Fred
    July 2, 2017
    Be wary of any jacket blurb extolling the virtues of the writing within as "dreamy." This usually signals vague or ambiguous language, unclear plot lines, etc. This book is a great example. Some of the plots are completely confusing and disorienting, and although that may be the mark of a great post-modernist writer, contrary to that school of thougt, obfuscation is not a sign of deep intelligence. Clarity is apparently a lost art in this post-Derrida world. A shame.Not for me.Thank you to the a Be wary of any jacket blurb extolling the virtues of the writing within as "dreamy." This usually signals vague or ambiguous language, unclear plot lines, etc. This book is a great example. Some of the plots are completely confusing and disorienting, and although that may be the mark of a great post-modernist writer, contrary to that school of thougt, obfuscation is not a sign of deep intelligence. Clarity is apparently a lost art in this post-Derrida world. A shame.Not for me.Thank you to the author and publisher for a review copy.
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  • J David
    June 16, 2017
    The Tower of the Antilles is a wonderful collection of short stories by Achy Obejas, a Cuban American. Her stories are of Cubans in Cuba and in America. I like settings and I especially loved the settings in Cuba which made me feel and understand better the country. My favorite stories were later ones, Superman and The Maldives. Superman is an erotic story of a young man, an entertainer. We follow him through his life. The language and the story are rewarding. This book is a gem and I highly rec The Tower of the Antilles is a wonderful collection of short stories by Achy Obejas, a Cuban American. Her stories are of Cubans in Cuba and in America. I like settings and I especially loved the settings in Cuba which made me feel and understand better the country. My favorite stories were later ones, Superman and The Maldives. Superman is an erotic story of a young man, an entertainer. We follow him through his life. The language and the story are rewarding. This book is a gem and I highly recommend it.
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  • Scott Drake
    July 12, 2017
    Brilliant stories that will likely be fodder for literature classes in future years. Obejas has vision, imagination, experience and the passion to create short, simple yet contemplative stories that beg rereading and absorbing. Muchas gracias!
  • Stacey
    July 10, 2017
    A fast read, but most of the stories didn't work for me as either erotic or immigrant fiction.
  • Lanie Tankard
    June 13, 2017
    Here's my review:http://www.thewoventalepress.net/2017...
  • Aj
    July 12, 2017
    The stories have been described as "dreamy." Well-written exploration of identity (sexual, cultural) and Cuba.
  • Melon
    June 23, 2017
    I don't want to take too many words to say that I did not enjoy this one. Felt a little beat over the head with sexuality, honestly. I get it, apparently this is an LGBT book... But I didn't know I was getting that when I signed up for this ARC. Such is the nature of the game. And I get it, it's probably my fault/hangup or whatever, but I really felt like the author went out of her way to work in "she" pronouns sometimes where they wouldn't normally be, just to make sure you couldn't forget, and I don't want to take too many words to say that I did not enjoy this one. Felt a little beat over the head with sexuality, honestly. I get it, apparently this is an LGBT book... But I didn't know I was getting that when I signed up for this ARC. Such is the nature of the game. And I get it, it's probably my fault/hangup or whatever, but I really felt like the author went out of her way to work in "she" pronouns sometimes where they wouldn't normally be, just to make sure you couldn't forget, and it felt forced. Lastly, there were some stories that I couldn't figure out what was even happening at points. And even more that I couldn't figure out what the point was of what was happening. So sorry to the author and all, I hate negative reviews, but this was a miss for me. **I received a free copy of this book in exchange for this clearly unbiased review.**
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  • Christopher Alonso
    April 30, 2017
    Review to come.
  • Mills College Library
    July 28, 2017
    Fiction O122t 2017
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