This Is What a Librarian Looks Like
In 2014, author and photographer Kyle Cassidy published a photo essay on Slate.com called "This is What A Librarian Looks Like," a montage of portraits and a tribute to librarians. Since then, Cassidy has made it his mission to remind us of how essential librarians and libraries are to our communities. His subjects are men and women of all ages, backgrounds, and personal style-from pink hair and leather jackets to button-downs and blazers. In short, not necessarily what one thinks a librarian looks like. The nearly 220 librarians photographed also share their personal thoughts on what it means to be a librarian. This is What A Librarian Looks Like also includes original essay by some of our most beloved writers, journalists, and commentators including Neil Gaiman, George R.R. Martin, Nancy Pearl, Cory Doctorow, Paula Poundstone, Amanda Palmer, Peter Sagal, Jeff VanderMeer, John Scalzi, Sara Farizan, Amy Dickinson, and others. Cassidy also profiles a handful of especially influential librarians and libraries.

This Is What a Librarian Looks Like Details

TitleThis Is What a Librarian Looks Like
Author
FormatHardcover
ReleaseMay 16th, 2017
PublisherBlack Dog & Leventhal
ISBN0316393983
ISBN-139780316393980
Number of pages240 pages
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Writing, Books About Books, Art, Photography, Library Science, Librarianship, Adult

This Is What a Librarian Looks Like Review

  • Angela M
    March 4, 2017
    How could I resist? I'm a retired Librarian and I just knew that I would love this tribute to the profession and and the wonderful contributions that librarians make to society. If you have an advanced digital copy like I was fortunate enough to get, do yourself a favor and read it on an IPad or better yet buy a copy so you can see the beautiful photographs of librarians from public libraries, university libraries, corporate libraries, school libraries. I love what Susan K. McClelland from Oak P How could I resist? I'm a retired Librarian and I just knew that I would love this tribute to the profession and and the wonderful contributions that librarians make to society. If you have an advanced digital copy like I was fortunate enough to get, do yourself a favor and read it on an IPad or better yet buy a copy so you can see the beautiful photographs of librarians from public libraries, university libraries, corporate libraries, school libraries. I love what Susan K. McClelland from Oak Park Public Library says , "Librarians are warrior princes and princesses wielding book love like swords." I was personally touched by Meridian Library Director Gretchen Caserotti's thoughts. "I was always a library kid. What drew me to my calling was the realization that stories can be consumed and created in many ways, and that technology is a powerful tool to do that." I was a library kid too, spending after school time and summer days there , thrilled at my first job at 16 as a "page" at the very same library where I was like a fixture. Although my career path led me to a corporate library, my heart will always be in that neighborhood library where I spent countless hours of bliss. John Jackson, a librarian at Loyola Marymount University says: "As a college librarian at a small institution, I have the opportunity to teach students to think critically, to think beyond their own experience, and put themselves in others' shoes." You'll find a bit of the history of libraries in the introduction, pictures and quotes from many librarians interspersed with thoughts from writers such as Neil Gaiman. He talks about the influence of public libraries and reminisces about the "magic" of interlibrary loans . Author Jude Deveraux brought me down memory lane remembering a school librarian handing over a copy of "The Borrowers" , a childhood favorite of mine as well. It wouldn't be a tribute unless it included a piece by Nancy Pearl , everyone's Librarian who contributes to NPR and written her notable "Book Lust" books.I highly recommended this to library lovers, to every reader actually. It will give you a greater appreciation of libraries and librarians and the importance of the profession as well as the institution. Every librarian should read it. It will make you feel even better about what you do. I received an advanced copy of this from Hackett with Books/Black Dog & Levanthal through NetGalley .
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  • Cheri
    April 11, 2017
    I’m not a Librarian, but I spent much of my childhood in our town Library. There aren’t too many buildings from that town that I can still picture clearly, but the Library is at the top of that list. I grew up in a family of readers, and my parents always had our house filled with books – most of which were acquired through the Library, or courtesy of the annual Church Book Sale. I still have the “My Little Book House” book set that my mother bought for me at one of those book sales, too young t I’m not a Librarian, but I spent much of my childhood in our town Library. There aren’t too many buildings from that town that I can still picture clearly, but the Library is at the top of that list. I grew up in a family of readers, and my parents always had our house filled with books – most of which were acquired through the Library, or courtesy of the annual Church Book Sale. I still have the “My Little Book House” book set that my mother bought for me at one of those book sales, too young to walk on my own yet, let alone read on my own.I read this on my Nook and the photographs of all the librarians included from libraries from all over are wonderful, and different kinds of libraries, not just public libraries, school libraries – the ones we’re likely most familiar with.What these librarians have shared of their calling varies from person to person, and what their function is at their library. Assistant Librarian (LIBRARYTHING.com) KJ Gormley speaks to the absolute necessity of libraries in communities, the unseen services they provide: ”If the library shut down tomorrow in my tiny Maine town of two thousand people, people would actually freeze. The GED program wouldn’t have a home, kids would be left to wander on Main Street until 5 p.m., shut-ins would lack a weekly visit with books, and any programs relating to the literacy, at any level, would cease. A good one-quarter of the town would have no access to the Internet. So, not nice things.”New Jersey Chapter Councillor, JP Porcaro (American Library Association Council) shares: “The best quote I found about libraries is actually by Keith Richards of the Rolling Stones. He says, ‘When you’re growing up there are two institutional places that effect you most powerfully: the church which belongs to God and the public library which belongs to you.” That quote spoke to me since I consider both places sacred. Sacrosanct. Hallowed ground. Divine in purpose. All of the various insights into why these librarians chose their profession, what it still means to them, along with insights about libraries and librarians from such celebrated authors as Neil Gaiman and George R. R. Martin, and more. At the end of the day, the librarians of our lives, especially those from our childhood, or those that saw a special need we didn’t even know we had and handed us just the right book at just the right time, or maybe our local librarian today - they may be everyday heroes, but they are heroes nonetheless.”This isn’t a book about America’s most significant libraries; it’s a book about everyday libraries doing everyday work. They’re just drops of rain in a thunderstorm, but together they work to make the ground fertile.Perhaps I wouldn’t have seen this book if I hadn’t happened upon my goodreads friend Angela’s marvelous review. I am so thankful to books like these, and Angela in particular for sharing her lovely review for such a wonderful, uplifting book. Thank you again, Angela! https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...Recommended!Pub Date: 16 May 2017Many thanks for the ARC provided by Hachette Books / Black Dog & Leventhal
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  • PattyMacDotComma
    March 31, 2017
    5★Mel Gooch of San Francisco Public Library claims: “Librarians are the ultimate search ninjas.”What a treat! A beautifully presented production that should be required reading for all public officials, civic leaders, and politicians. Teachers, parents and the general public already know how indispensable librarians are. I've added photos below.I remember seeing Ben Lexcen interviewed after his famous ‘winged keel’ took the “Australia II” to victory in the 1983 America’s Cup yacht race. (First l 5★Mel Gooch of San Francisco Public Library claims: “Librarians are the ultimate search ninjas.”What a treat! A beautifully presented production that should be required reading for all public officials, civic leaders, and politicians. Teachers, parents and the general public already know how indispensable librarians are. I've added photos below.I remember seeing Ben Lexcen interviewed after his famous ‘winged keel’ took the “Australia II” to victory in the 1983 America’s Cup yacht race. (First loss by America in 132 years!) The interviewer asked how he knew how to design it because he had left school at 14.Ben replied that he had learned how to read . . . and he knew where the library was. He didn’t mention the librarians who helped him, but I’m sure they did.I loved this, from the introduction by the author, about the recession and budgets:“In 2009, in my own city of Philadelphia, Mayor Michael Nutter announced his “doomsday budget,” which caused the Philadelphia Free Library System to announce that it was going to close every single branch. Director Siobhan Reardon posted a memo at each library, listing the services that would no longer be available when the doors closed: programs for children and teens, after-school programs, computer classes, programs to support small businesses and job seekers, visits from day care, community, and senior centers, community meetings, GED, ABE, and English as a Second Language programs as well as borrowing books. Turns out that the one thing people thought libraries did, loaning books, was just a part of a vast array of services being provided for the two million people in the Greater Philadelphia area. People in the city freaked out, in the grabbing-their-hair-and-spinning-around-in-circles sort of way. People who hadn’t been to a library in twenty years as well as well-known writers such as novelist Cory Doctorow bombarded representatives with pleas to save the libraries. With less than two weeks to go before the libraries were to begin shutting down, the state senate voted 32–17 to provide funding.” Another library connects kids with parents who are in jail making DVDs of the parents reading stories and giving the DVDs to their kids. More recently, a library is arranging video-conferencing so parents and kids could read together I real time. Just great!There are articles by authors (Cory Doctorow and Neil Gaiman, among others) who grew up knowing the library as the place they felt at home and inspired. There are pictures of every kind, shape, age and colour of librarian and all are passionate about their calling. ALEA PEREZ, Head of Youth Services at Westmont Public Library says: “Impassioned librarians are a force to be reckoned with. We have the curiosity of a scientist, the work ethic of a teacher, the creativity of an artist, and the ferocity of a prize fighter. We are so much more than Google."They have what Google doesn’t . . . a way of figuring out what you want even when you aren’t sure yourself. I’ve always said the internet is like a giant library with all the books and papers strewn around the floor. Google might shuffle some of them into some sort of piles, but really, if you don’t know what you want, how will you know when you find it?Cory Doctorow said: “The major life-skill of the information age is information literacy, and no one’s better at that than librarians. It’s what they train for. It’s what they live for.”Neil Gaiman wrote a lengthy piece in which he said“The entirety of human history is characterized by the hunt for information, as if we’re searching for a flower in the desert. In today’s world of information overload and 24/7 news, we are still looking for that flower, but now we’re looking for the flower in a jungle. The jungle may be writhing with poisonous snakes, or something that looks like the flower you’re looking for may not be a flower at all, but actually something quite dangerous or fake. It’s a whole weird world. I, for one, am grateful for librarians who can lead out ahead of us into the jungle in our search for our flowers of information.”Gaiman also wrote a passionate article for The Guardian you might enjoy. (Thanks to Cecily for the link to this in the comments below.) https://www.theguardian.com/books/201... There is a well-argued case by Amy Dickinson for abolishing late fees for children’s books. “Late fees are the enemy of early literacy because instead of promoting responsible behavior, they suppress library visits for some of the people who need the institution the most. And of course these fees don’t promote children being more responsible, but only reveal to children how irresponsible, ignorant, or unaware their own parents are.. . . Families should not be assessed late fees for children’s books—instead the library should adopt the technique successfully used by Netflix for DVD rental: When children turn books in, they can take new books back out.”Wonderful book. Wonderful photos! Thanks to NetGalley and Hachette Books for a copy for review.
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  • Toni
    May 4, 2017
    An exceptional compilation of librarians and how they enrich our lives from childhood through every level of our education toward our path of adulthood, and never ever stop; thank goodness! My thank you to all the librarians in my life, and my children's lives that brought us the wonder of books. So powerful. I remember every square inch of my children's library where I grew up with love and awe to this day!Thank you Netgalley for the first peak. Thank you authors.
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  • Erin Cataldi
    May 18, 2017
    I will admit that I am a little partial to this book because I'm one of the librarians featured in it, BUT that is not the only reason by a long shot! Kyle Cassidy has done an insanely impressive job compiling the essence and passion of librarianship into one beautiful coffee table book. Over 300 librarians from all over the world are featured and all have a gorgeous photo accompanied by a quote or statement on what being a librarian means to the. Some are wordy and eloquent, some are moving, an I will admit that I am a little partial to this book because I'm one of the librarians featured in it, BUT that is not the only reason by a long shot! Kyle Cassidy has done an insanely impressive job compiling the essence and passion of librarianship into one beautiful coffee table book. Over 300 librarians from all over the world are featured and all have a gorgeous photo accompanied by a quote or statement on what being a librarian means to the. Some are wordy and eloquent, some are moving, and others are passionate pleas. Also included are mini essays from Kyle about different libraries and librarians, as well as essays from bestselling authors like Neil Gaiman John Scalzi, George R. R. Martin touting how libraries and librarians have helped their lives. A wonderful book that deserves a spot in very personal and public library. What an honor to have even been involved in this.
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  • Bridget
    March 5, 2017
    I've been dipping in and out of this lovely book for the last month or so. If any librarian on the planet was after quotes or ideas to explain exactly why they do what they do, then this book is just full of them.What changes a collection of books into something useful is a librarian: a curator, an indexer, a manager, a gardener who knows what to cut back, what to add, what to highlight, and, most of all, what the community around them needs to grow as a society.You get lots of perspective on li I've been dipping in and out of this lovely book for the last month or so. If any librarian on the planet was after quotes or ideas to explain exactly why they do what they do, then this book is just full of them.What changes a collection of books into something useful is a librarian: a curator, an indexer, a manager, a gardener who knows what to cut back, what to add, what to highlight, and, most of all, what the community around them needs to grow as a society.You get lots of perspective on libraries over time, how they were originally thought of by the ancients as well as historical figures who have been influential in the library world. From Alexandria to Benjamin Franklin and on through more recent times.Tyrion in particular says that books are a weapon. As a sword needs a whetstone to keep it sharp, a mind needs books, and his mind is his weaponThere are wonderful essays from the likes of Neil Gaiman, Jeff Vandermeer and George RR Martin just to name a few. All lovely perspectives on their experiences of libraries throughout their lives and their thoughts on the future of libraries. I found some of these essays very moving and really rather lovely. Also, quite revealing, some of our most revered authors have had experiences in libraries which have strongly influenced their work.But then there are the beautiful photographs of librarians that the book is filled with. Each one has a quote from the subject of libraries, what they do in their libraries, who they work with and the new ways they serve their communities, all kinds of communities from prisons, hospitals, schools, companies and organisations of many kinds. The photos show how diverse the library community is and the comments by the librarians show the ways that needs are met despite challenges and how the role of libraries in communities of all kinds is growing and changing and adapting to technology and modern times.I found this book to be inspirational, it gave me so much to think about, often I would read the words of a librarian and have to stop and take pause to consider how I could apply their thoughts to my work. I think that the library community will treasure this work, I'm so glad that I read it. I'm sure I'll go back to it again and again, I fully intend to buy a print copy.Thanks so much to Netgalley for giving me access to this wonderful book.
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  • Caron
    May 4, 2017
    This review can also be found on my blog at: https://diminishingthoughts.wordpress...I received this book from the publisher on NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.I took way longer than necessary to finish this book. What attracted me to this book was the fact that it celebrated Libraries and Librarians and I’d never seen a book like this before so I wanted to find out what these Librarians said about the profession I want to go into one day.Kyle Cassidy put together pictures, quotes, co This review can also be found on my blog at: https://diminishingthoughts.wordpress...I received this book from the publisher on NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.I took way longer than necessary to finish this book. What attracted me to this book was the fact that it celebrated Libraries and Librarians and I’d never seen a book like this before so I wanted to find out what these Librarians said about the profession I want to go into one day.Kyle Cassidy put together pictures, quotes, conversations with authors (I only recognised two- Neil Gaiman and G.R.R. Martin) and stories from different people about how the library shaped or changed their life. Many of these stories spoke about the library being this fantastical place that you walk past everyday but you don’t notice it unless 1. you’re looking for it or 2. you’re lost and just happened to find yourself at the doors.I feel like Cassidy did this book justice. He worked years on it to make it what it is and I’m honestly very impressed with it. I’m not sure if I’d ever read this book again but I want to own a hardcopy of it so it can be on display in my personal library. If people ask me what’s so great about libraries, why be a librarian? I’d like to give them this book as an answer and explanation all in one.One of my favourite quotes in this book is pictured below:Susan K. McClelland says: “Librarians are warrior princes and princesses wielding book love like swords! We are ever vigilant, curious, intelligent, and kind. Libraries are the banners that we carry proudly into the fray! Forward, ever forward!”I like that. I love that she says librarians are warriors. I want to be a warrior princess one day too. Imagine if my kids went to school and on career day they ask them what their mom is and they reply: a warrior princess.As I read each page of this book I found out so much I didn’t know. I learnt with each new story and I felt this huge surge of pride rush through me because this! This is what I aspire to become one day. I want to pass on the fact that knowledge is power, knowledge can be found in books and libraries hold more than just those books. The amount of things that libraries and librarians do for us is so widely spread that you won’t know what you have until it’s not there anymore.G.R.R. Martin on why certain characters (in his books) appear to be around libraries more than others: “Well, Tyrion in particular says that books are a weapon. As a sword needs a whetstone to keep it sharp, a mind needs books, and his mind is his weapon. He has no physical prowess in a world that values and esteems physical prowess above all, so he has to fight the knights and the lords with his mind. And books are a way to keep the mind sharp, keep the mind flexible, test yourself against other voices, other ideas, and learn things. Because you ever know what you’re going to need to know in some future time.”This book made me want to visit my childhood library and hug all the librarians and thank them for existing. I hope that one day I can be even a small fraction of what they are. Thank you librarians!Blog | Twitter | Instagram | Wattpad
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  • Heather
    May 2, 2017
    First & foremost, thank you to NetGalley & Black Dog & Leventhal for a digital ARC in exchange for my honest review. This book was... okay. I've seen other reviews describe this as a good coffee table book and I absolutely agree with those assessments. The blurbs from each of the librarians were worded differently but basically all meant the same thing. Libraries are vital to communities and provide unlimited access to a myriad of services. I completely agree with that. It was exhaus First & foremost, thank you to NetGalley & Black Dog & Leventhal for a digital ARC in exchange for my honest review. This book was... okay. I've seen other reviews describe this as a good coffee table book and I absolutely agree with those assessments. The blurbs from each of the librarians were worded differently but basically all meant the same thing. Libraries are vital to communities and provide unlimited access to a myriad of services. I completely agree with that. It was exhausting to re-read that message over and over again. The longer excerpts regarding the history of libraries was interesting and eye opening but sometimes long and drawn out and I felt some of the information didn't pertain to the point. Lastly, the digital versions format is terrible and I really wish the pictures of the librarians were not just better quality, but I really found myself wanting their portraits to portray them individually, and I didn't feel like that was the case. I've loved the library since I was a child and I go at least once a week now. I've instilled in my young child a love of reading and library visits, and the librarians are wonderful people who encourage that love for him. The work of librarians it detrimental and they are sources of vast and unending knowledge. While I appreciate that, I'm just not sure this book executed in pushing that message forward as well as it could have.
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  • Hannah
    January 10, 2017
    I accidently got a NetGalley copy of this. I clicked on an ad in a Book Reviewer Newsletter that I get and it took me to the book's NetGalley page. Now, usually when this happens it gives you the option to request it or 'read it now'. In this case, however, it took it upon itself to invite me and now I must read it to keep up my NetGalley review ratio. It does seem interesting; I just wasn't ready to download another NetGalley yet.UPDATE:This book was divided into sections; there would be a numb I accidently got a NetGalley copy of this. I clicked on an ad in a Book Reviewer Newsletter that I get and it took me to the book's NetGalley page. Now, usually when this happens it gives you the option to request it or 'read it now'. In this case, however, it took it upon itself to invite me and now I must read it to keep up my NetGalley review ratio. It does seem interesting; I just wasn't ready to download another NetGalley yet.UPDATE:This book was divided into sections; there would be a number of quotes from librarians on why they loved their work, followed by a longer passage telling about the history of a library or a special program being run somewhere in the country.Some of these larger sections I was interested in, such as the one written by a librarian who began an American Girl Doll lending program at her library. I did enjoy learning from many of these sections, and seeing ways that libraries were used other than for simply loaning books.The short sections accompanying the picture of a librarian, telling why the person featured in the image loved their job, weren't as interesting to me. Some I found more intriguing than others. Though they all were phrased differently, the few concept behind them all remained the same. However, it isn't the author's fault that librarians tend to all love their jobs for similar reasons.The formatting of this book did not translate well into digital form. Some images were small, some took up a while page, some were upside down, and some of the wording faded into a light grey on certain pages. However, in a physical form the book's visual appeal would be much stronger, especially considering all the beautiful images of people, something that I consider to be a highlight of this book.I would call this more of a coffee table book; something that you would flip through to find a short section that interested you, or that would interest your guests.It wass interesting to read some of the history behind libraries, and look at the images, but isn't likely that you are going to want to read this book all at once.
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  • Kathryn
    May 7, 2017
    I received a digital ARC of this book from the publisher and NetGalley. The idea behind this book is great, but the format of it as an e-book has a lot to be desired. This would be much better as a physical coffee table book. It was awful in regards to formatting on my actual Kindle e-reader, but somewhat better on my phone app and I'm guessing even better on a Kindle Fire. The author spoke with hundreds of librarians and Library Science students, as well as some authors and printed excerpts, qu I received a digital ARC of this book from the publisher and NetGalley. The idea behind this book is great, but the format of it as an e-book has a lot to be desired. This would be much better as a physical coffee table book. It was awful in regards to formatting on my actual Kindle e-reader, but somewhat better on my phone app and I'm guessing even better on a Kindle Fire. The author spoke with hundreds of librarians and Library Science students, as well as some authors and printed excerpts, quotes and essays. The print fluctuated from crisp and clear print to very light, hard-to-read fonts on a semi-dark background. Some of the essays were interesting, especially when authors or librarians talked about childhood memories of the library and how it shaped their lives. Also, most of the quotes, excepts, and essays were accompanied by photos, but it was often difficult to sometimes determine who was being matched up with whom. At times, the only way, it was decipherable were in the cases where you could determine which name and photo went together based on their gender or ethnicity. Overall, I did like the book, but reading it in a physical format would have worked better and hopefully in the final published version, photographs will be clearly labeled.
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  • Andreea Marin
    April 22, 2017
    Kyle Cassidy published a photo essay on Slate in 2014 called “This is What A Librarian Looks Like,” a montage of portraits and a tribute to librarians. The essay had success and spread widely through social media. Cassidy expanded this project into what is now the new-coming book This Is What a Librarian Looks Like: A Celebration of Libraries, Communities, and Access to Information.The book has three components:1. Brief essays on the history of the American Library2. Photographs of contemporary Kyle Cassidy published a photo essay on Slate in 2014 called “This is What A Librarian Looks Like,” a montage of portraits and a tribute to librarians. The essay had success and spread widely through social media. Cassidy expanded this project into what is now the new-coming book This Is What a Librarian Looks Like: A Celebration of Libraries, Communities, and Access to Information.The book has three components:1. Brief essays on the history of the American Library2. Photographs of contemporary American Librarians3. Essays by writers, journalists, and commentators including Neil Gaiman, George R.R. Martin, Nancy Pearl, Cory Doctorow, Jeff VanderMeer, and others who discuss what the library means to them now, and what memories they have of the library from their childhood and/or youth.I really enjoyed this book with all its components, however, as a reader and librarian I was much more interested in the essays written by authors and the history parts. I wish they were longer. Some author interviews were only a paragraph long. For 220 images of librarians to fit in this large book, expect a coffee-table-style book. I understand the political undertones, specifically the one I mentioned above, where this book aims to put a face to the community of librarians in America for Congress, but as a physical codex, the book will become immediately dated because of the abundance of contemporary photographs. On the other hand, the same component makes it somewhat unique to preserving the ‘here and now.’ I would urge the reader to look at this book first and foremost as an art/photography book, where the histories and author essays are the supplements for the images, not the other way around as is usually the case. Nonetheless, the book advertises itself as a celebration of libraries and librarians, and in that respect, it has succeeded.In terms of librarians photographed, this book is America-centric. Though the librarians are multicultural and diverse, the workplaces of the librarians photographed are mostly in the United States covering an array of public libraries, special collections, school libraries, and academic libraries. The authors interviewed are American, Canadian, and British. Overall this book focuses on the Western experience of the library.I recommend this book to anyone interested in libraries, photography, and who has enjoyed blogs/books like Humans of New York which focus on individuals with an excerpt on what they do, and what they enjoy. I especially recommend this book to Congress.
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  • Kevin (sumptuousbooks)
    April 6, 2017
    I received a copy of this book via Netgalley for an honest review. Thanks for that. Wow. What a read. The book is a non-fiction standalone about libraries and librarians. You can divide the book in 3 sections: first, it talks about what libraries are and important historical stories about them. Second, a collection of pictures and quotes/statements from librarians about what libraries are and what they mean to them and the community. And third, a collection of statements/stories by famous author I received a copy of this book via Netgalley for an honest review. Thanks for that. Wow. What a read. The book is a non-fiction standalone about libraries and librarians. You can divide the book in 3 sections: first, it talks about what libraries are and important historical stories about them. Second, a collection of pictures and quotes/statements from librarians about what libraries are and what they mean to them and the community. And third, a collection of statements/stories by famous authors like George R. R. Martin about what role libraries play or played in their lives. I, myself, loved this book. The librarians featured in it are selected from a really diverse group. All the statements and stories just compete with each other about how much they love books and libraries. It's so marvellous. And the book really reminds you what role libraries played/play in your own life. The only negative thing about my copy: it was an eBook. I think it's better as a physical copy because of all the pictures. I'm definitely getting myself a physical one as soon as possible to put it on my coffee table.
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  • Geraldine
    May 18, 2017
    Iong live libraries. This is what a librarian looks like is an interesting book to scroll through. It definitely gets the message across that libraries are fundamental to society. The thing is, once you've read a few pages you've basically got the gist of the book.
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  • Heather
    May 18, 2017
    I counted 37 cardigans, 40 funky pieces of jewelry, 103 pairs of glasses, 12 visible tattoos, and 7 unnatural hair colors. (I was expecting more wild hair and tattoos.) But it is obvious that I have found my tribe.
  • Jen Grover
    May 25, 2017
    A fun look into the lives of some like minded people. <3
  • Angela
    March 2, 2017
    What a nice look at the career and the people who have chosen this line of work! I enjoyed seeing in visual form what I already knew: that librarians are an incredibly diverse bunch of people who happen to share a common love of learning. There ARE a lot of glasses and cardigans being sported here, but readers not very familiar with the profession might be surprised to see the tattoos, brightly-dyed hair, and hipster styling of many of these folks. (I wasn't, but then again I've been doing this What a nice look at the career and the people who have chosen this line of work! I enjoyed seeing in visual form what I already knew: that librarians are an incredibly diverse bunch of people who happen to share a common love of learning. There ARE a lot of glasses and cardigans being sported here, but readers not very familiar with the profession might be surprised to see the tattoos, brightly-dyed hair, and hipster styling of many of these folks. (I wasn't, but then again I've been doing this for a long time.) We've come a long way from the bunned, shushing old matron of the classic stereotype! Sprinkled throughout are short essays by famous writers on the role that the library has had in their life, and there are short pieces on the history of libraries, the interesting collections at various locations, etc. The quotes from the featured staff become pretty redundant after awhile, but it's nice to see a unified theme and enthusiasm (the bottom line of which is: libraries are important and awesome). The cynic in me wants to note that this a glowing portrait of the profession rather than a measured look at both the joys and challenges of this line of work, but that should be clear going in. I doubt that anyone is picking up this book to get an objective career overview. What it IS, then, is a lovely little promotional piece for libraries and the good that they do, and I would like to share it with people who are skeptics or perhaps just unaware of the many great things libraries are continuing to do in their communities. Recommended for the bookish set, who will see themselves reflected in these pages.Thanks to NetGalley for providing me with an ARC.
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  • Rhonda Lomazow
    March 4, 2017
    As a very young child I fell in love with books thanks to the magic world of libraries.My dad took us once a week the books& the friendly librariansalways with the perfect book suggestion helped me acquire my life long love of books.This book is an ode to all librarians their pictures ,essays their love for their profession jumps out of their pictures. For all bookworms for all of us who cherished our libraries you will love this book,
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  • LibraryDanielle
    January 19, 2017
    Note: this does not work as an ebook. Don't waste money on it. Get the actual book. It would make a fantastic coffee table book.I was pre-approved on Net-Galley for this title and was pretty excited to check it out. The book does not disappoint, but the format did not work. Some of the text fades to SUPER light gray, almost matching the background of my kindle, and the layout just isn't made for ebook. Normally I'm super mean and would deduct stars for that, but I didn't this time, because with Note: this does not work as an ebook. Don't waste money on it. Get the actual book. It would make a fantastic coffee table book.I was pre-approved on Net-Galley for this title and was pretty excited to check it out. The book does not disappoint, but the format did not work. Some of the text fades to SUPER light gray, almost matching the background of my kindle, and the layout just isn't made for ebook. Normally I'm super mean and would deduct stars for that, but I didn't this time, because with the upcoming administration this kind of message is very needed. It humanizes librarians all over and shares their stories, what's important to them, and their message. I do wish the photos were less "school photos" and more informal, but that's personal preference. I think it would have made the book more friendly and less like the scam "who's who" books. The ebook also didn't have an index so I couldn't quickly skim though to see if I knew anyone, or there was anyone from my state. I'm hoping that the finished version does have the index, because it would greatly benefit the book (there's a line that says index in the ebook, so I'm hopeful). I definitely think this is a fun and useful book for libraries and schools to own, but it's very much a niche title and random people won't really purchase it.
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  • Keeley
    January 25, 2017
    I had never heard of the author's original librarian photo montage, but enjoyed flipping through this book filled with photos of and thoughts from librarians across the country. Librarians connect people to all sorts of information and are essential to learning. A great ode to the library, probably my favorite place in the world!Thanks to NetGalley for the digital ARC.
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  • Sarah
    January 12, 2017
    Librarians often don't look like the stereotype... and neither do libraries! This book is a great look into the evolving role of libraries and librarians in today's world.I received an ARC from NetGalley.
  • Monique Elizabeth
    May 24, 2017
    This is What a Librarian Looks Like by Kyle CassidyRating: 5/5For anyone doubting that librarians and libraries are important, this book serves as a beautiful and blunt reminder.This book not only shows us that librarians come in all shapes, sizes, races, and genders, but that each librarian is in it for the same reasons. Whether it's a passion for books and literacy, the desire to serve the community in the way it has served them, or to give young people a place where they can feel included and This is What a Librarian Looks Like by Kyle CassidyRating: 5/5For anyone doubting that librarians and libraries are important, this book serves as a beautiful and blunt reminder.This book not only shows us that librarians come in all shapes, sizes, races, and genders, but that each librarian is in it for the same reasons. Whether it's a passion for books and literacy, the desire to serve the community in the way it has served them, or to give young people a place where they can feel included and safe to learn, these librarians and countless others have done so much more than simply caretaking books.What was most striking to me were the several constants reiterated throughout this work by the featured librarians. As I read, one librarian's words would remind me of what another librarian had said a few pages back. The overwhelming messages were that the library is for the community, the library is an equalizer, librarians are needed more than ever given the influx of information from the Internet's plethora of sources, libraries are a safe space, librarians are fighters for everything from copyright to the human right to knowledge to literacy and more, libraries are the one truly free spaces left for knowledge access, and that librarians are here help any way they can,This book included short quotes from each featured librarian with the librarian's reasons for why they became a librarian, or what they do, or why they love what they do, or why the library/being a librarian is important. In addition to these statements, authors wrote articles about their experiences in the library and its influence in their lives. Many authors and librarians would not be who they are today had it not been for a library or a librarian. What was most interesting were various about the origins of notable libraries and archives and their histories.As a librarian-in-training, this book reminded me why I'm studying library science, and why I want to be a librarian and archivist. For everyone else, this book should serve as a reminder or an eye-opener. But mostly, this book should be a call to action. Libraries are in danger from those who have forgotten just how important their purpose is in communities and across the world. This is What a Librarian Looks Like reminds us that it's up to individuals to decide if literacy and access to knowledge is important enough to their communities. I highly recommend this as one for your personal shelf, a coffee-table book, and/or library collections.I received this as an advanced copy graciously provided by Hachette via NetGalley.
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  • Rebecca N. McKinnon
    May 27, 2017
    I think this book is great for the general public, anyone who has a very specific idea of what a library is and needs their perspective broadened. However, it's not so good for a reader like me who already works in a library, someone who's already aware of the broad range of options for a librarian's career focus. This is shelved in the library science section and it's a thick book, which made me think it would go in depth as to different librarians' jobs. For example, a section on academic libr I think this book is great for the general public, anyone who has a very specific idea of what a library is and needs their perspective broadened. However, it's not so good for a reader like me who already works in a library, someone who's already aware of the broad range of options for a librarian's career focus. This is shelved in the library science section and it's a thick book, which made me think it would go in depth as to different librarians' jobs. For example, a section on academic librarians versus public service librarians versus technical services librarians versus special collections librarians, archivists, etc. This book clearly had the opportunity to do that with the range of librarians quoted inside, but it failed to take that opportunity. It gave this massive list of librarians one paragraph each and what all did they say? Pretty much the same thing...Libraries are important. At that point, it's more a photography book and should be shelved in the photography section, rather than the library science section. But, as others have said, some of the photography isn't quality. And sadly, I even found a typo early on. I'm giving this two stars instead of one mainly because another reader may enjoy it...and also the Cory Doctorow essay made it worth it. The rest of the author essays all repeated the same, overstated message--Libraries matter, and here are my memories of libraries and books from my childhood, etc. So much of this book is sweet in small doses (a coffee table read, for sure), but it missed a huge opportunity to be so much more and is lacking a certain quality to even be the best at what it tried to be.
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  • Gordon Warnock
    May 18, 2017
    I’m so happy to have found this. As a product of public and school libraries, I was already grateful for the librarians in my life and the love for stories that they helped foster. What I didn’t know before this book was just how much else these folks provide to the less fortunate among us. Shouts out to Briony Zlomke for lending out dolls to those who can’t afford them, Nick Higgins for making it possible for prisoners to read bedtime stories to their kids over the Internet, Bretagne Byrd for b I’m so happy to have found this. As a product of public and school libraries, I was already grateful for the librarians in my life and the love for stories that they helped foster. What I didn’t know before this book was just how much else these folks provide to the less fortunate among us. Shouts out to Briony Zlomke for lending out dolls to those who can’t afford them, Nick Higgins for making it possible for prisoners to read bedtime stories to their kids over the Internet, Bretagne Byrd for bringing the Internet to people who don’t otherwise have it, and the many other superheroes profiled in this book. This is one of the most astute arguments I’ve found for the existence of libraries in today’s society. One of my favorite passages comes from New York Times best seller, John Scalzi: “I don’t use my local library like I used libraries when I was younger. But I want my local library, in no small part because I recognize that I am fortunate not to need my local library—but others do, and my connection with humanity extends beyond the front door of my house. My life was indisputably improved because those before me decided to put those libraries there. It would be stupid and selfish and shortsighted of me to declare, after having wrung all I could from them, that they serve no further purpose, or that the times have changed so much that they are obsolete. My library is used every single day that it is open, by the people who live here, children to senior citizens. They use the building, they use the Internet, they use the books. This is, as it happens, the exact opposite of what obsolete means. I am glad my library is here and I am glad to support it.”Yes. This.
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  • Brittany Soder
    May 26, 2017
    At times I loved this book and at other times I was underwhelmed. In a time when librarians are fighting tooth and nail to stay afloat this book can help to facilitate conversations about the wide range of services that libraries offer. I was inspired by the wide range of people were portrayed in this book. While librarianship is still mostly dominated by white women, I liked the diversity this book represented. Thank you for giving these librarians a place to have their voice heard. I was also At times I loved this book and at other times I was underwhelmed. In a time when librarians are fighting tooth and nail to stay afloat this book can help to facilitate conversations about the wide range of services that libraries offer. I was inspired by the wide range of people were portrayed in this book. While librarianship is still mostly dominated by white women, I liked the diversity this book represented. Thank you for giving these librarians a place to have their voice heard. I was also inspired by the stories of other libraries and how they have fought to provide for their communities (i.e. Kayaks or dolls). However, I got a little tired of the interjections from various 'well known people.' While I understand the power of stories, they all seemed to say the same thing...'libraries are amazing, my library was my second home, I read so many books, etc.' Of course these are important stories, but did this book need so many? The only other thing that bothered me was the 'sound bites' from librarians. I noticed a lot said the same thing 'if libraries close, it will be chaos' 'we help with technology.' Why so much overlap? There is so much to say about librarianship and these sound bites seemed to gloss over some of the real issues facing libraries. The few librarians who did tackle topics of social justice and libraries - THANK YOU for showing a bit of the complexities that we are facing as a profession.Overall - a fun and fast read and I enjoyed see the vast locations and job titles presented!
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  • KP
    May 17, 2017
    When I received notification from my library that my hold on this book had come in, THE SAME DAY AS THE RELEASE DATE, I dropped everything and ran over there. I've been looking forward to this book for months, and it did not disappoint. Looking at the photos of all the different librarians, from all over the US (and some from Canada, and many who are, of course, immigrants) was deeply settling and inspiring. It was so cool to see their smiles, their outfits, their funky and fun and classic jewel When I received notification from my library that my hold on this book had come in, THE SAME DAY AS THE RELEASE DATE, I dropped everything and ran over there. I've been looking forward to this book for months, and it did not disappoint. Looking at the photos of all the different librarians, from all over the US (and some from Canada, and many who are, of course, immigrants) was deeply settling and inspiring. It was so cool to see their smiles, their outfits, their funky and fun and classic jewelry, the way they hold themselves-- and, of course, read snippets about their thoughts on the importance of libraries.The book could get a little redundant at times, but I thought it spoke to how closely aligned most librarians are in their mission and goals. Plus, it underscored the importance of libraries and the breadth and depth of what they provide.The essays by other creators were interesting, and I enjoyed the spotlights on particular libraries/librarians and the unique things they were doing (the one about the librarian who introduced American Girls into her library actually made me cry a little, because I know so many children in my life who would have adored that).This was such an excellent book. I'm seriously considering buying two copies of it-- one for my office at my library, and one for my coffee table at home, just so more people can be introduced to the variety of librarians out there in the world, all of whom are doing excellent work.(It was also a pleasant surprise to discover that a friend I know from online was one of the librarians in this book!)
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  • Geoffrey
    May 8, 2017
    As a professional librarian myself who was lucky enough to access this book through NetGalley, I don't believe my (very admittedly biased) adoration for this books knows any bounds. Through the proud words of numerous librarians, information and literacy professionals, writers, and many other, this book does the grand service of showing how libraries are still quite important at both micro and macro level. Many of the women and men interviewed for this book reveal how they and their institutions As a professional librarian myself who was lucky enough to access this book through NetGalley, I don't believe my (very admittedly biased) adoration for this books knows any bounds. Through the proud words of numerous librarians, information and literacy professionals, writers, and many other, this book does the grand service of showing how libraries are still quite important at both micro and macro level. Many of the women and men interviewed for this book reveal how they and their institutions strive in all matter of ways to specifically adapt to provide for the individual needs of their unique communities. Many others meanwhile help provide the crucial insight that all these libraries who are as diverse as the people and places that they serve continue to offer an array of critical and near-universal benefits, ranging from serving as bastions of equal access in an increasingly unequal society, to their steadfast positions as place of refuges and safe spaces to those who enter their doors. To put that all in a much more succinct matter - this book is an effective and beautiful reminder from librarians and their allies that despite what many may say, libraries still very much matter in today's world, and in far more ways than one (myself included) may expect.
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  • LA Smith
    May 19, 2017
    I can think of no better time than now for a book that explores from so many directions the importance of libraries, librarians, and the free flow of information. Kyle Cassidy has created here a moving and humanizing panegyric, a love letter to knowledge and the people with a passion for sharing it, for making it readily available for all who seek it. Cassidy's delightful photographic portraits of librarians from all corners of the world alternately reinforce and shatter some stereotypes we have I can think of no better time than now for a book that explores from so many directions the importance of libraries, librarians, and the free flow of information. Kyle Cassidy has created here a moving and humanizing panegyric, a love letter to knowledge and the people with a passion for sharing it, for making it readily available for all who seek it. Cassidy's delightful photographic portraits of librarians from all corners of the world alternately reinforce and shatter some stereotypes we have come to associate with librarians, and the words of the librarians themselves form a richly layered and complex madrigal that celebrates their common passion for empowering people with the information they need and entertaining them with the whimsy they desire. Cassidy includes short essays on libraries from the likes of Neil Gaiman, George R. R. Martin, Nancy Pearl, and Amanda Palmer that reinforce for the reader a sense of community among those of us for whom libraries have always felt like home, for whom librarians have always felt like family. Beautifully written, photographed, and edited, this book deserves a place on the (no doubt already overstuffed) shelves of any reader or seeker of knowledge.
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  • Mandy
    May 30, 2017
    Libraries. Librarians. All sorts, all shapes and sizes – here brought together in a coffee-table book lavishly illustrated and with some short essays from well-known writers - about libraries. Very much the sort of book that no doubt many a librarian or ex-librarian will one day receive as a gift. Enjoyable and well-intentioned but ultimately somewhat ephemeral. Once you’ve been through it once you’re unlikely to read it again. But it’s an attractive book and a worthy cause, a hymn of praise to Libraries. Librarians. All sorts, all shapes and sizes – here brought together in a coffee-table book lavishly illustrated and with some short essays from well-known writers - about libraries. Very much the sort of book that no doubt many a librarian or ex-librarian will one day receive as a gift. Enjoyable and well-intentioned but ultimately somewhat ephemeral. Once you’ve been through it once you’re unlikely to read it again. But it’s an attractive book and a worthy cause, a hymn of praise to librarians everywhere. So that means to me too….. how could I object?
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  • Sheila Garry
    May 19, 2017
    One of the most important things a library does is foster a sense of community through the programs they offer the public. People attend, learn, discuss and meet new neighbors.The Internet hasn't automatically granted free info for all. Over half of all Americans don't have Internet access at home. Nor can they afford magazines, DVDS, or books. Libraries offer all this and more for free. People who argue that libraries and books are obsolete just don't get it. They are technology specialists who One of the most important things a library does is foster a sense of community through the programs they offer the public. People attend, learn, discuss and meet new neighbors.The Internet hasn't automatically granted free info for all. Over half of all Americans don't have Internet access at home. Nor can they afford magazines, DVDS, or books. Libraries offer all this and more for free. People who argue that libraries and books are obsolete just don't get it. They are technology specialists who can help us enter the next information gathering highway.
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  • roxi Net
    May 26, 2017
    I'm a bit biased. I'm going to be a librarian, so this book was literally for me. I'm not sure if anyone outside of having a deep love of libraries would want this book, but it's amazing. Photos of librarians are so inspirational, the interviews of authors and people, stories of libraries, just fuel my personal passion to become a librarian. Love it!
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