The Long Run
An unlikely marathoner finds her way through grief and into the untold history of women and running. Thirty-year-old Catriona Menzies-Pike defined herself in many ways: voracious reader, pub crawler, feminist, backpacker, and, since her parents' deaths a decade earlier, orphan. "Runner" was nowhere near the list. Yet when she began training for a half marathon on a whim, she found herself an instant convert. Soon she realized that running, "a pace suited to the precarious labor of memory," was helping her to grieve the loss of her parents in ways that she had been, for ten messy years, running away from. As Catriona excavates her own past, she also grows curious about other women drawn to running. What she finds is a history of repression and denial running was thought to endanger childbearing, and as late as 1967 the organizer of the Boston Marathon tried to drag a woman off the course, telling her to "get the hell out of my race" but also of incredible courage and achievement. As she brings to life the stories of pioneering athletes and analyzes the figure of the woman runner in pop culture, literature, and myth, she comes to the heart of why she's running, and why any of us do."

The Long Run Details

TitleThe Long Run
Author
FormatHardcover
ReleaseMay 23rd, 2017
PublisherCrown Publishing Group (NY)
ISBN1524759449
ISBN-139781524759445
Number of pages256 pages
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Autobiography, Memoir, Sports and Games, Sports, Health

The Long Run Review

  • LauraBeth
    May 24, 2017
    The Long Run sprints ahead of other books that I’ve read about running (which have been a lot). First of all – this is one of the only books that I’ve read about running that is female-centric – but not in the way that one might expect. Instead of being a shallow book of Pinterest self-help quotes, this book aims higher and hits the mark by delving into the psyche of women and for the reasons they run. It made me question why it was exactly that I began running a few years ago. It connects a lot The Long Run sprints ahead of other books that I’ve read about running (which have been a lot). First of all – this is one of the only books that I’ve read about running that is female-centric – but not in the way that one might expect. Instead of being a shallow book of Pinterest self-help quotes, this book aims higher and hits the mark by delving into the psyche of women and for the reasons they run. It made me question why it was exactly that I began running a few years ago. It connects a lot of dots to running: the human psyche, feminism, culture, history and even literature. Reading this book made me realize that the author is a treasure trove of information on a myriad of topics and her ability to interrelate all of these ideas was skillfully done. Additionally, the author looks at heroic women who have broken through social barriers in the running world and while it made me appreciate these women much more than I have previously, I also walked away with much respect and admiration for the author. She’s the everyday woman who overcame heartache and a sedentary lifestyle by transforming herself into a runner. She represents what we’re all capable of doing. Catriona Menzies-Pike is inspiring and fierce in her own right. Many thanks to Crown Publishing and NetGalley for allowing me to read an ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Heather Fineisen
    January 15, 2017
    The author combines women’s history of running with he personal experience to create an interesting and informative look at the sport. The author includes her love of reading and literary references throughout the narrative. I am not a runner but enjoyed the book, especially the history.
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  • Melissa
    March 31, 2017
    Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for an Advanced Reader Copy in exchange for an honest review.Wow wow wow... I don't think I even read the description when requesting this one from Netgalley. "LONG RUN" jumped out at me loud and clear. I knew it had to be about running, and as a runner (albeit with a four year break after the twins being born), I wanted to read it. ASAP. I do that with any books about running, swimming or cycling, preferably all three at once. So far so good. The writer has Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for an Advanced Reader Copy in exchange for an honest review.Wow wow wow... I don't think I even read the description when requesting this one from Netgalley. "LONG RUN" jumped out at me loud and clear. I knew it had to be about running, and as a runner (albeit with a four year break after the twins being born), I wanted to read it. ASAP. I do that with any books about running, swimming or cycling, preferably all three at once. So far so good. The writer has been through some horrible tragedies but through it all, she found something both therapeutic and enjoyable, running! There is a t-shirt out there that says "Running... It's cheaper than therapy!" After three full marathons (two involving interstate travel), eight half marathons, four triathlons, a handful of 5K and 10Ks, at least ten pair of Brooks Adrenalines size 7W (in case you are shopping for me), a Garmin watch, a used road bike from Craigslist, two drawers full of workout clothes, swim flippers/pull buoy/goggles, a treadmill, two iPod shuffles, and truckloads of Gatorade, I would have to argue. My co-pay is only $30 a pop lol... The author has done her research on the history of the marathon and the participation of women in them. Each chapter discusses a various aspect of running and women with anecdotes of her personal life interspersed. I thought it was brilliant. There are a few sluggish spots, but overall the book was amazing.At any rate, this book is a great read, maybe even if you're not a runner!
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  • Helen Maurice
    April 10, 2016
    Loved this book! Was able to relate to as I have taken part in most of the Sydney runs that Catriona has run and described. Not a book I would usually read, I found the intermingling of historical and feminist perspectives fascinating. Being a Sydney girl, I took great pleasure in reading about the author's runs around the harbour and surrounds. I laughed and cried with my favourite passages being those when Catriona puts into perfect words the way I feel when I run
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  • Ms. Yingling
    March 27, 2017
    E ARC from Netgalley.comThis book is an odd combination of memoir and history. The memoir isn't anything new-- while the author mentions that she has read a lot of running memoirs that didn't speak to her experience as a reluctant runner, most of the memoirs I have read are much like this. The runner doesn't want to run, but has personal issues, so takes it up reluctantly and finds that it answers many of the questions in her life and helps her deal with issues. What does make this book appealin E ARC from Netgalley.comThis book is an odd combination of memoir and history. The memoir isn't anything new-- while the author mentions that she has read a lot of running memoirs that didn't speak to her experience as a reluctant runner, most of the memoirs I have read are much like this. The runner doesn't want to run, but has personal issues, so takes it up reluctantly and finds that it answers many of the questions in her life and helps her deal with issues. What does make this book appealing is the history of women and running, and especially the intersectionality of feminism and running. Complete with citations in the back, the author lays out the most complete history of women and running that I have seen. This is fantastic, and would be a fabulous resource for school libraries if we could just separate that part from the memoir! I should take notes and look up some of the women she mentions, because I see a LOT Of National History Day project possibilities. I know there are a lot of teachers and librarians who also run (and who might be on spring break!), so this book is worth mentioning. And is anyone else waiting for this year's Boston Marathon in order to watch Kathryn Switzer return for the 50th anniversary of her groundbreaking run?
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  • Niki
    May 30, 2017
    An interesting female-centric view on the topic of running, both as a pastime and a competitive endeavor. The author, a self-proclaimed reluctant runner, delves into a little bit of everything - culture, literature, history, feminism - to navigate her own (mis) adventures with running. The material can be a bit dry at times, but with a wealth of fascinating tidbits (ex: women's running competitions have only been a part of the Olympics since 1984). At its best, the book is wonderfully thought-pr An interesting female-centric view on the topic of running, both as a pastime and a competitive endeavor. The author, a self-proclaimed reluctant runner, delves into a little bit of everything - culture, literature, history, feminism - to navigate her own (mis) adventures with running. The material can be a bit dry at times, but with a wealth of fascinating tidbits (ex: women's running competitions have only been a part of the Olympics since 1984). At its best, the book is wonderfully thought-provoking.
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  • Karen Germain
    May 25, 2017
    Thank you to Crown Publishing for providing me with an advanced copy of Catriona Menzies-Pike's memoir, The Long Run, in exchange for an honest review.PLOT - When she was in her early twenties, Catriona Menzies-Pike was dealt a major life-change, when her parents both died in a plane crash. She spent the following decade finishing her education, while dealing with both her profound grief, and the extensive probate process to close her parent's estate. She had never considered herself very athlet Thank you to Crown Publishing for providing me with an advanced copy of Catriona Menzies-Pike's memoir, The Long Run, in exchange for an honest review.PLOT - When she was in her early twenties, Catriona Menzies-Pike was dealt a major life-change, when her parents both died in a plane crash. She spent the following decade finishing her education, while dealing with both her profound grief, and the extensive probate process to close her parent's estate. She had never considered herself very athletic, but when she turned thirty, she decided that she wanted to change her lifestyle and began running. The Long Run chronicles her journey to becoming a marathon runner, including an examination on how running helped her cope with loss and the history of female runners. LIKE- I'm not a runner. I've finished a handful of half-marathons and other athletic events, but I've always been more of a slow finisher, mostly walking. I've never had the drive to turn myself into a runner. Running is not what drew me to Menzies-Pike's memoir. Like Menzies-Pike, I also lost my parents at a young age and this is what made me interested in her story.The Long Run is half a history of running, specifically female runners. I was not expecting her memoir to be so heavy on the history, but I'm glad it was, as it was fascinating. I had recently heard the story of runner Kathrine Switzer, who in 1967 was the first woman to run the Boston Marathon as an official participant. Switzer registered using her first initial, rather than her name, and snuck by in a time when women were not allowed to participate. Famously, a race official tried to physically remove her from the course, but her boyfriend at the time, stepped in and Switzer kept running. The Long Run is filled with stories of other female runners from around the world who helped break down barriers. I may have zero interest in running, but I'm grateful to these women who took risks so that I could have opportunities. It's amazing to me to think that Switzer's Boston Marathon run was just ten years before I was born. I feel like I grew up in a world where I could aspire to anything.Menzies-Pike also writes about the fear that women have, a fear that has been drilled into them, regarding things like running alone or running at night. Until last summer, when I moved to downtown Portland, I've never felt unsafe in my environment. Now, I live in a place where I would not walk outside of my building at night without my husband. In the daytime, I even feel nervous. A big part of this, is that we live right next to a pretty park, where unfortunately, bad things have happened. This fear has limited my life. I don't go to writing events or other things, stuff that I wouldn't have hesitated to do when we lived in Los Angeles. Fear is powerful and controlling.DISLIKE- I wish Menzies-Pike had made her memoir more focused on her grieving and transformation. It could have been more introspective. If I was a runner, I think I would have been more interested in the specific details of her major races. As a non-runner, these portions were a little tedious and I found my attention drifting.RECOMMEND- If you're a female athlete or interested in the history of marathons, The Long Run would be a great pick. Like my review? Check out my blog!
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  • Madeleine
    May 2, 2017
    This and other reviews at www.topshelftext.blogspot.com!I wouldn't necessarily call myself a runner. Sure, I enjoy running, but if we're being honest, it's hard and requires a lot of mental energy for me, so it's not always my go-to option for exercise. In the past year or so, I've only gone on a handful of runs, but after reading The Long Run: A Memoir of Loss and Life in Motion, I've felt inspired to lace up my sneakers and take another shot at being a "runner." Here's the thing about this boo This and other reviews at www.topshelftext.blogspot.com!I wouldn't necessarily call myself a runner. Sure, I enjoy running, but if we're being honest, it's hard and requires a lot of mental energy for me, so it's not always my go-to option for exercise. In the past year or so, I've only gone on a handful of runs, but after reading The Long Run: A Memoir of Loss and Life in Motion, I've felt inspired to lace up my sneakers and take another shot at being a "runner." Here's the thing about this book: it's not a typical sports memoir. Catriona Menzies-Pike is not a famous athlete. She's run a handful of marathons and many, many half-marathons, but when you put her running accomplishments in perspective, she's pretty much on par with any other ordinary person who also happens to run marathons.What makes this memoir interesting is not that it's about running, but that it's written from a feminist perspective. Within the first chapter, I realized that this was one of the most well-written memoirs I've read, and by the time Menzies-Pike mentioned her PhD in Literature, I could tell that she was a voracious reader, and someone of extraordinary intelligence. She not only writes about her own life experiences -- a plane crash that left her orphaned, a downward spiral shortly after, and her discovery that running helped to heal her -- but also writes about the history of women in running. I learned so much about the discrimination of women in this sport (starting in the time of Ancient Greece and continuing well into the 1960's) and the stories of individual women who dared to run alongside male athletes. One of the most interesting (and disturbing) facts that I learned? Women were often told to avoid running because it would threaten their fertility. Women runners who entered races were often scolded for their selfishness, race organizers certain that to run a marathon was to sacrifice a future as a mother. Now, of course, we know that a woman can be both an athlete and a mother, so it seems absurd to think that this was a huge reason behind the discrimination. There are some spots where I felt the history (or the focus on sexism) was a little drawn out and sluggish, but in the end I came away from this book feeling inspired to run and to encourage the women in my life to pursue dreams that may feel impossible. Her story is proof that dedication bears fruit and I loved her overall message that no matter your size, speed, or distance, when you set out on a run, you are a runner.
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  • Christi
    May 26, 2017
    I do not seem to possess the endurance that it takes to become a runner. I admire those that can lace up their sneakers and run for miles at a time. I'm lucky to do jogging intervals when I attempt to run. Maybe I do not have the mental stamina it takes. Maybe I need a shove in the right direction and a little inspiration from those who have ran before me. This reason is why I picked up The Long Run by Australian writer and runner Catriona Menzies-Pike.Catrina Menzies-Pike started running after I do not seem to possess the endurance that it takes to become a runner. I admire those that can lace up their sneakers and run for miles at a time. I'm lucky to do jogging intervals when I attempt to run. Maybe I do not have the mental stamina it takes. Maybe I need a shove in the right direction and a little inspiration from those who have ran before me. This reason is why I picked up The Long Run by Australian writer and runner Catriona Menzies-Pike.Catrina Menzies-Pike started running after mourning the deaths of both of her parents in a plane crash. After dealing with depression and addiction for years, Ms. Menzies-Pike started running first as a hobby and later adopted the running lifestyle. It is during this time that the author begins to research the history of women in running and the road that has led to her own participation in a half-marathon.Any avid runner will be able to relate to her stories and why she runs and this is the part that I really enjoyed reading, despite it being a small part of the book as a whole. The majority of the book is a history lesson on women's rights and women in sports. I was hoping this story would be more about the author's overcoming a personal tragedy and working through grief through running but I felt like Ms. Menzies-Pike keeps her readers at arms length throughout the book. The focus feels more on history and not on the author's story.The Long Run is very well researched but lacks the author's personal story which is why I chose this book in the first place. I started this book hoping for inspiration to run and I did not find that at all. *I received a complimentary copy of this book in exchange for an honest review
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  • Edwin Howard
    March 2, 2017
    THE LONG RUN by Catriona Menzies-Pike is an entertaining book that smoothly melds a memoir of Menzies-Pike's journey into being the runner she is today and a history of distance running, particularly looking at women's place in the distance running sport. Menzies-Pike's writes about her beginnings as a runner and follows through her completing her first marathon and beyond. She describes the highs and lows of training, finding the zen of running, and how she balanced her life to include trainin THE LONG RUN by Catriona Menzies-Pike is an entertaining book that smoothly melds a memoir of Menzies-Pike's journey into being the runner she is today and a history of distance running, particularly looking at women's place in the distance running sport. Menzies-Pike's writes about her beginnings as a runner and follows through her completing her first marathon and beyond. She describes the highs and lows of training, finding the zen of running, and how she balanced her life to include training. Along the way, Menzies-Pike prose painted marvelous pictures of running through Sydney and other cities and the harsh realities of being in and struggling through races. Throughout the book, Menzies-Pike bounces over to providing a history of women's distance racing, how it struggled (and still does) with negative sexual reactions to women runner's clothing and bodies, to how for many years, certain athletic associations felt that a woman's body can't handle distance running, and to how only in the last 40 years or so has women's racing really evolved into a sport on the same (or close to the same) level as men's distance running. A good running memoir/look at the sport of running, THE LONG RUN is a well-written book that is inspirational and entertaining and for all the runners out there (and I am one too), a good book to check out. I received this book as part of the Early reviewers program with LibraryThing.
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  • Karen Lewis
    May 25, 2017
    The Long Run is most compelling when it focuses on the details of the author's personal training and running regime, and her own life story. Catriona Menzies-Pike juxtaposes interesting snippets of history of women running (or women being excluded from competitions) which are in themselves fascinating, but for me distract from the compelling details of her personal quest. Readers wondering what it might be like to set a training challenge and then actually "go for it" will likely enjoy this book The Long Run is most compelling when it focuses on the details of the author's personal training and running regime, and her own life story. Catriona Menzies-Pike juxtaposes interesting snippets of history of women running (or women being excluded from competitions) which are in themselves fascinating, but for me distract from the compelling details of her personal quest. Readers wondering what it might be like to set a training challenge and then actually "go for it" will likely enjoy this book. It is definitely a memoir and not a "how-to train" book. Vivid descriptions of the author’s enthusiasms and terrors of race day, and her particular logistics of mental prep for a big run are very inspiring! I love passages describing how the runner's experience narrows to the moment: portrayal of the marathoner’s journey, both interior (recovery from grief and entering a zone of metaphysical moments) and exterior (shade trees, geckos, wallabies, steep trails, other runners). My own running practice is supported by a landscape of shadows, light, redwoods, oak, banana slugs, quail, ferns, squirrels, bear, wildflowers, so I loved this literary visit to Ms. Menzies-Pike's Australian terrain.That said, I think the history and political/feminist details about running beg for a book of their own. This author has the determination to pull it off.This review is based on an ARC from NetGalley.
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  • Gaby
    May 25, 2017
    The Long Run is a memoir by a young woman in Sydney who hadn't identified as an athlete or a runner. The books and articles that she'd read about running seemed to focus on ambitious, Type A people or on self improvement or weight loss. Menzies-Pike shares her own story of how running opened up a "new geography" of her home city. She discusses books about running from the point of view of a reader (as compared to reading the books as a runner). With self-depreciating humor shines through whether The Long Run is a memoir by a young woman in Sydney who hadn't identified as an athlete or a runner. The books and articles that she'd read about running seemed to focus on ambitious, Type A people or on self improvement or weight loss. Menzies-Pike shares her own story of how running opened up a "new geography" of her home city. She discusses books about running from the point of view of a reader (as compared to reading the books as a runner). With self-depreciating humor shines through whether she discusses what first women marathoners faced in 1896 or her family anecdotes or her own travel stories, Menzies-Pike delivers an engaging, well thought-out discussion. Her book is about running but it is also about determination, perseverance, and taking control while keeping a sense of humor.
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  • frites
    February 5, 2017
    Interesting history and analysis of the place of women's involvement in running over millennia, across society, sport, art, literature and mythology. The personal component stemming from the author's loss i found quite profoundly upsetting. Made me reflect on how fortunate I was to have my parents during my vulnerable twenties, let alone how lucky I am to still have them both now. Also shows how powerful the pursuit of running can be as a channel for life's difficulties. Absurd that women were d Interesting history and analysis of the place of women's involvement in running over millennia, across society, sport, art, literature and mythology. The personal component stemming from the author's loss i found quite profoundly upsetting. Made me reflect on how fortunate I was to have my parents during my vulnerable twenties, let alone how lucky I am to still have them both now. Also shows how powerful the pursuit of running can be as a channel for life's difficulties. Absurd that women were denied this natural right for so long. Another thing to be for which to be grateful.
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  • Greg Zimmerman
    May 30, 2017
    Loved this! A must-read if you're late-blooming runner (as I am). It's part running memoir but also part history of women runners (which, embarrassingly, I knew nothing about - which is part of her point). It's sad, smart, hilariously self-deprecating, and absolutely inspiring.
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  • Rhonda Lomazow
    May 24, 2017
    Catriona loses her parents at the young age of thirty.To survive cope she takes up running she shares wuith us her road to healing&She also writes about the history of women runners.A wonderful hybrid of memoir&history a terrific read.
  • Lissa
    February 24, 2017
    The author of this running memoir experienced the tragic loss of both of her parents in a plane wreck when she was only twenty. She then spent the next decade traveling around in a fugue of grief and loss. Her decision to begin training for half-marathons and marathons was not logical, she was never athletic, but one made of desperation to begin something new in her life. This book looks at the history of long races, women's role in the marathon, what current races look like and how she approach The author of this running memoir experienced the tragic loss of both of her parents in a plane wreck when she was only twenty. She then spent the next decade traveling around in a fugue of grief and loss. Her decision to begin training for half-marathons and marathons was not logical, she was never athletic, but one made of desperation to begin something new in her life. This book looks at the history of long races, women's role in the marathon, what current races look like and how she approaches her training. As a professor of literature, she also throws discussion of books into the mix which I enjoyed. Although this book felt a little long at points (even though it really isn't a long book) I found her down-to-earth experience with long distance running both fascinating and inspiring. I am not a runner and don't exactly see myself becoming one but if any books was to encourage that possibility, this would be the one. I received this book from LibraryThing in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Julie Garner
    April 9, 2016
    A very intriguing book that is part memoir and part history. Catriona shares with us her reasons for beginning running at the age of 30. What motivates her and keeps her moving. Interdispersed through her story is a history about women and their place within the running community, more specifically, the marathon. For many decades is was deemed unseemly and unsafe for women to run, let alone run long distance. There has been recorded many times women ran alongside men but their times were not inc A very intriguing book that is part memoir and part history. Catriona shares with us her reasons for beginning running at the age of 30. What motivates her and keeps her moving. Interdispersed through her story is a history about women and their place within the running community, more specifically, the marathon. For many decades is was deemed unseemly and unsafe for women to run, let alone run long distance. There has been recorded many times women ran alongside men but their times were not included as it was believed they should not have been in the race. It makes you realise how much we take forgranted in today's world. Running is second nature to all of us, whether we choose to participate or not. Catriona reminds us that it doesn't matter how fast you run, or where you place in the race, just the fact that you are doing it is amazing, especially, if you are a woman.I found this a very fascinating look at running from the perspective of someone who always saw herself as a non-runner. Then her research into women and their trials and tribulations along the way to enter what was a man's domain really opened my eyes into how much of a struggle it has been to become a part of the running fraternity.This is a fantastic read for someone who is thinking about starting running, or who is already running and wants some inspiration to run longer distances. I know that I have been re-invigorated to continue with my running plan (I have let it slide for the last two weeks).Get out there! Long run, short run, fast run, slow run...it doesn't matter. Just keep taking one step at a time and finish!!!
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  • Roxanne
    February 14, 2017
    This is a Goodreads win review. This book is about a lady who took up running at age 30. The running is her way of dealing with her parents death. She then found other women who ran and they bonded about life. It is a book about keep moving forward in life despite the things that happen to you.
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  • Olwen
    June 14, 2016
    An enlightening story of the history of women in running. Some was surprising - for instance, I never thought of french women as avid runners (I thought they spent all their time in cafes and smoking) but it seems they were at the forefront of running and marathons. Interspersed with the history is the author's personal experience of running. The narrative progresses the same way the author says her running does - slow and steady. Eventually, you get to the end. This is not a motivational tome, An enlightening story of the history of women in running. Some was surprising - for instance, I never thought of french women as avid runners (I thought they spent all their time in cafes and smoking) but it seems they were at the forefront of running and marathons. Interspersed with the history is the author's personal experience of running. The narrative progresses the same way the author says her running does - slow and steady. Eventually, you get to the end. This is not a motivational tome, although as a writer I found it useful; particularly the reminder that running enables you to get out of your own head and into your body. I was reminded of why I run, and received some insight into why I might have taken up running.
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  • James
    March 31, 2016
    Menzies - Pike captures some of the romance and not-so-romantic elements of running. She shared a lot of her own triumphs and struggles, which I found helpful. At times the author's critique of the gender and commercialisation seemed to jar with her own story, and I didn't think it carried the two elements in sync. But it has strengthened my resolve to keep running, despite the great ordinary-ness of much of the experience, despite the gimmicky stuff we sign up for as goals, and with the encoura Menzies - Pike captures some of the romance and not-so-romantic elements of running. She shared a lot of her own triumphs and struggles, which I found helpful. At times the author's critique of the gender and commercialisation seemed to jar with her own story, and I didn't think it carried the two elements in sync. But it has strengthened my resolve to keep running, despite the great ordinary-ness of much of the experience, despite the gimmicky stuff we sign up for as goals, and with the encouragement that much internal/psychological work happens without us doing much about it by simply giving space to 'be' as we run.
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  • Ann Welton
    January 4, 2017
    First, thank you to NetGalley for an e-book copy of this book for my enjoyment. I found this book to be totally enjoyable – the story of a young 30 year old female who began a running career after several life events left her feeling less than excited about where she might be headed. As a long distance runner myself for over 50 years, I found this book “un-put-downable” from the very beginning, as I could identify with the author as she moved into running half marathons, marathons, then realized First, thank you to NetGalley for an e-book copy of this book for my enjoyment. I found this book to be totally enjoyable – the story of a young 30 year old female who began a running career after several life events left her feeling less than excited about where she might be headed. As a long distance runner myself for over 50 years, I found this book “un-put-downable” from the very beginning, as I could identify with the author as she moved into running half marathons, marathons, then realized her life commitment to running. Only 4 stars, as non-runners may not be as excited about this book as I was, but her writing is stellar, kept me loving every page. Thank you Ms. Menzies-Pike.
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  • David
    May 25, 2016
    Enjoyed the book and story although although I could not relate to many of the references the author listed some parts I could. The idea of wanting to be able to run without anyone else noticing you, of not needing all of the gear or hype that some people think they need appeals to me as does not having the need to be competitive. Some of the historical references seem to be drawing a long bow to support a viewpoint although I can understand why they have been included. People run for different Enjoyed the book and story although although I could not relate to many of the references the author listed some parts I could. The idea of wanting to be able to run without anyone else noticing you, of not needing all of the gear or hype that some people think they need appeals to me as does not having the need to be competitive. Some of the historical references seem to be drawing a long bow to support a viewpoint although I can understand why they have been included. People run for different reasons, I'm glad she enjoys doing so.
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  • Jenn Lopez
    January 30, 2017
    I sincerely enjoyed the writing style of this author. This was a fascinating memoir/ history lesson on women in running. I have tried time and again to become a "runner" with a snail's pace and a hunger to sit on the couch and eat junk food over jumping into work out gear and step on the treadmill. I know the pleasure in completing a work out, and totally understand the procrastination of getting started on one. Great book!
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  • Zora
    March 13, 2016
    This elegantly written book offered a well balanced mix of cultural history and memoir of women who run. I can see why she wrote it, given most books about running are pitched at the motivational market. There are so many other ways to write about our bodies and what they can do than currently on offer.
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  • Sara
    February 1, 2017
    Fabulous part history part memoir book. Very interesting information about the history of running with personal experiences intermixed throughout. Really quite entertaining! Loved it ☺
  • DalaiMommaReadingDrama
    April 17, 2017
    I am not a runner. Although I have heard that "if you run down the street...if you run at a park...if you run to lose weight...if you run for 20 minutes or 1 hour, then you are a runner". I don't really know if I believe that but yes...I am intrigued by people that run. A good deal of admiration because I can't even run to my mailbox without feeling faint. I will say this...I've lost 15 pounds running several days a week for an entire summer. What can I say....GOALS.And so I had to get my hands I am not a runner. Although I have heard that "if you run down the street...if you run at a park...if you run to lose weight...if you run for 20 minutes or 1 hour, then you are a runner". I don't really know if I believe that but yes...I am intrigued by people that run. A good deal of admiration because I can't even run to my mailbox without feeling faint. I will say this...I've lost 15 pounds running several days a week for an entire summer. What can I say....GOALS.And so I had to get my hands on this book, The Long Run: A Memoir of Loss and Life in Motion by Catriona Menzies-Pike. It was fascinating. I truly enjoyed this reading....having zipped through it in a couple of hours. History of running...a story of a runner. It's a wonderful and interesting book. Thanks as always to the wonderful peeps here at goodreads for my free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review to which I gladly and voluntarily gave.
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