Doom Patrol, Volume 1
The spirit of Grant Morrison's groundbreaking Doom Patrol is captured in this debut series starring the cult-favorite misfits as a part of Gerard Way's new Young Animal imprint.Flex Mentallo, Robotman, Rebis, Crazy Jane, and more are back to twist minds and take control. This new take on a classic embraces and reimagines the Morrison run's signature surrealism and irreverence. Incorporating bold, experimental art and a brash tone to match a new generation of readers, Gerard Way's Doom Patrol establishes radical new beginnings, breaks new ground, and honors the warped team dynamic of the world's strangest heroes.This abstract and unexpected ensemble series nods at the Doom Patrol's roots by continuing to break the barriers of the traditional superhero genre.Collecting Doom Patrol 1-6

Doom Patrol, Volume 1 Details

TitleDoom Patrol, Volume 1
Author
FormatPaperback
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 6th, 2017
PublisherDC Comics
ISBN1401269796
ISBN-139781401269791
Number of pages168 pages
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Superheroes, Dc Comics, Science Fiction, Fantasy, Graphic Novels Comics

Doom Patrol, Volume 1 Review

  • Sam Quixote
    May 19, 2017
    An enchanted colostomy bag belches into existence The Bliznar, an anthropomorphic multi-gender entity whose left testicle is running for Mayor of Kandahar and who wants to write this year’s Christmas No. 1 jig. But a ragtag team of anti-hero pro-superhero anti-hairdressers called Bloom 50 Squad have to lose the intergalactic atomic race and lock up the evil Princess Bitchtacular before the FixFaxes obliterate the comics universe of the 12th Dimension! Better gwant up the pooble before sippy revs An enchanted colostomy bag belches into existence The Bliznar, an anthropomorphic multi-gender entity whose left testicle is running for Mayor of Kandahar and who wants to write this year’s Christmas No. 1 jig. But a ragtag team of anti-hero pro-superhero anti-hairdressers called Bloom 50 Squad have to lose the intergalactic atomic race and lock up the evil Princess Bitchtacular before the FixFaxes obliterate the comics universe of the 12th Dimension! Better gwant up the pooble before sippy revs the teeser! Ok, that was deliberate gibberish I just made up (and kinda reads at the end there like something from Rick and Morty’s interdimensional cable) but it makes about as much sense as Gerard Way and Nick Derington’s unreadable first volume of the relaunched Doom Patrol. If this title is an indicator of the quality to follow in DC’s new Young Animal line (which Way is also curating) then it’s gonna be Rebirth 2.0. I can’t pretend to be a fan of or know much about Doom Patrol as I’ve only read the first Grant Morrison book and it didn’t grab me, so forgive me not knowing pretty much every character in this book. Not that Way makes any effort to make this book accessible - it’s basically Morrison fanfic for uber fans of Morrison and Doom Patrol. He so desperately wants to be Grant Morrison and falls short by several light years. So the premise is: a magic ambulance/sentient godlike entity called Danny is a portal to another realm where Flex Mentallo lives - now that character I do recognise from the excellent Grant Morrison/Frank Quitely book from the mid-90s (highly recommended over this tripe). The robot dude on the cover is living in a gyro - yes, the wrap snack many people enjoy on the reg - and some dude called Niles Caulder is doing one-page skits for no reason. None of the Doom Patrol can remember who they are for some reason (maybe it ties into the end of Morrison’s Doom Patrol, I don’t know, I never read it, but it might well do given Way’s obsession with Morrison) and this book is about gathering them together once again to stop some evil intergalactic corporation from turning people in hamburgers. There’s more nonsensical art school bollocks but it’s not worth going into - it’s like enduring atrociously, outstandingly bad Avant-garde filmmaking. Incoherent storytelling, incompetent writing that mostly reads like cast-off Danger Days-era My Chemical Romance lyrics (Way’s former band), obnoxiously pretentious, and incomprehensible in general, I have no idea what the fuck this nonsense was but I know I was mega-bored and thoroughly unimpressed with it. You may as well zone out when reading this and come up with your own story because at least then something will entertain and make sense to you. Gerard Way and Nick Derington’s Doom Patrol is all the reasons why Doom Patrol will never be a good comic. Teese up that sippy, poobles!
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  • ☙ percy ❧
    May 2, 2017
    i received an ARC of this through NetGalley. gerard way says in the afterword that "we want you to feel like it's 3:00am and you have no idea what's going on - but somehow you do?" and he succeeded admirably in this goal. this was a surrealist, touching, ingenious postpostpostpostmodernist masterpiece. seriously, put postmodernism (and a whole lot of brilliance) in a blender for a few hours and this will pop out, probably. another thing Way mentioned in the afterword was that a reviewer said tha i received an ARC of this through NetGalley. gerard way says in the afterword that "we want you to feel like it's 3:00am and you have no idea what's going on - but somehow you do?" and he succeeded admirably in this goal. this was a surrealist, touching, ingenious postpostpostpostmodernist masterpiece. seriously, put postmodernism (and a whole lot of brilliance) in a blender for a few hours and this will pop out, probably. another thing Way mentioned in the afterword was that a reviewer said that you can't really review this book, because it's a book to be experienced rather than reviewed. and i completely agree; mainly because if i say anything at all about the plot, it will spoil a little bit of that experience. one thing i can say: this was incredibly well-written, with probably the best character development and storyline of any comic i've ever read. it made me cry, but in the best possible way. and everyone should read it.
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  • Rory Wilding
    May 31, 2017
    If you are interested in the arts, you are an oddball to the general public, but being an outsider allows you to be creative, no matter what weird ideas that comes out of your mind. However, there is a tendency of being too weird and when it comes to comics, no one epitomizes this more than Grant Morrison, a man with such a unique imagination that either rises or falls depending on the material. Amongst the number of creators Morrison has influenced, Gerard Way has been very local about his love If you are interested in the arts, you are an oddball to the general public, but being an outsider allows you to be creative, no matter what weird ideas that comes out of your mind. However, there is a tendency of being too weird and when it comes to comics, no one epitomizes this more than Grant Morrison, a man with such a unique imagination that either rises or falls depending on the material. Amongst the number of creators Morrison has influenced, Gerard Way has been very local about his love for the Scotsman, in particular his run of Doom Patrol, which not only inspired on his Dark Horse series The Umbrella Academy but also his own run of Doom Patrol as part of DC’s Young Animal imprint.Please click here for my full review.
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  • Jeff
    September 16, 2016
    After a disastrous year, it looks like DC has finally done one thing right. This issue was a very promising start for Way's new imprint.
  • Alex Sarll
    April 26, 2017
    Gerard Way's series was the launch book for his Young Animal imprint, but its first arc concludes simultaneously with the last title to debut, because no celebrity from outside comics can ever stick to a monthly schedule. It's a tradition or an old charter or something. Still, unlike anyone else to write this misfit team since Grant Morrison, Way does manage the difficult balancing act of respecting that classic run, yet not merely pastiching it. The art is lighter and more straightforward, but Gerard Way's series was the launch book for his Young Animal imprint, but its first arc concludes simultaneously with the last title to debut, because no celebrity from outside comics can ever stick to a monthly schedule. It's a tradition or an old charter or something. Still, unlike anyone else to write this misfit team since Grant Morrison, Way does manage the difficult balancing act of respecting that classic run, yet not merely pastiching it. The art is lighter and more straightforward, but this is still a profoundly weird book, albeit with a new flavour of weirdness all its own. A flavour which soon turns out to be less than ethically sourced...
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  • Thomas Maluck
    May 3, 2017
    "I love the Doom Patrol, they've all got weird backstories and almost their own visual language for how the universe works, there's nothing ordinary about them!"vs "Eww, this comic is weird, it didn't tell me what was going on in every scene, who is this for?"Volume one gets the band back together, and if volume two can keep up the sharp visuals and high-velocity story, I'll stick with this what-in-the-what series to the end.
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  • Tripp
    April 16, 2017
    Nothing could live up to the Grant Morrison era. But this is a great start by Gerard Way. If the book can just remain on a regular schedule and the direction could come into focus, this may really be a successful iteration of Doom Patrol. New readers would probably appreciate many aspects of the book by reading the Morrison era or at the very least Wikipedia.
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  • Charles
    May 4, 2017
    Review to be posted after DC embargo.
  • Craig
    March 25, 2017
    I have waited for this book for a very long time. The lovely thing is that I got a lot of what I wanted, and I got a lot of what I wanted, but I just didn't know I wanted it. Derrington's art is a lovely departure from the standard, 90sesque vibe that DC descended into with the New 52. Way seems to have a handle on the characters, and I especially like that Sam and his son have a place here. There is not enough history of the DP being a diverse book, with poor Josh Clay being shot in the head by I have waited for this book for a very long time. The lovely thing is that I got a lot of what I wanted, and I got a lot of what I wanted, but I just didn't know I wanted it. Derrington's art is a lovely departure from the standard, 90sesque vibe that DC descended into with the New 52. Way seems to have a handle on the characters, and I especially like that Sam and his son have a place here. There is not enough history of the DP being a diverse book, with poor Josh Clay being shot in the head by the Chief. But I have to confess...I don't like Way's most impactful creation, Casey, enough to care about her. If I have one critique beyond not really warming to her, it's that I don't think we need to have the ingenue nymphette character, the POV/ object of male gaze character, in a book in 2017. Why do we need a POV character at this point to tell us that the Doom Patrol gets weird, and it gets weird fast? And why do we need it to be the male fantasy nerd girl on top of it?Beyond that, I'm more than a little disappointed that Rita has been erased again from the book. Cliff mentions that he needs to find her, and then nothing. When you think about it, DP *could* be a truly feminist book: Jane's resolution of her abuse, Rita dealing with the literal male gaze as a Hollywood star, Kate as the first trans character for DC, Marion as a sex-trafficked victim, etc. We don't necessarily need new characters to make this interesting or to illustrate the strong female characters that have been members of the Doom Patrol in previous incarnations.Speaking of one of these characters, the end of this volume descends into a rush of circumstantial coincidence. Why this could not have been given more space is beyond me. That aside, I really like this book and will continue to support it. I can't wait to see what Way and Derrington have up their collective sleeve, but I hope pacing will become less of an issue and Casey will be less dominant.
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  • Michael Cook
    June 1, 2017
    I received an ARC of this book from Edelweiss.It's been quite some time since Gerad Way has published any kind of ongoing comic series. The last one he did was The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys, co-written with Shaun Simon, and that was back in 2013. So, the world of comics was in need of his return. He'd been teasing the third volume of The Umbrella Academy for years now, and it was beginning to look like we'd never see another ongoing series from him again. Then came DC's announcement of I received an ARC of this book from Edelweiss.It's been quite some time since Gerad Way has published any kind of ongoing comic series. The last one he did was The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys, co-written with Shaun Simon, and that was back in 2013. So, the world of comics was in need of his return. He'd been teasing the third volume of The Umbrella Academy for years now, and it was beginning to look like we'd never see another ongoing series from him again. Then came DC's announcement of the Young Animal imprint, spearheaded by Way himself. Along with the imprint would be his first ongoing series in ages, a reboot of Doom Patrol. The big question is: was his return to comics worth the wait? Answer: yes. In volume 1 of Doom Patrol, Way reintroduces readers to the unconventional team of heroes through the lens of Casey Brinke, an EMS driver who is drawn into a series of weird circumstances when she finds the broken body of Robotman. Casey and the other members of the team must outwit a bunch of aliens who want control of a magic, sentient van that can create life. So, basically, it's a pretty typical subject matter for a Gerard Way comic. The good news is that Doom Patrol is really good. The first issue is a bit offputting, especially to people unfamiliar with the property. But once the second issue starts, things begin to fall into place and mesh into a story that's both engaging and action packed as well as emotional and moving. With Doom Patrol, Gerard Way reminds us of why he's such a welcome voice in the comics industry. The main storyline revolves around Casey Brinke's journey into this world, and her reactions as she remembers who she is and what her part in this whole story is. Way was smart to have her be the audience's way into the story, as it works both for people who are familiar with the original runs and for those who have never read an issue of Doom Patrol in their lives.Like all of Way's stories, each character has a well developed and consistent personality throughout the series. Where he suffers, as always, is the plot. It's not a bad plot, by any means, but he often strays from it and his conclusions almost never fully live up to their setups. It's not a major problem; it's not like the conclusion to this arc is bad - it's quite good. But it's not as good as it could be, and that tends to be the case with all of Way's comics. It's as though he writes himself into a corner and can't quite get himself out, so he pulls something out of his hat and it doesn't quite work the way he thinks or hopes it will. The benefit of this story, however, is that there's the promise of much more story to come. Since this is an ongoing comic, instead of a limited series, the audience has more time with the characters to look forward to, and that's the book's best strength.Alongside Way's remarkable character writing comes wonderful artwork from Nick Derrington. He has a style that's unique to the book but works perfectly. Each character has a well distinguished, well thought out design that makes sense for who they are what the character needs. The facial expressions are spot on and he's great with background work. His artwork is easily the best aspect of the book.Overall, Doom Patrol, Volume 1 is a good read. It's enjoyable, full of interesting characters, and lined with good artwork.I give it four out of five stars.
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  • Alan D.D.
    May 24, 2017
    3,5It's hard to say anything about a tory as weird as this one, even more when it was written by one my favorite singers, Gerard Freaking Way, mostly, because I didn't understand half of what is happening, just as he said at the end of the book.This is like the starngest sex I had with a comic book. I couldn't put it down since the beggining, and had to actually force myself to do it so I could sleep a little. I wasn't thinking on next morning and that I would need myself to be able to work, to 3,5It's hard to say anything about a tory as weird as this one, even more when it was written by one my favorite singers, Gerard Freaking Way, mostly, because I didn't understand half of what is happening, just as he said at the end of the book.This is like the starngest sex I had with a comic book. I couldn't put it down since the beggining, and had to actually force myself to do it so I could sleep a little. I wasn't thinking on next morning and that I would need myself to be able to work, to be able to walk even, but only that I wanted to know what the heck was happening next. This is so addictive it shoud be illegal, really.There are a few ideas that become clear and understandable, proposals that I gave me little problem, if no one at all, but the others were just so strange and bizarre I couldn't get them. This may be because it's the first volume, the first real chapter of this story, which has been promoted as with "the weirdest heroes," and sure Way kept himself loyal to the idea, so it may be right for him to help newcomers to understand a little bit more of what's going on.Now that I touched the point, I need to say that I knew nothing, absolutely nothing, of these guys, the Doom Patrol, but the concept is great. A Western, American, old-style comic book that reminds me of American Uglies with a high dose of SciFi and absurd humor. Despite the fact that it's hard to follow, you still manage to find the greatness on it, you get really into it and entertains more than you might expect.I'm not part of those who like the art, but considering the tyle, the tone and the real nature of this comic book, well, it the best one you can use. There are some panels and pages that impressed me, like the one with people coming out of one Danny to get into the other right next it, or the very first page, which I love because... I'm still trying to know why.You can expect me to read the next volumes in this book, and know that I had my first time with Way (no pun intended, you dirty minders,) I'm most likely to love them.
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  • Chris Lemmerman
    May 15, 2017
    [Read as single issues]Weird doesn't even begin to cover this one. Gerard Way and Nick Derington relaunch the Doom Patrol as part of the new Young Animal imprint at DC, and it's weird as hell. Centred around Casey Brinke, a paramedic who is suddenly whisked away to the world of Negative Men, Robot Men, Crazy Jane cultists, sentient bricks named Danny, an alien race that want to farm humans, and Flex Mentallo (yep, him again), Doom Patrol is a peculiar series that richochets between plot points o [Read as single issues]Weird doesn't even begin to cover this one. Gerard Way and Nick Derington relaunch the Doom Patrol as part of the new Young Animal imprint at DC, and it's weird as hell. Centred around Casey Brinke, a paramedic who is suddenly whisked away to the world of Negative Men, Robot Men, Crazy Jane cultists, sentient bricks named Danny, an alien race that want to farm humans, and Flex Mentallo (yep, him again), Doom Patrol is a peculiar series that richochets between plot points over and over until it all comes together in one giant explosion in the final issue. It's totally bonkers, and it'll likely take multiple readings to appreciate everything Way and Derington have folded into the plot for this one, but it's worth mining it all to see how clever it all is.Derington's art is deceptively simple, and that makes all the wacky weirdness look even more insane. The unsung hero is colourist Tamra Bonvillain, who I expect will reach Jordie Bellaire levels of fame very quickly with her glorious colour choices. The normalcy of the art is a cracking contrast to the insanity of the story.Reading this one in trade will probably mean you get a lot more out of it than you would in single issues, and Young Animal launches with a huge success.
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  • Ramon
    May 20, 2017
    Sometimes Way still reads like Morrison fanfic, and I get it, we all go there sometimes. But things still feel so disconnected in this introductory arc, which ostensibly gathers the gang back together but you're never really made to understand why you should care or want these people to come together. If you're not familiar with Morrison's run I don't know how effective this would be for you. I'm familiar and I'm not especially interested. For all the outre ideas, it feels like the character dev Sometimes Way still reads like Morrison fanfic, and I get it, we all go there sometimes. But things still feel so disconnected in this introductory arc, which ostensibly gathers the gang back together but you're never really made to understand why you should care or want these people to come together. If you're not familiar with Morrison's run I don't know how effective this would be for you. I'm familiar and I'm not especially interested. For all the outre ideas, it feels like the character development is underdeveloped. Beautiful art/coloring/lettering, though. And sometimes I feel like Way ends up painting himself into a corner, and the sustainability of such a series comes into question.
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  • Ilse
    May 18, 2017
    This was so good! And utterly confusing.Gerard has a lot to say at the end of the comic and i really enjoyed reading that and said "We want to conjure feelings and questions, moods and moments. We want you to feel like it's 3:00 am and you have no idea what's going on - but somehow you do?"Which I think explains this comic pretty well, you really have to eperience this. You can't really review it, just read it and experience it!Thanks to Netgally for providing me this book for an honest review
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  • Casey
    May 13, 2017
    Look, if you think I'm going to be biased toward a comic book featuring a Casey with red hair cut in a similar style to mine...okay, you might be on to something. But really, Doom Patrol is weird. Refreshingly weird. Where else are going to read a metaphor about life being like a gyro and find yourself nodding along at the accuracy of it all? This is a promising title and makes me curious about what strange adventures the Patrol will go on next. (Also, definitely needs more Lotion.)I received an Look, if you think I'm going to be biased toward a comic book featuring a Casey with red hair cut in a similar style to mine...okay, you might be on to something. But really, Doom Patrol is weird. Refreshingly weird. Where else are going to read a metaphor about life being like a gyro and find yourself nodding along at the accuracy of it all? This is a promising title and makes me curious about what strange adventures the Patrol will go on next. (Also, definitely needs more Lotion.)I received an ARC of this title from NetGalley.
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  • Saruuh Kelsey
    May 12, 2017
    More now immediately please thank you.This is the craziest comic I have ever read. It doesn't make any kind of sense, but also it makes perfect sense. The characters are weirdos, and they don't really make sense either, and I love them for it. And the art is perfect and colourful and echoes how hopeful the story is despite the impending apocalypse. Doom Patrol is the kind of weird I have been waiting for without knowing I've been waiting for it.
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  • Nathaniel Darkish
    May 27, 2017
    I really want to love this comic. It's weird, and funny, and has a great style to it, but in spite of my best efforts to make sense of it all, I was left very confused. I'll probably try one more volume of this when it comes out to see if I can make the sundry insane story elements come together in my head.
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  • Cat (cat-thecatlady)
    May 7, 2017
    I don't know, I didn't like this. I had no idea what was going on 90% of the time, it always felt like I missed reading something. maybe it's the whole deal but it didn't work for me. the art was very, very good tho.full review soon
  • John H
    May 30, 2017
    This was my first foray into Doom Patrol, so I was pretty confused for a while. I did some reading on Wikipedia and skimmed back over the whole book and things started to make a little more sense. It's still pretty darn weird, but I would read future issues. I liked the art a lot.
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  • Emmanuel Nevers
    May 14, 2017
    Weird, crazy and nuts...all in the best way possible!
  • Nora
    June 1, 2017
    when the sun comes up and the sirens fade, you pick each other up...and make each other new.
  • Lauren Evatt
    January 11, 2017
    I am so excited for this comic! I love Gerard Way's work and can't wait to see what he does with Doom Patrol.
  • Variaciones Enrojo
    September 15, 2016
    Futuro tomo recopilatorio de Doom Patrol: Brick by Brick.
  • Wing Kee
    April 27, 2017
    Wow is the least exciting thing I can say about this first arc.World: Derington's art is phenomenal, the panels the linework, the emotions from the characters, it's all absolutely fantastic and gives this book a very modern Doom Patrol tone to it that I don't think another artist could not have. The art calls to the past Morrison run and is stylishly fresh at the same time. I LOVE THE ART! The world building is also just as amazing with the call back to all the wonderful pieces of the Doom Patro Wow is the least exciting thing I can say about this first arc.World: Derington's art is phenomenal, the panels the linework, the emotions from the characters, it's all absolutely fantastic and gives this book a very modern Doom Patrol tone to it that I don't think another artist could not have. The art calls to the past Morrison run and is stylishly fresh at the same time. I LOVE THE ART! The world building is also just as amazing with the call back to all the wonderful pieces of the Doom Patrol's past and the new evolution of classic characters. Then there are the new ones like Space Case, Sam, Lucius, Fugg, Terry None and LOTION!!!! They are all quirky, insane and outcasts just like what Doom Patrol was intended to be. I wont' say anything else but just read it, new readers will find it super odd and absurd and old readers will tear up with all the call backs to the past.Story: Insane, absurd, crazy and illogical all wrapped up in a beautiful Doom Patrol story, amazing! Way understands the Doom Patrol and loves it, you can feel it in the writing and how he handles these characters. This is an origin/reboot story and it's great, it calls back to all the wonderful characters such as Cliff, Larry, Danny and some I won't say because when you see them you will tear up (I did). The pacing is all over the place, it's choppy, it's patchworked and leaves the readers wondering what the hell is happening and where are the boundaries of logic and the rules for this world, but it's these things that make this book so amazing. It's weird, it's absurd and I love it. The team finally get back together and new and old characters are reestablished and it's fantastic. Characters: I am going to try to avoid spoilers so I'll talk about general feelings. For the classic characters, it's wonderful what this creative team has done to reboot and reestablish them for the modern reader. They are hip, cool, and WEIRD. I got the same sense of tragic weirdness and outcasts that I got in the Morrison run and that's fantastic. For the new characters, amazing, they are just as weird, just as strange and at the same time feels like they belong in Doom Patrol all along. Just read it for the characters.Doom Patrol has always been about outcasts and feeling comfortable in their own strangeness, it's about accepting what you are and the message is just as strong in this new series as it was in the past runs. It's weird but at the same time it's a big warm comforting blanket of a book that tells us weirdos that it's okay to be weird and given the right setting we can be just as awesome and the Doom Patrol :)Onward to the next book!
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